TV News Roundup: ‘You’re the Worst’ Sets Final Season Premiere Date

In today’s TV News Roundup, Anika Noni Rose is set to star in TNT’s upcoming drama “Beast Mode,” and FXX announced the premiere date for the last season of “You’re the Worst.” DATES ION Television is kicking of…

In today’s TV News Roundup, Anika Noni Rose is set to star in TNT’s upcoming drama “Beast Mode,” and FXX announced the premiere date for the last season of “You’re the Worst.” DATES ION Television is kicking off its tenth holiday movie season Nov. 25 with the premiere of “Christmas Cupid’s Arrow,” followed by more film […]

Anika Noni Rose To Star In TNT Pilot ‘Beast Mode’, Tina Mabry To Direct

Anika Noni Rose has been cast as the lead in TNT’s drama pilot, Beast Mode (working title),  inspired by the life of legendary boxing trainer Ann Wolfe.
Tina Mabry (Pose) is attached to direct the pilot, written and executive produced by David Sc…

Anika Noni Rose has been cast as the lead in TNT’s drama pilot, Beast Mode (working title),  inspired by the life of legendary boxing trainer Ann Wolfe. Tina Mabry (Pose) is attached to direct the pilot, written and executive produced by David Schneiderman and produced by Ann Wolfe and MACRO in association with Studio T. Pulling herself and her two daughters up from poverty, abuse, homelessness, and criminality, Marsha Blackstone (Rose) reached the pinnacle of boxing as a…

Anika Noni Rose Met With ‘Wreck It Ralph 2′ Team About Restoring the Disney Princess’ Darker Skin Tone

The voice of Princess Tiana spoke to the “Ralph Breaks the Internet” animation team about changes to the character’s complexion and facial features.

Actress Anika Noni Rose released a statement Tuesday revealing that approached Disney about changes made to Princess Tiana’s skin color and facial features for “Wreck It Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks the Internet.” Last week, Disney announced that it restored Princess Tiana’s original features following massive public outcry, but it is now clear that Rose played a pivotal role in affecting that change. Introduced in 2009’s “The Princess and the Frog,” Tiana is the first and only black Disney Princess. Her likeness was based on Rose herself, as she revealed in a statement made on Twitter.

“While making “The Princess and the Frog,” she said, animator Mark Henn based the character’s look on Rose, and asked her if there were any features she wanted Tiana to have. “Among the first things I said were a round nose, full lips, and that she be left-handed,” said Rose. She added that she was “as surprised” as Princess Tiana’s fans were when first-look images revealed that she “looked very different, with lighter skin and much sharper features.”

“My team and I immediately put in a call to the studio to talk about the visual changes, and three weeks ago I had a meeting in person with the ‘Wreck-It Ralph team,’ my original animator Mark Henn, and others,” she said.

“They explained how CGI animation did different things to the characters’ color tones in different light compares to hand drawn original characters, and I was able to express how important it is to the little girls (and let’s face it, grown women) who felt represented by her that her skin tone stay as rich as it had been, and that her nose continue to be the little round nose that Mark so beautifully rendered in the movie; the same nose on my very own face and on many other little brown faces around the world, that we so rarely get to see represented in fantasy,” Rose said.

She also thanked Disney for taking the time to “have an open dialogue about legacy and representation… In doing so, they recognize that her legacy is also their legacy.”

In addition to her work in “The Princess and the Frog,” Rose has also starred on “The Good Wife,” “Bates Motel,” and “Dreamgirls.” In 2004, she won the Tony Award for “Caroline, or Change,” and was nominated for another Tony in 2014 for “A Raisin in the Sun,” opposite Denzel Washington.

‘Assassination Nation’ Review: Verve Carries the Day in Scattershot Satire

Its story couldn’t be more contemporary — what happens to a small community when people’s online secrets start getting exposed — but “Assassination Nation” is clearly the product of artists with a deep background in old movies. The plotline recalls “Le Corbeau” (that 1943 Nazi-occupation classic about a French village torn apart by poison-pen letters) by way of “Jawbreaker,” and the red, white and blue split-screens will tickle both fans of Godard’s “Made in U.S.A.” and Abel Gance’s “Napoleon.”

And even if the somewhat scattershot “Assassination Nation” might not wind up being as well remembered in cinema history, audiences may nonetheless forgive the film’s shortcomings because of its sheer verve and chutzpah. Whatever faults lie in the script by writer-director Sam Levinson (“Another Happy Day”) get swallowed up by the flash and dazzle of his direction and the editing by Ron Patane (“A Most Violent Year”).

For popular girls Lily (Odessa Young, “A Million Little Pieces”), Sarah (Suki Waterhouse), Bex (Hari Nef, “Mapplethorpe”) and Em (Abra), all is as it should be in their quaint suburb of Salem (Yes, Salem.) They’ve got students and teachers alike wrapped around their finger, and adult men stare agape when they walk down the street in formation.

Watch Video: ‘Assassination Nation’ Full Trailer Is Straight-Up Bonkers

But early on in the film, someone hacks into the mayor’s computer and releases all his personal info, revealing that this conservative “family values” candidate likes cross-dressing and having sex with other men. He responds to this revelation by shooting himself at a city council meeting.

The next victim is Principal Turrell (Colman Domingo, “Fear the Walking Dead”), a sympathetic figure who nonetheless gets hounded out of his job after the release of some unkind emails and his online porn choices. The revelations keep coming, turning friend against friend and revealing all manner of indiscretions — including Lily’s sexts with her married babysitting client Nick (Joel McHale) — and by the time Lily is accused of being the hacker, Salem gets whipped up into a paranoid frenzy, with everyone wondering whose secrets will be revealed next.

