‘Fantastic Beasts’ Stuffs Suitcase With $75 Million on Box Office Debut

“Harry Potter” prequel “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” met expectations on its debut weekend, easily topping the box office with $75 million.

Previous predictions for the movie were wide-ranging, as some trackers put “Potter” spinoff movie ahead of $80 million. Others pegged its three-day opening at more than $90 million. Warner Bros. expected it would safely land above $70 million.

The wizarding film starring Eddie Redmayne was produced for a reported $180 million, which will be further offset by its international opening, expected to bring in more than $100 million across 80 markets.

Also Read: Why ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Should Be a Monster Box Office Hit in China

“Fantastic Beasts” opens in China next weekend, where “Harry Potter” movies have always performed strongly.

It’s playing on 4,144 screens domestically and has a 76 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. “Fantastic Beasts” also has a top-notch A CinemaScore, graded by those who screened it on opening night.

The film cast a big shadow over the weekend’s other new wide releases.

Following up its hit comedy “Bad Moms,” STX’s coming-of-age dramedy “The Edge of Seventeen” earned $4.8 million, down from previous estimates of $10 million.

Also Read: STX Finds Fast Footing: ‘Bad Moms’ Spinoffs, ‘Edge of Seventeen’ Raves and Martin Scorsese

That’s still a solid number for the warmly-reviewed film, which was made for $9 million and stars Hailee Steinfeld as a curmudgeonly high schooler with a sharp wit. Marking the directorial debut of Kelly Fremon Craig, the film has critics comparing it to John Hughes classics “The Breakfast Club” and “Sixteen Candles.” It net a 95 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore.

“The Edge of Seventeen” also stars Woody Harrelson and Kyra Sedgwick, and is playing on 1,945 screens.

Open Road’s boxing drama “Bleed for This” came in much lower than initial estimates of $6 million. Playing on 1,549 screens, its ticket sales are expected to end the weekend with an estimated $3 million. It stars Miles Teller and Aaron Eckhart, and has a 63 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore.

Also Read: ‘Edge of Seventeen’ Toronto Review: Woody Harrelson Steals Angsty High School Comedy

Tri-Star drama “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” distributed by Sony, expanded into 1,176 theaters this weekend following a mostly sold-out limited Los Angeles and New York opening. Ang Lee’s high-tech film, shot at 120 frames per second, hasn’t gotten great reviews and currently sits at 41 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. It’s now expected to gross less than $2 million.

However, it’s not all bad news for the film, as it made $11.8 million in China last weekend.

Returning to “Fantastic Beasts,” given its new story and timeline within J.K. Rowling’s wizarding world, the title has been something of a box office question mark — especially in predicting how it will stack up against the “Harry Potter” movies.

On the low end: “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” opened to $77.1 million in 2007 and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” bowed to $77.8 million in 2009.

Also Read: ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ Keeps Magical World Alive in London

By comparison, the biggest debut of the original series came in 2011 with “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” which grossed $169.2 million on its opening and went on to earn $1.34 billion worldwide to become the eighth highest grossing film of all time, just behind 2015’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron.”

“Fantastic Beasts,” directed by David Yates, is expanding from a three-movie franchise to five, author and screenwriter Rowling announced last month.

Set in the same universe as “Harry Potter,” the inaugural “Fantastic Beasts” movie takes place in 1920s New York and stars Redmayne as a British “magizoologist” named Newt Scamander who travels across the pond to hunt for magical creatures.

Also Read: ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Points Wand at $75 Million Debut, Lower Than All ‘Harry Potter’ Movies

Newt arrives in New York, as Percival Graves (Colin Farrell) investigates a collapsed building destroyed by a magical creature. The film opens with several newspaper headlines about Grindelwald attacking wizards.

Farrell and Redmayne are joined onscreen by Katherine Waterston, Jon Voight, Ezra Miller, Zoe Kravitz, Samantha Morton, Dan Fogler and Alison Sudol.

Also Read: 7 Things We Know About JK Rowling’s ‘Fantastic Beasts’ (Photos)

Yates directed the last four “Harry Potter” films.

The already green-lit second film in the “Fantastic Beasts” series will be set in another major world city with different magical creatures.

“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” is based on the Rowling book of the same name, which was a mock textbook about magical creatures. In the “Harry Potter” series, the book is required reading for Hogwarts students.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Fantastic Beasts’ to Bag Big $76 Million at the Box Office

‘Fantastic Beasts’ Enchants Thursday Box Office With $8.75 Million

Eddie Redmayne Smuggles Some ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Past TSA Agent James Corden (Video)

‘Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them’ Is a ‘Truly Magical Experience’ and 8 Other Enchanted Reviews

‘Fantastic Beasts’ Review: JK Rowling Reveals She’s a Creature of Habit

Does ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“Harry Potter” prequel “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” met expectations on its debut weekend, easily topping the box office with $75 million.

Previous predictions for the movie were wide-ranging, as some trackers put “Potter” spinoff movie ahead of $80 million. Others pegged its three-day opening at more than $90 million. Warner Bros. expected it would safely land above $70 million.

The wizarding film starring Eddie Redmayne was produced for a reported $180 million, which will be further offset by its international opening, expected to bring in more than $100 million across 80 markets.

“Fantastic Beasts” opens in China next weekend, where “Harry Potter” movies have always performed strongly.

It’s playing on 4,144 screens domestically and has a 76 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. “Fantastic Beasts” also has a top-notch A CinemaScore, graded by those who screened it on opening night.

The film cast a big shadow over the weekend’s other new wide releases.

Following up its hit comedy “Bad Moms,” STX’s coming-of-age dramedy “The Edge of Seventeen” earned $4.8 million, down from previous estimates of $10 million.

That’s still a solid number for the warmly-reviewed film, which was made for $9 million and stars Hailee Steinfeld as a curmudgeonly high schooler with a sharp wit. Marking the directorial debut of Kelly Fremon Craig, the film has critics comparing it to John Hughes classics “The Breakfast Club” and “Sixteen Candles.” It net a 95 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore.

