‘Green Book’ Wins Toronto Film Festival’s People’s Choice Award

Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” has won the Grolsch People’s Choice Award at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, TIFF announced at an awards ceremony on Sunday.

The film, which tells the true story of an Italian-American nightclub bouncer (Viggo Mortensen) who serves as the chauffeur for a black pianist on a tour through the Deep South in the early 1960s, opened at the festival on Tuesday and was an instant hit with audiences and critics, although Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” had been considered the likely winner of the People’s Choice Award.

Runners-up for the award were Barry Jenkins’ lyrical James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Alfonso Cuaron’s moving memory piece “Roma.”

Also Read: ‘Green Book’ Film Review: Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali Take a Perilous Road Trip Through the Deep South

In the past, Toronto audience members voted by depositing their ticket stubs in a box at the theater, or by using the TIFF app — festival organizers took into account the size of the theaters in which each film screened — with the films that received votes from the largest percentage of their audience winning the prizes.

This year, though, the voting moved online only, which caused fans of Lady Gaga, Timothee Chalamet and Robert Pattinson, among others, to lobby for “A Star Is Born,” “Beautiful Boy” and “High Life,” respectively, encouraging fans to vote as many times as possible. However, TIFF VP of Corporate Affairs Andrea Grau said the festival “takes many steps to ensure the integrity of the votes recorded,” including checking the origin of the votes against a ticket buyer database, to prevent “mass campaign voting.”

The People’s Choice Documentary Award went to “Free Solo,” with runner-up awards going to “This Changes Everything” and “The Biggest Little Farm.”

The top award in the Midnight Madness section went to “The Man Who Feels No Pain” by Vasan Bala, followed by David Gordon Green’s “Halloween” and Sam Levinson’s “Assassination Nation.”

Also Read: Toronto So Far: ‘First Man’ and ‘A Star Is Born’ Lead a Crop of Films With Heart and Dazzle

A jury chose Ho Wi Ding’s “Cities of Last Things” as the winner in the Platform section, whose 12 selections included Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” and Carol Morley’s “Out of Blue.”

A new award for the best film by a  female director at the festival, the Eurimage Audentia Award, went to Aalam-Warge Davidian for “Fig Tree.”

The FIPRESCI jury of international film critics gave honors to Guy Nattiv’s “Skin” and Carmel Winters’ “Float Like a Butterfly.” The NETPAC jury singled out “The Third Wife” as the festival’s best Asian film from an emerging director (Ashleigh Mayfair).

The award for the festival’s best Canadian film went to Sebastian Pilote’s “The Fireflies Are Gone,” while the award for best Canadian first feature went to Katherine Jerkovic for “Roads in February.”

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’ Film Review: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Reinvigorate a Classic

Every one of the 254 feature films that played Toronto was eligible for the People’s Choice Award, with competitors including Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born,” Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book,” Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk,” David Lowery’s “The Old Man & the Gun,” Paul Greengrass’ “22 July,” Steve McQueen’s “Widows,” Felix Van Groeningen’s “Beautiful Boy,” Jason Reitman’s “The Front Runner” and Marielle Heller’s “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Nine of the last 10 People’s Choice Award winners went on to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, with only 2011’s “Where Do We Go Now?” failing to make the cut with Academy voters.

Three TIFF audience winners have gone on to win the Best Picture Oscar in that time: “12 Years a Slave” in 2013, “The King’s Speech” in 2010 and “Slumdog Millionaire” in 2008. Two others won before that: “American Beauty” in 1999 and “Chariots of Fire” in 1981. Other recent Toronto winners include “La La Land,” “Silver Linings Playbook,” “The Imitation Game,” “Room” and last year’s choice, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Also Read: ‘Green Book’ Film Review: Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali Take a Perilous Road Trip Through the Deep South

The winners:

Grolsch People’s Choice Award: “Green Book,” Peter Farrelly
Runners-up: “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Barry Jenkins; “Roma,” Alfonso Cuaron
People’s Choice Documentary Award: “Free Solo,” E. Chai Vasarhelvi and Jimmy Chin
Runners-up: “This Changes Everything,” Tom Donahue; “The Biggest Little Farm,” John Chester
People’s Choice Midnight Madness Award: “The Man Who Feels No Pain,” Vasan Bala
Runners-up: “Halloween,” David Gordon Green; “Assassination Nation,” Sam Levinson

Platform Prize: “Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding
Special Mention: “The River,” Emir Baigazin

Eurimage Audentia Award for Best Female Director: “Fig Tree,” Aalam-Warge Davidian

Best Canadian Feature Film: “The Fireflies Are Gone,” Sebastien Pilote
Best Canadian First Feature: “Roads in February,” Katherine Jerkovic

International Critic (FIPRESCI) Prize for Special Presentations: “Skin,” Guy Nattiv
International Critic (FIPRESCI) Prize for Discovery program: “Float Like a Butterfly,” Carmel Winters

NETPAC Award for Best Asian Film: “The Third Wife,” Ash Mayfair
Special mention: “The Crossing,” Bai Xue

Short Cuts Award for International Short Film: “The Field,” Sandhya Suri
Honorable Mentions: “F— You,” Anette Sidor; “This Magnificent Cake!,” Emma de Swaef and Marc James Roels
Short Cuts Award for Canadian Short Film: “Brotherhood,” Meryam Joobeur
Honorable Mention: “Fauve,” Jeremy Comte

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Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” has won the Grolsch People’s Choice Award at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, TIFF announced at an awards ceremony on Sunday.

The film, which tells the true story of an Italian-American nightclub bouncer (Viggo Mortensen) who serves as the chauffeur for a black pianist on a tour through the Deep South in the early 1960s, opened at the festival on Tuesday and was an instant hit with audiences and critics, although Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” had been considered the likely winner of the People’s Choice Award.

Runners-up for the award were Barry Jenkins’ lyrical James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Alfonso Cuaron’s moving memory piece “Roma.”

In the past, Toronto audience members voted by depositing their ticket stubs in a box at the theater, or by using the TIFF app — festival organizers took into account the size of the theaters in which each film screened — with the films that received votes from the largest percentage of their audience winning the prizes.

This year, though, the voting moved online only, which caused fans of Lady Gaga, Timothee Chalamet and Robert Pattinson, among others, to lobby for “A Star Is Born,” “Beautiful Boy” and “High Life,” respectively, encouraging fans to vote as many times as possible. However, TIFF VP of Corporate Affairs Andrea Grau said the festival “takes many steps to ensure the integrity of the votes recorded,” including checking the origin of the votes against a ticket buyer database, to prevent “mass campaign voting.”