Also Read: Paramount Network’s Shelved ‘Heathers’ Adaptation Gets International Distribution

“Assassination Nation” certainly has style to burn, from the wardrobe color choices to the intensity of the action. (There’s a heart-stopping moment in which Em’s mom Nance, played by the great Anika Noni Rose, fends off a home intruder as cinematographer Marcell Rév (“White God”) shoots entirely through the windows from the outside.)

But Levinson has still created such a recognizable-enough reality that when the story goes to extremes, it feels like the movie’s going off the rails. An evil sheriff tells the girls that the FBI traced the hacking from Lily’s house, and when Em quite rightly asks, “Then why aren’t they here?” the film never has an answer, since that would get in the way of mob frenzy and vigilante justice.

Also Read: ‘Stargirl’ Casts Brec Bassinger as Lead in DC Universe Series

The central quartet of actresses is terrific, carving out individual characters even in a film that’s often more interested in them for their visual iconography than for their inner lives. (It’s notable that even when they are surrounded by chaos, these women always have each other’s backs.) Nef’s Bex, in particular, is the kind of teen we haven’t seen much yet in the movies: a transgender character played by a trans actress, Bex is completely self-possessed and utterly comfortable with both her gender and her sexuality. She might have to deal with the mercurial and unreliable nature of the teen-boy libido, but Bex is nobody’s victim.

It’s always apparent what “Assassination Nation” is going for, and it more often than not fulfills its ambitions, and the hits more than make up for the misses. It’s not going to tell audiences anything they don’t already know about human nature and social media and hidden inner lives, but it explores all of those ideas with visual ferocity.



Related stories from TheWrap:

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‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’ First Teaser: Teen Witch’s Birthday Doesn’t Look Too Happy (Video)

‘The Goldbergs’: Adam’s Birthday Party Gets Chaotic in ‘Sixteen Candles’ Tribute Episode Tease (Video)

Elle Fanning Film ‘Teen Spirit’ Nabbed by Mickey Liddell

Its story couldn’t be more contemporary — what happens to a small community when people’s online secrets start getting exposed — but “Assassination Nation” is clearly the product of artists with a deep background in old movies. The plotline recalls “Le Corbeau” (that 1943 Nazi-occupation classic about a French village torn apart by poison-pen letters) by way of “Jawbreaker,” and the red, white and blue split-screens will tickle both fans of Godard’s “Made in U.S.A.” and Abel Gance’s “Napoleon.”

And even if the somewhat scattershot “Assassination Nation” might not wind up being as well remembered in cinema history, audiences may nonetheless forgive the film’s shortcomings because of its sheer verve and chutzpah. Whatever faults lie in the script by writer-director Sam Levinson (“Another Happy Day”) get swallowed up by the flash and dazzle of his direction and the editing by Ron Patane (“A Most Violent Year”).

For popular girls Lily (Odessa Young, “A Million Little Pieces”), Sarah (Suki Waterhouse), Bex (Hari Nef, “Mapplethorpe”) and Em (Abra), all is as it should be in their quaint suburb of Salem (Yes, Salem.) They’ve got students and teachers alike wrapped around their finger, and adult men stare agape when they walk down the street in formation.

But early on in the film, someone hacks into the mayor’s computer and releases all his personal info, revealing that this conservative “family values” candidate likes cross-dressing and having sex with other men. He responds to this revelation by shooting himself at a city council meeting.

The next victim is Principal Turrell (Colman Domingo, “Fear the Walking Dead”), a sympathetic figure who nonetheless gets hounded out of his job after the release of some unkind emails and his online porn choices. The revelations keep coming, turning friend against friend and revealing all manner of indiscretions — including Lily’s sexts with her married babysitting client Nick (Joel McHale) — and by the time Lily is accused of being the hacker, Salem gets whipped up into a paranoid frenzy, with everyone wondering whose secrets will be revealed next.

“Assassination Nation” certainly has style to burn, from the wardrobe color choices to the intensity of the action. (There’s a heart-stopping moment in which Em’s mom Nance, played by the great Anika Noni Rose, fends off a home intruder as cinematographer Marcell Rév (“White God”) shoots entirely through the windows from the outside.)

But Levinson has still created such a recognizable-enough reality that when the story goes to extremes, it feels like the movie’s going off the rails. An evil sheriff tells the girls that the FBI traced the hacking from Lily’s house, and when Em quite rightly asks, “Then why aren’t they here?” the film never has an answer, since that would get in the way of mob frenzy and vigilante justice.

The central quartet of actresses is terrific, carving out individual characters even in a film that’s often more interested in them for their visual iconography than for their inner lives. (It’s notable that even when they are surrounded by chaos, these women always have each other’s backs.) Nef’s Bex, in particular, is the kind of teen we haven’t seen much yet in the movies: a transgender character played by a trans actress, Bex is completely self-possessed and utterly comfortable with both her gender and her sexuality. She might have to deal with the mercurial and unreliable nature of the teen-boy libido, but Bex is nobody’s victim.

It’s always apparent what “Assassination Nation” is going for, and it more often than not fulfills its ambitions, and the hits more than make up for the misses. It’s not going to tell audiences anything they don’t already know about human nature and social media and hidden inner lives, but it explores all of those ideas with visual ferocity.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Joel Edgerton Explains Why Lucas Hedges Was Right to Play Gay Teen in 'Boy Erased' (Video)

'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' First Teaser: Teen Witch's Birthday Doesn't Look Too Happy (Video)

'The Goldbergs': Adam's Birthday Party Gets Chaotic in 'Sixteen Candles' Tribute Episode Tease (Video)

Elle Fanning Film 'Teen Spirit' Nabbed by Mickey Liddell

Anika Noni Rose Joins Mary J. Blige & Nat Wolff In ‘Body Cam’

Tony winner Anika Noni Rose has been cast opposite Mary J. Blige and Nat Wolff in horror thriller Body Cam for Paramount Players.
Directed by Malik Vittahl, Body Cam centers around several LAPD police officers who are haunted by a malevolent spirit tha…

Tony winner Anika Noni Rose has been cast opposite Mary J. Blige and Nat Wolff in horror thriller Body Cam for Paramount Players. Directed by Malik Vittahl, Body Cam centers around several LAPD police officers who are haunted by a malevolent spirit that is tied to the murder of a black youth at the hands of two white cops. All of them are caught on a body cam video that was destroyed in a cover up. Rose will play Taneesha Brand, a woman who finds out that sometimes the…

‘Assassination Nation’ Full Trailer Is Straight-Up Bonkers (Video)

The first full-length trailer for the buzzy Sundance acquisition film “Assassination Nation” has dropped, and it’s all sorts of bonkers.

