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Golden Globes 2019: The Complete List of Nominees

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The nominees are in for next month’s 76th annual Golden Globes! Yes, Little Monsters: Lady Gaga got a nod. And also yes, Comic-Con dwellers: “Black Panther” has been nominated for Best Movie – Drama.

Find all of the nominees in each of the 25 categories below. “Vice” led the way for film, while “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story” collected the most chances for a trophy on the TV side of the business.

The 2019 Golden Globe Awards take place Sunday, Jan. 6 starting at 8/7c on NBC. Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh are set to host the ceremony.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Amy Adams – “Vice”
Claire Foy – “First Man”
Regina King – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone – “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz – “The Favourite”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alan Arkin – “The Kominsky Method”
Kieran Culkin – “Succession”
Edgar Ramirez – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Ben Whishaw – “A Very English Scandal”
Henry Winkler – “Barry”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Kristen Bell – “The Good Place”
Candice Bergen – “Murphy Brown”
Alison Brie – “GLOW”
Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Debra Messing – “Will & Grace”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“The Alienist” – TNT
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” – FX
“Escape at Dannemora” – Showtime
“Sharp Objects” – HBO
“A Very English Scandal” – Prime Video

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“Barry” – HBO
“The Good Place” – NBC
“Kidding” – Showtime
“The Kominsky Method” – Netflix
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” – Prime Video

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
“A Quiet Place”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Black Panther”
“First Man”
“Mary Poppins Returns”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Amy Adams – “Sharp Objects”
Patricia Arquette – “Escape at Dannemora”
Connie Britton – “Dirty John”
Laura Dern – “The Tale”
Regina King – “Seven Seconds”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alex Bornstein – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Patricia Clarkson – “Sharp Objects”
Penelope Cruz – “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story”
Thandie Newton – “Westworld”
Yvonne Strahovski – “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Sacha Baron Cohen – “Who Is America”
Jim Carrey – “Kidding”
Michael Douglas – “The Kominsky Method”
Donald Glover – “Atlanta”
Bill Hader – “Barry”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Antonio Banderas – “Genius: Picasso”
Daniel Bruhl – “The Alienist”
Darren Criss – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Patrick Melrose”
Hugh Grant – “A Very English Scandal”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
“Capernaum” – Lebanon
“Girl” – Belgium
“Never Look Away” – Germany
“Roma” – Mexico
“Shoplifters” – Japan 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara – “The Favourite”
Barry Jenkins – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Adam McKay – “Vice”
Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Black Panther”
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Motion Picture – Animated
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Mirai”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Glenn Close – “The Wife”
Lady Gaga – “A Star Is Born”
Nicole Kidman – “Destroyer”
Melissa McCarthy – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Rosamund Pike – “A Private War”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe – “At Eternity’s Gate”
Lucas Hedges – “Boy Erased”
Rami Malek – “Bohemian Rhapsody”
John David Washington – “BlacKkKlansman”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Emily Blunt – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Olivia Colman – “The Favourite”
Elsie Fisher – “Eighth Grade”
Charlize Theron – “Tully”
Constance Wu – “Crazy Rich Asians”

Best Director – Motion Picture
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”
Spike Lee – “BlacKkK
lansman”
Adam McKay – “Vice”

Best Television Series – Drama
“The Americans” – FX
“Bodyguard” – Netflix
“Homecoming” – Prime Video
“Killing Eve” – BBC America
“Pose” – FX

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe – “Outlander”
Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Sandra Oh – “Killing Eve”
Julia Roberts – “Homecoming”
Keri Russell – “The Americans”

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Jason Bateman – “Ozark”
Stephan James – “Homecoming”
Richard Madden – “Bodyguard”
Billy Porter – “Pose”
Matthew Rhys – “The Americans”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Christian Bale – “Vice”
Lin-Manuel Miranda – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Viggo Mortensen – “Green Book”
Robert Redford – “The Old Man & The Gun”
John C. Reilly – “Stan & Ollie”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Mahershala Ali – “Green Book”
Timothee Chalamet – “Beautiful Boy”
Adam Driver – “BlacKkKlansman”
Richard E. Grant – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell – “Vice”

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“All the Stars” – “Black Panther”
“Girl in the Movies” – “Dumplin'”
“Requiem for a Private War” – “A Private War”
“Revelation” – “Boy Erased”
“Shallow” – “A Star Is Born”

Jennifer Maas contributed to this report.

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Golden Globes Nomination Predictions 2019: All the Contenders in Top Categories (Photos)

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Golden Globes nominations often contain a handful of head-scratchers and curiosities, but this is already a more curious year than most at the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Two films that could easily have qualified as musicals, “A Star Is Born” and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” elected to go into the drama category instead. One that could have been a drama, “Green Book,” entered as a comedy. And one that will be a major contender in many categories, “Roma,” is ineligible for the best drama category because it’s not in English.

Such is the landscape going into this year’s Golden Globes nominations. In trying to figure out which way the members of the HFPA are leaning, it helps to understand that even though the group only has around 90 voters, there are many factions within it: Some are focused on television, some are indie fans, some gravitate toward big stars who can make their ceremony the glitziest one possible.

Here are our best guesses in an odd year.

FILM CATEGORIES

Best Motion Picture – Drama
The two films that could have qualified as musicals, “A Star Is Born” and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” were both adored by many of the voters, making the former a prohibitive favorite and the latter a strong candidate for a nomination as well. Other contenders range from big-studio offerings like “Black Panther,” “First Man,” “Widows” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” to indies like “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “BlacKkKlansman” and “Boy Erased.”

Expect a mixture of the two, with the provocative nature of “BlacKkKlansman” making it irresistible and the sheer craftsmanship and scale of “First Man” landing it a spot. The final slot might come down to “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Black Panther,” “At Eternity’s Gate” or “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” The last of those may need to settle for acting nominations — and while the blockbuster status of “Black Panther” will be appealing to boost ratings, the artistic pedigree of Barry Jenkins and “Beale Street” could give it a slight edge over the potential sleeper, “At Eternity’s Gate.”

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“First Man”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper is a lock for “A Star Is Born,” as is Rami Malek for playing Freddie Mercury in “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Ryan Gosling, a winner two years ago for “La La Land,” should make it back for playing Neil Armstrong in “First Man.” That leaves two slots for actors from smaller movies: Ethan Hawke in “First Reformed,” Willem Dafoe in “At Eternity’s Gate,” Lucas Hedges in “Boy Erased,” John David Washington in “BlacKkKlansman” or Clint Eastwood in the last movie the HFPA saw before voting, “The Mule.”

We think Hawke will get in, perhaps buoyed by his Gotham Award win — and since the HFPA members have been suspiciously quiet about their reactions to “The Mule,” the last slot will go to Dafoe, whom they loved as Vincent Van Gogh.

Predicted nominees:
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate”
Ryan Gosling, “First Man”
Ethan Hawke, “First Reformed”
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Lady Gaga is an absolute no-brainer here, and Glenn Close (“The Wife”) and Melissa McCarthy (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”) seem destined for nominations as well. And then it becomes a question of whether voters want to reward a complete newcomer like Yalitza Aparicio for “Roma” (which is eligible in other categories despite being in a foreign language), another foreign actress like Joanna Kulig for “Cold War” (apparently popular with voters), a genre performance like Toni Collette’s in “Hereditary,” or one or two of the big stars in the running: Nicole Kidman in “Destroyer,” Julia Roberts in “Ben Is Back,” Saoirse Ronan in “Mary Queen of Scots,” Natalie Portman in “Vox Lux,” or Viola Davis in “Widows.”

We’re guessing that Davis and Kidman get in and Roberts gets saved for the TV categories, but watch out for Kulig.

Predicted nominees:
Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
Glenn Close, “The Wife”
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Viola Davis, “Widows”
Nicole Kidman, “Destroyer”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
You can argue with the submission of “Green Book” as a comedy rather than a drama,  but the HFPA accepted it that way, and you can’t argue that it’ll be one of the finalists. “Mary Poppins Returns,” the one big musical that has submitted itself as such, should be there as well, along with “The Favourite,” which might live up to its name in this category. Beyond that, “Crazy Rich Asians” is hard to ignore in a year with so much emphasis on diversity and inclusion, and “Vice” is a flashy latecomer that could slip in as well.