“The Edge of Seventeen” also stars Woody Harrelson and Kyra Sedgwick, and is playing on 1,945 screens.

Open Road’s boxing drama “Bleed for This” came in much lower than initial estimates of $6 million. Playing on 1,549 screens, its ticket sales are expected to end the weekend with an estimated $3 million. It stars Miles Teller and Aaron Eckhart, and has a 63 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore.

Tri-Star drama “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” distributed by Sony, expanded into 1,176 theaters this weekend following a mostly sold-out limited Los Angeles and New York opening. Ang Lee’s high-tech film, shot at 120 frames per second, hasn’t gotten great reviews and currently sits at 41 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. It’s now expected to gross less than $2 million.

However, it’s not all bad news for the film, as it made $11.8 million in China last weekend.

Returning to “Fantastic Beasts,” given its new story and timeline within J.K. Rowling’s wizarding world, the title has been something of a box office question mark — especially in predicting how it will stack up against the “Harry Potter” movies.

On the low end: “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” opened to $77.1 million in 2007 and “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” bowed to $77.8 million in 2009.

By comparison, the biggest debut of the original series came in 2011 with “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” which grossed $169.2 million on its opening and went on to earn $1.34 billion worldwide to become the eighth highest grossing film of all time, just behind 2015’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron.”

“Fantastic Beasts,” directed by David Yates, is expanding from a three-movie franchise to five, author and screenwriter Rowling announced last month.

Set in the same universe as “Harry Potter,” the inaugural “Fantastic Beasts” movie takes place in 1920s New York and stars Redmayne as a British “magizoologist” named Newt Scamander who travels across the pond to hunt for magical creatures.

Newt arrives in New York, as Percival Graves (Colin Farrell) investigates a collapsed building destroyed by a magical creature. The film opens with several newspaper headlines about Grindelwald attacking wizards.

Farrell and Redmayne are joined onscreen by Katherine Waterston, Jon Voight, Ezra Miller, Zoe Kravitz, Samantha Morton, Dan Fogler and Alison Sudol.

Yates directed the last four “Harry Potter” films.

The already green-lit second film in the “Fantastic Beasts” series will be set in another major world city with different magical creatures.

“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” is based on the Rowling book of the same name, which was a mock textbook about magical creatures. In the “Harry Potter” series, the book is required reading for Hogwarts students.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Fantastic Beasts' to Bag Big $76 Million at the Box Office

'Fantastic Beasts' Enchants Thursday Box Office With $8.75 Million

Eddie Redmayne Smuggles Some 'Fantastic Beasts' Past TSA Agent James Corden (Video)

'Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them' Is a 'Truly Magical Experience' and 8 Other Enchanted Reviews

'Fantastic Beasts' Review: JK Rowling Reveals She's a Creature of Habit

Does 'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Box Office: ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Debuts to Magical $75 Million

“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” dominated the weekend box office, debuting to a boisterous $75 million and launching a new cinematic franchise. It confirms Warner Bros.’ high hopes for the property and its decision to back five installments in the fantasy series. The film is a spin-off of the Harry Potter films, but… Read more »

“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” dominated the weekend box office, debuting to a boisterous $75 million and launching a new cinematic franchise. It confirms Warner Bros.’ high hopes for the property and its decision to back five installments in the fantasy series. The film is a spin-off of the Harry Potter films, but... Read more »

James Franco’s Movie Column: ‘Ne Me Quitte Pas’ Is a Documentary Version of ‘Waiting for Godot’

The actor-director shares his thoughts on a Dutch documentary now playing at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens.

James + Semaj is a column where James Franco talks to his reverse self, Semaj, about new films. Rather than a conventional review, it is place where James and Semaj can muse about ideas that the films provoke. James loves going to the movies and talking about them. But a one-sided take on a movie, in print, might be misconstrued as a review. As someone in the industry it could be detrimental to James’s career if he were to review his peers, because unlike the book industry—where writers review other writer’s books—the film industry is highly collaborative, and a bad review of a peer could create problems. So, assume that James (and Semaj) love all these films. What they’re interested in talking about is all the ways the films inspire them, and make them think. James is me, and Semaj is the other side of me.

This week’s column is focused on “Ne Me Quitte Pas” (“Don’t Leave Me”), which is currently screening at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York through Nov. 27. 

James: This is a Dutch documentary that plays as a dark alcoholic bromance.

Semaj: Or a modern take on “Waiting for Godot.

James: Without the Godot.

Semaj: Godot wasn’t even in his own play.

James: I know that. That’s the point.

Semaj: Yeah, but you said “without the Godot,” which implies that these two guys, Marcel and Bob, aren’t waiting for anything, and I think that they are.

James: Like what? Some meaning in their lives? I think they’re beyond that. They’re entering the final chapters of their lives, Bob is further on than Marcel, and they’re just trying to cope, to make the best of what’s there — but basically just get on until the end.

Semaj: See, I don’t know about that. First let’s be clear about the situation: the movie opens up on Marcel being dumped by his wife because she has met someone else. She says that she probably would have left him even if she hadn’t met someone. Marcel tries to talk her into having sex with him one more time, she says no many times, even if, as Marcel proposes, her new lover won’t find out; and then he says they could do it at 6 a.m. . . .

James: I know, I mean what the fuck is that? Why would she be more agreeable if they did it early in the morning?

Semaj: I don’t know. But an even bigger question is how the filmmakers got these subjects to allow such intimate access. Some of the scenes – this opening scene stands out as one of them – must have required the filmmakers getting very close with their cameras.

James: Yeah, and how would the filmmakers even think to follow these two guys, of all people? As if they were just sitting around thinking, “Hey, these two guys are messes, they drink a lot, and are a little suicidal; they are trying to escape their lives one way or another, either gradually, or in one deliberate gesture . . . um, yeah! Let’s make a movie about them!’”