“This is the story of how my town, Salem, lost its mind,” says the narrator. “When 17,000 people’s texts and emails get leaked, people get really weird.”

“Assassination Nation” follows four teenage girls in a quiet town who become the focus of worldwide attention when their personal information is leaked by a hacker.

Also Read: Bill Skarsgard, Bella Thorne Thriller ‘Assassination Nation’ Sells to Neon, Russo Brothers for $10 Million

The thriller stars Odessa Young, Suki Waterhouse, Bella Thorne, Nill Skarsgard, Hari Nef, Abra, Colman Domingo, Joel McHale and Anika Noni Rose. It was written and directed by Sam Levinson and produced by David S. Goyer, Anita Gou, Kevin Turen, Aaron L. Gilbert, Matthew J. Malek and Manu Gargi.

“Assassination Nation” sold to Neon and the Russo Brothers’ production company AGBO for $10 million at the Sundance Film Festival, marking one of the biggest sales of the festival.

Also Read: Bella Thorne Has Worked Every Day Since She Was 6 Weeks Old, Plus 4 More Things in Vogue Doc (Video)

“You may kill me, but you can’t kill us all,” says Young’s character at the end of the trailer.

Watch it above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Hulu Acquires Sundance Award-Winning Doc ‘Crime + Punishment’

Sundance, SXSW Comedy ‘Never Goin’ Back’ Sells to A24

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The first full-length trailer for the buzzy Sundance acquisition film “Assassination Nation” has dropped, and it’s all sorts of bonkers.

“This is the story of how my town, Salem, lost its mind,” says the narrator. “When 17,000 people’s texts and emails get leaked, people get really weird.”

“Assassination Nation” follows four teenage girls in a quiet town who become the focus of worldwide attention when their personal information is leaked by a hacker.

The thriller stars Odessa Young, Suki Waterhouse, Bella Thorne, Nill Skarsgard, Hari Nef, Abra, Colman Domingo, Joel McHale and Anika Noni Rose. It was written and directed by Sam Levinson and produced by David S. Goyer, Anita Gou, Kevin Turen, Aaron L. Gilbert, Matthew J. Malek and Manu Gargi.

“Assassination Nation” sold to Neon and the Russo Brothers’ production company AGBO for $10 million at the Sundance Film Festival, marking one of the biggest sales of the festival.

“You may kill me, but you can’t kill us all,” says Young’s character at the end of the trailer.

Watch it above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Hulu Acquires Sundance Award-Winning Doc 'Crime + Punishment'

Sundance, SXSW Comedy 'Never Goin' Back' Sells to A24

Sundance Award-Winning Doc 'Shirkers' Lands at Netflix

‘Carmen Jones’ Theater Review: Anika Noni Rose Goes from Dreamgirl to Total Femme Fatale

“Carmen Jones” hasn’t been seen on Broadway since the 1940s despite the excellent 1954 film version starring Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte. It’s dearth of Broadway revivals could stem from the fact that operagoers don’t want to see a musical and theatergoers don’t want to see an opera.

As evidenced by the new “Carmen Jones” revival, which opened Wednesday at Off Broadway’s Classic Stage Company, Oscar Hammerstein II’s reworking of the Georges Bizet classic is definitely an opera, not a musical. What’s also very clear here is that Hammerstein’s tinkering is nothing short of brilliant, and that includes his lyrics, his snippets of dialogue and, above all, his totally convincing update of the story to an all-black military base in the South during World War II.

When the factory worker Carmen Jones seduces her boyfriend Joe into going AWOL and following her to Chicago, we still think of old Seville when her new lust interest, boxer Husky Miller, sings “Stan’ Up and Fight.” The words are Hammerstein’s but nothing says “bullfighter” like Bizet’s tune “March of the Toreadors.”

Also Read: ‘Skintight’ Theater Review: Idina Menzel Masterfully Proves Ageism Is a Guy Thing

The original 1943 “Carmen Jones” was a good hour shorter than “Carmen,” and under the direction of John Doyle, this revival clocks in at just over 90 minutes. There’s a strong tradition for hacking away at Bizet’s bloated opera. In 1983, Peter Brook enjoyed a great success with his very truncated “La Tragedie de Carmen,” which employed only four performers to tell the story of doomed love.

Bizet purists will squawk, but “Carmen” has always been my least favorite work among the Met Opera’s standard repertory, those dozen or so warhorses that get staged almost every other season. The absence of Bizet’s children’s chorus from Act 1 put me in a good mood for the rest of the evening. With that disclosure out of the way, Doyle’s work here makes clear that “Carmen Jones” deserves a revival on Broadway. And the superb cast he has assembled is more than ready for midtown Manhattan.

It’s a little odd to hear Carmen’s arias sung by a soprano, but Anika Noni Rose seduces with an ultra-cool presence, if not the requisite low notes. She sits back and lets the men on stage, as well as the audience, come to her. In a very intimate Off Broadway theater, it’s not easy to sing opera without showing the physical effort involved. We’re essentially watching her in close-up throughout the show. Rose gives a masterful minimalist performance, one that’s delivered with utter confidence, which is the hallmark of every great Carmen.

