Pandora Stock Surges After Report of Possible SiriusXM Takeover

A CNBC report that Pandora is willing to sell itself has caused the stock to surge on Friday.

Citing sources, CNBC said the company was “open to engaging in talks with longtime suitor SiriusXM.”

The Internet-radio pioneer was up over 12 percent at one point on Friday following CNBC’s report. Liberty Media, which controls Sirius XM, made an informal offer to buy Pandora earlier this year for the company valued at over $3.4 billion, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Also Read: Struggling Pandora Restores Founder Tim Westergren as CEO

Pandora traded above $14 per share after the WSJ report, but recently fell to near $10, while the latest CNBC report has caused the stock to hit $13 at times on Friday.

The WSJ reported that the rejected offer was for $15 per share. Meanwhile, Reuters reported on Friday that Pandora is making “no new effort to sell itself,” citing a source. This isn’t the first time that a Pandora rumored sale has made news.

Back in February, The New York Times also cited sources to report that Pandora enlisted Morgan Stanley to meet with potential buyers.

Also Read: Pandora Ordered to Pay Labels Higher Royalty Rate

In late 2015, the company was ordered to pay labels a higher royalty rate, which had a negative impact on its financials. Compared to its previous rate of 14 cents per every 100 streams of a song, the company was ordered to pay 17 cents per 100 streams, with the rate rising each year based on inflation.

Pandora has clearly generated a lot of news based on a potential sale, but investors seem to think the latest CNBC report has legs.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Struggling Pandora Restores Founder Tim Westergren as CEO

Pandora Mulling Deal to Sell Company (Report)

David Bowie Music Streams Explode on Spotify, Pandora

A CNBC report that Pandora is willing to sell itself has caused the stock to surge on Friday.

Citing sources, CNBC said the company was “open to engaging in talks with longtime suitor SiriusXM.”

The Internet-radio pioneer was up over 12 percent at one point on Friday following CNBC’s report. Liberty Media, which controls Sirius XM, made an informal offer to buy Pandora earlier this year for the company valued at over $3.4 billion, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Pandora traded above $14 per share after the WSJ report, but recently fell to near $10, while the latest CNBC report has caused the stock to hit $13 at times on Friday.

The WSJ reported that the rejected offer was for $15 per share. Meanwhile, Reuters reported on Friday that Pandora is making “no new effort to sell itself,” citing a source. This isn’t the first time that a Pandora rumored sale has made news.

Back in February, The New York Times also cited sources to report that Pandora enlisted Morgan Stanley to meet with potential buyers.

In late 2015, the company was ordered to pay labels a higher royalty rate, which had a negative impact on its financials. Compared to its previous rate of 14 cents per every 100 streams of a song, the company was ordered to pay 17 cents per 100 streams, with the rate rising each year based on inflation.

Pandora has clearly generated a lot of news based on a potential sale, but investors seem to think the latest CNBC report has legs.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Struggling Pandora Restores Founder Tim Westergren as CEO

Pandora Mulling Deal to Sell Company (Report)

David Bowie Music Streams Explode on Spotify, Pandora

BuzzFeed Sponsored Content Chief Leaves Company

BuzzFeed Chief Marketing and Chief Creative Officer Frank Cooper is leaving the company, TheWrap has learned.

Cooper is departing less than two years after taking over Buzzfeed’s creative services team. He was previously at PepsiCo Inc. and AOL, and worked closely with marketing executives and ad agencies to create sponsored content.

BuzzFeed did not provide additional comment.

Also Read: BuzzFeed Gets Another $200M From NBCUniversal

Last week, NBCUniversal made a $200 million investment in BuzzFeed. Recode reported the investment last month, saying it valued the digital publisher at $1.7 billion. NBCUniversal infused $200 million into BuzzFeed last year, valuing the company at $1.5 billion — indicating roughly the same valuation after factoring the new money.

