Cannes Report, Day 3: Women Rule, ‘Cold War’ Hailed as ‘Best Film’ Yet

Distributors are buying films faster at this year’s Cannes Film Festival than they did at the last Sundance or Toronto fests.

On Thursday, Saban Films bought Gerard Butler’s “Keepers,” Sony Pictures Classics picked up the rights to Lebanese director Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” and Jessica Chastain’s all-female thriller “355” landed a French distributor.

Two clear highlights from the film festival’s third day: “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler talking about how he loved working with women on his films, and Paweł Pawlikowski’s film “Cold War,” which received mostly glowing reviews. Many early viewers even called it the best film to come out of Cannes yet this year (so far).

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 2: ‘Rafiki’ Makes History, ‘Don Quixote’ Scores Legal Victory

Films screening on Friday include “Ash Is Purest White” and Jean-Luc Godard’s “The Image Book,” the latter of which should get some buzz.

See below for highlights from Cannes, day three:

Saban Films Plays the Game

Saban Films picked up the North American rights to Gerard Butler’s “Keepers,” the distributor announced Thursday.

Kristoffer Nyholm directed the film which also stars Peter Mullan and Connor Swindells. The thriller is inspired by the Flannan Isle mystery where three lighthouse keepers arrive on an uninhabited island for a six-week shift but then discover something life-changing that isn’t theirs to keep. Soon, they have to battle paranoia and isolation to survive.

Saban Films has been at the forefront of the acquisitions game at festivals lately — at Sundance earlier this year, Saban picked up the rights to buzzy film “Lizzie,” which stars Chloe Sevigny and Kristen Stewart.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Sony Classics

Sony Classics Flips for “Capernaum”

On Thursday, Sony Pictures Classics acquired the North American and Latin American rights to Lebanese director Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” which is set to premiere at Cannes next Thursday in competition.

The Lebanese director previously had two films, titled “Caramel” and “Where Do We Go Now?” premiere at the festival. “Where Do We Go Now?” won the Audience Award at the 2011 Toronto Film Festival and was also distributed by Sony Classics.

Labaki also wrote and also appears in “Capernaum,” which tells the story of a child who rebels against the life that’s been imposed on him and decides to bring a lawsuit against his parents.

Getty Images

Ryan Coogler’s Panel

“Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler took part in a panel on Thursday, one of the hottest tickets on the Croisette. Vulture senior editor Kyle Buchanan posted a thread on Twitter about the conversation — and the filmmaker’s comments about working with strong women were the talk of the town.

When interviewer Elvis Mitchell praised him for working with female cinematographers and female editors for all three of his films, which also include “Fruitvale Station” and “Creed,” Coogler said, “It’s not something to brag about. Honestly, for my first film, I was looking for the best cinematographer I could find. Rachel Morrison was that. She was the best d.p. we could get at the time, and I thought I was getting somebody amazing, but she turned out to be incredible.”

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

He also said that the women are “more important” than the men in Wakanda, and he would be into making a film just about the characters played by Lupita Nyong’o, Letitia Wright, Angela Bassett and Gurira.

“A lot of times, in comic books, it’s a little bit of tokenism: You’ve got one black person, you’ve got one woman that fights,” added Coogler. “I was fired up about that, and I didn’t want to blow the opportunity.”

Jessica Chastain’s All-Star ‘355’ Gets French Deal

In general, the topic of female empowerment seems to be the rage at this year’s festival. Cate Blanchett and the rest of the jury faced questions questions about #TimesUp and the number of films directed by women during a press conference on the first day. And on Thursday, Jessica Chastain’s all-star film “355” got French distribution from SND.

The film is a female-led spy thriller that also stars Lupita Nyong’o, Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz and Fan Bingbing. Simon Kinberg (“X-Men; Dark Phoenix”) will direct.

“355” centers on the five top agents from organizations around the world uniting to stop a global syndicate from acquiring a weapon that could plunge an already unstable world into total chaos. They have to overcome cultural and political differences to form a bond and work together.

However, TheWrap’s Steve Pond reported that the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors for decades.  Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women.

Also Read: ‘Sorry Angel’ Film Review: AIDS Drama Explores the Quiet Places

‘Sorry Angel’ Debuts to (Mostly) Glowing Reviews

Christophe Honoré has impressed most with his new film, “Sorry Angel,” which debuted at Cannes on Thursday. The film follows a male student from Britanny who has a love affair with a 39-year0old man. Vincent Lacoste, Pierre Deladonchamps and Denis Podalydes star.