Semaj: I have no idea how the idea, or the agreement came about, but what we have is are very intimate portraits of these two at the bottom of their cups.

James: On the other hand, Marcel and Bob are funny, in a Beckett kind of bleak, end- of-day-clown kind of way.

Semaj: Yeah, I mean, when I saw that this film was billed as a comedy I was a little confused because their lives are pretty bleak; but then again, I think Beckett’s poor saps in tattered suits waiting for the never showing Godot were based on Laurel and Hardy.

James: And Chaplin was “The Tramp,” a funny man in the guise of a down and out depression era bum. Maybe these are the modern equivalents?

Semaj: Yeah, possibly, except that this is a documentary, and these characters are real.

James: Yeah, there has to be something about watching fictional tramps navigate the cruel world through slapstick that enables us to laugh much easier than two obvious problem drinkers stumbling through the remainder of their days: passing out, vomiting, drunk driving cars and scooters (in the snow!), and talking themselves back off the wagon after painfully concerted attempts to get sober.

Semaj: Even still, there is something sadly humorous about these two that the camera’s attention carves out in relief so that we can, for the duration of the documentary, walk in their shoes and enjoy the sad smiles and eye twinkles of two people that we might normally just write off.

James: And, as far as the question we asked before, are they waiting for something? I think they are waiting, or maybe what it is, is that they’re searching. They’re searching for meaning. They’re trying – at least Marcel is trying, Bob’s actions show less of a desire to change – to live life so that there is some significance in what he does.

Semaj: Yeah, I see what you’re saying. Although Bob does write a poem about the fading brilliance of life, which isn’t too bad either.

James: They’re both working through existential crises.

Semaj: Yes, Bob chooses to stay as he is, drinking rum everyday (although he refuses to admit to himself how much he actually drinks) while Marcel struggles to be a good father to his three young children every other weekend, even though the house he lives in is squalid and he is destitute.

James: And more than that he tries to sober up by going to a clinic for a ten day cure.

Semaj: Yeah, boy, is that depressing.

James: Well, he tells dirty jokes to the nurses.

Semaj: Feels more like the band playing music on the deck of the Titanic.

James: Why? Because he’s trying to be humorous in a time of hopelessness?

Semaj: Yeah. Which sounds like our country over the past two weeks.

James: That’s for sure. And, to go back to that unfettered/unlimited access question, there is a scene where Marcel is wandering the halls of the clinic in the middle of the night, and the camera operator is there capturing it all! I mean what did they do, stay the night with him in the clinic in the case that he woke up like this and wandered the halls?

Semaj: I don’t know, maybe. You’re right, sometimes the filmmakers get such amazing, almost impossible moments, it feels as if it had to be staged.

James: But on the other hand, it also feels like the moments that we’re talking about are so pedestrian and sad  — taking a face plant on the floor and passing out, pouring boiling water on Marcel to wake him, getting a rotten tooth pulled by the dentist (“there are two left” Bob says afterward), sniffing ammonia and puking outside, getting drunk and puking on the kitchen floor — that if the filmmakers were to stage anything, they would have gone for bigger Hollywood moments.

Semaj: My guess is they worked a bit like the reality show “The Hills”: if the guys had something to talk about or do (such as Bob giving Marcel the ammonia cure for sobering up – sniffing an ammonia suffused rag) they asked them to do it in a specific place so that they might be able to set up the camera in an optimal position.

James: So you think this movie is like “The Hills.

Semaj: Only in the sense that they ‘re real characters in a human wasteland trying to create meaning through their earthbound actions.

Science Channel Scraps ‘Punkin Chunkin’ Special After Woman Badly Injured in Accident

Science Channel has scrapped its plan for a three-hour “Punkin Chunkin” special on Nov. 26 after an accident during the event earlier this month in Delaware left a woman in critical condition. “Punkin Chunkin” is a competitive event organized by the World Championship Punkin Chunkin Association in which teams compete to hurl pumpkins long distances… Read more »

Science Channel has scrapped its plan for a three-hour “Punkin Chunkin” special on Nov. 26 after an accident during the event earlier this month in Delaware left a woman in critical condition. “Punkin Chunkin” is a competitive event organized by the World Championship Punkin Chunkin Association in which teams compete to hurl pumpkins long distances... Read more »

‘Eva Nova’: Film Review

Slovakia’s foreign-language Oscar submission, ‘Eva Nova,’ directed by Marko Skop, is a character study of a former Communist-era actress and recovering alcoholic, played by the great Emilia Vasaryova. read more


Slovakia's foreign-language Oscar submission, 'Eva Nova,' directed by Marko Skop, is a character study of a former Communist-era actress and recovering alcoholic, played by the great Emilia Vasaryova.

read more

Donald Trump Still Doesn’t Like ‘SNL’: “Nothing Funny At All”; ‘Hamilton’ “Overrated”, He Hears

Filling an entire White House cabinet apparently leaves plenty of time for the future leader of the free world to continue reviewing television comedies and Broadway smashes. This morning, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted his bitterness – and a decidedly ill-informed understanding of equal time provisions – in new responses to both Saturday Night Live and Hamilton.
Trump famously disapproved of Alec Baldwin’s portrayal of the GOP candidate during election season, and…

Filling an entire White House cabinet apparently leaves plenty of time for the future leader of the free world to continue reviewing television comedies and Broadway smashes. This morning, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted his bitterness – and a decidedly ill-informed understanding of equal time provisions – in new responses to both Saturday Night Live and Hamilton. Trump famously disapproved of Alec Baldwin’s portrayal of the GOP candidate during election season, and…

India’s Film Bazaar Celebrates a Decade by Looking to the Future

GOA – Film Bazaar, the annual film market run by the National Film Development Corporation, turns 10 this year. Bazaar regulars will miss NFDC Nina Lath Gupta, the inspirational architect of the market, who will not be attending the event this year due to illness. Leading the event (Nov. 20-24) instead is Film Bazaar director… Read more »

GOA – Film Bazaar, the annual film market run by the National Film Development Corporation, turns 10 this year. Bazaar regulars will miss NFDC Nina Lath Gupta, the inspirational architect of the market, who will not be attending the event this year due to illness. Leading the event (Nov. 20-24) instead is Film Bazaar director... Read more »

‘The Affair’ Showrunner Sarah Treem on Why Season 3 Veers a Different Direction

The woman driving the most complex relationship drama on television reveals her philosophy towards developing the new narratives of Season 3. 