Cooper reported to ad Sales boss Greg Coleman, according to the WSJ.

BuzzFeed reorganized itself into two separate departments earlier this year: an editorial side, led by BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith, and an entertainment division, overseen by Ze Frank, the president of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures.
The Wall Street Journal first reported the news of Cooper’s departure.
Related stories from TheWrap:

BuzzFeed Gets Another $200M From NBCUniversal

Ivanka Trump Slams BuzzFeed’s ‘Mulatto C–k’ Report as a ‘Total Lie’

BuzzFeed Teams Up With Keshet for New Digital Game Show

BuzzFeed Chief Marketing and Chief Creative Officer Frank Cooper is leaving the company, TheWrap has learned.

Cooper is departing less than two years after taking over Buzzfeed’s creative services team. He was previously at PepsiCo Inc. and AOL, and worked closely with marketing executives and ad agencies to create sponsored content.

BuzzFeed did not provide additional comment.

Last week, NBCUniversal made a $200 million investment in BuzzFeed. Recode reported the investment last month, saying it valued the digital publisher at $1.7 billion. NBCUniversal infused $200 million into BuzzFeed last year, valuing the company at $1.5 billion — indicating roughly the same valuation after factoring the new money.

Cooper reported to ad Sales boss Greg Coleman, according to the WSJ.

BuzzFeed reorganized itself into two separate departments earlier this year: an editorial side, led by BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith, and an entertainment division, overseen by Ze Frank, the president of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures.
The Wall Street Journal first reported the news of Cooper’s departure.
Related stories from TheWrap:

BuzzFeed Gets Another $200M From NBCUniversal

Ivanka Trump Slams BuzzFeed's 'Mulatto C–k' Report as a 'Total Lie'

BuzzFeed Teams Up With Keshet for New Digital Game Show

Facebook Is Now Less of an Echo Chamber. Twitter Is More of One

If you were stunned that Donald Trump won the election, we have bad news: You may be one of the millions of Americans who occupy an internet echo chamber.

Trump’s win over Hillary Clinton has led to changes at Facebook and Twitter as the two social media platforms examine the roles that fake news stories and online abuse may have had on the election. The problems are separate but closely related: In both cases, the root cause is people trying to see things they like, and avoid things they don’t.

In some ways, the companies are going in opposite directions: Facebook is trying to prevent users from seeing only stories that pleasantly confirm their biases. Twitter, meanwhile, is trying to protect people from seeing ugly, abusive messages from people whose views diverge strongly from their own. Both companies are struggling with how to find a middle ground where users are exposed to the truth in a civil way.

Also Read: Trump vs. ‘The Media’: Facing Bigots and ISIS, He Attacks the NY Times

Adding to their problems: Not everyone wants to know the truth. Or be civil.

Here’s a look at the problems faced by both companies, and what changes they’ve made since Trump’s shocking (to some) election.

Facebook

On Monday, hours after a top Clinton campaign staffer spoke out against Facebook, the Wall Street Journal reported that Mark Zuckerberg’s company would block fake news sites from using its advertising network to generate revenue. The decision came soon after Google did the same thing.

Also Read: Facebook Is Telling Users, Including Mark Zuckerberg, They Are Dead (Updated)

“We vigorously enforce our policies and take swift action against sites and apps that are found to be in violation,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement to the WSJ. “Our team will continue to closely vet all prospective publishers and monitor existing ones to ensure compliance.”

Many Hillary Clinton supporters lay some of the blame for her defeat on a Facebook algorithm that feeds false stories to low-information voters — the kind of people who could be tricked into believing baseless claims, for example, that President Obama was born in Kenya. When they click on one bit of false information, they’re led down a rabbit hole of more conservative conspiracy theories, until it seems like all anyone ever talks about are Bill Clinton’s supposed secret son and Benghazi.