The People’s Choice Documentary Award went to “Free Solo,” with runner-up awards going to “This Changes Everything” and “The Biggest Little Farm.”

The top award in the Midnight Madness section went to “The Man Who Feels No Pain” by Vasan Bala, followed by David Gordon Green’s “Halloween” and Sam Levinson’s “Assassination Nation.”

A jury chose Ho Wi Ding’s “Cities of Last Things” as the winner in the Platform section, whose 12 selections included Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” and Carol Morley’s “Out of Blue.”

A new award for the best film by a  female director at the festival, the Eurimage Audentia Award, went to Aalam-Warge Davidian for “Fig Tree.”

The FIPRESCI jury of international film critics gave honors to Guy Nattiv’s “Skin” and Carmel Winters’ “Float Like a Butterfly.” The NETPAC jury singled out “The Third Wife” as the festival’s best Asian film from an emerging director (Ashleigh Mayfair).

The award for the festival’s best Canadian film went to Sebastian Pilote’s “The Fireflies Are Gone,” while the award for best Canadian first feature went to Katherine Jerkovic for “Roads in February.”

Every one of the 254 feature films that played Toronto was eligible for the People’s Choice Award, with competitors including Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born,” Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book,” Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk,” David Lowery’s “The Old Man & the Gun,” Paul Greengrass’ “22 July,” Steve McQueen’s “Widows,” Felix Van Groeningen’s “Beautiful Boy,” Jason Reitman’s “The Front Runner” and Marielle Heller’s “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Nine of the last 10 People’s Choice Award winners went on to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, with only 2011’s “Where Do We Go Now?” failing to make the cut with Academy voters.

Three TIFF audience winners have gone on to win the Best Picture Oscar in that time: “12 Years a Slave” in 2013, “The King’s Speech” in 2010 and “Slumdog Millionaire” in 2008. Two others won before that: “American Beauty” in 1999 and “Chariots of Fire” in 1981. Other recent Toronto winners include “La La Land,” “Silver Linings Playbook,” “The Imitation Game,” “Room” and last year’s choice, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

The winners:

Grolsch People’s Choice Award: “Green Book,” Peter Farrelly
Runners-up: “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Barry Jenkins; “Roma,” Alfonso Cuaron
People’s Choice Documentary Award: “Free Solo,” E. Chai Vasarhelvi and Jimmy Chin
Runners-up: “This Changes Everything,” Tom Donahue; “The Biggest Little Farm,” John Chester
People’s Choice Midnight Madness Award: “The Man Who Feels No Pain,” Vasan Bala
Runners-up: “Halloween,” David Gordon Green; “Assassination Nation,” Sam Levinson

Platform Prize: “Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding
Special Mention: “The River,” Emir Baigazin

Eurimage Audentia Award for Best Female Director: “Fig Tree,” Aalam-Warge Davidian

Best Canadian Feature Film: “The Fireflies Are Gone,” Sebastien Pilote
Best Canadian First Feature: “Roads in February,” Katherine Jerkovic

International Critic (FIPRESCI) Prize for Special Presentations: “Skin,” Guy Nattiv
International Critic (FIPRESCI) Prize for Discovery program: “Float Like a Butterfly,” Carmel Winters

NETPAC Award for Best Asian Film: “The Third Wife,” Ash Mayfair
Special mention: “The Crossing,” Bai Xue

Short Cuts Award for International Short Film: “The Field,” Sandhya Suri
Honorable Mentions: “F— You,” Anette Sidor; “This Magnificent Cake!,” Emma de Swaef and Marc James Roels
Short Cuts Award for Canadian Short Film: “Brotherhood,” Meryam Joobeur
Honorable Mention: “Fauve,” Jeremy Comte

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Toronto Film Review: Viggo Mortensen in ‘Green Book’

OK, class, who can explain what the “Green Book” is? If you don’t know, you were born either well after the American Civil Rights movement or with something called “white privilege,” seeing as how the indispensable travel guide for black motorists seek…

OK, class, who can explain what the “Green Book” is? If you don’t know, you were born either well after the American Civil Rights movement or with something called “white privilege,” seeing as how the indispensable travel guide for black motorists seeking “vacation without aggravation” by listing friendly places to stay and tips on how […]

‘Green Book’ Director Peter Farrelly On Pic’s Transformative Roles & Unexpected Laughs – Toronto Studio

In the same year Peter Farrelly created his first television series, Audience Network’s Loudermilk, the director is presenting his first dramatic feature with Universal Pictures’ Green Book. Based on a true story, the film examines a burgeo…

In the same year Peter Farrelly created his first television series, Audience Network’s Loudermilk, the director is presenting his first dramatic feature with Universal Pictures’ Green Book. Based on a true story, the film examines a burgeoning friendship between Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), a black classical pianist, and Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen), the working-class Italian-American bouncer tasked with escorting him through the 1960s American South. Coming to Farrelly…

‘Green Book’ Film Review: Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali Take a Perilous Road Trip Through the Deep South

Melissa McCarthy, Steve Carell and Dave Chappelle are among the onetime comedians delivering dramatic performances at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, and on Tuesday director Peter Farrelly joined the TIFF ranks of funny folks getting serious. Farrelly, the director of “There’s Something About Mary,” “Dumb and Dumber” and “Shallow Hal,” has moved away from hair-gel gags to civil-rights abuses with “Green Book,” which premiered on Tuesday night after a press screening earlier in the day.

The title comes from the Negro Motorist Green Book, a publication designed to tell African-Americans where they could safely eat and stay in the South during the days of segregation. In this case, the man following it was an Italian-American bouncer from the Bronx, “Tony Lip” (played by Viggo Mortensen), who was hired to chauffeur black pianist Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) on a concert tour from Manhattan into the South in 1962.

That trip really happened, with Nick Vallelonga, son of the real-life Frank Anthony Vallelonga, aka Tony Lip, serving as one of the producers on “Green Book.”

Also Read: Alexander Skarsgard, Jesse Eisenberg Film ‘The Hummingbird Project’ Heads to The Orchard

In a festival full of auteur statements like “Roma,” “Vox Lux” and “If Beale Street Could Talk,” the words you can use to describe “Green Book” all contain a faint tinge of condescension: charming, crowdpleasing, sweet

But it’s hardly Farrelly’s fault that he set out to make a mainstream audience movie that tells a fascinating story, and it’s a clear accomplishment that he succeeded as well as he did. While TIFF audiences at public screenings are famously appreciative of almost everything they see, the Press & Industry screenings usually conclude in dead silence as everybody hurries to get to their next film. But “Green Book” drew a robust round of sustained applause on Tuesday, by far the biggest reception at any P&I screening I attended over the last six days.