Also Read: ‘Sugar in Our Wounds’ Theater Review: The Earth Grandmother Steals the Show

Elsewhere the vocals are more in line with what operagoers would expect, and Doyle’s singing actors are generous with their trained voices. David Aron Damane’s booming bass-baritone is ideal for Husky Miller, or the Toreador.

Lindsay Roberts offers an unusually intense Cindy Lou, the good girl who follows Joe just as he tragically follows Carmen. The mercurial intricacies of “La fleur que tu m’avais jetee” (“Dis Flower” here) hold no problems for Clifton Duncan. His Joe is perhaps a little too skittish and virginal when he first meets Carmen, but this soldier grows up fast for his date with death.

As for all those “dises,” “dats” and “does” in the lyrics, the actors have wisely softened or omitted them. Bill T. Jones is the esteemed choreographer. There’s not much dancing, but the ensemble moves with ease around the small stage.

 

 

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Skintight’ Theater Review: Idina Menzel Masterfully Proves Ageism Is a Guy Thing

‘Sugar in Our Wounds’ Theater Review: The Earth Grandmother Steals the Show

‘Othello’ Theater Review: Corey Stoll Makes Iago a Mesmerizing Villain

“Carmen Jones” hasn’t been seen on Broadway since the 1940s despite the excellent 1954 film version starring Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte. It’s dearth of Broadway revivals could stem from the fact that operagoers don’t want to see a musical and theatergoers don’t want to see an opera.

As evidenced by the new “Carmen Jones” revival, which opened Wednesday at Off Broadway’s Classic Stage Company, Oscar Hammerstein II’s reworking of the Georges Bizet classic is definitely an opera, not a musical. What’s also very clear here is that Hammerstein’s tinkering is nothing short of brilliant, and that includes his lyrics, his snippets of dialogue and, above all, his totally convincing update of the story to an all-black military base in the South during World War II.

When the factory worker Carmen Jones seduces her boyfriend Joe into going AWOL and following her to Chicago, we still think of old Seville when her new lust interest, boxer Husky Miller, sings “Stan’ Up and Fight.” The words are Hammerstein’s but nothing says “bullfighter” like Bizet’s tune “March of the Toreadors.”

The original 1943 “Carmen Jones” was a good hour shorter than “Carmen,” and under the direction of John Doyle, this revival clocks in at just over 90 minutes. There’s a strong tradition for hacking away at Bizet’s bloated opera. In 1983, Peter Brook enjoyed a great success with his very truncated “La Tragedie de Carmen,” which employed only four performers to tell the story of doomed love.

Bizet purists will squawk, but “Carmen” has always been my least favorite work among the Met Opera’s standard repertory, those dozen or so warhorses that get staged almost every other season. The absence of Bizet’s children’s chorus from Act 1 put me in a good mood for the rest of the evening. With that disclosure out of the way, Doyle’s work here makes clear that “Carmen Jones” deserves a revival on Broadway. And the superb cast he has assembled is more than ready for midtown Manhattan.

It’s a little odd to hear Carmen’s arias sung by a soprano, but Anika Noni Rose seduces with an ultra-cool presence, if not the requisite low notes. She sits back and lets the men on stage, as well as the audience, come to her. In a very intimate Off Broadway theater, it’s not easy to sing opera without showing the physical effort involved. We’re essentially watching her in close-up throughout the show. Rose gives a masterful minimalist performance, one that’s delivered with utter confidence, which is the hallmark of every great Carmen.

Elsewhere the vocals are more in line with what operagoers would expect, and Doyle’s singing actors are generous with their trained voices. David Aron Damane’s booming bass-baritone is ideal for Husky Miller, or the Toreador.

Lindsay Roberts offers an unusually intense Cindy Lou, the good girl who follows Joe just as he tragically follows Carmen. The mercurial intricacies of “La fleur que tu m’avais jetee” (“Dis Flower” here) hold no problems for Clifton Duncan. His Joe is perhaps a little too skittish and virginal when he first meets Carmen, but this soldier grows up fast for his date with death.

As for all those “dises,” “dats” and “does” in the lyrics, the actors have wisely softened or omitted them. Bill T. Jones is the esteemed choreographer. There’s not much dancing, but the ensemble moves with ease around the small stage.

 

 

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Skintight' Theater Review: Idina Menzel Masterfully Proves Ageism Is a Guy Thing

'Sugar in Our Wounds' Theater Review: The Earth Grandmother Steals the Show

'Othello' Theater Review: Corey Stoll Makes Iago a Mesmerizing Villain

Tony Winner Anika Noni Rose Sets Musical Theater Return With ‘Carmen Jones’

EXCLUSIVE: Anika Noni Rose is coming back to musical theater. The actress will star in an Off Broadway production of Carmen Jones, her first appearance in a musical since winning a Tony Award for 2004’s Broadway production of Tony Kushner’s Caroline, or Change.
Directing for the Classic Stage Company will be CSC‘s Artistic Director John Doyle, with choreography by Bill T. Jones. Beginning a limited engagement Friday, June 8, the production marks the first major New York…

EXCLUSIVE: Anika Noni Rose is coming back to musical theater. The actress will star in an Off Broadway production of Carmen Jones, her first appearance in a musical since winning a Tony Award for 2004’s Broadway production of Tony Kushner’s Caroline, or Change. Directing for the Classic Stage Company will be CSC's Artistic Director John Doyle, with choreography by Bill T. Jones. Beginning a limited engagement Friday, June 8, the production marks the first major New York…

BET Cancels ‘The Quad’ After 2 Seasons

“The Quad” has been canceled by BET less than week after its Season 2 finale, a spokesperson for the network told TheWrap Monday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson was a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships. The series also starred Sean Blakemore, Jasmine Guy, Ruben Santiago-Hudson.

The show premiered on BET with a two-hour pilot in February 2017. Last November, it was renewed for a sophomore installment that ran from Jan. 23 – April 3.