The fact that Facebook posts aren’t vetted for accuracy, like those on mainstream news sites, newscasts or newspapers, means more exposure to the kinds of stories that might not make it into the mainstream news media. Many conservatives say that’s good, because it means previously ignored stories can’t be censored. But it also means they aren’t fact-checked by professional journalists, and could be flat-out hoaxes.

Also Read: Facebook Bans Fake News Sites From Using Ad Network

One meme going around this week, for example, says Donald Trump won the popular vote. He didn’t. On Sunday night, HBO’s “Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver slammed Facebook as a “cesspool of nonsense” and pointed to a fake story about the Pope endorsing Trump that was shared almost 1 million times.

James Shamsi, a consultant for the social media company Chameleon.LA thinks Facebook’s echo chamber “works perfectly for anything other than politics” because it “shows you the type of content, news and events that align with your taste and views.”

Also Read: John Oliver Slams Facebook News Feed’s ‘Cesspool of Nonsense’ During Election (Video)

He said Facebook should simply “give an option to turn off algorithmic content distribution for anything related to politics,” which would essentially solve the problem.

“Facebook can also make it so that while you watch videos related to certain candidates, the next video suggested is one about the other candidate. There’s a bunch of things they can do, for instance also just simply implementing a minimum ratio of the opposing views content,” Shamsi told TheWrap. “The fact that barely any of my friends know anyone that voted for Trump, or saw any news that was positive about Trump, shows you how much the algorithm inadvertently divides and shelters us from opposite thoughts.”

On Saturday, Mark Zuckerberg ducked the question of whether Facebook spreads misinformation by calling it a “pretty crazy concept.” But he later said the company must work harder to “flag hoaxes and fake news.”

Also Read: Mark Zuckerberg Admits Facebook Must Improve News Feed: ‘There is More We Can Do’

That isn’t good enough for a group of “renegade employees” who have formed a task force to examine Facebook’s role in spreading fake news prior to the election, according to BuzzFeed.

“It’s not a crazy idea. What’s crazy is for him to come out and dismiss it like that, when he knows, and those of us at the company know, that fake news ran wild on our platform during the entire campaign season,” one Facebook employee told BuzzFeed.

Clinton campaign chief digital strategist Teddy Goff told Politico on Monday that while “everyone has the right to say what they want,” Facebook needs to stop publishing work from content providers with “a record of making stuff up.”

Twitter

People of every political stripe use Twitter to share quick takes, stories and news. A Twitter moment titled “Day 1 In Trump’s America” recently went viral by presenting a “collection of tweets about racist episodes [people of color] are facing now that Trump is our President Elect.”

Trump, meanwhile, has famously used the platform to promote his campaign and mock opponents. Three times in the past week, he has turned his ire on the New York Times.

But the open nature of Twitter has made it easy to reach out and harass, insult and threaten total strangers. Such trolling has become such an issue that Trump’s wife, Melania Trump, plans to make cyberbullying a key issue when she becomes first lady in January.

Also Read: Donald Trump Spars With New York Times (Again)

Twitter announced changes on Tuesday designed to reduce the “amount of abuse, bullying and harassment” to which users are exposed. It expanded its “mute” function to allow people to “mute keywords, phrases, and even entire conversations you don’t want to see notifications about.”

It also announced it had “retrained all of our support teams on our policies, including special sessions on cultural and historical contextualization of hateful conduct.”

Also Read: Donald Trump’s Twitter Future Will Be ‘Very Restrained’ (Video)

But racist and hateful encounters go both ways. Some people see their own insults as productive political expression, and others’ comments as attacks. With the new changes, Twitter will be safer than ever. From insults, but also from “entire conversations.”

If you choose not to see opposing views, you’ll have only yourself to blame next time an election catches you off guard.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Facebook Bans Fake News Sites From Using Ad Network

Democrats Believe Facebook Contributed to Hillary Clinton’s Loss To Donald Trump

Mark Zuckerberg Admits Facebook Must Improve News Feed: ‘There is More We Can Do’

If you were stunned that Donald Trump won the election, we have bad news: You may be one of the millions of Americans who occupy an internet echo chamber.