When the movie begins, Tony Vallelonga is looking for work after the Copacabana has shut down for a couple of months worth of remodeling. He reluctantly agrees to serve as a driver and de facto road manager for Dr. Don Shirley, an elegant man with three PhDs who is so refined he might as well be from Mars as far as Joey is concerned.

Do we know what’s going to happen as soon as they climb into the car and hit the road for an eight-week tour that starts in the Midwest and then takes a hard left turn into the Deep South? Of course we do. The two men will get on each other’s nerves; Joey will start to lose his casual racism when he sees how Shirley is treated in the South; the pianist will come to a grudging respect and even affection for his driver; the tough guy will get more cultured; and the uptight guy will loosen up.

Also Read: ‘White Boy Rick’ Film Review: Real-Life Drug Saga Bolstered by Strong Performances

All of that is pretty much a given, and Farrelly isn’t one to throw any curve balls at us. But he also knows how to keep things light enough to set up the tough moments; “Green Book” is not a comedy in the way his previous films were, but it is always a pleasure to watch.

Mortensen has the flamboyant role and makes the most of it, turning Joey into a gruff, gluttonous bonehead with a big heart and a thick accent. It’s a deliciously oversized performance, though Mortensen also nails unexpectedly quiet moments, notably one where he learns something new and potentially shocking about his boss and simply mutters, “I’ve been working nightclubs in New York City my whole life. I know it’s a … complicated world.”

Ali’s character is more internal, harder to embrace until a couple of moving scenes in which we learn a few more of his secrets and his pains. As he showed with his Oscar-winning performance in “Moonlight,” the actor has a real gravity to him, which is perfect for Don Shirley, and he’s completely convincing in the concert scenes. (To its credit, the movie isn’t afraid to stop for jazz.)

Also Read: ‘The Predator’ Film Review: Shane Black Further Dumbs Down This Sci-Fi/Horror Franchise

The movie gets darker as the journey goes further South, and as the myriad indignities and humiliations mount. But our investment in the characters rarely flags, thanks to Mortensen and Ali and a director who is interested in cleanly and efficiently delivering a story worth hearing.

It all ends on Christmas Eve, and if you don’t know what’s coming by that point you haven’t been paying attention. But that’s OK: To say that we know where the characters in “Green Book” are going is not to cheapen the undeniable pleasures of the ride.

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Melissa McCarthy, Steve Carell and Dave Chappelle are among the onetime comedians delivering dramatic performances at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, and on Tuesday director Peter Farrelly joined the TIFF ranks of funny folks getting serious. Farrelly, the director of “There’s Something About Mary,” “Dumb and Dumber” and “Shallow Hal,” has moved away from hair-gel gags to civil-rights abuses with “Green Book,” which premiered on Tuesday night after a press screening earlier in the day.

The title comes from the Negro Motorist Green Book, a publication designed to tell African-Americans where they could safely eat and stay in the South during the days of segregation. In this case, the man following it was an Italian-American bouncer from the Bronx, “Tony Lip” (played by Viggo Mortensen), who was hired to chauffeur black pianist Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) on a concert tour from Manhattan into the South in 1962.

That trip really happened, with Nick Vallelonga, son of the real-life Frank Anthony Vallelonga, aka Tony Lip, serving as one of the producers on “Green Book.”

In a festival full of auteur statements like “Roma,” “Vox Lux” and “If Beale Street Could Talk,” the words you can use to describe “Green Book” all contain a faint tinge of condescension: charming, crowd-pleasing, sweet

But it’s hardly Farrelly’s fault that he set out to make a mainstream audience movie that tells a fascinating story, and it’s a clear accomplishment that he succeeded as well as he did. While TIFF audiences at public screenings are famously appreciative of almost everything they see, the Press & Industry screenings usually conclude in dead silence as everybody hurries to get to their next film. But “Green Book” drew a robust round of sustained applause on Tuesday, by far the biggest reception at any P&I screening I attended over the last six days.

When the movie begins, Tony Vallelonga is looking for work after the Copacabana has shut down for a couple of months worth of remodeling. He reluctantly agrees to serve as a driver and de facto road manager for Dr. Don Shirley, an elegant man with three PhDs who is so refined he might as well be from Mars as far as Joey is concerned.

Do we know what’s going to happen as soon as they climb into the car and hit the road for an eight-week tour that starts in the Midwest and then takes a hard left turn into the Deep South? Of course we do. The two men will get on each other’s nerves; Joey will start to lose his casual racism when he sees how Shirley is treated in the South; the pianist will come to a grudging respect and even affection for his driver; the tough guy will get more cultured; and the uptight guy will loosen up.

All of that is pretty much a given, and Farrelly isn’t one to throw any curve balls at us. But he also knows how to keep things light enough to set up the tough moments; “Green Book” is not a comedy in the way his previous films were, but it is always a pleasure to watch.

Mortensen has the flamboyant role and makes the most of it, turning Joey into a gruff, gluttonous bonehead with a big heart and a thick accent. It’s a deliciously oversized performance, though Mortensen also nails unexpectedly quiet moments, notably one where he learns something new and potentially shocking about his boss and simply mutters, “I’ve been working nightclubs in New York City my whole life. I know it’s a … complicated world.”

Ali’s character is more internal, harder to embrace until a couple of moving scenes in which we learn a few more of his secrets and his pains. As he showed with his Oscar-winning performance in “Moonlight,” the actor has a real gravity to him, which is perfect for Don Shirley, and he’s completely convincing in the concert scenes. (To its credit, the movie isn’t afraid to stop for jazz.)

The movie gets darker as the journey goes further South, and as the myriad indignities and humiliations mount. But our investment in the characters rarely flags, thanks to Mortensen and Ali and a director who is interested in cleanly and efficiently delivering a story worth hearing.

It all ends on Christmas Eve, and if you don’t know what’s coming by that point you haven’t been paying attention. But that’s OK: To say that we know where the characters in “Green Book” are going is not to cheapen the undeniable pleasures of the ride.

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‘Green Book’ Review: Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali Triumph in a Touching Update to ‘Driving Miss Daisy’ — TIFF

Peter Farrelly breaks away from his lowbrow comedy roots with this sentimental dramedy about a tough white guy defending a black pianist in the Deep South.

A sly corrective to “Driving Miss Daisy,” the sentimental dramedy “Green Book” is not the sort of movie one might expect from one half of the directing duo behind “Dumb and Dumber.” But director Peter Farrelly’s endearing story about a tough Italian-American from the Bronx shepherding an acclaimed black pianist from New York City through the Deep South in 1962 nails the formula for a touching and meaningful look at race and class in America, the likes of which studios rarely produce anymore. It’s an obvious but enjoyable period piece — and a throwback to another era of Hollywood filmmaking, resurrected in the 21st century with two of the best actors working today, who elevate this didactic form of storytelling above the market standard for schmaltz.