Still, “Eighth Grade,” “The Old Man and the Gun,” “The Death of Stalin,” “Paddington 2,” “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” and even another true musical, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” aren’t out of the running.

Predicted nominees:
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Viggo Mortensen and Christian Bale, who gained a lot of weight for their roles in “Green Book” and “Vice,” respectively, are guaranteed to be nominated. Robert Redford’s (probably) final performance in “The Old Man and the Gun” should be charming enough to do the trick. And then voters could go for big names (Ewan McGregor for “Christopher Robin,” Ryan Reynolds for “Deadpool 2,” Lin-Manuel Miranda for “Mary Poppins Returns,” John C. Reilly for “Stan and Ollie”) or for Globes newcomers like Nick Robinson for “Love, Simon” or the fast-rising Lakeith Stanfield for “Sorry to Bother You.”

Predicted nominees:
Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”
Christian Bale, “Vice”
Robert Redford, “The Old Man and the Gun”
Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Mary Poppins Returns”
John C. Reilly, “Stan and Ollie”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Olivia Colman is, yes, “The Favourite.” Emily Blunt is a practically perfect nominee for “Mary Poppins Returns.” It’d be a surprise if Constance Wu (“Crazy Rich Asians”) and Elsie Fisher (“Eighth Grade”) didn’t make the cut as well.

That leaves the final slot open for a big star in a little-seen movie, like Charlize Theron in “Tully,” a well-liked actress in a well-liked indie; Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life”; Lily James in another true musical, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again”; and surprise New York Film Critics Circle winner Regina Hall in “Support the Girls.” We think Hahn will edge out Theron for the spot.

Predicted nominees:
Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins Returns”
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”
Kathryn Hahn, “Private Life”
Elsie Fisher, “Eighth Grade”
Constance Wu, “Crazy Rich Asians”

Best Supporting Actor
Moving to the acting categories that aren’t split by genre, the top four in supporting actor seem clearly to be Mahershala Ali for “Green Book,” Timothee Chalamet for “Beautiful Boy,” Richard E. Grant for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” and Sam Elliott for “A Star Is Born.”

If Sam Rockwell had more scenes in “Vice,” he’d be a lock — but his part as George W. Bush is so small that it could leave room for Adam Driver (“BlacKkKlansman”), Michael B. Jordan (“Black Panther”), Nicholas Hoult (“The Favorite”) or Hugh Grant (“Paddington 2”). But he’ll probably slip in because he manages to steal a couple of scenes from Christian Bale.

Predicted nominees:
Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”
Timothee Chalamet, “Beautiful Boy”
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell, “Vice”

Best Supporting Actress
Two of the slots are likely reserved for schemers from “The Favourite,” Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz. Regina King for “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Amy Adams for “Vice” will lock up two more. And then what? Claire Foy for “First Man,” Michelle Yeoh for “Crazy Rich Asians,” Nicole Kidman for “Boy Erased,” Margot Robbie for “Mary Queen of Scots”? Or would they dare give Meryl Streep her 32nd nomination for one scene in “Mary Poppins Returns?”

We think that “First Man” will claim another nomination here, though Yeoh or Robbie wouldn’t be a surprise.

Predicted nominees:
Amy Adams, “Vice”
Regina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”
Claire Foy, “First Man”

Best Director
He’s not eligible for Best Motion Picture – Drama, but “Roma” director Alfonso Cuaron is eligible here, and the HFPA likes him. They also like Bradley Cooper, and they can’t ignore Yorgos Lanthimos and Spike Lee.

That leaves a lot of additional choices: 2016 winner Damien Chazelle for “First Man,” Barry Jenkins for “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Peter Farrelly for “Green Book,” Adam McKay for “Vice,” Ryan Coogler for “Black Panther,” and Rob Marshall for “Mary Poppins Returns.”

Farrelly’s movie is a likelier winner in other categories, but voters may bypass the guy who directed “Dumb and Dumber” in favor of the guy whose movie “La La Land” swept the Globes two years ago.

Predicted nominees:
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Damien Chazelle, “First Man”
Alfonso Cuaron, “Roma”
Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Favourite”
Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman”

Best Screenplay
You might think that with two best-picture categories and only five screenplay nominees, this category would go almost exclusively to films nominated for one of the top two awards. But in fact, almost every year at least one of the screenplay nominees is not a best-film nominee. Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed” could well be the one to turn that trick this year (and maybe even “Eighth Grade” or “A Quiet Place,” if voters want to get adventurous). Among films that will be nominated for the top prizes, the barbs of “The Favourite” and the heart of “Green Book” should prevail, along with “BlacKkKlansman” and “If Beale Street Could Talk.” But “A Star Is Born,” “Roma,” “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” have real shots, too.

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman”
“The Favourite”
“First Reformed”
“Green Book”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”

Best Original Score
It’s hard to predict what will stand out, and whether voters will focus on the songs in “A Star Is Born” and “Mary Poppins Returns” to the exclusion of the scores. But “First Man,” “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “BlacKkKlansman,” “Incredibles 2,” “Widows” and “Isle of Dogs” have all attracted attention. And wouldn’t they love to nominate Radiohead’s Thom Yorke for his first film score, even if it means embracing Luca Guadagnino’s gory “Suspiria?”

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman” Terence Blanchard
“First Man” Justin Hurwitz
“If Beale Street Could Talk” Nicholas Britell
“Incredibles 2” Michael Giacchino
“Suspiria” Thom Yorke

Best Original Song
“Shallow?” Of course. A song from “Mary Poppins Returns?” Naturally. A Kendrick Lamar song from “Black Panther?” Can’t miss that opportunity. In a category often littered with big names — and one in which documentary songs from the likes of Diane Warren and Tim McGraw are ineligible — look for Annie Lennox (“Requiem for a Private War”) and Dolly Parton (“The Girl in the Movies”) to have enough luster to grab the final two spots in a crowded field that also includes potential nominees Troye Sivan and Jonsi, Alan Menken, Kesha and Arlissa.

Predicted nominees:
“All the Stars” from “Black Panther”
“The Girl in the Movies” from “Dumplin'”
“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
“Requiem for A Private War” from “A Private War”
“Shallow” from “A Star Is Born”

Best Motion Picture – Animated
Without any of the indie animated films making a big splash this year, the major studios seem to have this category all but locked up: Disney/Pixar with “Incredibles 2” and “Ralph Breaks the Internet,” Fox with “Isle of Dogs” and Sony with “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” The last slot could go to a smaller film like “Mirai,” “Tito and the Birds” or “Ruben Brandt, Collector,” but it’s more likely to be “Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch,” “Early Man” or “Smallfoot.”

Predicted nominees:
“Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch”
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
Where the Oscar foreign-language race has 87 submissions from 87 different countries, the Globes voters are only considering 37 films, fewer than half of which are in the Oscar race. Still, Oscar contenders “Cold War” (which voters loved), “Roma” (which they might not have loved but will feel obligated to nominate), “Capernaum” and “Girl” (both of which hit hard) should be safe, and joined by the non-Oscar contender “Everybody Knows,” which has the advantage of starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem.

But watch out for “Shoplifters,” “Museo” (starring Globes favorite Gael Garcia Bernal), “What Will People Say,” “The Guilty” and “Happy as Lazzaro” (which will give them another chance to salute a widely acclaimed film ineligible for the Oscars).

Predictions:
“Capernaum”
“Cold War”
“Everybody Knows”
“Girl”
“Roma”

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

Best Television Series – Drama
With nominations moved up to the first week of December instead of the second week, voters had less time than usual to catch up on the glut of television. That might help existing shows over new ones, although “Killing Eve” is inescapable and the presence of Julia Roberts in “Homecoming” should be more than enough to give that show a nomination.

Otherwise, it’s likely that voters will lean toward last year’s winner, “The Handmaid’s Tale” and maybe the final season of “The Americans,” and lots of HFPA members are still fans of “This Is Us.” Among new shows, “Pose” might be a little too adventurous for their tastes. But “Better Call Saul” or “Westworld” could easily end up in the mix, as could HBO’s summer premiere “Succession,” which would allow the Globes to recognize a show before the Emmys can.

Predicted nominees:
“The Americans”
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
“Homecoming”
“Killing Eve”
“This Is Us”

Best Actor in a Drama Series
Voters still love “This Is Us” and they’ve always loved Kevin Costner, so that takes care of three slots. It would seem churlish to deny Matthew Rhys in the final season of “The Americans,” and J.K. Simmons could make it in a battle with John Krasinski (“Jack Ryan”), Jason Bateman (“Ozark”), Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”) and Stephan James (“Homecoming”) for that last spot.