Also Read: BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

“The Quad’s second season picked up in the spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggled to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) all appeared in recurring guest roles during the second season season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Also Read: ‘Being Mary Jane’ to End With 2-Hour Movie on BET

The news of “The Quad”s cancelation comes after BET decided to wrap the Gabrielle Union-led drama series “Being Mary Jane” last fall.

Variety was first to report “The Quad”s cancellation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

‘The Quad’ Star Anika Noni Rose Talks Gender Clashes on College Campus (Video)

‘The Quad’ Star Anika Noni Rose Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

“The Quad” has been canceled by BET less than week after its Season 2 finale, a spokesperson for the network told TheWrap Monday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson was a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships. The series also starred Sean Blakemore, Jasmine Guy, Ruben Santiago-Hudson.

The show premiered on BET with a two-hour pilot in February 2017. Last November, it was renewed for a sophomore installment that ran from Jan. 23 – April 3.

“The Quad’s second season picked up in the spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggled to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) all appeared in recurring guest roles during the second season season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

The news of “The Quad”s cancelation comes after BET decided to wrap the Gabrielle Union-led drama series “Being Mary Jane” last fall.

Variety was first to report “The Quad”s cancellation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

BET's 'The Quad' Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

'The Quad' Star Anika Noni Rose Talks Gender Clashes on College Campus (Video)

'The Quad' Star Anika Noni Rose Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

‘The Quad’ Canceled At BET After Two Seasons

BET has canceled drama series The Quad less than a week after its second-season finale, a network spokesperson confirmed to Deadline.
Created by Felicia D. Henderson and Charles Holland, The Quad starred Anika Noni Rose as Dr. Eva Fletcher, a newly elected President of the fictional Georgia A&M University. Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Sean Blakemore and Jasmine Guy also starred. The series premiered February 1, 2017 with a two-hour pilot and was renewed for a second season that…

BET has canceled drama series The Quad less than a week after its second-season finale, a network spokesperson confirmed to Deadline. Created by Felicia D. Henderson and Charles Holland, The Quad starred Anika Noni Rose as Dr. Eva Fletcher, a newly elected President of the fictional Georgia A&M University. Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Sean Blakemore and Jasmine Guy also starred. The series premiered February 1, 2017 with a two-hour pilot and was renewed for a second season that…

#BuryYourGays: 11 LGBT TV Characters Killed Off in 2017, From ‘Kingdom’ to ‘The Walking Dead’ (Photos)

Nate (Nick Jonas), “Kingdom”: After finally coming out to his father (Frank Grillo) in the show’s penultimate episode, Nate is shot and killed after getting into a fight with a bouncer.

Martha (Laura Wilson), “The Handmaid’s Tale”: Ofglen/Emily (Alexis Bledel) and her lover are both put on trial for “gender treachery,” but only Martha is sentenced to execution by hanging for her homosexuality.

Mr. Kaplan (Susan Blommaert), “The Blacklist”: Mr. Kaplan narrowly escaped death several times before, but the “Blacklist” villain took a dive off a bridge when cornered by police at the end of Season 4.

Mia (Ashley Greene), “Rogue”: Betrayed by her ex-girlfriend Sadie (Eve Harlow), Mia is shot in the back and left for dead after selling a stolen microchip for $10 million.

Eleanor (Hannah New), “Black Sails”: The former pirate ally was killed by a Spanish soldier during an invasion engineered by her husband, the British governor of the Bahamas (Luke Roberts).

Eric (Jordan Woods-Robinson), “The Walking Dead”: One-half of “TWD’s” last surviving gay couple, Eric took a shot to the gut in Season 8, dying in his partner’s arms.

Brett (Cody Saintgnue), “Teen Wolf”: Brett’s fluid sexuality was only briefly hinted at before the young werewolf was run down by a hunter’s car in Season 6.

Edward Drummond (Leo Suter), “Victoria”: Like his real-life counterpart, Edward died taking a bullet for his Prime Minister, but the ITV drama took some creative liberty by giving him a doomed gay romance with Lord Alfred Paget before his death.

Jukebox (Anika Noni Rose), “Power”: After the crooked cop takes Ghost’s (Omari Hardwick) son hostage, she’s double-crossed and gunned down by Kanan (50 Cent).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Univision, Telemundo and UniMas Lagged in LGBT Characters This Year, GLAAD Study Finds

LGBTQ Characters on TV Reach All-Time High, GLAAD Reports

Stars Speak Up on Spirit Day, Against LGBTQ Bullies: ‘Take a Stand’

Nate (Nick Jonas), “Kingdom”: After finally coming out to his father (Frank Grillo) in the show’s penultimate episode, Nate is shot and killed after getting into a fight with a bouncer.

Martha (Laura Wilson), “The Handmaid’s Tale”: Ofglen/Emily (Alexis Bledel) and her lover are both put on trial for “gender treachery,” but only Martha is sentenced to execution by hanging for her homosexuality.

Mr. Kaplan (Susan Blommaert), “The Blacklist”: Mr. Kaplan narrowly escaped death several times before, but the “Blacklist” villain took a dive off a bridge when cornered by police at the end of Season 4.

Mia (Ashley Greene), “Rogue”: Betrayed by her ex-girlfriend Sadie (Eve Harlow), Mia is shot in the back and left for dead after selling a stolen microchip for $10 million.

Eleanor (Hannah New), “Black Sails”: The former pirate ally was killed by a Spanish soldier during an invasion engineered by her husband, the British governor of the Bahamas (Luke Roberts).

Eric (Jordan Woods-Robinson), “The Walking Dead”: One-half of “TWD’s” last surviving gay couple, Eric took a shot to the gut in Season 8, dying in his partner’s arms.

Brett (Cody Saintgnue), “Teen Wolf”: Brett’s fluid sexuality was only briefly hinted at before the young werewolf was run down by a hunter’s car in Season 6.