Proving that he can blend in with virtually any material at his disposal, Viggo Mortensen adds another notch to his chameloenesque abilities as the streetwise Frank Anthony Vallelonga, who prefers the casual monicker Tony Lip. A no-nonsense guido willing to do anything to support the family in the community where he’s spent his entire life, Tony loses his gig at the Copacabana and suddenly needs a new source of employment. Summoned to a palatial apartment above Carnegie Hall, the feisty character finds himself faced down by affluent pianist Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), who offers Tony a two-month gig to drive him on a concert tour through several southern states.

The pair’s odd-couple chemistry immediately takes hold, with the straight-faced musician’s highbrow temperament striking Tony as a complete mystery. He’s equally confused about Don’s assumption that Tony would have a problem with black people. “Just the other day, my wife and I had a couple coloreds over … for drinks,” says Tony. He gets the gig.

So yes, “Green Book” is one of those by-the-numbers feel-good stories about two men from different worlds uniting over universal hardships and overcoming the biases of a less enlightened time. But Farrelly tackles the material with a confidence that makes each beat count, as the story plays up the offbeat dynamic between the two through a series of complications, most of which call for Tony to take charge as Don faces numerous racist developments over the course of their road trip. Despite occasionally overplaying the “white savior” archetype, the screenplay maintains a clear sense of both characters, in part because it draws on a true story. The screenplay is co-written by the real-life Tony’s son, Nick Vallelonga, who appears to have drawn from his father’s vivid memories of the experience. It could have made a charming documentary; instead, it’s an actor’s showcase.

The movie’s best scenes unfold as Tony speeds down the highway, running his mouth, while Don’s subdued facade gradually shows some cracks as Tony’s charm sets in. As the charismatic man introduces Tony to fried chicken and cranks up the radio, the pair confront internalized biases from both sides of the aisle. The gap between Tony’s understanding of Don’s educated mindset and Don’s cultured standards yield constant punchlines. Shocked that Don’s never heard of Lil Richard and Aretha Franklin, Tony declares, “These are your people!” When Don responds, “You have a very narrow perception of me,” Tony chuckles with the reply, “I’m good, right?”

At times, “Green Book” feels as if it was made several decades ago, and falls short of foregrounding Don’s hardships so much as Tony’s relationship to them. On several occasions, he jumps into action to save Don from various forms of bigotry — a brawl at an all-white bar, crude police officers, and a segregated restaurant all figure into a plot that grows tiresome after several variations on the same complication. However, Farrelly manages to juggle these scenes with a delicate balance of humor and bittersweet vibes that actually do surface in many of the lowbrow comedies he directed with his brother Bobby. Remove the slapstick, and there’s not that big of a gap between the emotional trajectory of “There’s Something About Mary” and “Green Book,” both of which deal with overconfident men who get in touch with their sensitive side. The new movie’s schematic approach builds out Tony’s gentler side with his constant attempts to mail letters to his wife (a warm Linda Cardellini), struggling to describe anything of note until Don takes over the composition.

The bond between the two men starts to fray right on cue, though there’s a decent amount of authenticity to the way they talk through the tensions between them once they bubble to the surface. Mortensen inhabits the character with a kind of authenticity that endows some of the more heavy-handed showdowns with surprising depth (particularly in a monologue where he tells Ali, “I’m blacker than you are”), and Ali’s major studio role since his Oscar win for “Moonlight” allows him to transform a part that could have instantly fallen into a crude caricature and make it real. A brilliant artist incapable of fully expressing the many facets of his personality, Don sits at the cross-section of America’s evolving attitudes toward race, but the movie wisely avoids overplaying that symbolism by simply letting the story move along to its rousing conclusion.

Produced with the elegance and economy of classic studio production, “Green Book” glides along with a jazzy soundtrack and vivid period details. Cinematographer Sean Porter, whose credits include Jeremy Saulnier’s “Green Room” and “Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter,” excels at capturing middle America as a rich tapestry of smoky bars and empty lots. He also gives the musical performances their due, setting the stage for an extraordinary climactic piano jam that does a better job of achieving the movie’s cross-cultural message than any of the spats building up to it.

As if it hadn’t yet hit every trope on schedule, “Green Book” arrives at a good-natured Christmas finale, where the coda has been telegraphed long before it arrives. Nevertheless, the movie maintains an unapologetic air as it goes through the usual motions, and Farrelly never loses grasp of the welcoming tone. A chronicle of two men from opposing worlds finding common ground, “Green Book” works overtime to justify an easy win, and it’s hard not to appreciate the effort.

Grade: B

“Green Book” premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. Universal Pictures will release it November 21.

Zurich Film Festival Sets Peter Farrelly’s ‘Green Book’ for Opening Night

Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” is set to be the opening night film for the 14th Zurich Film Festival, the festival announced Friday. The drama, which stars Viggo Mortensen and Oscar-winner Mahershala Ali, will see its European Premiere in Zurich on Sept…

Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” is set to be the opening night film for the 14th Zurich Film Festival, the festival announced Friday. The drama, which stars Viggo Mortensen and Oscar-winner Mahershala Ali, will see its European Premiere in Zurich on Sept. 27. Set in the early 1960s, “Green Book” is inspired by the true story […]

Mahershala Ali, Viggo Mortensen Go on a Life-Changing Journey in First ‘Green Book’ Trailer (Video)

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen go on a life-changing trip in the first trailer for Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book.”

Mortensen plays Tony Lip, a bouncer from the Bronx who is hired to drive Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), a world-renowned African-American pianist, on a concert tour from Manhattan to the Deep South. They must rely on “The Green Book” to guide them to the clubs and bars that were then safe for African-Americans, but they are still confronted with racism and class issues during their journey of a lifetime.

“It takes courage to change people’s hearts,” Lip gets told by an onlooker who watches Shirley play the piano.

Also Read: Mahershala Ali to Lead ‘True Detective’ Season 3

Linda Cardellini also stars in the drama.

“Green Book” is executive produced by Participant’s Jeff Skoll and Jonathan King, along with Octavia Spencer and Kwame L. Parker, as well as Cinetic Media’s John Sloss and Steven Farneth. Producers are Jim Burke and Charles B. Wessler alongside Farrelly’s fellow writers Brian Currie and Nick Vallelonga. Farrelly is also producing.

Also Read: Is Mahershala Ali the First Muslim Oscar Winner?

“Green Book” will hit theaters on Nov. 21.