Vanity Fair’s Richard Lawson wrote that ‘Sorry Angel” is a “rich and thoughtful romantic drama that is less about politics than it is about matters of the heart and body. A chewy, handsomely staged novel of a movie, ‘Sorry Angel’ contains moments of piercing intelligence and heartbreaking beauty.”

IndieWire’s Eric Kohn wrote: “The most emotional and understated work from French director Christophe Honoré is a touching tribute to the art and culture of early ’90s France, charting creative obsessions young and old, and strikes a note that’s life-affirming and melancholic.”

However, Peter Bradshaw from The Guardian said “it is often poignant and humorous but also placid and complacent, with performances bordering on the self-regarding and even faintly insufferable.”

‘Cold War’ Also Debuts

Four years after his film “Ida” won the foreign-language Oscar, Paweł Pawlikowski’s film “Cold War” also debuted on Thursday, and The Telegraph’s Tim Robey declared: “By a distance, the best film in Cannes competition so far…” Another Twitter user agreed, writing, “Pawlikowski’s ‘Cold War’ the best feature of Cannes so far. Beautifully shot and performed and with the right amount of fatalism.”

Vulture’s Kyle Buchanan revealed that there was “lots of well-deserved praise for Cannes entry ‘Cold War,’” and TheWrap’s Steve Pond called it “ravishing” and “haunting” in his review.

Also Read: ‘Cold War’ Film Review: Romance in Postwar Europe Is Ravishing and Haunted

See some more reactions to the movie below.

COLD WAR doesn’t waste a frame. IDA had more mystery and wonder, but this is a natural continuation, visually and thematically, for a fimmmaker obsessed with exploring the post-WWII fracturing of European identity. A concise treat. #cannes

— erickohn (@erickohn) May 11, 2018

COLD WAR: the first truly great film I’ve seen at Cannes this year. Delicate and forceful when it’s supposed to be, a tragic romance that reminds you why we find tragedy romantic.

— Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse) May 11, 2018

Having now seen Cold War I can report back that it is absolutely brilliant – a heartbreaking story, with astonishing performances and a hauntingly beautiful soundtrack. I would recommend it to all. Cate Blanchett, it’s got my vote! ???????????? #cannes2018 @Festival_Cannes

— Margot James (@margot_james_mp) May 10, 2018

The buzz ahead of Cannes around Pawel Pawlikowski’s ‘Cold War’ is strong. Have heard from a few people that it will be in contention for awards. Certainly looks beautiful and if it approaches ‘Ida’ we’re in for a treat. pic.twitter.com/xANuF9htV5

— Andreas Wiseman (@AndreasWiseman) May 3, 2018

Cold War by Pawlikowski is superb, by some distance the best in the main competition thus far @IFI_Dub @Festival_Cannes pic.twitter.com/2zA289aNGO

— David O Mahony (@David_O_Mahony) May 11, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Confirms ‘Don Quixote’ for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: ‘Cinema Has Regained Its Rights’

‘BlacKkKlansman’ Star Laura Harrier on Going From Spider-Man’s Homecoming to Cannes Red Carpet

‘Rafiki’ Film Review: African Gay Romance Is a First for Cannes

Distributors are buying films faster at this year’s Cannes Film Festival than they did at the last Sundance or Toronto fests.

On Thursday, Saban Films bought Gerard Butler’s “Keepers,” Sony Pictures Classics picked up the rights to Lebanese director Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” and Jessica Chastain’s all-female thriller “355” landed a French distributor.

Two clear highlights from the film festival’s third day: “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler talking about how he loved working with women on his films, and Paweł Pawlikowski’s film “Cold War,” which received mostly glowing reviews. Many early viewers even called it the best film to come out of Cannes yet this year (so far).

Films screening on Friday include “Ash Is Purest White” and Jean-Luc Godard’s “The Image Book,” the latter of which should get some buzz.

See below for highlights from Cannes, day three:

Saban Films Plays the Game

Saban Films picked up the North American rights to Gerard Butler’s “Keepers,” the distributor announced Thursday.

Kristoffer Nyholm directed the film which also stars Peter Mullan and Connor Swindells. The thriller is inspired by the Flannan Isle mystery where three lighthouse keepers arrive on an uninhabited island for a six-week shift but then discover something life-changing that isn’t theirs to keep. Soon, they have to battle paranoia and isolation to survive.

Saban Films has been at the forefront of the acquisitions game at festivals lately — at Sundance earlier this year, Saban picked up the rights to buzzy film “Lizzie,” which stars Chloe Sevigny and Kristen Stewart.

Sony Classics

Sony Classics Flips for “Capernaum”

On Thursday, Sony Pictures Classics acquired the North American and Latin American rights to Lebanese director Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” which is set to premiere at Cannes next Thursday in competition.