Predicted nominees:
Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”
Kevin Costner, “Yellowstone”
Matthew Rhys, “The Americans”
J.K. Simmons, “Counterpart”
Milo Ventimiglia, “This Is Us”

Best Actress in a Drama Series
Do the voters want Julia Roberts to come to their party? Of course they do. They know they also need Sandra Oh and Elisabeth Moss and Keri Russell, but from there they could go for Oh’s castmate Jodie Comer, Evan Rachel Wood for another season of “Westworld” or two ways to make a statement: Rewarding Jodie Whittaker for being the first female “Doctor Who” or Robin Wright for anchoring the Kevin Spacey-less “House of Cards.” That last one might be irresistible.

Predicted nominees:
Sandra Oh, “Killing Eve”
Julia Roberts, “Homecoming”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Keri Russell, “The Americans”
Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
A few new comedy shows are vying for spots in this category, among them “Barry,” “The Kominsky Method,” “Kidding” and “Camping.” “Barry” seems to be a lock and “The Kominsky Method,” with HFPA favorite Michael Douglas as its star, has a strong shot at securing a nomination alongside last year’s winner, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and the previous year’s winner, “Atlanta.” But you can’t rule out two-time nominee “black-ish” or the second season of “The Good Place.” And you can’t rule out the star power of Jim Carry in “Kidding,” or the shot of adrenaline he might deliver to the awards show.

Predicted nominees:
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
“Barry”
“Atlanta”
“The Good Place”
“The Kominsky Method”

Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Rachel Brosnahan won last year and she’s not going anywhere. The HFPA has long had a great relationship with “Camping” star Jennifer Garner. Our other picks are from an array of contenders that also include Issa Rae for “Insecure,” Candice Bergen for “Murphy Brown,” Constance Wu for “Fresh Off the Boat,” Tracee Ellis Ross for “black-ish,” Allison Janney for “Mom” and Lily Tomlin for “Grace and Frankie.”

Predicted nominees:
Kristen Bell, “The Good Place”
Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Alison Brie, “GLOW”
Jennifer Garner, “Camping”
Maya Rudolph, “Forever”

Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Bill Hader is a must for “Barry” and Jim Carrey and Michael Douglas are old HPFA faves now eligible again for “Kidding” and “The Kominsky Method,” so count them in. But that leaves a batch of men contending for two slots: Donald Glover for “Atlanta,” Ted Danson for “The Good Place,” Anthony Anderson for “black-ish,” William H. Macy for “Shameless,” Tracy Morgan for “The Last O.G.,” and even Sacha Baron Cohen for “Who Is America.” (They do want some viral moments on their show, after all.)

Predicted nominees:
Jim Carrey, “Kidding”
Ted Danson, “The Good Place”
Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”
Donald Glover, “Atlanta”
Bill Hader, “Barry”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Ryan Murphy is the old reliable in this category, and “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” will be nominated for everything, just as it was at the Emmys. But then it’s a matter of which miniseries registered most strongly with the voters: “Sharp Objects,” “A Very English Scandal,” “Maniac,” “Escape at Dannemora,” or “The Romanoffs.”

The first two seem like good bets, but the HFPA have shown less visible enthusiasm for “Maniac” and “Escape at Dannemora,” which could open the way to the TV movie “The Tale” or for “Patrick Melrose.”

Predicted nominees:
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
“The Romanoffs”
“Sharp Objects”
“The Tale”
“A Very English Scandal”

Best Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie
Darren Criss, Hugh Grant and Benedict Cumberbatch seem to be favorites here, but is there enough support in the HFPA ranks for “Escape at Dannemora” and “Maniac” for Benicio del Toro and Jonah Hill to grab the last two slots? John Legend (“Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”) and Antonio Banderas (“Genius: Picasso”) are lurking – and so is a real wild card, Peter Dinklage in the HBO movie “My Dinner With Herve.”

Predicted nominees:
Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose”
Benicio del Toro, “Escape at Dannemora”
Peter Dinklage, “My Dinner With Herve”
Hugh Grant, “A Very English Scandal”

Best Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie
As a star at the center of a big film (“Vice”) and a big HBO miniseries (“Sharp Objects”), Amy Adams is on solid footing here to land two Globe nominations, one in film and one in TV. So is Regina King, who may well pair her “If Beale Street Could Talk” film nom with another one for “Seven Seconds.” And you know, Emma Stone might just double up with “The Favourite” in film and “Maniac” in TV.

If they want actresses who won’t have another Globe nomination in a different category, they’ll likely look to Patricia Arquette (“Escape at Dannemora”), Laura Dern (“The Tale”) and maybe Florence Pugh (“The Little Drummer Girl”), Hayley Atwell (“Howards End”) or Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story: Apocalypse”).

Predicted nominees:
Amy Adams, “Sharp Objects”
Emma Stone, “Maniac”
Patricia Arquette, “Escape at Dannemora”
Laura Dern, “The Tale”
Regina King, “Seven Seconds”

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or Movie Made for Television
The supporting categories in television are wide open, mixing comedy and drama series with TV movies and limited series. Among the hundreds of potential nominees, we’re going with a mixture of old favorites and hot newcomers, with the emphasis on the former.

Predicted nominees:
Alan Arkin, “The Kominsky Method”
Edgar Ramirez, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Ben Whishaw, “A Very English Scandal”
Henry Winkler, “Barry”

Best Supporting Actress Series, Limited Series or Movie Made for Television
Again, performers from every type of TV show are eligible — and again, it’s hard to make sense of the possibilities except that Globe voters like these folks. Bonus points to Laurie Metcalf for surviving the “Roseanne” wreck.

Predicted nominees:
Alex Borstein, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Patricia Clarkson, “Sharp Objects”
Penelope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Laurie Metcalf, “The Conners”
Thandie Newton, “Westworld”

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Golden Globes Nomination Predictions: What Stars Will Be Born This Year?

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Golden Globes nominations often contain a handful of head-scratchers and curiosities, but this is already a more curious year than most at the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Two films that could easily have qualified as musicals, “A Star Is Born” and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” elected to go into the drama category instead. One that could have been a drama, “Green Book,” entered as a comedy. And one that will be a major contender in many categories, “Roma,” is ineligible for the best drama category because it’s not in English.

Such is the landscape going into this year’s Golden Globes nominations. In trying to figure out which way the members of the HFPA are leaning, it helps to understand that even though the group only has around 90 voters, there are many factions within it: Some are focused on television, some are indie fans, some gravitate toward big stars who can make their ceremony the glitziest one possible.

Here are our best guesses in an odd year.

FILM CATEGORIES

Best Motion Picture – Drama
The two films that could have qualified as musicals, “A Star Is Born” and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” were both adored by many of the voters, making the former a prohibitive favorite and the latter a strong candidate for a nomination as well. Other contenders range from big-studio offerings like “Black Panther,” “First Man,” “Widows” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” to indies like “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “BlacKkKlansman” and “Boy Erased.”

Expect a mixture of the two, with the provocative nature of “BlacKkKlansman” making it irresistible and the sheer craftsmanship and scale of “First Man” landing it a spot. The final slot might come down to “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Black Panther,” “At Eternity’s Gate” or “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” The last of those may need to settle for acting nominations — and while the blockbuster status of “Black Panther” will be appealing to boost ratings, the artistic pedigree of Barry Jenkins and “Beale Street” could give it a slight edge over the potential sleeper, “At Eternity’s Gate.”

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“First Man”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper is a lock for “A Star Is Born,” as is Rami Malek for playing Freddie Mercury in “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Ryan Gosling, a winner two years ago for “La La Land,” should make it back for playing Neil Armstrong in “First Man.” That leaves two slots for actors from smaller movies: Ethan Hawke in “First Reformed,” Willem Dafoe in “At Eternity’s Gate,” Lucas Hedges in “Boy Erased,” John David Washington in “BlacKkKlansman” or Clint Eastwood in the last movie the HFPA saw before voting, “The Mule.”

We think Hawke will get in, perhaps buoyed by his Gotham Award win — and since the HFPA members have been suspiciously quiet about their reactions to “The Mule,” the last slot will go to Dafoe, whom they loved as Vincent Van Gogh.