Trump’s win over Hillary Clinton has led to changes at Facebook and Twitter as the two social media platforms examine the roles that fake news stories and online abuse may have had on the election. The problems are separate but closely related: In both cases, the root cause is people trying to see things they like, and avoid things they don’t.

In some ways, the companies are going in opposite directions: Facebook is trying to prevent users from seeing only stories that pleasantly confirm their biases. Twitter, meanwhile, is trying to protect people from seeing ugly, abusive messages from people whose views diverge strongly from their own. Both companies are struggling with how to find a middle ground where users are exposed to the truth in a civil way.

Adding to their problems: Not everyone wants to know the truth. Or be civil.

Here’s a look at the problems faced by both companies, and what changes they’ve made since Trump’s shocking (to some) election.

Facebook

On Monday, hours after a top Clinton campaign staffer spoke out against Facebook, the Wall Street Journal reported that Mark Zuckerberg’s company would block fake news sites from using its advertising network to generate revenue. The decision came soon after Google did the same thing.

“We vigorously enforce our policies and take swift action against sites and apps that are found to be in violation,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement to the WSJ. “Our team will continue to closely vet all prospective publishers and monitor existing ones to ensure compliance.”

Many Hillary Clinton supporters lay some of the blame for her defeat on a Facebook algorithm that feeds false stories to low-information voters — the kind of people who could be tricked into believing baseless claims, for example, that President Obama was born in Kenya. When they click on one bit of false information, they’re led down a rabbit hole of more conservative conspiracy theories, until it seems like all anyone ever talks about are Bill Clinton’s supposed secret son and Benghazi.

The fact that Facebook posts aren’t vetted for accuracy, like those on mainstream news sites, newscasts or newspapers, means more exposure to the kinds of stories that might not make it into the mainstream news media. Many conservatives say that’s good, because it means previously ignored stories can’t be censored. But it also means they aren’t fact-checked by professional journalists, and could be flat-out hoaxes.

One meme going around this week, for example, says Donald Trump won the popular vote. He didn’t. On Sunday night, HBO’s “Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver slammed Facebook as a “cesspool of nonsense” and pointed to a fake story about the Pope endorsing Trump that was shared almost 1 million times.

James Shamsi, a consultant for the social media company Chameleon.LA thinks Facebook’s echo chamber “works perfectly for anything other than politics” because it “shows you the type of content, news and events that align with your taste and views.”

He said Facebook should simply “give an option to turn off algorithmic content distribution for anything related to politics,” which would essentially solve the problem.

“Facebook can also make it so that while you watch videos related to certain candidates, the next video suggested is one about the other candidate. There’s a bunch of things they can do, for instance also just simply implementing a minimum ratio of the opposing views content,” Shamsi told TheWrap. “The fact that barely any of my friends know anyone that voted for Trump, or saw any news that was positive about Trump, shows you how much the algorithm inadvertently divides and shelters us from opposite thoughts.”

On Saturday, Mark Zuckerberg ducked the question of whether Facebook spreads misinformation by calling it a “pretty crazy concept.” But he later said the company must work harder to “flag hoaxes and fake news.”

That isn’t good enough for a group of “renegade employees” who have formed a task force to examine Facebook’s role in spreading fake news prior to the election, according to BuzzFeed.

“It’s not a crazy idea. What’s crazy is for him to come out and dismiss it like that, when he knows, and those of us at the company know, that fake news ran wild on our platform during the entire campaign season,” one Facebook employee told BuzzFeed.

Clinton campaign chief digital strategist Teddy Goff told Politico on Monday that while “everyone has the right to say what they want,” Facebook needs to stop publishing work from content providers with “a record of making stuff up.”