The Lebanese director previously had two films, titled “Caramel” and “Where Do We Go Now?” premiere at the festival. “Where Do We Go Now?” won the Audience Award at the 2011 Toronto Film Festival and was also distributed by Sony Classics.

Labaki also wrote and also appears in “Capernaum,” which tells the story of a child who rebels against the life that’s been imposed on him and decides to bring a lawsuit against his parents.

Getty Images

Ryan Coogler’s Panel

“Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler took part in a panel on Thursday, one of the hottest tickets on the Croisette. Vulture senior editor Kyle Buchanan posted a thread on Twitter about the conversation — and the filmmaker’s comments about working with strong women were the talk of the town.

When interviewer Elvis Mitchell praised him for working with female cinematographers and female editors for all three of his films, which also include “Fruitvale Station” and “Creed,” Coogler said, “It’s not something to brag about. Honestly, for my first film, I was looking for the best cinematographer I could find. Rachel Morrison was that. She was the best d.p. we could get at the time, and I thought I was getting somebody amazing, but she turned out to be incredible.”

He also said that the women are “more important” than the men in Wakanda, and he would be into making a film just about the characters played by Lupita Nyong’o, Letitia Wright, Angela Bassett and Gurira.

“A lot of times, in comic books, it’s a little bit of tokenism: You’ve got one black person, you’ve got one woman that fights,” added Coogler. “I was fired up about that, and I didn’t want to blow the opportunity.”

Jessica Chastain’s All-Star ‘355’ Gets French Deal

In general, the topic of female empowerment seems to be the rage at this year’s festival. Cate Blanchett and the rest of the jury faced questions questions about #TimesUp and the number of films directed by women during a press conference on the first day. And on Thursday, Jessica Chastain’s all-star film “355” got French distribution from SND.

The film is a female-led spy thriller that also stars Lupita Nyong’o, Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz and Fan Bingbing. Simon Kinberg (“X-Men; Dark Phoenix”) will direct.

“355” centers on the five top agents from organizations around the world uniting to stop a global syndicate from acquiring a weapon that could plunge an already unstable world into total chaos. They have to overcome cultural and political differences to form a bond and work together.

However, TheWrap’s Steve Pond reported that the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors for decades.  Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women.

‘Sorry Angel’ Debuts to (Mostly) Glowing Reviews

Christophe Honoré has impressed most with his new film, “Sorry Angel,” which debuted at Cannes on Thursday. The film follows a male student from Britanny who has a love affair with a 39-year0old man. Vincent Lacoste, Pierre Deladonchamps and Denis Podalydes star.

Vanity Fair’s Richard Lawson wrote that ‘Sorry Angel” is a “rich and thoughtful romantic drama that is less about politics than it is about matters of the heart and body. A chewy, handsomely staged novel of a movie, ‘Sorry Angel’ contains moments of piercing intelligence and heartbreaking beauty.”

IndieWire’s Eric Kohn wrote: “The most emotional and understated work from French director Christophe Honoré is a touching tribute to the art and culture of early ’90s France, charting creative obsessions young and old, and strikes a note that’s life-affirming and melancholic.”

However, Peter Bradshaw from The Guardian said “it is often poignant and humorous but also placid and complacent, with performances bordering on the self-regarding and even faintly insufferable.”

‘Cold War’ Also Debuts

Four years after his film “Ida” won the foreign-language Oscar, Paweł Pawlikowski’s film “Cold War” also debuted on Thursday, and The Telegraph’s Tim Robey declared: “By a distance, the best film in Cannes competition so far…” Another Twitter user agreed, writing, “Pawlikowski’s ‘Cold War’ the best feature of Cannes so far. Beautifully shot and performed and with the right amount of fatalism.”

Vulture’s Kyle Buchanan revealed that there was “lots of well-deserved praise for Cannes entry ‘Cold War,'” and TheWrap’s Steve Pond called it “ravishing” and “haunting” in his review.

See some more reactions to the movie below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Confirms 'Don Quixote' for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: 'Cinema Has Regained Its Rights'

'BlacKkKlansman' Star Laura Harrier on Going From Spider-Man's Homecoming to Cannes Red Carpet

'Rafiki' Film Review: African Gay Romance Is a First for Cannes

Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival is officially in full swing: “Everybody Knows” premiered Tuesday night to open the festival, where everyone had eyes for jury president Cate Blanchett.

Asghar Farhadi’s “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” wasn’t on the market long after the film premiered to somewhat mixed reviews — Focus Features nabbed the U.S. and international rights faster than anyone could say, “Croisette.”