Predicted nominees:
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate”
Ryan Gosling, “First Man”
Ethan Hawke, “First Reformed”
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Lady Gaga is an absolute no-brainer here, and Glenn Close (“The Wife”) and Melissa McCarthy (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”) seem destined for nominations as well. And then it becomes a question of whether voters want to reward a complete newcomer like Yalitza Aparicio for “Roma” (which is eligible in other categories despite being in a foreign language), another foreign actress like Joanna Kulig for “Cold War” (apparently popular with voters), a genre performance like Toni Collette’s in “Hereditary,” or one or two of the big stars in the running: Nicole Kidman in “Destroyer,” Julia Roberts in “Ben Is Back,” Saoirse Ronan in “Mary Queen of Scots,” Natalie Portman in “Vox Lux,” or Viola Davis in “Widows.”

We’re guessing that Davis and Kidman get in and Roberts gets saved for the TV categories, but watch out for Kulig.

Predicted nominees:
Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
Glenn Close, “The Wife”
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Viola Davis, “Widows”
Nicole Kidman, “Destroyer”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
You can argue with the submission of “Green Book” as a comedy rather than a drama,  but the HFPA accepted it that way, and you can’t argue that it’ll be one of the finalists. “Mary Poppins Returns,” the one big musical that has submitted itself as such, should be there as well, along with “The Favourite,” which might live up to its name in this category. Beyond that, “Crazy Rich Asians” is hard to ignore in a year with so much emphasis on diversity and inclusion, and “Vice” is a flashy latecomer that could slip in as well.

Still, “Eighth Grade,” “The Old Man and the Gun,” “The Death of Stalin,” “Paddington 2,” “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” and even another true musical, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” aren’t out of the running.

Predicted nominees:
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Viggo Mortensen and Christian Bale, who gained a lot of weight for their roles in “Green Book” and “Vice,” respectively, are guaranteed to be nominated. Robert Redford’s (probably) final performance in “The Old Man and the Gun” should be charming enough to do the trick. And then voters could go for big names (Ewan McGregor for “Christopher Robin,” Ryan Reynolds for “Deadpool 2,” Lin-Manuel Miranda for “Mary Poppins Returns,” John C. Reilly for “Stan and Ollie”) or for Globes newcomers like Nick Robinson for “Love, Simon” or the fast-rising Lakeith Stanfield for “Sorry to Bother You.”

Predicted nominees:
Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”
Christian Bale, “Vice”
Robert Redford, “The Old Man and the Gun”
Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Mary Poppins Returns”
John C. Reilly, “Stan and Ollie”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Olivia Colman is, yes, “The Favourite.” Emily Blunt is a practically perfect nominee for “Mary Poppins Returns.” It’d be a surprise if Constance Wu (“Crazy Rich Asians”) and Elsie Fisher (“Eighth Grade”) didn’t make the cut as well.

That leaves the final slot open for a big star in a little-seen movie, like Charlize Theron in “Tully,” a well-liked actress in a well-liked indie; Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life”; Lily James in another true musical, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again”; and surprise New York Film Critics Circle winner Regina Hall in “Support the Girls.” We think Hahn will edge out Theron for the spot.

Predicted nominees:
Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins Returns”
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”
Kathryn Hahn, “Private Life”
Elsie Fisher, “Eighth Grade”
Constance Wu, “Crazy Rich Asians”

Best Supporting Actor
Moving to the acting categories that aren’t split by genre, the top four in supporting actor seem clearly to be Mahershala Ali for “Green Book,” Timothee Chalamet for “Beautiful Boy,” Richard E. Grant for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” and Sam Elliott for “A Star Is Born.”

If Sam Rockwell had more scenes in “Vice,” he’d be a lock — but his part as George W. Bush is so small that it could leave room for Adam Driver (“BlacKkKlansman”), Michael B. Jordan (“Black Panther”), Nicholas Hoult (“The Favorite”) or Hugh Grant (“Paddington 2”). But he’ll probably slip in because he manages to steal a couple of scenes from Christian Bale.

Predicted nominees:
Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”
Timothee Chalamet, “Beautiful Boy”
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell, “Vice”

Best Supporting Actress
Two of the slots are likely reserved for schemers from “The Favourite,” Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz. Regina King for “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Amy Adams for “Vice” will lock up two more. And then what? Claire Foy for “First Man,” Michelle Yeoh for “Crazy Rich Asians,” Nicole Kidman for “Boy Erased,” Margot Robbie for “Mary Queen of Scots”? Or would they dare give Meryl Streep her 32nd nomination for one scene in “Mary Poppins Returns?”

We think that “First Man” will claim another nomination here, though Yeoh or Robbie wouldn’t be a surprise.

Predicted nominees:
Amy Adams, “Vice”
Regina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”
Claire Foy, “First Man”

Best Director
He’s not eligible for Best Motion Picture – Drama, but “Roma” director Alfonso Cuaron is eligible here, and the HFPA likes him. They also like Bradley Cooper, and they can’t ignore Yorgos Lanthimos and Spike Lee.

That leaves a lot of additional choices: 2016 winner Damien Chazelle for “First Man,” Barry Jenkins for “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Peter Farrelly for “Green Book,” Adam McKay for “Vice,” Ryan Coogler for “Black Panther,” and Rob Marshall for “Mary Poppins Returns.”

Farrelly’s movie is a likelier winner in other categories, but voters may bypass the guy who directed “Dumb and Dumber” in favor of the guy whose movie “La La Land” swept the Globes two years ago.

Predicted nominees:
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Damien Chazelle, “First Man”
Alfonso Cuaron, “Roma”
Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Favourite”
Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman”

Best Screenplay
You might think that with two best-picture categories and only five screenplay nominees, this category would go almost exclusively to films nominated for one of the top two awards. But in fact, almost every year at least one of the screenplay nominees is not a best-film nominee. Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed” could well be the one to turn that trick this year (and maybe even “Eighth Grade” or “A Quiet Place,” if voters want to get adventurous). Among films that will be nominated for the top prizes, the barbs of “The Favourite” and the heart of “Green Book” should prevail, along with “BlacKkKlansman” and “If Beale Street Could Talk.” But “A Star Is Born,” “Roma,” “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” have real shots, too.

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman”
“The Favourite”
“First Reformed”
“Green Book”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”

Best Original Score
It’s hard to predict what will stand out, and whether voters will focus on the songs in “A Star Is Born” and “Mary Poppins Returns” to the exclusion of the scores. But “First Man,” “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “BlacKkKlansman,” “Incredibles 2,” “Widows” and “Isle of Dogs” have all attracted attention. And wouldn’t they love to nominate Radiohead’s Thom Yorke for his first film score, even if it means embracing Luca Guadagnino’s gory “Suspiria?”

Predicted nominees:
“BlacKkKlansman” Terence Blanchard
“First Man” Justin Hurwitz
“If Beale Street Could Talk” Nicholas Britell
“Incredibles 2” Michael Giacchino
“Suspiria” Thom Yorke

Best Original Song
“Shallow?” Of course. A song from “Mary Poppins Returns?” Naturally. A Kendrick Lamar song from “Black Panther?” Can’t miss that opportunity. In a category often littered with big names — and one in which documentary songs from the likes of Diane Warren and Tim McGraw are ineligible — look for Annie Lennox (“Requiem for a Private War”) and Dolly Parton (“The Girl in the Movies”) to have enough luster to grab the final two spots in a crowded field that also includes potential nominees Troye Sivan and Jonsi, Alan Menken, Kesha and Arlissa.

Predicted nominees:
“All the Stars” from “Black Panther”
“The Girl in the Movies” from “Dumplin'”
“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
“Requiem for A Private War” from “A Private War”
“Shallow” from “A Star Is Born”

Best Motion Picture – Animated
Without any of the indie animated films making a big splash this year, the major studios seem to have this category all but locked up: Disney/Pixar with “Incredibles 2” and “Ralph Breaks the Internet,” Fox with “Isle of Dogs” and Sony with “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” The last slot could go to a smaller film like “Mirai,” “Tito and the Birds” or “Ruben Brandt, Collector,” but it’s more likely to be “Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch,” “Early Man” or “Smallfoot.”