Watch the trailer above.

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Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen go on a life-changing trip in the first trailer for Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book.”

Mortensen plays Tony Lip, a bouncer from the Bronx who is hired to drive Dr. Don Shirley (Ali), a world-renowned African-American pianist, on a concert tour from Manhattan to the Deep South. They must rely on “The Green Book” to guide them to the clubs and bars that were then safe for African-Americans, but they are still confronted with racism and class issues during their journey of a lifetime.

“It takes courage to change people’s hearts,” Lip gets told by an onlooker who watches Shirley play the piano.

Linda Cardellini also stars in the drama.

“Green Book” is executive produced by Participant’s Jeff Skoll and Jonathan King, along with Octavia Spencer and Kwame L. Parker, as well as Cinetic Media’s John Sloss and Steven Farneth. Producers are Jim Burke and Charles B. Wessler alongside Farrelly’s fellow writers Brian Currie and Nick Vallelonga. Farrelly is also producing.

“Green Book” will hit theaters on Nov. 21.

Watch the trailer above.

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Viggo Mortensen Will Accept Invitation to Join Academy After Saying No Before

Viggo Mortensen Explains Why 'Captain Fantastic' Is 'Sure to Offend' (Video)

'Captain Fantastic' Sundance Review: Viggo Mortensen Raises an Off-the-Grid Family in This Touching Dramedy

Viggo Mortensen-Mahershala Ali’s ‘Green Book’ Set for Awards Season Release

Universal has given road-trip drama “Green Book,” starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali, an awards-season release of Nov. 21. Production companies are Participant Media and DreamWorks Pictures. Peter Farrelly directs the movie, based …

Universal has given road-trip drama “Green Book,” starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali, an awards-season release of Nov. 21. Production companies are Participant Media and DreamWorks Pictures. Peter Farrelly directs the movie, based on a true friendship that transcended race, class and the 1962 Mason-Dixon line. Mortensen portrays an Italian-American bouncer with a seventh-grade education […]

Universal Dates ‘Green Book’, Shifting ‘Welcome To Marwen’ To December

Universal has set a November 21 release date for Green Book, the Participant/DreamWorks comic road trip movie starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali and directed by Peter Farrelly. The studio’s Steve Carell-starrer Welcome to Marwen, which h…

Universal has set a November 21 release date for Green Book, the Participant/DreamWorks comic road trip movie starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali and directed by Peter Farrelly. The studio’s Steve Carell-starrer Welcome to Marwen, which had been on that date, now moves to December 21, the Friday before Christmas. In the true story Green Book, Mortensen plays Tony Lip, an Italian-American bouncer with a seventh-grade education who is hired to drive Dr. Don Shirley…

Berlinale: A Cautious Market Meets a Reviving Independent Business

Alicia Vikander, Julianne Moore, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen star in new projects at a Berlin market boosted by a number of early looks at high-profile movies in the making. Even so, activity at this year’s European Film Market is unlikely to diverge much from the caution seen at recent major gatherings, such as Sundance. […]

Alicia Vikander, Julianne Moore, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen star in new projects at a Berlin market boosted by a number of early looks at high-profile movies in the making. Even so, activity at this year’s European Film Market is unlikely to diverge much from the caution seen at recent major gatherings, such as Sundance. […]

All 18 Movies and Shows Steve Bannon Wrote, Directed or Produced (Photos)

Before he had the ear of the president, former White House Chief Political Strategist Steve Bannon tried his hand at Hollywood. As a producer, he was behind several small movies, but he really hit his movie-making stride writing and directing conservative documentaries aimed at Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Here’s a complete list of every Hollywood project in which Bannon’s had a hand.

“The Indian Runner” (1991) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s first movie as an executive producer was, somewhat ironically, written and directed by famous Trump critic Sean Penn. “The Indian Runner” starred Viggo Mortensen and David Morse as brothers on the opposite sides of the law. Here’s the trailer.

“Titus” (1999) — Co-Executive Producer
Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange star in this modern-styled adaptation of the Shakespeare “Titus Andronicus.” That story packs an interesting mix of 1950s aesthetics and ancient Roman subject matter. Bannon served as co-executive producer on the project, the production of which was his obsession for almost a decade. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: 37 Movies Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Executive Produced (Photos)

“Reagan: In the Face of Evil” (2004) — Co-Producer
Bannon wrote and directed this documentary, based on the book “Reagan’s War” by Peter Schweizer. It’s heavily conservative and positive about the former Republican president, focusing on his Cold War battle with the Soviet Union. It also holds a fairly abysmal 11 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Watch the trailer here.

“Border War: The Battle Over Illegal Immigration” (2006) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s got a lot of interest in illegal immigration. “Border War” expands its look on illegal immigrants coming from Mexico, trying to include everything from human smuggling and crime to protests and immigration laws. Watch the trailer here.

“Tradition Never Graduates: A Season Inside Notre Dame Football” (2007) — Executive Producer
For the first time since he was producing Shakespeare, Bannon’s filmography takes a break from conservative-leaning movies to talk about how great Notre Dame football is.

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Melissa McCarthy’s Spicer Returns to Send Disney’s Moana to Gitmo (Video)

“The Chaos Experiment” (2009) — Executive Producer
Obviously the best way to improve a “Saw”-style serial killer thriller is with a heavy handed anti-global warming message. Val Kilmer is a deranged global warming scientist who no one will believe. So he locks six people in a steam room to simulate what global warming will eventually do to the world. Watch the trailer here.

“Generation Zero” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
More than one critic called Bannon’s documentary “Generation Zero” a “horror movie” about the US economy. Bannon explains the economic crash of 2008 by blaming the national deficit and bank bailouts, as well as the 1960s and the Baby Boomer generation. But really, this is about the rise of the Tea Party. Watch the trailer here.

“Battle for America” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Bannon tried to get out the conservative vote for the 2010 midterm elections by painting it as a war against the Obama Administration in this documentary. It’s kind of hilarious listening to some of the conservative comments about the radical Obama presidency in the face of Trump’s first seven weeks in office. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Every ‘SNL’ Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

“Fire from the Heartland” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Focusing on women in American conservatism, “Fire from the Heartland” paints the picture of a powerful American cultural movement that draws strength from women’s issues. The movie posits that angry “Mama Grizzly” conservative women are the unforeseen side-effect of feminism in America. Watch the trailer here.

“Sarah Palin: The Undefeated” (2010)
“The Undefeated” chronicles Sarah Palin’s rise in battling the Republican establishment and the liberal media. Bannon’s doc explores her life and history as a politician, painting her as a warrior who went up against special interests and corruption as she rose from Alaska to the national stage. Watch the trailer here.