Blanchett and the rest of the jury took on issues of #TimesUp and the lack of female directors during a press conference on Tuesday, with Blanchett assuring audiences that all films will be regarded equally in terms of the “quality” of the work, and not whether they have a female director or not.

Also Read: Why Cannes Film Market May Move at an Escargot’s Pace This Year

Wednesday will see the premiere of two competition titles, “Yommedine” and “Leto,” the former having a first-time director — a rarity for the Cannes competition. The latter is by a director under house arrest in Russia.

All in all, a continued pattern of caution will reign when it comes to deals at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, numerous industry insiders told TheWrap. In general, festival titles have been selling at a snail’s pace since last September’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Some things to watch out for during the festival: Amazon and Netflix’s spending spree — or lack thereof — this year. And distributors buying content packages with big movie stars attached.

See what everyone has been talking about on the first day of Cannes below.

“Everybody Knows” Premieres

On Tuesday, Asghar Farhadi’s new film, “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” premiered at Cannes — to somewhat mixed reviews.

The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw called it an “intimately painful and powerful drama,” while IndieWire’s David Ehrlich described the film starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem as “a layered, absorbing kidnapping drama…. Bardem rules. Farhadi’s best since ‘A Separation.’”

However, other critics weren’t too kind. One early viewer said it was “kind of empty, low key and not at all interesting,” while Alex Billington wrote, “Just wanted it to be over, and now it thankfully is.”

Critics reviews skewed more positive than negative — on MetaCritic, the drama holds a score of 73 percent.

Also Read: ‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Regardless of the reviews, Focus Features pounced on “Everybody Knows,” acquiring the film for U.S. and key international territories early Wednesday morning.

Directed by Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi, the film follows Laura (Cruz) on her travels from Argentina to her small home town in Spain for her sister’s wedding, bringing her two children along for the occasion.  Amid the joyful reunion and festivities, the eldest daughter is abducted. In the tense days that follow, various family and community tensions surface and deeply hidden secrets are revealed.

See more reviews below.

Asghar Farhadi’s Everybody Knows is an intimately painful and powerful drama, crucially anchored by three heavyweight performances – Cruz, Bardem, Darín. Review later #Canne2018 #Cannes71 #Cannes

— Peter Bradshaw (@PeterBradshaw1) May 8, 2018

Asghar Farhadi’s Everybody Knows is an intimately painful and powerful drama, crucially anchored by three heavyweight performances – Cruz, Bardem, Darín. Review later #Canne2018 #Cannes71 #Cannes

— Peter Bradshaw (@PeterBradshaw1) May 8, 2018

Best Opener since… aveeeeery long time, but not Farhadi‘s best. #Cannes2018

— Joachim Kurz (@Mietgeist) May 8, 2018

Everybody Knows is messy melodrama that doesn’t add up to much but it’s Farhadi’s most cinematic work. Although that’s never been his strength so… #cannes2018

— Gregory Ellwood (@TheGregoryE) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: a layered, absorbing kidnapping drama about secrets, the specter of money, and how such things can curdle into the kind of resentment that’s starving for any chance to make itself real. Bardem rules. Farhadi’s best since A SEPARATION. solid start to #Cannes2018.

— david ehrlich (@davidehrlich) May 8, 2018

You see the twist coming 20 minutes in, but hey, Farhadis #EverybodyKnows is still fun in its delicate deconstruction of a family. Bardem is having fun. So is Cruz but her role reduces her to the sobbing mama in the end. Too bad. It could‘ve used more viciousness. #cannes2018

— Beatrice Behn (@DansLeCinema) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: Another rock solid episode of “The Young & The Restless” from Asghar Farhadi. The guy makes soaps! Is this a crime? I give it a B. #Cannes2018

— Jordan Hoffman (@jhoffman) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS: Asghar Farhadi spins great yarns of doubt and tension and he’s got a kidnap whodunit worthy of Agatha Christie with his latest. Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem co-star, but it’s an ensemble success. A strong start to #Cannes2018

— Peter Howell (@peterhowellfilm) May 8, 2018

Everybody Knows – Everybody was bored. Big Spanish wedding turns into kidnapping thriller turns into big Spanish domestic drama. Didn’t grab me like Farhadi’s past films. Just wanted it to be over, and now it thankfully is. #cannes2018

— Alex Billington (@firstshowing) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS is minor Farhadi. Kind of empty, low key and not all that interesting. Applause at the press screening was muted perhaps because if just that. #Cannes2018

— The Syndicate (@YourSyndicate) May 8, 2018

EVERYBODY KNOWS is maudlin siliness, it’s family melodrama wrapped in a kidnapping caper that trades on the chrasima of its stars to little success. Predictability overshadows any moments of meaning or impact #Cannes2018

— ???????????????????? ???????????????????????? (@filmfest_ca) May 8, 2018

Cate Blanchett

It’s clear that the best reviews out of Cannes haven’t been about movies so far — instead, everyone can’t stop raving about Queen Cate Blanchett.