Predicted nominees:
“Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch”
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
Where the Oscar foreign-language race has 87 submissions from 87 different countries, the Globes voters are only considering 37 films, fewer than half of which are in the Oscar race. Still, Oscar contenders “Cold War” (which voters loved), “Roma” (which they might not have loved but will feel obligated to nominate), “Capernaum” and “Girl” (both of which hit hard) should be safe, and joined by the non-Oscar contender “Everybody Knows,” which has the advantage of starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem.

But watch out for “Shoplifters,” “Museo” (starring Globes favorite Gael Garcia Bernal), “What Will People Say,” “The Guilty” and “Happy as Lazzaro” (which will give them another chance to salute a widely acclaimed film ineligible for the Oscars).

Predictions:
“Capernaum”
“Cold War”
“Everybody Knows”
“Girl”
“Roma”

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

Best Television Series – Drama
With nominations moved up to the first week of December instead of the second week, voters had less time than usual to catch up on the glut of television. That might help existing shows over new ones, although “Killing Eve” is inescapable and the presence of Julia Roberts in “Homecoming” should be more than enough to give that show a nomination.

Otherwise, it’s likely that voters will lean toward last year’s winner, “The Handmaid’s Tale” and maybe the final season of “The Americans,” and lots of HFPA members are still fans of “This Is Us.” Among new shows, “Pose” might be a little too adventurous for their tastes. But “Better Call Saul” or “Westworld” could easily end up in the mix, as could HBO’s summer premiere “Succession,” which would allow the Globes to recognize a show before the Emmys can.

Predicted nominees:
“The Americans”
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
“Homecoming”
“Killing Eve”
“This Is Us”

Best Actor in a Drama Series
Voters still love “This Is Us” and they’ve always loved Kevin Costner, so that takes care of three slots. It would seem churlish to deny Matthew Rhys in the final season of “The Americans,” and J.K. Simmons could make it in a battle with John Krasinski (“Jack Ryan”), Jason Bateman (“Ozark”), Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”) and Stephan James (“Homecoming”) for that last spot.

Predicted nominees:
Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”
Kevin Costner, “Yellowstone”
Matthew Rhys, “The Americans”
J.K. Simmons, “Counterpart”
Milo Ventimiglia, “This Is Us”

Best Actress in a Drama Series
Do the voters want Julia Roberts to come to their party? Of course they do. They know they also need Sandra Oh and Elisabeth Moss and Keri Russell, but from there they could go for Oh’s castmate Jodie Comer, Evan Rachel Wood for another season of “Westworld” or two ways to make a statement: Rewarding Jodie Whittaker for being the first female “Doctor Who” or Robin Wright for anchoring the Kevin Spacey-less “House of Cards.” That last one might be irresistible.

Predicted nominees:
Sandra Oh, “Killing Eve”
Julia Roberts, “Homecoming”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Keri Russell, “The Americans”
Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
A few new comedy shows are vying for spots in this category, among them “Barry,” “The Kominsky Method,” “Kidding” and “Camping.” “Barry” seems to be a lock and “The Kominsky Method,” with HFPA favorite Michael Douglas as its star, has a strong shot at securing a nomination alongside last year’s winner, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and the previous year’s winner, “Atlanta.” But you can’t rule out two-time nominee “black-ish” or the second season of “The Good Place.” And you can’t rule out the star power of Jim Carry in “Kidding,” or the shot of adrenaline he might deliver to the awards show.

Predicted nominees:
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
“Barry”
“Atlanta”
“The Good Place”
“The Kominsky Method”

Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Rachel Brosnahan won last year and she’s not going anywhere. The HFPA has long had a great relationship with “Camping” star Jennifer Garner. Our other picks are from an array of contenders that also include Issa Rae for “Insecure,” Candice Bergen for “Murphy Brown,” Constance Wu for “Fresh Off the Boat,” Tracee Ellis Ross for “black-ish,” Allison Janney for “Mom” and Lily Tomlin for “Grace and Frankie.”

Predicted nominees:
Kristen Bell, “The Good Place”
Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Alison Brie, “GLOW”
Jennifer Garner, “Camping”
Maya Rudolph, “Forever”

Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Bill Hader is a must for “Barry” and Jim Carrey and Michael Douglas are old HPFA faves now eligible again for “Kidding” and “The Kominsky Method,” so count them in. But that leaves a batch of men contending for two slots: Donald Glover for “Atlanta,” Ted Danson for “The Good Place,” Anthony Anderson for “black-ish,” William H. Macy for “Shameless,” Tracy Morgan for “The Last O.G.,” and even Sacha Baron Cohen for “Who Is America.” (They do want some viral moments on their show, after all.)

Predicted nominees:
Jim Carrey, “Kidding”
Ted Danson, “The Good Place”
Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”
Donald Glover, “Atlanta”
Bill Hader, “Barry”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Ryan Murphy is the old reliable in this category, and “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” will be nominated for everything, just as it was at the Emmys. But then it’s a matter of which miniseries registered most strongly with the voters: “Sharp Objects,” “A Very English Scandal,” “Maniac,” “Escape at Dannemora,” or “The Romanoffs.”

The first two seem like good bets, but the HFPA have shown less visible enthusiasm for “Maniac” and “Escape at Dannemora,” which could open the way to the TV movie “The Tale” or for “Patrick Melrose.”

Predicted nominees:
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
“The Romanoffs”
“Sharp Objects”
“The Tale”
“A Very English Scandal”

Best Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie
Darren Criss, Hugh Grant and Benedict Cumberbatch seem to be favorites here, but is there enough support in the HFPA ranks for “Escape at Dannemora” and “Maniac” for Benicio del Toro and Jonah Hill to grab the last two slots? John Legend (“Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”) and Antonio Banderas (“Genius: Picasso”) are lurking – and so is a real wild card, Peter Dinklage in the HBO movie “My Dinner With Herve.”

Predicted nominees:
Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose”
Benicio del Toro, “Escape at Dannemora”
Peter Dinklage, “My Dinner With Herve”
Hugh Grant, “A Very English Scandal”

Best Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie
As a star at the center of a big film (“Vice”) and a big HBO miniseries (“Sharp Objects”), Amy Adams is on solid footing here to land two Globe nominations, one in film and one in TV. So is Regina King, who may well pair her “If Beale Street Could Talk” film nom with another one for “Seven Seconds.” And you know, Emma Stone might just double up with “The Favourite” in film and “Maniac” in TV.

If they want actresses who won’t have another Globe nomination in a different category, they’ll likely look to Patricia Arquette (“Escape at Dannemora”), Laura Dern (“The Tale”) and maybe Florence Pugh (“The Little Drummer Girl”), Hayley Atwell (“Howards End”) or Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story: Apocalypse”).

Predicted nominees:
Amy Adams, “Sharp Objects”
Emma Stone, “Maniac”
Patricia Arquette, “Escape at Dannemora”
Laura Dern, “The Tale”
Regina King, “Seven Seconds”

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or Movie Made for Television
The supporting categories in television are wide open, mixing comedy and drama series with TV movies and limited series. Among the hundreds of potential nominees, we’re going with a mixture of old favorites and hot newcomers, with the emphasis on the former.

Predicted nominees:
Alan Arkin, “The Kominsky Method”
Edgar Ramirez, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Ben Whishaw, “A Very English Scandal”
Henry Winkler, “Barry”

Best Supporting Actress Series, Limited Series or Movie Made for Television
Again, performers from every type of TV show are eligible — and again, it’s hard to make sense of the possibilities except that Globe voters like these folks. Bonus points to Laurie Metcalf for surviving the “Roseanne” wreck.

Predicted nominees:
Alex Borstein, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Patricia Clarkson, “Sharp Objects”
Penelope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Laurie Metcalf, “The Conners”
Thandie Newton, “Westworld”

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SFFILM Boosts Local Hero Boots Riley, Amy Adams and Steve McQueen with Awards

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SFFILM executive director Noah Cowan knows how to play awards season. He moved the San Francisco Film Society’s annual awards fundraising night from April to December — in the awards corridor — knowing he could lure some awards players to San Francisco. What’s in it for them? Bay Area Academy members, who showed up for a Monday night pre-event cocktail party at The Palace of Fine Arts, including documentary filmmakers, costume designers, sound editors, animators, and visual effects artists. With both Pixar and Lucasfilm based in San Francisco, it’s a crafts mecca.