“The Hope & the Change” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Democrats are disillusioned because of Barack Obama, Bannon works to show in this documentary. Interviewing something like 40 Democrats and Independents, the movie finds people who never got the Hope and Change they were promised. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Twitter Wants Rosie O’Donnell as New ‘SNL’ Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

“District of Corruption” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Before he was part of the Trump Administration and the constant allegations of corruption it weathers, Bannon made this doc hammering the Obama Administration with claims of corruption. Bannon wrote and directed this one, working with conservative watch dog group Judicial Watch. Check out the trailer here.

“Occupy Unmasked” (2012) — Writer, Director
Bannon’s documentaries have shown the Tea Party in a positive light, and in “Occupy Unmasked,” he goes after a liberal movement. The movie portrays Occupy as radical, uncontrollable, and dangerous. Watch the trailer here.

“Sweetwater” (2013) — Executive Producer
Taking a break from making documentaries, Bannon produced “Sweetwater.” The Western is all about revenge and murdering bad dudes, and has a pretty notable cast, including heavy hitters like January Jones, Jason Isaacs, Ed Harris and Stephen Root. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Steve Bannon Rips ‘Opposition Party’ Media at CPAC: ‘It’s Always Wrong’ (Video)

“Rickover: The Birth of Nuclear Power” (2014) — Executive Producer
“Rickover” tells the story of controversial US Navy Admiral Hyman Rickover, who pushed for the first nuclear-powered submarine. After that, Rickover became an entrepreneur and nuclear pioneer, building the first commercial nuclear power plant. The documentary, produced by Bannon, appeared on PBS, of all places.

“Clinton Cash” (2016) — Writer, Executive Producer
Ahead of the 2016 election, Bannon wrote a documentary adaptation of the book “Clinton Cash” by Peter Schweizer. The movie focuses on Clinton Foundation corruption and suggests foreign money influences Hillary Clinton in government. Another ironic one, as allegations of ethics breaches and using the presidency for personal enrichment continue to follow the Trump family. Watch the trailer here.

“Torchbearer” (2016) — Writer, Director, Executive Producer
“Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson goes around the world to talk about Christianity and the Bible in this Bannon-directed doc. The Duck Commander uses the Bible to add context to historical sites, pushing the idea of a culture war to get Christians out to the 2016 polls. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: George Clooney Calls President Trump a Hypocrite: ‘He is a Hollywood Elitist’

“Seinfeld” (1992) — Investor
Bannon’s investment banking company bought a minor stake in Castle Rock Entertainment, the producer behind the show, in 1992. That gave Bannon’s company an undisclosed chunk of the syndication royalties for the show. By 2013, “Seinfeld” reruns had earned $3.1 billion. Even if Bannon only had a one-percent cut of the royalties, “Seinfeld” would have netted him $31 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Steve Bannon’s Ex-Partner: Michael Moore and Leni Riefenstahl Inspired His Look, Approach (Exclusive)

Twitter Wants Rosie O’Donnell as New ‘SNL’ Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

Before Breitbart, Steve Bannon Wrote a Lot of Messed-Up Screenplays

Before he had the ear of the president, former White House Chief Political Strategist Steve Bannon tried his hand at Hollywood. As a producer, he was behind several small movies, but he really hit his movie-making stride writing and directing conservative documentaries aimed at Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Here’s a complete list of every Hollywood project in which Bannon’s had a hand.

“The Indian Runner” (1991) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s first movie as an executive producer was, somewhat ironically, written and directed by famous Trump critic Sean Penn. “The Indian Runner” starred Viggo Mortensen and David Morse as brothers on the opposite sides of the law. Here’s the trailer.

“Titus” (1999) — Co-Executive Producer
Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange star in this modern-styled adaptation of the Shakespeare “Titus Andronicus.” That story packs an interesting mix of 1950s aesthetics and ancient Roman subject matter. Bannon served as co-executive producer on the project, the production of which was his obsession for almost a decade. Watch the trailer here.

“Reagan: In the Face of Evil” (2004) — Co-Producer
Bannon wrote and directed this documentary, based on the book “Reagan’s War” by Peter Schweizer. It’s heavily conservative and positive about the former Republican president, focusing on his Cold War battle with the Soviet Union. It also holds a fairly abysmal 11 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Watch the trailer here.

“Border War: The Battle Over Illegal Immigration” (2006) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s got a lot of interest in illegal immigration. “Border War” expands its look on illegal immigrants coming from Mexico, trying to include everything from human smuggling and crime to protests and immigration laws. Watch the trailer here.

“Tradition Never Graduates: A Season Inside Notre Dame Football” (2007) — Executive Producer
For the first time since he was producing Shakespeare, Bannon’s filmography takes a break from conservative-leaning movies to talk about how great Notre Dame football is.

“The Chaos Experiment” (2009) — Executive Producer
Obviously the best way to improve a “Saw”-style serial killer thriller is with a heavy handed anti-global warming message. Val Kilmer is a deranged global warming scientist who no one will believe. So he locks six people in a steam room to simulate what global warming will eventually do to the world. Watch the trailer here.

“Generation Zero” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
More than one critic called Bannon’s documentary “Generation Zero” a “horror movie” about the US economy. Bannon explains the economic crash of 2008 by blaming the national deficit and bank bailouts, as well as the 1960s and the Baby Boomer generation. But really, this is about the rise of the Tea Party. Watch the trailer here.

“Battle for America” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Bannon tried to get out the conservative vote for the 2010 midterm elections by painting it as a war against the Obama Administration in this documentary. It’s kind of hilarious listening to some of the conservative comments about the radical Obama presidency in the face of Trump’s first seven weeks in office. Watch the trailer here.

“Fire from the Heartland” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Focusing on women in American conservatism, “Fire from the Heartland” paints the picture of a powerful American cultural movement that draws strength from women’s issues. The movie posits that angry “Mama Grizzly” conservative women are the unforeseen side-effect of feminism in America. Watch the trailer here.

“Sarah Palin: The Undefeated” (2010)
“The Undefeated” chronicles Sarah Palin’s rise in battling the Republican establishment and the liberal media. Bannon’s doc explores her life and history as a politician, painting her as a warrior who went up against special interests and corruption as she rose from Alaska to the national stage. Watch the trailer here.

“The Hope & the Change” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Democrats are disillusioned because of Barack Obama, Bannon works to show in this documentary. Interviewing something like 40 Democrats and Independents, the movie finds people who never got the Hope and Change they were promised. Watch the trailer here.