Twitter

People of every political stripe use Twitter to share quick takes, stories and news. A Twitter moment titled “Day 1 In Trump’s America” recently went viral by presenting a “collection of tweets about racist episodes [people of color] are facing now that Trump is our President Elect.”

Trump, meanwhile, has famously used the platform to promote his campaign and mock opponents. Three times in the past week, he has turned his ire on the New York Times.

But the open nature of Twitter has made it easy to reach out and harass, insult and threaten total strangers. Such trolling has become such an issue that Trump’s wife, Melania Trump, plans to make cyberbullying a key issue when she becomes first lady in January.

Twitter announced changes on Tuesday designed to reduce the “amount of abuse, bullying and harassment” to which users are exposed. It expanded its “mute” function to allow people to “mute keywords, phrases, and even entire conversations you don’t want to see notifications about.”

It also announced it had “retrained all of our support teams on our policies, including special sessions on cultural and historical contextualization of hateful conduct.”

But racist and hateful encounters go both ways. Some people see their own insults as productive political expression, and others’ comments as attacks. With the new changes, Twitter will be safer than ever. From insults, but also from “entire conversations.”

If you choose not to see opposing views, you’ll have only yourself to blame next time an election catches you off guard.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Facebook Bans Fake News Sites From Using Ad Network

Democrats Believe Facebook Contributed to Hillary Clinton's Loss To Donald Trump

Mark Zuckerberg Admits Facebook Must Improve News Feed: 'There is More We Can Do'

Peter Bart: As The Internet Creates Its Own Version Of Fact, Print Does A Fade-Out

With the election finally behind us, several of the nation’s most important newspapers took this awkward moment to begin major staff cutbacks this week, and it’s the world of culture and pop culture, not merely the ink-stained journalists, that will feel the impact. The decline and fall of newspapers like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal will have a devastating impact on theater, independent film, art and music, as reported earlier this week by Deadline’s Jeremy…

With the election finally behind us, several of the nation's most important newspapers took this awkward moment to begin major staff cutbacks this week, and it's the world of culture and pop culture, not merely the ink-stained journalists, that will feel the impact. The decline and fall of newspapers like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal will have a devastating impact on theater, independent film, art and music, as reported earlier this week by Deadline’s Jeremy…

Donald Trump Affair Story Suppressed by National Enquirer (Report)

The company behind the National Enquirer quashed a story about GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump having an affair with a Playboy model, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

The Journal said that the National Enquirer parent company, American Media, agreed to pay Karen McDougal $150,000 for a story regarding a decade-old relationship with Trump, who at the time was married to his current wife Melania, but never published the piece.

American Media denied paying McDougal, the 1998 Playmate of the Year, for the Trump story, but instead said it paid her for a series of fitness columns and magazine covers.

Also Read: Donald Trump Rips Jay Z Over Cursing at Hillary Clinton Rally (Video)

“AMI has not paid people to kill damaging stories about Mr. Trump,” the company said in a statement.

Trump campaign spokesperson Hope Hicks has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment, but told the Journal that reports of Trump having an affair with McDougal were “totally untrue,” and that the campaign has “no knowledge of any of this.”

Citing unnamed sources, the Journal said that, while McDougal expected the story to run, American Media had no intention to publish it. A spokesperson for McDougal has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Also Read: Bill Maher Says He’s ‘Sh-tting in My Pants’ Over a Donald Trump Win (Video)

In a statement to the Journal, American Media CEO and Trump friend David J. Pecker defended the Enquirer’s coverage of Trump, saying the paper “set the agenda” on Trump’s extramarital relationship with Marla Maples.

“That in itself speaks volumes about our commitment to investigative reporting,” Pecker said.

According to the Journal, McDougal told friends that she was with Trump for nearly a year, starting in 2006 and extending into 2007.

Also Read: Donald Trump’s Child-Rape Accuser Drops Lawsuit After Receiving Threats

The Journal said that American Media’s contract with McDougal included perpetual exclusive rights to the story, and while the company wasn’t obligated to run it, McDougal was prohibited from telling it elsewhere.