As president of the Cannes jury, Blanchett was front and center during the first day of Cannes, giving opening remarks and posing with the rest of the jury that included Ava DuVernay and Kristen Stewart (who also couldn’t stop ogling at Blanchett).

Also Read: Cannes’ Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

In fact, the hashtag #Cannes2018 was filled with pictures of Blanchett in her stunning pink suit and matching sunnies.

Cate Blanchett on films by women at #Cannes2018: “[They] are not there because of their gender but because of the quality of their work. We will be assessing them as filmmakers, as we should be.” https://t.co/yjD26E0kqv pic.twitter.com/3RXMewF5vq

— IndieWire (@IndieWire) May 8, 2018

Cate Blanchett at the Cannes Jury Photocall. She looks amazing pic.twitter.com/HhB96uhetG

— Best of Cate (@bestofcate) May 8, 2018

good morning to kristen stewart and cate blanchett at cannes only pic.twitter.com/Bzn83U9tLj

— Kristen (@salesonfilm) May 8, 2018

”Being attractive doesn’t preclude being intelligent. I think this is by its very nature a glamorous, fantastic, spectacular festival full of joie de vivre, full of great, good humor, full of discord and disharmony,”

— Cate Blanchett on red-carpet glamour and Cannes. pic.twitter.com/z9CRcgokg3

— Best of Cate (@bestofcate) May 8, 2018

find someone who looks at you the way kristen stewart is looking at cate blanchett omg ???? #Cannes pic.twitter.com/9qC4socrWU

— Ashley Lee (@cashleelee) May 8, 2018

The jury faced questions of #TimesUp and the number of films directed by women during a press conference on the first day of the festival. According to IndieWire, Blanchett insisted she will look at each film with an open mind, since three films under Palme d’Or consideration are directed by women.

The films in consideration directed by women “are not there because of their gender but because of the quality of their work. We will be assessing them as filmmakers, as we should be.”

“Would I like to see more women in competition?” Blanchett asked. “Absolutely.”

According to TheWrap’s Steve Pond, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors for decaes.  Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women.

Only one, Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” has won Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or, though actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seudoux were given honorary Palmes alongside “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director Abdellatif Kechiche’s real one in 2013.

Admittedly, things are getting better. Of the 11 times that three or more women have placed films in competition, eight have come in the last 13 years. Three women made the cut in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 — and four did so in 2011.

Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter Are Back for Third ‘Bill & Ted’ Film

On Tuesday, “Bill & Ted” was trending on Twitter in the United States because it was announced that Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter would reprise their roles as “Ted” Theodore Logan and “Bill” S. Preston Esq. in “Bill & Ted Face the Music,” the third film in the franchise.

The first film, “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” was released in 1989. The sequel “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey” came out in 1991.

Also Read: Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter to Reprise Roles in Third ‘Bill & Ted’ Film

MGM is set to release the film domestically under its Orion Pictures banner. Endeavor Content negotiated the deal. Bloom will be handling the international sales in Cannes this week and will be introducing the films to buyers.

Getty Images

Screen Media Sings for Julianne Moore’s ‘Bel Canto’

Screen Media picked up the North American rights to Paul Weitz’s “Bel Canto,” the company announced Tuesday.

The film, which Weitz and Anthony Weintraub adapted from the best-selling 2001 novel by Ann Patchett, stars Julianne Moore as a famous American soprano who travels to South America in the 1990s to give a private concert at the birthday party of a wealthy Japanese industrialist (Ken Watanabe) — and then gets caught in a hostage situation.

The cast also includes Sebastian Koch, Christopher Lambert, Ryo Kase, Tenoch Huerta, and María Mercedes Coroy.

Still No Selfies Allowed

Everyone can’t seem to stop talking about how adamant the festival is this year about not allowing selfies and photographs on the red carpet.

On Monday, TheWrap’s Steve Pond reported that The Cannes Film Festival has laid down some new, or at least updated, rules this year. No selfies on the red carpet. No Netflix films. No press screenings in advance of premieres.

The Los Angeles Times’ Amy Kaufman tweeted, “Everyone abiding by selfie rule. I got reprimanded for even having my phone camera on.”