Edward Drummond (Leo Suter), “Victoria”: Like his real-life counterpart, Edward died taking a bullet for his Prime Minister, but the ITV drama took some creative liberty by giving him a doomed gay romance with Lord Alfred Paget before his death.

Jukebox (Anika Noni Rose), “Power”: After the crooked cop takes Ghost’s (Omari Hardwick) son hostage, she’s double-crossed and gunned down by Kanan (50 Cent).

Related stories from TheWrap:

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BET’s ‘The Quad’ Gets January Return, Season 2 Guest Stars Revealed (Exclusive)

BET’s “The Quad” will return for Season 2 on Jan. 23, 2018, the network announced on Tuesday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson is a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships.

The show’s second season will pick up in spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggles to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution. If she fails, the school may be forced to join Georgia’s large, public and predominantly white university system in order to keep its doors open.

Also Read: ‘The Mane Event’: How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) are all slated to appear in recurring guest roles this season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Patton will play Lenny Jenkins, the over-zealous father of the latest high school quarterback phenomenon.

Lee will reprise his role as Southwestern Delta University’s executive band director and Cecil Diamond’s (Ruben Santiago-Hudson) chief rival, Clive Taylor. Ralph will guest star as Ula Pettiway, Georgia A&M faculty member Carlton Pettiway’s wife, and Morgan will play Dr. Helen Chambers.

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‘The Mane Event’: How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

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Eminem Calls Out Donald Trump During BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher (Video)

BET’s “The Quad” will return for Season 2 on Jan. 23, 2018, the network announced on Tuesday.

Led by Anika Noni Rose, the scripted drama from executive producer Felicia D. Henderson is a true-to-life drama about HBCU (historically black college or university) culture and relationships.

The show’s second season will pick up in spring semester, with Georgia A&M’s survival as an independent, historically Black university hanging in a precarious balance as the driven Dr. Eva Fletcher (Rose) struggles to raise capital for the nearly bankrupt institution. If she fails, the school may be forced to join Georgia’s large, public and predominantly white university system in order to keep its doors open.

Rapper and producer Antwan “Big Boi” Patton Sr., RonReaco Lee (“Survivor’s Remorse,” “Let’s Get Together”), Sheryl Lee Ralph (“One Mississippi,” “Ray Donovan”) and Debbi Morgan (“Power,” “All My Children”) are all slated to appear in recurring guest roles this season, alongside Jasmine Guy (“A Different World,” “School Daze”).

Patton will play Lenny Jenkins, the over-zealous father of the latest high school quarterback phenomenon.

Lee will reprise his role as Southwestern Delta University’s executive band director and Cecil Diamond’s (Ruben Santiago-Hudson) chief rival, Clive Taylor. Ralph will guest star as Ula Pettiway, Georgia A&M faculty member Carlton Pettiway’s wife, and Morgan will play Dr. Helen Chambers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Mane Event': How BET Ruined the Royal Wedding, According to Twitter

'Being Mary Jane' to End With 2-Hour Movie on BET

Eminem Calls Out Donald Trump During BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher (Video)

Alyssa Milano Kicks Off #MeToo Crusade for Victims of Sexual Harassment

Alyssa Milano started the social media movement #MeToo Sunday afternoon to shed light on the widespread problem of sexual assault, harassment and rape.

The crusade Sunday began when she tweeted a note from a friend that said, “If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

Milano added, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Social media flood gates opened, with thousands replying “#MeToo,” causing it to trend.

Also Read: Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet. pic.twitter.com/k2oeCiUf9n

— Alyssa Milano (@Alyssa_Milano) October 15, 2017

All this began after several women came forward to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, harassment and rape, including Milano’s “Charmed” co-star Rose McGowan. A representative for Weinstein has stated, “Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

Also Read: France to Strip Harvey Weinstein of Legion of Honor

In an essay for PatriotNotPartisan.com last week, Milano wrote that while she is “sickened and angered” over accusations of Weinstein’s abuse of power, she is “ecstatic” that it has opened up a dialogue around sexual harassment, objectification and degradation of women.

“To the women who have suffered any form of abuse of power, I stand beside you. To the women who have come forward against a system that is designed to keep you silent, I stand in awe of you and appreciate you and your fortitude,” she wrote. “Your strength will inspire others.”

Me too

– Anna Paquin (@AnnaPaquin) October 15, 2017

Me too https://t.co/ScX67Kmmiy

– Debra Messing (@DebraMessing) October 15, 2017

Me, too #MeToo

– Anika Noni Rose (@AnikaNoniRose) October 15, 2017

Me too. I don’t know if means anything coming from a gay man but it’s happened. Multiple times.

– Javier Muñoz (@JMunozActor) October 15, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Rose McGowan Clarifies: Harvey Weinstein ‘Raped Me’

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Courtney Love: ‘I Was Banned by CAA for Speaking Out Against Harvey Weinstein’

Woody Allen Hopes Harvey Weinstein Revelations Won’t ‘Lead to a Witch Hunt Atmosphere’

Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

Alyssa Milano started the social media movement #MeToo Sunday afternoon to shed light on the widespread problem of sexual assault, harassment and rape.

The crusade Sunday began when she tweeted a note from a friend that said, “If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

Milano added, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” Social media flood gates opened, with thousands replying “#MeToo,” causing it to trend.

All this began after several women came forward to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, harassment and rape, including Milano’s “Charmed” co-star Rose McGowan. A representative for Weinstein has stated, “Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

In an essay for PatriotNotPartisan.com last week, Milano wrote that while she is “sickened and angered” over accusations of Weinstein’s abuse of power, she is “ecstatic” that it has opened up a dialogue around sexual harassment, objectification and degradation of women.