It took two obscure poets for Sarah Treem to accept that her show was a love story. The showrunner discovered 20th century writers Linda Gregg and Jack Gilbert, who wrote from differing points of view about their relationship, just as she and her writing staff were developing the major story arcs for Season 3 of the Showtime drama, and she was realizing how her perception of the show had changed.

“[Gregg]’s writing about their divorce and [Gilbert]’s writing about their divorce, and it’s really like our show, in that you would never believe that it was the same story,” she said to IndieWire during the Television Critics Association press tour. “It’s like, ‘Oh right, it’s a love story.’ It’s not a fairy tale love story, but it’s still a love story.”

READ MORE: ‘The Affair’: Watch the First Episode of Season 3 Online for Free

The concept of two people in love seeing things quite differently from each other is of course dear to Treem’s heart. Since its beginning, the Golden Globe-winning drama has plumbed the depths of the dysfunctions that haunt Noah (Dominic West), Alison (Ruth Wilson), Helen (Maura Tienery) and Cole (Joshua Jackson).

But what’s made the drama revolutionary is its determination to play with point of view, switching perspectives between characters. Often, we see two different versions of the same event, with no indication that one person’s recollection is more accurate than the other’s.

This approach is not driven by a rigid framework; instead, as described below, Treem has a loose outlook towards the development process — and the show’s future in general. For, wherever “The Affair” goes in Season 3, Treem doesn’t see it as the end of the story.

In general, are you still enjoying the organic approach to what choices you make in the writing process?

I was thinking about it this year, because I was trying to articulate it for the writers. The way that I think about each season is like a geometric proof. You have a hypothesis at the beginning of the season, and you know basically the answer. You know where you’re trying to get to at the end of the season. The work of the season becomes about trying to solve that hypothesis in the most elegant way. It’s the middle. There’s a million different variations of how the season could go, as long as you know what you’re trying to do at the beginning.

Dominic West in "The Affair."

Dominic West in “The Affair.”

Phil Caruso/SHOWTIME

Are you happy continuing to explore what you’ve created here? In your mind, is there any pressure to try something new and crazier next season, really explode this thing? 

I don’t feel like I have a pressure to explode anything but I do have a pressure to always recreate from season to season. Season 3 is not in the same model as Season 2. Season 2 wasn’t in the same model as Season 1. That’s honestly more like, I just get bored. I don’t want to do it gain. We’ve done it. We solved that proof and now I want to try something new.

When you were doing interviews in Season 1, you said that you came in to Showtime with a three-season pitch. How far away have you veered from that original pitch? 

Pretty far. A lot of the stuff that I wanted to do previous seasons ended up getting done sooner. I had a much more languid pace in the beginning, I wanted the show to ease out much more slowly. But it just didn’t work out that way. Stuff got moved up. Then the premise of the show changed. A lot of it has to do honestly with actors and what kind of energy you’re getting and what kind of relationships are being formed on camera. Where the attraction is, where the crew is, where the charisma goes. At a certain point, I think, as a television writer you really need to start writing to what you see on film, if you want your show to have longevity.

READ MORE: Maura Tierney is a Thoughtful Mess in ‘The Affair’ — And Deserves an Emmy For It (Exclusive Video)

Some stuff that I thought was going to work didn’t work. Some stuff that I didn’t expect came up. We just kept writing that way. At first you’re inspired by the ideas of these characters and then the characters take on lives on their own. Then you’re inspired by what you see on the screen. That changes expectations and your imagination to a certain extent.

And what are your feelings about a Season 4?

In terms of Season 4, I have some ideas and I’m really excited about it. I would not say that I have a rock solid plan at this point. I’m going to go through this season and see what comes.

Ruth Wilson in "The Affair."

Ruth Wilson in “The Affair.”

Phil Caruso/SHOWTIME

 

You mentioned you’re going back to 10 episodes, after doing 12 last season. What was the shift like to 12 and are you happy about going back to 10?

Yeah. I had a baby in April and I wanted to take maternity leave, and there was just no way to get 12 episodes in. Too much. Ten is good, 10 is tight, 10 is a very strong season. You don’t have any time to explore, go off on tangents. You really are just driving from the beginning to the end. It’s exciting. I like it a lot.

Something that happens in TV seasons, I find, is that naturally, it depends on how long the season is, but whatever episode is three episodes before the end, becomes this climactic episode. It’s like an Aristotelian format. There’s an inciting incident, then there’s a rising act, and that’s the crisis episode. In this season it’s going to be Episode 7. Last season it was Episode 9, because there was 12 episodes in last season. It just shows that this was the moment where everything that rises must converge, for all storylines to come to their natural crisis point.

What are you most excited about in terms of the way the show’s evolved? Especially for this upcoming season.

If you could possibly imagine, the show gets darker. More psychological. What I keep trying to do every year is double down on this idea of POV, perspectives. How do we see ourselves and how do other people see us? This year, this new idea came up about how somebody could even split within themselves. It’s not just about you think of yourself one way and I think of you as someway else. It’s almost like you don’t see some of your own darkness or you don’t see that there’s another self in you, a shadow self, in you, somewhere. That you yourself are not even aware of. That’s the hypothesis of this season, which is exciting. To me it feels like an organic outgrowth of what we’ve done in the past, where we’re still engaging with this idea of identity and self and perspective but in a new fresh way that does have these darker undercurrents. I’m pretty jazzed about this season.

“The Affair” premieres Sunday at 10 p.m. on Showtime. 