“District of Corruption” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Before he was part of the Trump Administration and the constant allegations of corruption it weathers, Bannon made this doc hammering the Obama Administration with claims of corruption. Bannon wrote and directed this one, working with conservative watch dog group Judicial Watch. Check out the trailer here.

“Occupy Unmasked” (2012) — Writer, Director
Bannon’s documentaries have shown the Tea Party in a positive light, and in “Occupy Unmasked,” he goes after a liberal movement. The movie portrays Occupy as radical, uncontrollable, and dangerous. Watch the trailer here.

“Sweetwater” (2013) — Executive Producer
Taking a break from making documentaries, Bannon produced “Sweetwater.” The Western is all about revenge and murdering bad dudes, and has a pretty notable cast, including heavy hitters like January Jones, Jason Isaacs, Ed Harris and Stephen Root. Watch the trailer here.

“Rickover: The Birth of Nuclear Power” (2014) — Executive Producer
“Rickover” tells the story of controversial US Navy Admiral Hyman Rickover, who pushed for the first nuclear-powered submarine. After that, Rickover became an entrepreneur and nuclear pioneer, building the first commercial nuclear power plant. The documentary, produced by Bannon, appeared on PBS, of all places.

“Clinton Cash” (2016) — Writer, Executive Producer
Ahead of the 2016 election, Bannon wrote a documentary adaptation of the book “Clinton Cash” by Peter Schweizer. The movie focuses on Clinton Foundation corruption and suggests foreign money influences Hillary Clinton in government. Another ironic one, as allegations of ethics breaches and using the presidency for personal enrichment continue to follow the Trump family. Watch the trailer here.

“Torchbearer” (2016) — Writer, Director, Executive Producer
“Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson goes around the world to talk about Christianity and the Bible in this Bannon-directed doc. The Duck Commander uses the Bible to add context to historical sites, pushing the idea of a culture war to get Christians out to the 2016 polls. Watch the trailer here.

“Seinfeld” (1992) — Investor
Bannon’s investment banking company bought a minor stake in Castle Rock Entertainment, the producer behind the show, in 1992. That gave Bannon’s company an undisclosed chunk of the syndication royalties for the show. By 2013, “Seinfeld” reruns had earned $3.1 billion. Even if Bannon only had a one-percent cut of the royalties, “Seinfeld” would have netted him $31 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Steve Bannon's Ex-Partner: Michael Moore and Leni Riefenstahl Inspired His Look, Approach (Exclusive)

Twitter Wants Rosie O'Donnell as New 'SNL' Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

Before Breitbart, Steve Bannon Wrote a Lot of Messed-Up Screenplays

Participant Boards ‘Green Book’ Starring Viggo Mortensen, Mahershala Ali & Linda Cardellini

Participant Media has come aboard to produce and finance Green Book, the Amblin Partners film that is set to star Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali. Peter Farrelly is directing, and Linda Cardellini has just joined the cast. The pic is set to start principal photography this week.
Penned by Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie, Green Book tells the true story of Tony Lip, an Italian-American bouncer with a seventh-grade education who in 1962 was hired to drive Dr…

Participant Media has come aboard to produce and finance Green Book, the Amblin Partners film that is set to star Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali. Peter Farrelly is directing, and Linda Cardellini has just joined the cast. The pic is set to start principal photography this week. Penned by Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie, Green Book tells the true story of Tony Lip, an Italian-American bouncer with a seventh-grade education who in 1962 was hired to drive Dr…

Viggo Mortensen Will Accept Invitation to Join Academy After Saying No Before

On Wednesday, “Captain Fantastic” star Viggo Mortensen was one of the 774 luminaries invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And this time, he plans to accept, a spokesperson for the actor told the Los Angeles Times Thursday.

Mortensen was previously invited to join the academy after being nominated for Best Actor for 2007’s “Eastern Promises,” but decided not to join. A representative for the actor told the Los Angeles Times in 2012 that “Viggo does not like judging art officially.”

However, while discussing his Oscar-nominated performance in last year’s family comedy-drama “Captain Fantastic,” he told TheWrap and others that he would likely accept the invitation if it were extended again — which it was, and which he did.

Also Read: Academy Breaks Own Record, Invites 774 New Members

Mortensen will become part of the largest and one of the most diverse classes in Academy history, joining “Wonder Woman” star Gal Gadot, “Get Out” director Jordan Peele, “Baywatch” leading man Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and icon Betty White as newly minted Oscar voters. The Class of 2017 broke last year’s size record, when the Academy let in 683 new members.

In addition, the new class will make the Academy a little less white and male, as the latest invitees are 39 percent female and 30 percent non-white. That’s not as diverse as last year’s class, which was 46 percent female and 41 percent non-white.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Whoopi Goldberg, Larry Karaszewski Elected to Academy’s Board of Governors

Hollywood Chris Battle Royale: Hemsworth, Evans and Pratt Join Pine as Academy Members

Academy Breaks Own Record, Invites 774 New Members

On Wednesday, “Captain Fantastic” star Viggo Mortensen was one of the 774 luminaries invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And this time, he plans to accept, a spokesperson for the actor told the Los Angeles Times Thursday.

Mortensen was previously invited to join the academy after being nominated for Best Actor for 2007’s “Eastern Promises,” but decided not to join. A representative for the actor told the Los Angeles Times in 2012 that “Viggo does not like judging art officially.”

However, while discussing his Oscar-nominated performance in last year’s family comedy-drama “Captain Fantastic,” he told TheWrap and others that he would likely accept the invitation if it were extended again — which it was, and which he did.

Mortensen will become part of the largest and one of the most diverse classes in Academy history, joining “Wonder Woman” star Gal Gadot, “Get Out” director Jordan Peele, “Baywatch” leading man Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and icon Betty White as newly minted Oscar voters. The Class of 2017 broke last year’s size record, when the Academy let in 683 new members.