Trump has been accused of inappropriate behavior by numerous women. Trump has denied the allegations and threatened to sue his accusers after the presidential election.

On Saturday, an unnamed woman who had accused Trump of raping her when she was 13 years old dropped her lawsuit against the candidate. The anonymous accuser had been scheduled to give a press conference earlier in the week, but abandoned the plan at the last minute, after receiving what her attorney Lisa Bloom characterized as numerous threats.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Donald Trump Rips Jay Z Over Cursing at Hillary Clinton Rally (Video)

Bill Maher Says He’s ‘Sh-tting in My Pants’ Over a Donald Trump Win (Video)

Donald Trump’s Child-Rape Accuser Drops Lawsuit After Receiving Threats

The company behind the National Enquirer quashed a story about GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump having an affair with a Playboy model, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

The Journal said that the National Enquirer parent company, American Media, agreed to pay Karen McDougal $150,000 for a story regarding a decade-old relationship with Trump, who at the time was married to his current wife Melania, but never published the piece.

American Media denied paying McDougal, the 1998 Playmate of the Year, for the Trump story, but instead said it paid her for a series of fitness columns and magazine covers.

“AMI has not paid people to kill damaging stories about Mr. Trump,” the company said in a statement.

Trump campaign spokesperson Hope Hicks has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment, but told the Journal that reports of Trump having an affair with McDougal were “totally untrue,” and that the campaign has “no knowledge of any of this.”

Citing unnamed sources, the Journal said that, while McDougal expected the story to run, American Media had no intention to publish it. A spokesperson for McDougal has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

In a statement to the Journal, American Media CEO and Trump friend David J. Pecker defended the Enquirer’s coverage of Trump, saying the paper “set the agenda” on Trump’s extramarital relationship with Marla Maples.

“That in itself speaks volumes about our commitment to investigative reporting,” Pecker said.

According to the Journal, McDougal told friends that she was with Trump for nearly a year, starting in 2006 and extending into 2007.

The Journal said that American Media’s contract with McDougal included perpetual exclusive rights to the story, and while the company wasn’t obligated to run it, McDougal was prohibited from telling it elsewhere.

Trump has been accused of inappropriate behavior by numerous women. Trump has denied the allegations and threatened to sue his accusers after the presidential election.

On Saturday, an unnamed woman who had accused Trump of raping her when she was 13 years old dropped her lawsuit against the candidate. The anonymous accuser had been scheduled to give a press conference earlier in the week, but abandoned the plan at the last minute, after receiving what her attorney Lisa Bloom characterized as numerous threats.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Donald Trump Rips Jay Z Over Cursing at Hillary Clinton Rally (Video)

Bill Maher Says He's 'Sh-tting in My Pants' Over a Donald Trump Win (Video)

Donald Trump's Child-Rape Accuser Drops Lawsuit After Receiving Threats

Wall Street Journal Slashes Print Pages, Arts and Local Coverage Due to Shrinking Ad Sales

The Wall Street Journal will combine sections and trim the size of its print edition to cope with advertising declines, the company announced on Wednesday.

The new version of its print edition will start Nov. 14 and combine several sections and reduce the size of some coverage areas. Coverage of arts, culture and local news will take a hit but  Journal execs promised that business coverage will “remain largely the same.”

“All newspapers face structural challenges and we must move to create a print edition that can stand on a sound financial footing for the foreseeable future while our digital horizons continue to expand,” Editor Gerard Baker told staffers in an email on Wednesday.

Also Read: New York Times Beats Q3 Earnings Forecast Despite Print Ads Declining 18.5 Percent

Like most major players in the newspaper industry, the Journal has been forced to make cutbacks because of an industry-wide decline in print advertising. The paper has also offered buyouts to employees and warned of possible layoffs.