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‘Search Party’ has fun with mystery-story twists

Alia Shawkat, still identified with “Arrested Development” despite appearing in six films in 2015 alone, takes the lead in “Search Party,” an engaging new serial mystery comedy from TBS. Premiering Monday, with its 10 episodes playing two at a time over five consecutive nights, it is the latest…

Alia Shawkat, still identified with "Arrested Development" despite appearing in six films in 2015 alone, takes the lead in "Search Party," an engaging new serial mystery comedy from TBS. Premiering Monday, with its 10 episodes playing two at a time over five consecutive nights, it is the latest...

Kristen Wiig Goes Diva In Her Catty Return To ‘Saturday Night Live’, So To Speak

Saturday Night Live guest host Kristen Wiig brought back a couple familiar faces from her days on cast, none more brilliant – at least in the character’s own mind – than Mindy Elise Grayson, the Broadway diva with more practiced grace than actual brains.
In a vintage game show bit supposedly from 1964, Wiig’s stagey thespian is too self-involved to grasp the concept of “Secret Word.” When the password, uh, secret word, is “branch,” Grayson intones “braaanch.” You get the…

Saturday Night Live guest host Kristen Wiig brought back a couple familiar faces from her days on cast, none more brilliant – at least in the character’s own mind – than Mindy Elise Grayson, the Broadway diva with more practiced grace than actual brains. In a vintage game show bit supposedly from 1964, Wiig’s stagey thespian is too self-involved to grasp the concept of “Secret Word.” When the password, uh, secret word, is “branch,” Grayson intones “braaanch.” You get the…

‘SNL’ Needles Post-Election Depressives: “We’ll Be Fine, Right Here In The Bubble”

There were no solemn renditions of mournful Leonard Cohen songs on NBC’s Saturday Night Live last night, but the gang in Studio 8-H isn’t quite celebrating yet either. A stunned post-Trump mood was apparent in at least of couple of sketches during the pre-Thanksgiving Kristen Wiig-hosted episode.
The first, the pre-taped “Target Commercial,” featured cast member Cecily Strong in a mock ad for the open-on-Thanksgiving store, her gloomy demeanor forecasting a true Black…

There were no solemn renditions of mournful Leonard Cohen songs on NBC’s Saturday Night Live last night, but the gang in Studio 8-H isn’t quite celebrating yet either. A stunned post-Trump mood was apparent in at least of couple of sketches during the pre-Thanksgiving Kristen Wiig-hosted episode. The first, the pre-taped “Target Commercial,” featured cast member Cecily Strong in a mock ad for the open-on-Thanksgiving store, her gloomy demeanor forecasting a true Black…

The Comics Page: Tensions come to a head between co-workers

On The Comics Page, The A.V. Club invites comics artists to illustrate their pop cultural flights of fancy. This week: Carly Monardo offers a silent reflection on a relationship. (Previously, she exami…

On The Comics Page, The A.V. Club invites comics artists to illustrate their pop cultural flights of fancy. This week: Carly Monardo offers a silent reflection on a relationship. (Previously, she examined a tension-filled work relationship as it followed an employee home.)

TV Club: Kristen Wiig comes home for a funny, political SNL Thanksgiving

I’m not an actor, I’m a [Ghostbuster, former SNL] star!”

Kristen Wiig returned to 8H for her second time as host, and delivered exactly the Kristen Wiig episode you expect. To be fair, we only got two returning Wiig characters—Secret Word’s Broadway star and terrible game show contestant Mindy Elise Grayson and constitutionally unable to keep a secret Aunt Sue—which is about two fewer than I was expecting. I love Wiig, but her first hosting gig was swamped with characters that had run dry before she left the show in 2012. Honestly, she was best tonight in her silly monologue, where she demanded and then discarded a ukelele, double-necked electric guitar, and stoll, then sang an elaborately silly, catchy, and inaccurate ode to Thanksgiving. (There were pilgrims, Indians, space aliens, Ben Franklin, Paul Revere, Napoleon, and FDR, among others.)

As often happens when a former …

I’m not an actor, I’m a [Ghostbuster, former SNL] star!”

Kristen Wiig returned to 8H for her second time as host, and delivered exactly the Kristen Wiig episode you expect. To be fair, we only got two returning Wiig characters—Secret Word’s Broadway star and terrible game show contestant Mindy Elise Grayson and constitutionally unable to keep a secret Aunt Sue—which is about two fewer than I was expecting. I love Wiig, but her first hosting gig was swamped with characters that had run dry before she left the show in 2012. Honestly, she was best tonight in her silly monologue, where she demanded and then discarded a ukelele, double-necked electric guitar, and stoll, then sang an elaborately silly, catchy, and inaccurate ode to Thanksgiving. (There were pilgrims, Indians, space aliens, Ben Franklin, Paul Revere, Napoleon, and FDR, among others.)

As often happens when a former ...

Watch Kristen Wiig Bring Mindy Elise Grayson Back to ‘SNL’ to Be Bad At a Game Show (Video)

“Remember Mindy, do not say the secret word.”

On this week’s “Saturday Night Live”, host and former cast member Kristen Wiig revived her over-dramatic starlet, Mindy Elise Grayson, for another rousing game of “Secret Word” — which the character was notoriously bad at. Now hosted by Kenan Thompson (formerly by Bill Hader) the show’s comeback brought Wiig’s Mindy back and kept to the best of her jokes, with old Hollywood flair capping it all off. You can watch the full sketch above.

“Remember Mindy, do not say the secret word.” #WiigOnSNL pic.twitter.com/wLiMPN9VIz

— Saturday Night Live (@nbcsnl) November 20, 2016

The skit traditionally parodies the wide variety of game shows that became all the rage in the 60’s and 70’s (a notice at the beginning tells us this originally aired in 1964), with Wiig’s Mindy being one of the many characters that comes in and breaks every rule.