Cannes is not messing around w/ selfie ban. I just got my ticket for opening gala, in envelope is this: “No selfies and pictures on the red carpet, thank you. *offenders will be denied entrance to the screenings.” No personal photography on most photographed red carpet in world. pic.twitter.com/ZFB27gDvxR

— Chris Gardner (@chrissgardner) May 8, 2018

If you’re at #Cannes remember, no selfies, no Netflix, no horseplay, no hoop-and-stick, no hopscotch, no ice cream socials, no “jump rope,” no homemade jams or jellies, no catching fireflies, no “May pole,” and no referencing films any other way besides “The [Director Surname]”

— Josh L. Dickey (@JLDlite) May 8, 2018

At my first #cannes opening night and it feels even fancier than the #Oscars. They play music as stars walk down the red carpet and announce each celebrity with their resume. Also: Everyone abiding by selfie rule. I got reprimanded for even having my phone camera on.

— Amy Kaufman (@AmyKinLA) May 8, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Women in Cannes: A Short History of Small Victories and Decades of Male Dominance (Photos)

Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Cannes Film Festival 2018 Preview: No Selfies, No Netflix, No Problem

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival is officially in full swing: “Everybody Knows” premiered Tuesday night to open the festival, where everyone had eyes for jury president Cate Blanchett.

Asghar Farhadi’s “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” wasn’t on the market long after the film premiered to somewhat mixed reviews — Focus Features nabbed the U.S. and international rights faster than anyone could say, “Croisette.”

Blanchett and the rest of the jury took on issues of #TimesUp and the lack of female directors during a press conference on Tuesday, with Blanchett assuring audiences that all films will be regarded equally in terms of the “quality” of the work, and not whether they have a female director or not.

Wednesday will see the premiere of two competition titles, “Yommedine” and “Leto,” the former having a first-time director — a rarity for the Cannes competition. The latter is by a director under house arrest in Russia.

All in all, a continued pattern of caution will reign when it comes to deals at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, numerous industry insiders told TheWrap. In general, festival titles have been selling at a snail’s pace since last September’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Some things to watch out for during the festival: Amazon and Netflix’s spending spree — or lack thereof — this year. And distributors buying content packages with big movie stars attached.

See what everyone has been talking about on the first day of Cannes below.

“Everybody Knows” Premieres

On Tuesday, Asghar Farhadi’s new film, “Everybody Knows,” or “Todos Lo Saben,” premiered at Cannes — to somewhat mixed reviews.

The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw called it an “intimately painful and powerful drama,” while IndieWire’s David Ehrlich described the film starring Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem as “a layered, absorbing kidnapping drama…. Bardem rules. Farhadi’s best since ‘A Separation.'”

However, other critics weren’t too kind. One early viewer said it was “kind of empty, low key and not at all interesting,” while Alex Billington wrote, “Just wanted it to be over, and now it thankfully is.”

Critics reviews skewed more positive than negative — on MetaCritic, the drama holds a score of 73 percent.

Regardless of the reviews, Focus Features pounced on “Everybody Knows,” acquiring the film for U.S. and key international territories early Wednesday morning.

Directed by Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi, the film follows Laura (Cruz) on her travels from Argentina to her small home town in Spain for her sister’s wedding, bringing her two children along for the occasion.  Amid the joyful reunion and festivities, the eldest daughter is abducted. In the tense days that follow, various family and community tensions surface and deeply hidden secrets are revealed.

See more reviews below.

Cate Blanchett

It’s clear that the best reviews out of Cannes haven’t been about movies so far — instead, everyone can’t stop raving about Queen Cate Blanchett.

As president of the Cannes jury, Blanchett was front and center during the first day of Cannes, giving opening remarks and posing with the rest of the jury that included Ava DuVernay and Kristen Stewart (who also couldn’t stop ogling at Blanchett).

In fact, the hashtag #Cannes2018 was filled with pictures of Blanchett in her stunning pink suit and matching sunnies.

The jury faced questions of #TimesUp and the number of films directed by women during a press conference on the first day of the festival. According to IndieWire, Blanchett insisted she will look at each film with an open mind, since three films under Palme d’Or consideration are directed by women.

The films in consideration directed by women “are not there because of their gender but because of the quality of their work. We will be assessing them as filmmakers, as we should be.”

“Would I like to see more women in competition?” Blanchett asked. “Absolutely.”

According to TheWrap’s Steve Pond, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors for decaes.  Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women.

Only one, Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” has won Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or, though actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seudoux were given honorary Palmes alongside “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director Abdellatif Kechiche’s real one in 2013.

Admittedly, things are getting better. Of the 11 times that three or more women have placed films in competition, eight have come in the last 13 years. Three women made the cut in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 — and four did so in 2011.

Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter Are Back for Third ‘Bill & Ted’ Film

On Tuesday, “Bill & Ted” was trending on Twitter in the United States because it was announced that Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter would reprise their roles as “Ted” Theodore Logan and “Bill” S. Preston Esq. in “Bill & Ted Face the Music,” the third film in the franchise.

The first film, “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” was released in 1989. The sequel “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey” came out in 1991.

MGM is set to release the film domestically under its Orion Pictures banner. Endeavor Content negotiated the deal. Bloom will be handling the international sales in Cannes this week and will be introducing the films to buyers.

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Screen Media Sings for Julianne Moore’s ‘Bel Canto’

Screen Media picked up the North American rights to Paul Weitz’s “Bel Canto,” the company announced Tuesday.

The film, which Weitz and Anthony Weintraub adapted from the best-selling 2001 novel by Ann Patchett, stars Julianne Moore as a famous American soprano who travels to South America in the 1990s to give a private concert at the birthday party of a wealthy Japanese industrialist (Ken Watanabe) — and then gets caught in a hostage situation.

The cast also includes Sebastian Koch, Christopher Lambert, Ryo Kase, Tenoch Huerta, and María Mercedes Coroy.

Still No Selfies Allowed

Everyone can’t seem to stop talking about how adamant the festival is this year about not allowing selfies and photographs on the red carpet.

On Monday, TheWrap’s Steve Pond reported that The Cannes Film Festival has laid down some new, or at least updated, rules this year. No selfies on the red carpet. No Netflix films. No press screenings in advance of premieres.

The Los Angeles Times’ Amy Kaufman tweeted, “Everyone abiding by selfie rule. I got reprimanded for even having my phone camera on.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Women in Cannes: A Short History of Small Victories and Decades of Male Dominance (Photos)

Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in 'Terrifying Pain' for Cannes Opener 'Everybody Knows'

Cannes Film Festival 2018 Preview: No Selfies, No Netflix, No Problem

Cannes’ Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

A version of this story appeared in TheWrap’s magazine’s Cannes issue.

For decades, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors. The rarefied club of Cannes-approved art-house auteurs, the filmmakers on whom the festival rests, has simply always been predominantly male.

Over the years, oversights and snubs have been easy to find. It’s hard to imagine, for instance, that directors as esteemed as Agnieszka Holland, Julie Taymor, Mira Nair, Kelly Reichardt or Elaine May haven’t warranted spots on the Croisette, or that Agnès Varda hasn’t deserved more than her single placement in the main competition, which she got in 1962 for “Cleo From 5 to 8.”

Yes, a female director, Barbara Virginia, had a film in competition in 1946, the first year that Cannes took place. But it wasn’t until 1954, with Carmen Toscano and Kinuyo Tanaka, that two women had films in the competition, and it wasn’t until 1961 that a woman won Cannes’ best director award. (Russian director Yuliya Sointseva was the first for “The Story of the Flaming Years.”)

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival to Offer Sexual Harassment Hotline

The stats are pretty dismal: Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women. (See chart below.) Only one, Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” has won Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or, though actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seudoux were given honorary Palmes alongside “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director Abdellatif Kechiche’s real one in 2013.

Admittedly, things are getting better. Of the 11 times that three or more women have placed films in competition, eight have come in the last 13 years. Three women made the cut in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 — and four did so in 2011.

And the current decade is the first one in which more than 10 percent of the competition directors have been women — though Cannes faced immediate criticism this year for only including Alice Rohrwacher, Eva Husson and Nadine Labaki among its 21 competition directors.

Festival chief Thierry Frémaux has insisted that he will never make gender a programming factor, but the Un Certain Regard section has six solo women directors and one co-director among its 18 films, while the independent Critics’ Week competition finds women outnumbering men four to three.

Also Read: Penélope Cruz Says She Spent Months in ‘Terrifying Pain’ for Cannes Opener ‘Everybody Knows’

Rohrwacher, by the way, is in the Cannes main competition this year for the second time, bringing “Lazzaro Felice” to the Palais four years after her film “The Wonders” won the festival’s grand prize.

That makes her one of 10 women to have placed two films in the competition, the others being Sofia Coppola, Maiwenn Le Besco, Samira Makhmalbaf, Lucrecia Martel, Marta Meszaros, Lynne Ramsay, Margarethe von Trotta, Lina Wertmuller and Mai Zetterling.

The only women with more than two: Andrea Arnold, Jane Campion, Liliana Cavani and Nicole Garcia, with three each, and Japanese director Naomi Kawase with five.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Netflix CEO Disses Cannes Film Fest After Streamer Pulls Out: There Are ‘a Lot of Other Festivals’

Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Despite Producer’s Lawsuit to Block Screening

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

A version of this story appeared in TheWrap’s magazine’s Cannes issue.