The updated, trimmed-down version of the Journal will feature just two large sections on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. A third section will be added on Mondays and Fridays while the weekend edition of the paper will remain unchanged.

The Personal Journal and Arena sections will be combined into a new section called “Life & Arts,” which will become part of the A section and feature coverage of culture, sports, art and lifestyle. The Greater New York section will also be drastically reduced.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox News, CNN Claim Historic October Ratings

Sean Hannity to Work for President Trump? Fox News Host Says ‘Never’

Fox News Anchor Shepard Smith: Roger Ailes Didn’t Care That I’m Gay

The Wall Street Journal will combine sections and trim the size of its print edition to cope with advertising declines, the company announced on Wednesday.

The new version of its print edition will start Nov. 14 and combine several sections and reduce the size of some coverage areas. Coverage of arts, culture and local news will take a hit but  Journal execs promised that business coverage will “remain largely the same.”

“All newspapers face structural challenges and we must move to create a print edition that can stand on a sound financial footing for the foreseeable future while our digital horizons continue to expand,” Editor Gerard Baker told staffers in an email on Wednesday.

Like most major players in the newspaper industry, the Journal has been forced to make cutbacks because of an industry-wide decline in print advertising. The paper has also offered buyouts to employees and warned of possible layoffs.

The updated, trimmed-down version of the Journal will feature just two large sections on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. A third section will be added on Mondays and Fridays while the weekend edition of the paper will remain unchanged.

The Personal Journal and Arena sections will be combined into a new section called “Life & Arts,” which will become part of the A section and feature coverage of culture, sports, art and lifestyle. The Greater New York section will also be drastically reduced.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox News, CNN Claim Historic October Ratings

Sean Hannity to Work for President Trump? Fox News Host Says 'Never'

Fox News Anchor Shepard Smith: Roger Ailes Didn't Care That I'm Gay

Hillary Clinton Email Drama: 5 Latest Developments

A lot has happened since FBI Director James Comey sent a letter to Senators on Friday letting them know that his agency is investigating newly-surfaced Hillary Clinton emails.

Shortly after the news broke, we learned that the emails were discovered while the FBI was examining a computer belonging to former New York congressman Anthony Weiner and his wife, top Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

Clinton is mad at the FBI and wants more information to be revealed, while GOP nominee Donald Trump appears rejuvenated. Here are five things you might have missed over the weekend.

Also Read: Hillary Clinton Email Scandals: A Guide From Wikileaks to Anthony Weiner’s PC

650,000 emails
The Wall Street Journal published a blockbuster story on Sunday night about tensions within the FBI related to the Clinton email situation. The story notes that a whopping 650,000 emails were found on Anthony Weiner’s laptop. Citing people familiar with the matter, the WSJ said, “underlying metadata suggests thousands of those messages could have been sent to or from the private server that Mrs. Clinton used while she was secretary of state.”

This will absolutely last beyond Election Day
The WSJ notes, “It will take weeks, at a minimum, to determine whether those messages are work-related from the time Ms. Abedin served with Mrs. Clinton at the State Department; how many are duplicates of emails already reviewed by the FBI; and whether they include either classified information or important new evidence in the Clinton email probe.”

Officials couldn’t even begin reviewing the emails until they received a court order over the weekend, according to the paper.

Also Read: Hillary Clinton Urges FBI to Release ‘All the Information That It Has’

Feds split over the investigation
“Senior Justice Department officials had warned the FBI that telling Congress would violate policies against overt actions that could affect an election, and some within the FBI have been unhappy at Mr. Comey’s repeated public statements on the probe, going back to his press conference on the subject in July,” according to the WSJ.

Comey obviously notified Congress anyway and set off “the furor that promises to consume the final days of a tumultuous campaign,” the paper said while noting that the internal debate shows “the high stakes when such disagreements occur surrounding someone who is running for president.”

Clinton hasn’t asked Abedin for details
Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook told Fox News’ Chris Wallace on Sunday that Clinton has not even asked Abedin what the emails contain or what was on Weiner’s computer.