Also Read: ‘SNL’ Gag About Endless Political Punditry Takes Weird ‘Westworld’ Turn

Contestants work with special guests like Mindy to guess a “secret word” on a card, but Mindy, blatantly ignoring the rules of the game, always says the word out right. The character made some progress on Saturday evening, though, getting creative with hints like: “It’s what you give the director for casting you in the show,” and then correcting herself after misreading the cue card, saying, “Oh, its floral! I did oral.”

But Mindy found her ounce of humility before the skit’s end. “I know I blew it … just like I blew all of my lines in Siamese Sally and the Pad Thai Clan.”

The skit closed off with a hilarious ad for “Winston Baby Cigarettes,” which, if you haven’t guessed yet, are meant to be cigarettes for babies.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’ Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition (Video)

‘SNL’: Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in ‘The Bubble’

‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head (Video)

“Remember Mindy, do not say the secret word.”

On this week’s “Saturday Night Live”, host and former cast member Kristen Wiig revived her over-dramatic starlet, Mindy Elise Grayson, for another rousing game of “Secret Word” — which the character was notoriously bad at. Now hosted by Kenan Thompson (formerly by Bill Hader) the show’s comeback brought Wiig’s Mindy back and kept to the best of her jokes, with old Hollywood flair capping it all off. You can watch the full sketch above.

The skit traditionally parodies the wide variety of game shows that became all the rage in the 60’s and 70’s (a notice at the beginning tells us this originally aired in 1964), with Wiig’s Mindy being one of the many characters that comes in and breaks every rule.

Contestants work with special guests like Mindy to guess a “secret word” on a card, but Mindy, blatantly ignoring the rules of the game, always says the word out right. The character made some progress on Saturday evening, though, getting creative with hints like: “It’s what you give the director for casting you in the show,” and then correcting herself after misreading the cue card, saying, “Oh, its floral! I did oral.”

But Mindy found her ounce of humility before the skit’s end. “I know I blew it … just like I blew all of my lines in Siamese Sally and the Pad Thai Clan.”

The skit closed off with a hilarious ad for “Winston Baby Cigarettes,” which, if you haven’t guessed yet, are meant to be cigarettes for babies.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL' Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition (Video)

'SNL': Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in 'The Bubble'

'SNL': Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head (Video)

Indie Focus: Celebrate the heavy and the light with ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Elle’ and ‘The Edge of Seventeen’

Hello! I’m Mark Olsen, and welcome to your weekly field guide to a world of Only Good Movies.

This is another week with a number of new releases that will likely end up among the best films of the year. It’s exciting for all sorts of reasons, including as a reminder of the emotional power of cinema…

Hello! I’m Mark Olsen, and welcome to your weekly field guide to a world of Only Good Movies.

This is another week with a number of new releases that will likely end up among the best films of the year. It’s exciting for all sorts of reasons, including as a reminder of the emotional power of cinema...

‘SNL’ Gag About Endless Political Punditry Takes Weird ‘Westworld’ Turn

Is Trump’s America theme park of “Westworld”? This week’s “Saturday Night Live” asked that question, focusing on a panel of CNN political pundits and Anderson Cooper (Alex Moffat returning to that impersonation) as they reacted to the past week’s headlines revolving around Donald Trump.

With an assortment of media personalities from both left and right, all “SNL” cast, of course, Moffatt’s Anderson Cooper threw out topics, and received the same slew of replies each time with only slight variations. The order went like this:

“Okay, you know what? this is not normal.”

“This is crazy!”

“This isn’t like when [some other heinous thing Donald Trump or his surrogates or supporters did or said].”

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

“This is when we in the media have to draw the line!”

“M’kay, can we just remember that most Americans voted for Trump?”

“Actually, they didn’t, Kayleigh!”

Also Read: ‘SNL’ Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition

At first, the skit seemed like a standard “SNL” jab at the roundabout ways that pundits often argue with little result or mutual understanding. But then the pundits began to malfunction and stop working. As they froze up and stared blankly forward at the audience, a repair crew walked out to survey the damage.

“Okay, which one’s malfunctioning?” asked one cast member in a hazmat-style suit — revealing that the true punch line That’s one way to pull one over on your audience: take shots at politics and go extra dark with the latest HBO hit series.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’ Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition

‘SNL’: Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in “The Bubble”

‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Is Trump’s America theme park of “Westworld”? This week’s “Saturday Night Live” asked that question, focusing on a panel of CNN political pundits and Anderson Cooper (Alex Moffat returning to that impersonation) as they reacted to the past week’s headlines revolving around Donald Trump.

With an assortment of media personalities from both left and right, all “SNL” cast, of course, Moffatt’s Anderson Cooper threw out topics, and received the same slew of replies each time with only slight variations. The order went like this:

“Okay, you know what? this is not normal.”

“This is crazy!”

“This isn’t like when [some other heinous thing Donald Trump or his surrogates or supporters did or said].”

“This is when we in the media have to draw the line!”

“M’kay, can we just remember that most Americans voted for Trump?”

“Actually, they didn’t, Kayleigh!”

At first, the skit seemed like a standard “SNL” jab at the roundabout ways that pundits often argue with little result or mutual understanding. But then the pundits began to malfunction and stop working. As they froze up and stared blankly forward at the audience, a repair crew walked out to survey the damage.

“Okay, which one’s malfunctioning?” asked one cast member in a hazmat-style suit — revealing that the true punch line That’s one way to pull one over on your audience: take shots at politics and go extra dark with the latest HBO hit series.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL' Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition

'SNL': Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in "The Bubble"

'SNL': Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

‘SNL’ Weekend Update Stops Pulling Punches With Trump Transition

In what may be a case of “too little, too late,” Michael Che and Colin Jost kicked off “Weekend Update” on this week’s “Saturday Night Live” with a pretty brutal critique of everything Donald Trump has done since his election victory. “It hasn’t been great, but it also hasn’t been good or even fine,” said Che of the week following the election.

Though Weekend Update has a reputation for playing both sides and never quite going all in on Trump during the election cycle, that certainly wasn’t the case this week. Of course, at this point — with a Trump win already in the bag — it may not be super helpful.