For decades, the Cannes Film Festival has had a dismal record of showcasing the work of female directors. The rarefied club of Cannes-approved art-house auteurs, the filmmakers on whom the festival rests, has simply always been predominantly male.

Over the years, oversights and snubs have been easy to find. It’s hard to imagine, for instance, that directors as esteemed as Agnieszka Holland, Julie Taymor, Mira Nair, Kelly Reichardt or Elaine May haven’t warranted spots on the Croisette, or that Agnès Varda hasn’t deserved more than her single placement in the main competition, which she got in 1962 for “Cleo From 5 to 8.”

Yes, a female director, Barbara Virginia, had a film in competition in 1946, the first year that Cannes took place. But it wasn’t until 1954, with Carmen Toscano and Kinuyo Tanaka, that two women had films in the competition, and it wasn’t until 1961 that a woman won Cannes’ best director award. (Russian director Yuliya Sointseva was the first for “The Story of the Flaming Years.”)

The stats are pretty dismal: Over the first 71 years of Cannes, a paltry 4.3 percent of the competition films have been directed by women. (See chart below.) Only one, Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” has won Cannes’ top prize, the Palme d’Or, though actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seudoux were given honorary Palmes alongside “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director Abdellatif Kechiche’s real one in 2013.

Admittedly, things are getting better. Of the 11 times that three or more women have placed films in competition, eight have come in the last 13 years. Three women made the cut in 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 — and four did so in 2011.

And the current decade is the first one in which more than 10 percent of the competition directors have been women — though Cannes faced immediate criticism this year for only including Alice Rohrwacher, Eva Husson and Nadine Labaki among its 21 competition directors.

Festival chief Thierry Frémaux has insisted that he will never make gender a programming factor, but the Un Certain Regard section has six solo women directors and one co-director among its 18 films, while the independent Critics’ Week competition finds women outnumbering men four to three.

Rohrwacher, by the way, is in the Cannes main competition this year for the second time, bringing “Lazzaro Felice” to the Palais four years after her film “The Wonders” won the festival’s grand prize.

That makes her one of 10 women to have placed two films in the competition, the others being Sofia Coppola, Maiwenn Le Besco, Samira Makhmalbaf, Lucrecia Martel, Marta Meszaros, Lynne Ramsay, Margarethe von Trotta, Lina Wertmuller and Mai Zetterling.

The only women with more than two: Andrea Arnold, Jane Campion, Liliana Cavani and Nicole Garcia, with three each, and Japanese director Naomi Kawase with five.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Netflix CEO Disses Cannes Film Fest After Streamer Pulls Out: There Are 'a Lot of Other Festivals'

Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam's 'Don Quixote' Despite Producer's Lawsuit to Block Screening

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Women in Cannes: A Short History of Small Victories and Decades of Male Dominance (Photos)

From the time it first took place in 1946, the Cannes Film Festival has been dominated by male directors. Here are some milestones over the years when they did recognize the contributions of women.
1946
Barbara Virginia, the first female Portuguese mov…

From the time it first took place in 1946, the Cannes Film Festival has been dominated by male directors. Here are some milestones over the years when they did recognize the contributions of women.

1946
Barbara Virginia, the first female Portuguese movie director, also becomes the first woman in competition at Cannes when the inaugural festival accepts her film “Tres Dias Sem Deus” as part of the lineup.

1954
For the first time, two women are chosen for the main competition: Carmen Tocano for the documentary “Memories of a Mexican” (which she co-directed with her father Salvador) and Japanese actor-director Kinuyo Tanaka with “Love Letter.”

1957
Mexican-born actress Dolores del Rio becomes the first woman to serve on the Cannes jury.

1961
For the first time, Cannes’ best director award is won by a woman: Yuliya Solntsevaa Russian filmmaker who wins for her World War II drama “The Story of the Flaming Years.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Film Festival to Offer Sexual Harassment Hotline

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

If only the crime-romance Racer And The Jailbird moved as fast as its cars

All the best moments of Racer And The Jailbird take place in the front seat of a speeding automobile. Most of the time, it’s the racer of the title, Bibi, behind the wheel. Bibi is young, beautiful, and affluent. She’s played by Adèle Exarchopoulos, wh…

All the best moments of Racer And The Jailbird take place in the front seat of a speeding automobile. Most of the time, it’s the racer of the title, Bibi, behind the wheel. Bibi is young, beautiful, and affluent. She’s played by Adèle Exarchopoulos, who made her furiously emotive breakthrough in the sprawling,…

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