This awards night belonged to Oakland filmmaker made good, Boots Riley, whose father beamed with pride along with novelist Ishmael Reed, who presented the Kanbar Award for Storytelling to the rookie director. Riley thanked SFFILM for making him a filmmaker in residence in 2014 and helping him to develop Sundance breakout “Sorry to Bother You,” which Annapurna turned into a summer hit. “That made this able to happen. It made it real.”

Michelle Rodriguez at SFFILM Awards

Anne Thompson

The film society gave out $1 million last year to develop emerging features.

“I’m not getting an award for style,” said Riley, who quit film school to pursue the music boom and then returned to his first love, film. He complained that too many people write movies based on things they’ve seen in other movies, not real life. “I want something new that talks about how people can change the world.” “Sorry to Bother You” was “crazy,” he said, “Because it was new.”

The fundraiser raised over $250,000 from the assembled guests in a little over ten minutes from donors like Adam McKay, Dawn Porter, Alice Waters and more.

On Sunday night at the Castro, McKay submitted to an interview with “The Big Short” writer Michael Lewis, who reminded him that he dropped out of college. (During my interview with him and his “Vice” star Amy Adams the next day, they both remembered money being in short supply during their school days.) On Monday, McKay presented the Acting Award to Adams, thanking her for choosing the “more difficult road of “artist and an actress.” He needed her to play Machiavellian wife Lynne Cheney in “Vice” because he hinged the entire movie on her performance. Adams said she was glad she didn’t know that while she was making the movie. “I am someone who has a close relationship with fear,” Adams admitted.

Michelle Rodriguez presented the Directing Award to her “Widows” director Steve McQueen, who reminded the crowd that making movies is a family affair, he said. “It’s not me, it’s we.” But in the end, “the only thing worth living for and dying for is love.”

How Adam McKay Literally Put His Heart Into His Dick Cheney Film ‘Vice’

ajfkjsh EXCLUSIVE: Many directors can believe they put their hearts into their movies, but on Vice, Adam McKay came closer than most any of them. Similar to Dick Cheney — whose trouble with heart attacks before he finally got a heart transplant are well known — McKay suffered a heart attack during the making of the film. And he found a way to give his close call a sly shout out by putting footage of it into the searing drama he wrote and directed about the former vice president…

Here’s a Black Friday List of the Best Shopping Scenes in Movies, From ‘Elf’ to ‘Clueless’ to ‘Commando’ (Video)

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  1. Clueless (1995)For a teen girl in the mid 90s, nothing was more sacred than a trip to the mall. So it’s no surprise when we are introduced to Beverly Hill High’s Cher (Alicia Silverstone) with shopping bags in hand. Her sanctuary of choice? The iconic Westside Pavillon.
  2. Pretty Woman (1990)For Julia Roberts’ Vivian, shopping at a Chanel or Gucci before meeting rich businessman Edward was nothing but a pipe dream. Enter Edward, and she is handed all the money in the world. Did you ask me to leave your boutique yesterday? “Big mistake!”
  3. Enchanted (2007)Giselle (Amy Adams) doesn’t know what to wear for the ball. But no fear, six-year-old Morgan is here to save the day…with dad’s credit card.
  4. Crazy, Stupid, Love (2011) When rich ladies man Jacob (Ryan Gosling) sees newly single 40-year-old Cal is content wearing New Balances and keeping his money in a velcro wallet, Jacob demands a shopping spree. “Be better than the GAP,” Jacob tells Cal inches away from his face.
  5. Ocean’s 8 (2018)The audience is introduced to Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) fresh out of jail and fresh out of a nice wardrobe. That’s not a problem for Danny Ocean’s sister, who finesses the mall employees into giving her everything she needs.
  6. Wonder Woman (2017)We can’t blame the princess of the Amazons (Gal Gadot) for trying out 226 outfits before finding the right get-up. Plus, the shield and sword make for perfect accessories.
  7. Elf (2003)Buddy the Elf’s (Will Ferrell) first trip to the mall offered many ups and downs. Speaking of ups and downs, let’s not judge Buddy too much for not understanding how an escalator works.
  8. Commando (1985)It’s safe to say retired Special Forces soldier John Matrix (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is an aggressive shopper. In this clip, Matrix takes it upon himself to smash through a storefront to not only pick up some new clothes, but a new rocket launcher too. A typical stocking stuffer.
  9. National Lampoon’s European Vacation (1985)As the Griswolds fight off a potentially disastrous vacation, they decide to take a break and go shopping in Italy. Let’s hope they never wore those outfits more than once.
  10. Hannah Montana: The Movie (2009)Disney Channel’s favorite pop star (Miley Cyrus as Montana) is getting really famous. How famous? “Name it and its yours” famous. When she goes shopping and finds a perfect pair of shoes, she’s ready to fight thee Tyra Banks even if it means spectators are going to take plenty of photos.
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‘Vice’ Screens for Critics; Now, Christian Bale and Amy Adams Will Vie For Awards

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Finally, Adam McKay’s long-awaited “Vice” screened for the press on Saturday, November 17. It’s one of the last major screenings of the 2019 Oscar candidates, but but sometimes the best are saved for last.

On November 5, 2016, Paramount screened Denzel Washington’s “Fences” at a packed Westwood screening, followed by a short Q&A with the director and cast. Viola Davis went on to win Best Supporting Actress at SAG, the Golden Globes, and the BAFTAs on the way to her first Oscar. Paramount debuted “The Big Short” November 12, 2015 as closing night of the AFI FEST. It went on to receive five Oscar nominations with McKay and Charles Randolph’s adapted screenplay taking BAFTA, WGA, and the Oscar.

"Vice" cinematographe Greig Fraser

“Vice” cinematographer Greig Fraser and Christian Bale

Matt Kennedy

So now we have McKay’s follow-up, and anticipation is high. Financed by Annapurna, the movie is set to hit theaters December 25. And at the packed Westwood screening for guilds and awards press, applause was warm for its two leads, Bale and Amy Adams, who play Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife Lynne.

Much like this year’s Oscar-winner Gary Oldman and “Darkest Hour,” this is a case of a marriage between a great character actor channeling a real person as well as the makeup and prosthetics team that enabled him to change his appearance. At the Q&A that followed, three-time Oscar nominee and shape-shifter Bale (he won for “The Fighter”), who has returned to his fighting weight after a 40-pound weight gain to play Cheney admitted that he knew that the role would be a stretch.

“It’s a crazy idea, isn’t it?,” he said. “It seems like a typo to say Christian Bale as Dick Cheney, but it was an almost an impossible challenge, just within the galaxy of possible but about to leave that galaxy. That was exciting — ‘Really, you think I could do that? Can we actually achieve that?’ — and the challenge of that. [McKay and I] had a deal. ‘Let me move along,’ working with the great Greg Cannon and Chris Gallagher who did the the prosthetics… He knew that by the time I was that far in, I’m in no matter I where I was, even if this is the worst mistake and casting ever. He’s batshit crazy and brilliant, which is a wonderful combination.”

Bale researched Cheney heavily online, so much so that the politician infiltrated his Facebook memories. “We were hoping to get to the essence of the man,” he said, admitting that he stayed in character throughout filming.

Adams, who was robbed of an Oscar bid for “Arrival” after five nominations and no wins, is overdue. She also ages over the decades from fiercely ambitious young college wife to mother and Washington professional. Adams said she admired Lynne Cheney. “She reminded me of the best parts of my grandmother; she was an outspoken, pioneering woman who picked herself up by her bootstraps and could make it happen. She had a rough upbringing and a great romance with American history, there was so much to dig into … I loved this opportunity to develop the relationship between Dick and Lynne, it was very moving in a Shakespearean way.”

Among the tricks that McKay employs in the film, which like “The Big Short” is crammed with facts and figures and information and surprising detours, is one memorable scene in which his actors quote Shakespeare.

“At a certain point, the norm became just to watch movies that are entertaining or have explosions or laughs,” said McKay. “I’m a bit of a nerd, I find this stuff really fascinating. I try to highlight it with a fake ending or Shakespeare. This is an incredible moment: if Cheney says ‘no’ to being VP, history changes. There are no rules. It’s freeing to dive into movies from this different direction.”

Comedy actor director Tyler Perry plays it straight as Secretary of State Colin Powell, whom he admired and contacted in order to research the role; Powell made him read his book. Powell hasn’t seen the movie yet, and Perry said he is “worried” about his reaction. The important thing, said Perry, is that the movie is “highlighting a moment in history so we can pay attention to it so it doesn’t happen again.”