“To the women who have suffered any form of abuse of power, I stand beside you. To the women who have come forward against a system that is designed to keep you silent, I stand in awe of you and appreciate you and your fortitude,” she wrote. “Your strength will inspire others.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Twitter Suspension Sparks #WomenBoycottTwitter Protest

Rose McGowan Clarifies: Harvey Weinstein 'Raped Me'

Rose McGowan Launches Petition to Dissolve The Weinstein Company

Courtney Love: 'I Was Banned by CAA for Speaking Out Against Harvey Weinstein'

Woody Allen Hopes Harvey Weinstein Revelations Won't 'Lead to a Witch Hunt Atmosphere'

Scotland Yard Adds Three Sexual Assault Claims to Harvey Weinstein Investigation

‘Everything, Everything’ Review: Girl in the Plastic Bubble Falls for Boy Next Door

“Everything, Everything” is an updated, gender-reversed and more engaging version of “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble.” Hollywood loves stories of young pretty people with terminal illnesses. Think “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” “The Fault in Our Stars,” “Dying Young,” “Love Story,” and many more. So it’s no surprise that Nicola Yoon’s 2015 YA novel was adapted for the screen.

The lead actors are attractive and charismatic and give nuanced performances. Unfortunately, the dialogue they are given to speak is often trite and too many plot strands are unconvincing.

Amandla Stenberg (“The Hunger Games”) brings an appealing openness to the role of Maddy, a smart and imaginative 18-year-old girl with a rare autoimmune disease known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Because almost anything could kill her, Maddy is not allowed outdoors.

See Photos: 17 Breakout Movie Stars For 2017, From Amandla Stenberg to Patrick Schwarzenegger

She’s essentially sealed into her home, which is lavishly and tastefully decorated by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), who is also a doctor. Her mother has designed their home to bring the outdoors as close to inside as possible. If you had to live stuck inside forever, this would be the house to do it in.

We get very little sense of the 17 years that came before the movie starts. It would seem the charming, sweet and astoundingly well-adjusted Maddy never had friends, which is rather hard to believe given her warmth and the readiness of teens to connect electronically and virtually with her. It’s as if Maddy just sprung up in her late teens, allergic to all outdoors but relatively content with her life — until the appearance of the cute boy next door.

That boy is the slightly goofy, handsome and soulful Olly, affably played by Nick Robinson (“Kings of Summer”). On the day he moves in, he takes one look at Maddy and a mutual crush is born.

Also Read: George MacKay Joins Amandla Stenberg in WWII Love Story ‘Where Hands Touch’

They gaze at each other across reflective surfaces; conveniently, her bedroom window looks directly into his room. They text. A lot. And because constant texting is inherently un-cinematic, director Stella Meghie (“Jean of the Joneses”) invents a theatrical device to bring their text conversations to vivid life: Maddy is taking an architecture class online and has constructed a rather elaborate miniature model of a diner. She imagines a more normal scenario for their banter — the two of them inside that diner, getting to know each other naturally. It is definitely more viewer-friendly, but if the movie is trying to illuminate what it feels like to live forever trapped indoors, then it serves as more of an arty distraction.

And speaking of distraction, the story undermines itself by violating its own rules. Or changing them as it goes along. Initially, the only people allowed into their home are her mother, a kindly nurse (Ana de la Reguera,”Narcos”) and the nurse’s teenage daughter (Danube Hermosillo). They — and anything else from the outside world — supposedly go through a de-contamination process before entering. Until they don’t. What “Everything, Everything” boils down to is a wobbly sense of realism that defies its own established constraints and features a twist that strains credulity.

The script, by J. Mills Goodloe (“The Age of Adaline”), is hampered by such banal lines as: “I want to experience what it’s like to be alive,” and “I’m willing to sacrifice everything just to live one perfect day.”

On the plus side, director Meghie honors the original story’s treatment of Maddy as a mixed-race character. Her mom is black, and from photos of her late father, we see he was white. Olly is also white. Maddy’s nurse and her daughter are Latina. It’s a laudably multicultural world, with an emphasis on humanity, rather than ethnic differences. No one mentions race. This is a story about connection and love. And as a teen romance it works far better than as a tale of a young woman confined by a disease.

Also Read: Emma Stone Sends Gift to High Schooler Who Asked Her to Prom

The story has come under fire from advocacy groups for its implication that disabled people cannot lead full lives. It also treats a huge breach of trust and confidence as merely an outgrowth of parental affection, intensified by tragic loss. Maddy’s mother is a doctor and something she does would be worthy of a revoked medical license, but those matters of authenticity are brushed aside.

And then there are the issues of way-too-easy credit card fraud for ostensibly noble reasons and airplane travel for a teen with a compromised immune system and no driver’s license. It’s not just a matter of suspending disbelief: the viewer must turn off one’s sense of rational logic.

The film is at its best when it stays on more durable storytelling turf — first love. We get a palpable sense of the heady excitement, the awkwardness, the simple thrills that accompany that rush of affection and hormones.

Stenberg and Robinson play it just right, fully committed to their roles — equal parts dewy dreaminess and wry humor — mostly communicated through dual panes of glass. We believe their happy surprise when Maddy asks Olly after their first tender kiss, “Is it always like this?” and he replies simply: “It’s never like this.”

“Everything, Everything” gets several things wrong, but it’s admirable in the way it easily embraces diversity and rings true in its depiction of the first blush of love.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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‘New Mutants:’ Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams Set to Star in ‘X-Men’ Spinoff

Dustin Lance Black Talks New Film ‘Love at First Sight’ – Which Some Call a YA ‘Before Sunrise’ (Video)

13 Summer Movie Breakout Stars, From Zendaya to Brenton Thwaites (Photos)

“Everything, Everything” is an updated, gender-reversed and more engaging version of “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble.” Hollywood loves stories of young pretty people with terminal illnesses. Think “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” “The Fault in Our Stars,” “Dying Young,” “Love Story,” and many more. So it’s no surprise that Nicola Yoon’s 2015 YA novel was adapted for the screen.

The lead actors are attractive and charismatic and give nuanced performances. Unfortunately, the dialogue they are given to speak is often trite and too many plot strands are unconvincing.