It’s certainly odd that a scandal that could impact the presidential election isn’t something Clinton would ask her closest aide about. A rift between Clinton and Abedin, who was expected to have a high-level position in a Clinton administration will be something to monitor closely.

Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook says Hillary has not talked to Huma since news of FBI investigation broke (via @FoxNewsSunday) pic.twitter.com/4Ux4ZPWFqS

— FOX & Friends (@foxandfriends) October 31, 2016

Also Read: NY Post Whips Out ‘Dickileaks’ Puns About Anthony Weiner ‘Stroking Gun’

Trump thinks the FBI got it right
Well, obviously Trump would agree with Comey’s latest decision. It gives him strong new talking points for rallies and you can expect the GOP nominee to continue hammering the message until Election Day.

We must not let #CrookedHillary take her CRIMINAL SCHEME into the Oval Office. #DrainTheSwamp pic.twitter.com/GtPkj4xIz6

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 28, 2016

Related stories from TheWrap:

Hillary Clinton Urges FBI to Release ‘All the Information That It Has’

Hillary Clinton Email Scandals: A Guide From Wikileaks to Anthony Weiner’s PC

Here’s What FBI’s Letter About Hillary Clinton Email Probe Could Mean

A lot has happened since FBI Director James Comey sent a letter to Senators on Friday letting them know that his agency is investigating newly-surfaced Hillary Clinton emails.

Shortly after the news broke, we learned that the emails were discovered while the FBI was examining a computer belonging to former New York congressman Anthony Weiner and his wife, top Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

Clinton is mad at the FBI and wants more information to be revealed, while GOP nominee Donald Trump appears rejuvenated. Here are five things you might have missed over the weekend.

650,000 emails
The Wall Street Journal published a blockbuster story on Sunday night about tensions within the FBI related to the Clinton email situation. The story notes that a whopping 650,000 emails were found on Anthony Weiner’s laptop. Citing people familiar with the matter, the WSJ said, “underlying metadata suggests thousands of those messages could have been sent to or from the private server that Mrs. Clinton used while she was secretary of state.”

This will absolutely last beyond Election Day
The WSJ notes, “It will take weeks, at a minimum, to determine whether those messages are work-related from the time Ms. Abedin served with Mrs. Clinton at the State Department; how many are duplicates of emails already reviewed by the FBI; and whether they include either classified information or important new evidence in the Clinton email probe.”

Officials couldn’t even begin reviewing the emails until they received a court order over the weekend, according to the paper.

Feds split over the investigation
“Senior Justice Department officials had warned the FBI that telling Congress would violate policies against overt actions that could affect an election, and some within the FBI have been unhappy at Mr. Comey’s repeated public statements on the probe, going back to his press conference on the subject in July,” according to the WSJ.

Comey obviously notified Congress anyway and set off “the furor that promises to consume the final days of a tumultuous campaign,” the paper said while noting that the internal debate shows “the high stakes when such disagreements occur surrounding someone who is running for president.”

Clinton hasn’t asked Abedin for details
Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook told Fox News’ Chris Wallace on Sunday that Clinton has not even asked Abedin what the emails contain or what was on Weiner’s computer.

It’s certainly odd that a scandal that could impact the presidential election isn’t something Clinton would ask her closest aide about. A rift between Clinton and Abedin, who was expected to have a high-level position in a Clinton administration will be something to monitor closely.

Trump thinks the FBI got it right
Well, obviously Trump would agree with Comey’s latest decision. It gives him strong new talking points for rallies and you can expect the GOP nominee to continue hammering the message until Election Day.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Hillary Clinton Urges FBI to Release 'All the Information That It Has'

Hillary Clinton Email Scandals: A Guide From Wikileaks to Anthony Weiner's PC

Here's What FBI's Letter About Hillary Clinton Email Probe Could Mean