Among the other character actors on display are “The Big Short” star Steve Carell as Cheney mentor Donald Rumsfeld, Alison Pill as Cheney’s gay daughter Mary, and an hilarious Sam Rockwell as president George W. Bush, who doesn’t get nearly enough screen time.

Of course, the fate of “Vice” depends on how it fares with critics and moviegoers. But no matter what happens in that arena (and the fate of Annapurna may hang in the balance, as this smart, angry liberal movie cost some $60 million), screen actors will give Bale and Adams the love, from SAG to the Oscars.

‘Vice’ Enters The Oscar Race , Wins Praise For Christian Bale’s Dick Cheney, Amy Adams And Adam McKay At Early Screening

ajfkjsh One of the last shoes to drop in this year’s Oscar race, just dropped. Annapurna skipped the Fall Festival circuit and decided instead to take over the Bruin Theatre in Westwood today to put Adam McKay’s Vice (just finished a couple of days ago) out to the world. Judging by the reaction to this afternoon’s unveiling you can probably expect to not only see nominations for stars Christian Bale who , for lack of a better word , simply inhabits Cheney , and Amy Adams

Oscars: Christian Bale Leaps Into the Lead Actor Race With Adam McKay’s Sobering ‘Vice’

ajfkjsh ’Tis the season for latter-year revelations. With Adam McKay’s new film “Vice,” a follow-up to his 2015 Oscar winner “The Big Short,” a major one has landed, though it’s hardly a surprise: Christian Bale might be in line to receive his second Academy Award to date, for his uncanny portrayal of former Vice President Dick […]

SFFILM Awards Night Led by Amy Adams, Steve McQueen, and Boots Riley

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This year, the San Francisco Film Society’s (SFFILM) annual awards night will unfold December 3 at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts Exhibition Center with honorees including Oscar hopefuls Amy Adams (Annapurna’s “Vice”), Steve McQueen (Fox’s “Widows”) and Bay area rising star Boots Riley (Annapurna’s “Sorry to Bother You”). The annual celebration honors achievement in filmmaking craft – it’s also a fundraiser that benefits SFFILM’s youth education programs.

Amy Adams will be on hand to accept the Peter J. Owens Award for Acting; Steve McQueen will receive the Irving M. Levin Award for Film Direction; and emerging breakthrough talent Boots Riley will take home the Kanbar Award for Storytelling.

“These artists were selected because their work embodies the values of the Bay Area,” stated SFFILM Executive Director Noah Cowan, “in particular their role in championing innovative cinema, making the industry more diverse and inclusive, and actively participating in the social dialogue that is so desperately needed today.”

SFFILM moved its awards night from April’s film festival to the height of awards season in order to have some impact on the awards race. Public screenings and onstage talks will accompany SFFILM Awards Night.

Past recipients of the Peter J. Owens Award for Acting, which honors an actor whose work exemplifies brilliance, independence and integrity, include Kate Winslet (2017), Ellen Burstyn (2016), Richard Gere (2015), Jeremy Irons (2014), Harrison Ford (2013), Judy Davis (2012), Terence Stamp (2011), Robert Duvall (2010), Robert Redford (2009), Maria Bello (2008), and Robin Williams (2007).

A five-time Academy Award nominee and two-time Golden Globe winner, Amy Adams was most recently seen in HBO’s drama series “Sharp Objects,” in which she starred and executive produced with director Jean-Marc Vallée. She also stars in Adam McKay’s upcoming film “Vice” as Lynne Cheney alongside Christian Bale and Steve Carell. She recently wrapped production on “Woman in the Window,” alongside Gary Oldman and Julianne Moore. Adams’ additional film credits include Denis Villeneuve’s “Arrival,” for which she was named Best Actress by the National Board of Review; Zack Snyder’s “Justice League” and “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”; Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals”; Tim Burton’s “Big Eyes” and David O. Russell’s “American Hustle;” Spike Jonze’s “Her; Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master”; Nora Ephron’s “Julie and Julia”; John Patrick Shanley’s “Doubt”; Kevin Lima’s “Enchanted”; and Phil Morrison’s “Junebug”, among many others.

The Irving M. Levin Award for Film Direction is presented each year to one of the masters of world cinema. Past recipients include Kathryn Bigelow (2017), Mira Nair (2016), Guillermo del Toro (2015), Richard Linklater (2014) Philip Kaufman (2013), Kenneth Branagh (2012), Oliver Stone (2011), Walter Salles (2010), Francis Ford Coppola (2009), Mike Leigh (2008), Spike Lee (2007), and Werner Herzog (2006).

British artist and Academy Award-winner Steve McQueen is the recipient of an OBE (2002) and a CBE (2011) from Queen Elizabeth II. In 2013, McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” won multiple awards including the Best Picture Oscar. His second feature, “Shame” (2011), starring Michael Fassbender and Carey Mulligan, received numerous awards and nominations. In 2008, McQueen’s critically-hailed first feature, “Hunger,” won the Camera d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.  His latest film “Widows,” (November 16), is a modern-day thriller about four women (Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Cynthia Erivo) who take their fate into their own hands after being left in debt from their dead husbands’ criminal activities. McQueen resides in Amsterdam and London.

The Kanbar Award for Storytelling acknowledges the critical importance that storytelling plays in the creation of outstanding films. Past recipients include Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani (2017), Tom McCarthy (2016), Paul Schrader (2015), Stephen Gaghan (2014), Eric Roth (2013), David Webb Peoples (2012), Frank Pierson (2011), and James Schamus (2010).

Activist, filmmaker, and musician, former FilmHouse resident and SFFILM grantee Boots Riley studied film at San Francisco State University before rising to prominence as the front man of hip-hop groups The Coup and Street Sweeper Social Club. His debut feature film “Sorry to Bother You” premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, was acquired by Annapurna Pictures, and became a summer hit. His book of lyrics and anecdotes, “Tell Homeland Security- We Are The Bomb,” is out on Haymarket Press.

Amy Adams on Her Teen Years: ‘I Was in a Position Where I Might Become at Risk’

ajfkjsh “I don’t talk about it a lot…but when I was a young teen, I was in a position where I might become at risk,” Amy Adams said in her acceptance speech while receiving the Giving Tree Award at the Baby2Baby gala Saturday night, held at 3Labs in Culver City. “You never know when an act […]

Annapurna’s ‘Vice’ & ‘Beale Street’: The American Dream Warped And Deferred – The Contenders LA

ajfkjsh At Deadline’s The Contenders Los Angeles today, Annapurna Pictures showed off two dramas from their impressive awards-season slate, and a unifying concern emerged: The American Dream, and the ways it has changed over time. While members of the privileged class have bent it into a new, baser shape, for those less fortunate, it’s often denied altogether. The first of the two films at hand was Adam McKay’s Vice, his follow-up to The Big Short, which took on the 2008…

‘Vice’ Trailer: Christian Bale and Amy Adams Take on the Cheney Legacy in Adam McKay’s ‘Big Short’ Follow-Up

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Adam McKay’s “Vice” is his star-studded follow-up to “The Big Short,” and Annapurna has finally debuted the movie’s first official trailer. The film stars Christian Bale and Amy Adams as Dick and Lynne Cheney and tracks the politician’s rise into one of the most prominent vice presidents in American history. Bale is no stranger to extreme physical transformations (see “The Machinist” and “American Hustle”) and packed on the pounds to play Cheney at various points in his career.

While Bale’s physical transformation already has moviegoers buzzing about “Vice,” the film is also notable for featuring the likes of Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Bill Pullman, Alison Pill, Lily Rabe,  Tyler Perry, and Jesse Plemons in its ensemble cast. Both Carell and Bale starred in McKay’s “The Big Short,” with the latter earning an Oscar nomination. Carell is playing Donald Rumsfeld in “Vice,” while Sam Rockwell stars as George W. Bush.

“What Christian Bale really does is he psychologically breaks someone apart and puts them back together again,” McKay told Deadline about the film last year. “I’ve never seen someone work so hard at it, and it is hard on him, but really amazing to watch. The second I thought of doing the movie, I knew right away, the most exciting person to play him is Christian.”

Annpurna Pictures opens “Vice” nationwide December 25. Watch the official trailer below.