Amandla Stenberg (“The Hunger Games”) brings an appealing openness to the role of Maddy, a smart and imaginative 18-year-old girl with a rare autoimmune disease known as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Because almost anything could kill her, Maddy is not allowed outdoors.

She’s essentially sealed into her home, which is lavishly and tastefully decorated by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), who is also a doctor. Her mother has designed their home to bring the outdoors as close to inside as possible. If you had to live stuck inside forever, this would be the house to do it in.

We get very little sense of the 17 years that came before the movie starts. It would seem the charming, sweet and astoundingly well-adjusted Maddy never had friends, which is rather hard to believe given her warmth and the readiness of teens to connect electronically and virtually with her. It’s as if Maddy just sprung up in her late teens, allergic to all outdoors but relatively content with her life — until the appearance of the cute boy next door.

That boy is the slightly goofy, handsome and soulful Olly, affably played by Nick Robinson (“Kings of Summer”). On the day he moves in, he takes one look at Maddy and a mutual crush is born.

They gaze at each other across reflective surfaces; conveniently, her bedroom window looks directly into his room. They text. A lot. And because constant texting is inherently un-cinematic, director Stella Meghie (“Jean of the Joneses”) invents a theatrical device to bring their text conversations to vivid life: Maddy is taking an architecture class online and has constructed a rather elaborate miniature model of a diner. She imagines a more normal scenario for their banter — the two of them inside that diner, getting to know each other naturally. It is definitely more viewer-friendly, but if the movie is trying to illuminate what it feels like to live forever trapped indoors, then it serves as more of an arty distraction.

And speaking of distraction, the story undermines itself by violating its own rules. Or changing them as it goes along. Initially, the only people allowed into their home are her mother, a kindly nurse (Ana de la Reguera,”Narcos”) and the nurse’s teenage daughter (Danube Hermosillo). They — and anything else from the outside world — supposedly go through a de-contamination process before entering. Until they don’t. What “Everything, Everything” boils down to is a wobbly sense of realism that defies its own established constraints and features a twist that strains credulity.

The script, by J. Mills Goodloe (“The Age of Adaline”), is hampered by such banal lines as: “I want to experience what it’s like to be alive,” and “I’m willing to sacrifice everything just to live one perfect day.”

On the plus side, director Meghie honors the original story’s treatment of Maddy as a mixed-race character. Her mom is black, and from photos of her late father, we see he was white. Olly is also white. Maddy’s nurse and her daughter are Latina. It’s a laudably multicultural world, with an emphasis on humanity, rather than ethnic differences. No one mentions race. This is a story about connection and love. And as a teen romance it works far better than as a tale of a young woman confined by a disease.

The story has come under fire from advocacy groups for its implication that disabled people cannot lead full lives. It also treats a huge breach of trust and confidence as merely an outgrowth of parental affection, intensified by tragic loss. Maddy’s mother is a doctor and something she does would be worthy of a revoked medical license, but those matters of authenticity are brushed aside.

And then there are the issues of way-too-easy credit card fraud for ostensibly noble reasons and airplane travel for a teen with a compromised immune system and no driver’s license. It’s not just a matter of suspending disbelief: the viewer must turn off one’s sense of rational logic.

The film is at its best when it stays on more durable storytelling turf — first love. We get a palpable sense of the heady excitement, the awkwardness, the simple thrills that accompany that rush of affection and hormones.

Stenberg and Robinson play it just right, fully committed to their roles — equal parts dewy dreaminess and wry humor — mostly communicated through dual panes of glass. We believe their happy surprise when Maddy asks Olly after their first tender kiss, “Is it always like this?” and he replies simply: “It’s never like this.”

“Everything, Everything” gets several things wrong, but it’s admirable in the way it easily embraces diversity and rings true in its depiction of the first blush of love.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Alien: Covenant' to Take Down 'Guardians' With Both Sets of Teeth at the Box Office

'New Mutants:' Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams Set to Star in 'X-Men' Spinoff

Dustin Lance Black Talks New Film 'Love at First Sight' – Which Some Call a YA 'Before Sunrise' (Video)

13 Summer Movie Breakout Stars, From Zendaya to Brenton Thwaites (Photos)

‘Everything, Everything’: Film Review

Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson play star-crossed lovers in ‘Everything, Everything,’ the YA story of a girl with a rare immune disorder.read more


Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson play star-crossed lovers in 'Everything, Everything,' the YA story of a girl with a rare immune disorder.

read more

First Look: ‘Hunger Games’ Star Amandla Stenberg in ‘Everything, Everything’ (Watch)

A trailer has dropped for “Everything, Everything,” the first leading role for “The Hunger Games” alum Amandla Stenberg. Based on the book of the same name by Nicola Yoon, Stenberg plays a hermetic illness-struck 18-year-old, kept in her home by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), allegedly for her safety and health. But, as shown in the trailer, it’s hard… Read more »

A trailer has dropped for “Everything, Everything,” the first leading role for “The Hunger Games” alum Amandla Stenberg. Based on the book of the same name by Nicola Yoon, Stenberg plays a hermetic illness-struck 18-year-old, kept in her home by her mother (Anika Noni Rose), allegedly for her safety and health. But, as shown in the trailer, it’s hard... Read more »

TV Review: ‘The Quad’ on BET

BET is so committed to framing its new scripted series “The Quad” as an authentic glimpse of life at a historically black college/university that they made a fake website for Georgia A&M University, the fictional college campus where the show takes place. BET’s website includes videos from the “administrators” to students, taglines like “Do you know what HBCU life… Read more »

BET is so committed to framing its new scripted series “The Quad” as an authentic glimpse of life at a historically black college/university that they made a fake website for Georgia A&M University, the fictional college campus where the show takes place. BET’s website includes videos from the “administrators” to students, taglines like “Do you know what HBCU life... Read more »