The hosts zeroed-in on Donald Trump’s cabinet, starting with Steve Bannon and his association with the news site Breitbart. “Breitbart News has been criticized by many for being a sexist, racist, white nationalist news site,” Che said. “Strong words, I don’t know if I would call it a news site. Calling Breitbart a news site is like calling R. Kelly’s sex tape a rom-com.”

Next up was Senator Jeff Sessions, who is up for Attorney General somehow, Jost remarked, “even though Sessions was denied a federal position 30 years ago for making racist remarks.”

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

“But you know what they say,” Jost continued. “If at first you don’t succeed, wait 30 years until history lurches backwards.”

Jost then suggested that Trump may be making his selections as a weird, circuitous of delivering on one of his broad campaign promises:

“Half of the guys he’s picking have been unemployed,” Jost said as a picture of of Mike Huckabee, Rudy Giuliani and General Flynn came on screen. “Is this what he meant by bringing jobs back?”

Trump met with President Obama last week, and the current seated President suggested that he’d be spending more time than usual on the president-elect’s transition. “It was reported that Donald Trump was surprised by the scope of responsibility as President,” said Che. “Being President is hard! That’s why Obama looks like he spent eight years in a turkey smoker. Obama’s the only guy that gave up cigarettes and somehow looks worse.”

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in “The Bubble”

From there, Che started to break down Trump’ psyche a little bit.

“I think he just wanted to win the election because everything said he couldn’t. It’s like dating. Chasing someone hard to get is always more fun than the actual relationship. He just likes the chase. He enjoyed wooing America for 18 months, loved making crazy promises. Even when the media was talking about it. ‘Baby, don’t listen to your dumb fat friends, they’re just jealous.’ But it worked and America said yes! The chase is over and reality starts and it’s not fun anymore. He’s getting texts from Dennis Rodman, ‘Let’s hit up a pageant!’ ‘I can’t, I’ve got to build a wall. I don’t like this.’”

Jost followed that up by taking a shot at Trump’s reluctance to take up full-time residency in the White House as being part of that fear of commitment: “‘Yeah, babe, I think I’ll keep my place in new york.’ Which would cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. But it’s all worth it to help a millionaire go to sleep in his big boy bed.”

Weekend Update has a reputation for

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’: Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in “The Bubble”

‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Alec Baldwin to Return as Trump on ‘SNL’ Tomorrow, Shares Plan Going Forward

In what may be a case of “too little, too late,” Michael Che and Colin Jost kicked off “Weekend Update” on this week’s “Saturday Night Live” with a pretty brutal critique of everything Donald Trump has done since his election victory. “It hasn’t been great, but it also hasn’t been good or even fine,” said Che of the week following the election.

Though Weekend Update has a reputation for playing both sides and never quite going all in on Trump during the election cycle, that certainly wasn’t the case this week. Of course, at this point — with a Trump win already in the bag — it may not be super helpful.

The hosts zeroed-in on Donald Trump’s cabinet, starting with Steve Bannon and his association with the news site Breitbart. “Breitbart News has been criticized by many for being a sexist, racist, white nationalist news site,” Che said. “Strong words, I don’t know if I would call it a news site. Calling Breitbart a news site is like calling R. Kelly’s sex tape a rom-com.”

Next up was Senator Jeff Sessions, who is up for Attorney General somehow, Jost remarked, “even though Sessions was denied a federal position 30 years ago for making racist remarks.”

“But you know what they say,” Jost continued. “If at first you don’t succeed, wait 30 years until history lurches backwards.”

Jost then suggested that Trump may be making his selections as a weird, circuitous of delivering on one of his broad campaign promises:

“Half of the guys he’s picking have been unemployed,” Jost said as a picture of of Mike Huckabee, Rudy Giuliani and General Flynn came on screen. “Is this what he meant by bringing jobs back?”

Trump met with President Obama last week, and the current seated President suggested that he’d be spending more time than usual on the president-elect’s transition. “It was reported that Donald Trump was surprised by the scope of responsibility as President,” said Che. “Being President is hard! That’s why Obama looks like he spent eight years in a turkey smoker. Obama’s the only guy that gave up cigarettes and somehow looks worse.”

From there, Che started to break down Trump’ psyche a little bit.

“I think he just wanted to win the election because everything said he couldn’t. It’s like dating. Chasing someone hard to get is always more fun than the actual relationship. He just likes the chase. He enjoyed wooing America for 18 months, loved making crazy promises. Even when the media was talking about it. ‘Baby, don’t listen to your dumb fat friends, they’re just jealous.’ But it worked and America said yes! The chase is over and reality starts and it’s not fun anymore. He’s getting texts from Dennis Rodman, ‘Let’s hit up a pageant!’ ‘I can’t, I’ve got to build a wall. I don’t like this.'”

Jost followed that up by taking a shot at Trump’s reluctance to take up full-time residency in the White House as being part of that fear of commitment: “‘Yeah, babe, I think I’ll keep my place in new york.’ Which would cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. But it’s all worth it to help a millionaire go to sleep in his big boy bed.”

Weekend Update has a reputation for

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL': Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in "The Bubble"

'SNL': Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Alec Baldwin to Return as Trump on 'SNL' Tomorrow, Shares Plan Going Forward

AVQ&A: Tell us about your pop-culture weekend: November 18 – 20

We’ve expanded the definition of AVQ&A—our weekly thought-starter—by asking you (and us) a simple question each week: What pop culture did you consume this weekend, and what did you think of it? If you have suggestions for AVQ&A questions, big or small, you can email them to us here.

We’ve expanded the definition of AVQ&A—our weekly thought-starter—by asking you (and us) a simple question each week: What pop culture did you consume this weekend, and what did you think of it? If you have suggestions for AVQ&A questions, big or small, you can email them to us here.

What’s On Tonight: Let a double serving of Bob’s Burgers warm you up for Thanksgiving

Here’s what’s up in the world of TV for Sunday, November 20. All times are Eastern.