‘Vice’ First Look: Christian Bale Shocks With Extreme Dick Cheney Transformation

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Christian Bale is known for delivering shocking physical transformations, from his dramatic weight loss in “The Machinist” to his hefty weight gain in “American Hustle,” and he’s up to his usually tricks as Dick Cheney in “Vice.” Originally titled “Backseat,” “Vice” is writer-director Adam McKay’s next dramatic feature following the Oscar-winning success of “The Big Short.” Vanity Fair has debuted the first look at the movie, which finds Bale packing on the pounds to play the 46th Vice President of the United States.

“Vice” tracks Cheney’s rise into one of the most prominent vice presidents in American history. Amy Adams stars opposite Bale as Lynne Cheney, while Steve Carell plays Donald Rumsfeld and Sam Rockwell plays George W. Bush. Both Carell and Bale starred in McKay’s “The Big Short,” with Bale earning an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor.

“The Big Short” was a surprising change of pace for McKay, who had been previously known as the comedy director behind Will Ferrell vehicles like “Anchorman” and “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.” McKay served as an executive producer on HBO’s “Succession” earlier the year. Bale was last on the big screen in December’s “Hostiles.”

Annapurna Pictures will release “Vice” in theaters December 25. The film is being eyed as one of the company’s top awards contenders this year along with Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk.” Check out the first look photos from “Vice” below. Annapurna is set to debut the trailer tomorrow.

Christian Bale, "Vice"

Christian Bale, “Vice”

Greig Fraser/Annapurna Pictures

Christian Bale, "Vice"

Christian Bale, “Vice”

Greig Fraser/Annapurna Pictures

‘Sharp Objects’ Meets ‘Full House’ in New Video Mash-Up — Watch

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It’s not a spoiler to say that the HBO limited series “Sharp Objects,” the finale of which aired Sunday, isn’t exactly the happiest of family dramas. But you know what other family has experienced some degree of hardship? Why, the Tanners of “Full House” and subsequent Netflix continuation “Fuller House.”

Sure, DJ, Stephanie and the extended clan living in a fancy San Francisco townhouse aren’t, like Camille (Amy Adams), dealing with the murder of two local girls as well as deeply rooted issues of mental illness, self-harm, and addiction. But the Tanners have experienced their share of tragedy, and the show’s iconic opening credits sequence does make for a natural template to try a new spin on the “Sharp Objects” intro, as crafted by YouTube user DoingOK.

What director Jean-Marc Vallée, novelist Gillian Flynn, and showrunner Marti Noxon might think of this upbeat take on their series is as yet unknown. But the video does a great job of spotlighting the show’s incredible cast at their most sitcom-worthy, especially the underrated Henry Czerny as Alan.

Warning: This video may give the impression that “Sharp Objects” is more family-friendly than it is in reality, so watch with a great deal of caution. Still, it’s a fun take on the show that left us all gasping this summer.

“Sharp Objects” is streaming now on HBO Go and HBO NOW, and is also available on demand.

Amy Adams’ ‘Sharp Objects’ Scores 1.8 Million Viewers in HBO Finale

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HBO’s “Sharp Objects” landed 1.8 million viewers in the limited series’ Sunday finale. Adding in the first replay and some preliminary viewing on HBO Go and HBO Now platforms, and the Amy Adams vehicle’s premiere audience grew by 800,000 viewers, upping the grand total to 2.6 million viewers.

The end of the TV adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s debut novel came within 6 percent of the Season 1 closer of “Big Little Lies,” which brought in 1.9 million eyeballs in April 2017.

More to come…

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Adams' 'Sharp Objects' Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

Why it Was ‘Irresistible’ for ‘Sharp Objects’ to Hide Amma’s ‘Creepy’ Dollhouse in Plain Sight in Every Episode

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(Warning: Spoilers ahead for the “Sharp Objects” finale, “Milk”)

If you were surprised that Amma (Eliza Scanlen) ended up being the Wind Gap killer in HBO’s recently wrapped limited series “Sharp Objects,” you must not have been looking in the right places for clues.

Camille (Amy Adams) puts it all together in the final episode when she finds little teeth in the room of Amma’s dollhouse meant to represent the ivory floor in their mother Adora’s (Patricia Clarkson) bedroom. A mark of the mass murderer was pulling out the victims’ teeth.

Readers of the book have been looking at that dollhouse since the premiere episode, knowing the massive piece of incriminating evidence it contained — and showrunner Marti Noxon and director Jean-Marc Vallée were sure to keep the dollhouse in every episode both as a clue and as a metaphor.

“I think it’s irresistible for a director; it’s such a beautiful metaphor for trying to control the world around you,” Noxon told TheWrap in a recent interview.

“And you know, dollhouses are creepy,” she added with a laugh. “So because it is the key in the end to the girls, I think it was also sort of placed — metaphor intended — to have it in evidence a lot. Because it really is a symbol of Amma’s disorder of this crazy control thing she’s caught from her mom.”

Noxon is referencing Adora’s murder of Camille’s other little sister Marian, who died by Munchausen syndrome by proxy. In the finale, Adora goes to jail and, for a few minutes there, it’s easy to assume she also killed Natalie Keene and Ann Nash. The finale cuts off just as Camille is realizing the truth about her little sister, revealing Amma as the murderer.

To read all about the crazy ending, read our conversation with Noxon over here.

Jennifer Maas contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sharp Objects' Finale: Breaking Down Those Chilling Post-Credits Scenes

'Sharp Objects': 13 Differences Between Gillian Flynn's Novel and Amy Adams' HBO Series (Photos)

'Sharp Objects' Finale: Marti Noxon Explains the Final Line and Why They Cut the Ending Off Early

'Sharp Objects': Showrunner Marti Noxon Says Calhoun Day Started Out as a Joke

‘Sharp Objects’ Alan Crellin: Complicit or Oblivious? Creator Marti Noxon Gives Us Her Take

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(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve watched “Sharp Objects” through Sunday’s finale, “Milk.”)

“Sharp Objects” creator Marti Noxon will tell you that “this story is about the legacy of violence among these women.”

And that’s the truth, as HBO’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s debut novel came to a close Sunday with two shocking reveals: 1) Camille’s (Amy Adams) mother Adora (Patricia Clarkson) killed her little sister Marian by imposing Munchausen by proxy on her and slowly poisoning her to death as a child, and 2) Camille’s preteen half sister, Amma (Eliza Scanlen), was the one responsible for the grisly murders of the two young girls from their small hometown of Wind Gap, Missouri.

But sitting quietly in the middle of this storm of murderous rage amongst the women is Adora’s husband, Alan (played by Henry Czerny), trying to tune it all out while listening to his very expensive stereo equipment.

So what exactly did Alan know about all the violent acts the women closest to him were carrying out — including the fact his wife killed their child? Noxon tells TheWrap she left it ambiguous as to whether or not Alan was complicit or oblivious, but that in some “deep dark recess of his soul” he “knows everything.”

“I think this is, again, the story of like secrets and denial,” Noxton told TheWrap in an interview ahead of Sunday’s finale. “How about all of these people who live with people who are abusing their children and they know, but they don’t want to know, so they push it down and they make excuses and they justify behaviors? I think it’s just… he probably in some deep, dark recess of his soul knows everything. But I don’t think he admits it all to himself. This is what I would think Alan thinks of as one of the dark times that he’s just trying to get through.”

But Noxon says it’s possible Alan also “gets off on the violence.”

“We’ve seen these stories so many times about female spouses who walk that line between trying to control the force — the dangerous force in their family — but also not being willing to sacrifice to do it,” Noxon said. “And I think that’s Alan. He almost feels like a beaten spouse to me. He’s sort of trying to control Adora, but he’s also just trying to walk away.”

“I don’t know if he is in some ways, you know, he gets off on the violence?” she added. “I think he’s almost more a victim of whatever mind control [Adora has inflicted on him]. He feels like a very classically female character in that way.”

Read more from our interview with Noxon about the finale here. And get a breakdown of the finale’s chilling post-credits scenes here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sharp Objects' Finale: Breaking Down Those Chilling Post-Credits Scenes

'Sharp Objects': 13 Differences Between Gillian Flynn's Novel and Amy Adams' HBO Series (Photos)

'Sharp Objects' Finale: Marti Noxon Explains the Final Line and Why They Cut the Ending Off Early

'Sharp Objects': Showrunner Marti Noxon Says Calhoun Day Started Out as a Joke