Top picks

Bob’s Burgers (Fox, 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.): With Thanksgiving this Thursday, it’s time for all of us to stretch our jaws and stomach capacity to suck up as much food as possible. And in the spirit of excess, Fox is breaking its typically stingy policy with Bob’s Burgers in the fall and giving us two new episodes to gorge on. In “Large Brother, Where Fart Thou?” (an immediate contender for the show’s best episode title ever), Gene and Louise are left home alone without any parental or older sister guidance, and in “The Quirkducers,” the kids take Tina’s holiday fan fiction to produce Wagstaff’s annual play. Given its sterling track record with Thanksgiving episodes, Alasdair Wilkins is more than …

Here’s what’s up in the world of TV for Sunday, November 20. All times are Eastern.

Top picks

Bob’s Burgers (Fox, 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.): With Thanksgiving this Thursday, it’s time for all of us to stretch our jaws and stomach capacity to suck up as much food as possible. And in the spirit of excess, Fox is breaking its typically stingy policy with Bob’s Burgers in the fall and giving us two new episodes to gorge on. In “Large Brother, Where Fart Thou?” (an immediate contender for the show’s best episode title ever), Gene and Louise are left home alone without any parental or older sister guidance, and in “The Quirkducers,” the kids take Tina’s holiday fan fiction to produce Wagstaff’s annual play. Given its sterling track record with Thanksgiving episodes, Alasdair Wilkins is more than ...

Wiki Wormhole: This California town invented its own language

With more than 5.2 million articles, Wikipedia is an invaluable resource, whether you’re throwing a term paper together at the last minute or penna tine on my damie kays. We explore some of Wikipedia’s oddities in our 5,289,827-week series, Wiki Wormhole.

This week’s entry: Boontling

What it’s about: Like an entire town of middle-school BFFs, the town of Boonville, California, made up its own private language. Around 1890, the town was an isolated farming and ranching community and didn’t have much interaction with neighbors. So its peculiar slang was able to take hold in a relatively controlled environment, and 125 years later, some Boontling speakers are still hanging on, although Boonville only has 700 current residents and only a handful of those are keeping the argot alive.

Strangest fact: While Boontling borrows from Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Pomoan, and Spanish, a lot of …

With more than 5.2 million articles, Wikipedia is an invaluable resource, whether you’re throwing a term paper together at the last minute or penna tine on my damie kays. We explore some of Wikipedia’s oddities in our 5,289,827-week series, Wiki Wormhole.

This week’s entry: Boontling

What it’s about: Like an entire town of middle-school BFFs, the town of Boonville, California, made up its own private language. Around 1890, the town was an isolated farming and ranching community and didn’t have much interaction with neighbors. So its peculiar slang was able to take hold in a relatively controlled environment, and 125 years later, some Boontling speakers are still hanging on, although Boonville only has 700 current residents and only a handful of those are keeping the argot alive.

Strangest fact: While Boontling borrows from Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Pomoan, and Spanish, a lot of ...

‘SNL’: Brooklynites Run From the Real World By Hiding in “The Bubble”

This week’s “Saturday Night Live,” hosted by Kristen Wiig, saw a very pointed sketch that poked fun at the presumed “bubble” over millennial neighborhoods. The skit zeroed in on Brooklyn, and painted a picture of a new living establishment completely shuts out the rest of the world.

While it’s healthy to have a safe space away from others every once in a while, this particular skit highlighted the dangers of retreating into a bubble of like-minded people at all times. It’s something that should hit pretty close to home regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum.

Though of course the joke here is pointed more at liberals (and Bernie Bros, judging by the dollar bill adorned with Bernie Sanders’ face) living in Trump’s America.

The Bubble. Coming in January 2017. #WiigOnSNL pic.twitter.com/mkITyi739o

— Saturday Night Live (@nbcsnl) November 20, 2016

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Centering around a small part of Brooklyn, the pitch promised all sorts of things that fall into the liberal millennial stereotype. Citizens could “stay connected” to the outside world through sites such as Huffington Post, Daily Kos Netflix documentaries about Sushi Rice, and the “explosive comedy of McSweeney’s”.

The results of this year’s election have hit hard for many, and this was far from the only SNL skit to focus on the feeling of dread that washes over many when thinking about the future. Another — made into an ad for Target — focused on the idea of coping with one’s existential dread in the middle of a parking lot.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Alec Baldwin to Return as Trump on ‘SNL’ Tomorrow, Shares Plan Going Forward

‘SNL’: Watch Dave Chappelle As Negan from ‘The Walking Dead’ in ‘Chappelle’s Show’ Revival (Video)

This week’s “Saturday Night Live,” hosted by Kristen Wiig, saw a very pointed sketch that poked fun at the presumed “bubble” over millennial neighborhoods. The skit zeroed in on Brooklyn, and painted a picture of a new living establishment completely shuts out the rest of the world.

While it’s healthy to have a safe space away from others every once in a while, this particular skit highlighted the dangers of retreating into a bubble of like-minded people at all times. It’s something that should hit pretty close to home regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum.

Though of course the joke here is pointed more at liberals (and Bernie Bros, judging by the dollar bill adorned with Bernie Sanders’ face) living in Trump’s America.

Centering around a small part of Brooklyn, the pitch promised all sorts of things that fall into the liberal millennial stereotype. Citizens could “stay connected” to the outside world through sites such as Huffington Post, Daily Kos Netflix documentaries about Sushi Rice, and the “explosive comedy of McSweeney’s”.

The results of this year’s election have hit hard for many, and this was far from the only SNL skit to focus on the feeling of dread that washes over many when thinking about the future. Another — made into an ad for Target — focused on the idea of coping with one’s existential dread in the middle of a parking lot.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL': Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump Is in Way Over His Head

Alec Baldwin to Return as Trump on 'SNL' Tomorrow, Shares Plan Going Forward

'SNL': Watch Dave Chappelle As Negan from 'The Walking Dead' in 'Chappelle's Show' Revival (Video)