In addition, the new class will make the Academy a little less white and male, as the latest invitees are 39 percent female and 30 percent non-white. That’s not as diverse as last year’s class, which was 46 percent female and 41 percent non-white.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Whoopi Goldberg, Larry Karaszewski Elected to Academy's Board of Governors

Hollywood Chris Battle Royale: Hemsworth, Evans and Pratt Join Pine as Academy Members

Academy Breaks Own Record, Invites 774 New Members

Viggo Mortensen Circling Peter Farrelly’s Next Film ‘Green Book’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Following his Oscar nomination for “Captain Fantastic,” Viggo Mortensen may have found his next role. Mortsensen is in talks to star in Peter Farrelly’s next pic “Green Book.” Farrelly will direct from a script he co-wrote with Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie. Currie and Jim Burke will produce. The story is set in 1962 and… Read more »

Following his Oscar nomination for “Captain Fantastic,” Viggo Mortensen may have found his next role. Mortsensen is in talks to star in Peter Farrelly’s next pic “Green Book.” Farrelly will direct from a script he co-wrote with Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie. Currie and Jim Burke will produce. The story is set in 1962 and... Read more »

Viggo Mortensen’s ‘Unabomb’ Nets Multiple Sales for IM Global (EXCLUSIVE)

IM Global has inked a raft of deals for “Unabomb,” selling the Viggo Mortensen manhunt movie to distributors across Europe. The film has landed with Eagle (Italy), Metropolitan (France), Odeon (Greece), Splendid (Benelux), Scanbox (Scandinavia), Tobis (Germany), TriPictures (Spain) and Salim Ramia (Middle East). “It has a high-caliber studio, director and producer, and Viggo Mortensen is… Read more »

IM Global has inked a raft of deals for “Unabomb,” selling the Viggo Mortensen manhunt movie to distributors across Europe. The film has landed with Eagle (Italy), Metropolitan (France), Odeon (Greece), Splendid (Benelux), Scanbox (Scandinavia), Tobis (Germany), TriPictures (Spain) and Salim Ramia (Middle East). “It has a high-caliber studio, director and producer, and Viggo Mortensen is... Read more »

The Eight Performances Cut From Terrence Malick Movies We’d Most Like to See

From Rachel Weisz to Viggo Mortensen, no one is safe.

If you know what happened to Adrien Brody on “The Thin Red Line,” you know that filming scenes for a Terrence Malick movie doesn’t guarantee actually being in a Terrence Malick movie. Brody, who was originally positioned as the film’s lead, didn’t know until its premiere that his role had been drastically reduced; Christopher Plummer had a similar experience on “The New World.”

In the grand scheme of things, they’re lucky ones: More than a few actors have had their parts excised entirely, including one of the would-be stars of “Song to Song.” With that Austin-set romantic drama opening this week, it seemed like a good time to remind ourselves of what could have been.

READ MORE: Terrence Malick Makes a Rare Appearance at SXSW 2017 and Digs Deep On His Process

Billy Bob Thornton, “The Thin Red Line”

In some ways, Thornton represents a version of Malick’s World War II drama we’ll never know, as he recorded hours of narration that went entirely unused. The final film features voiceover from a dozen or so characters, some of them fairly minor; Thornton, however, would have had no onscreen presence at all. This would have been a first for Malick, who later commissioned Ben Kingsley to narrate “Knight of Cups.” 

 

Rachel Weisz, “To the Wonder”

Other than “The Thin Red Line,” Malick’s small-scale follow-up to “The Tree of Life” boasts the highest number of actors cut from the final production. “I did it for the experience of working with him, but one never knows with Terrence Malick,” the Oscar winner told SFGate of her experience. “You can shoot for three months and end up not being in the movie. That’s what happened to my storyline. So I had the experience of filming with him, but I didn’t get to see my work.”

 

Mickey Rourke, “The Thin Red Line”

Since Malick’s return to filmmaking 20 years after “Days of Heaven” featured his largest cast, it makes sense that it can also lay claim to the highest number of actors whose work didn’t make it past the editing room. Rourke called his role as an American soldier “some of the best work I ever did” in a 2005 interview, not that we’ll ever see more than a few snippets as DVD extras. “I’d gone through a really bad time and Terry knew about it so he incorporated it into the character. It really worked.”

READ MORE: ‘Song to Song’ Review: Terrence Malick’s Take on the Austin Music Scene Is Very Malick, And Not Much More — SXSW 2017

Jessica Chastain in "The Tree of Life"

Jessica Chastain in “The Tree of Life”

Cottonwood Pictures/REX/Shutterstock

Jessica Chastain, “To the Wonder”

Chastain had a breakout year in 2011, with roles in everything from “The Help” and “Coriolanus” to “Take Shelter” and “The Debt,” but her most memorable performance came in “The Tree of Life.” As such, it was only reasonable to look forward to seeing her in Malick’s follow-up. That didn’t end up happening, but at least Chastain seemed okay with it — she predicted that her part might get cut, as she was only on set for a few days, and so it did.

 

Barry Pepper, “To the Wonder”

Pepper, who starred in that other WWII movie from 1998, was to play a fellow priest alongside Javier Bardem. Like many (if not most) who’ve worked with Malick, he had little sense of what the film’s narrative entailed but enjoyed the experience all the same: “I’m being absolutely honest with you in saying that I don’t know what the story is about,” he told Collider in 2010. “All I know is my involvement, which is a small chapter within the film, which to me was absolute joy to work with him on that level because it was so free and so unlike anything I’d ever experienced.”

 

Viggo Mortensen, “The Thin Red Line”

The two-time Oscar nominee wasn’t the star he is today in the pre-Aragorn ’90s, and though star power has rarely factored into Malick’s cutting decisions in the past, it’s difficult not to wonder how prominent a role Mortensen might have played.

 

Bill Pullman, “The Thin Red Line”

Everyone’s favorite movie president did a tour of duty in World War II, but unfortunately his service won’t be memorialized onscreen the way his inspirational speech was. It seems his role as part of the Greatest Generation was never major to begin with, but he surely would have added something to the ensemble.

 

Christian Bale, “Song to Song”

It seems that Bale, who starred in “The New World” and “Knight of Cups,” is the most recent addition to this club; early reviews indicate that he doesn’t appear in Malick’s latest at all. At least he saw it coming: “I unfortunately wasn’t able to do everything I was meant to do, so I ended up doing like three, four days on that,” he told IndieWire’s Anne Thompson way back in 2013. “Which in Terry’s world means you’re never going to see me in it.”

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All 18 Movies and Shows Steve Bannon Wrote, Directed or Produced (Photos)

Before he had the ear of the president, Steve Bannon tried his hand at Hollywood. As a producer, he was behind several small movies, but he really hit his movie-making stride writing and directing conservative documentaries aimed at Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Here’s a complete list of every Hollywood project in which Bannon’s had a hand.

“The Indian Runner” (1991) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s first movie as an executive producer was, somewhat ironically, written and directed by famous Trump critic Sean Penn. “The Indian Runner” starred Viggo Mortensen and David Morse as brothers on the opposite sides of the law. Here’s the trailer.

“Titus” (1999) — Co-Executive Producer
Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange star in this modern-styled adaptation of the Shakespeare “Titus Andronicus.” That story packs an interesting mix of 1950s aesthetics and ancient Roman subject matter. Bannon served as co-executive producer on the project, the production of which was his obsession for almost a decade. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Twitter Wants Rosie O’Donnell as New ‘SNL’ Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

“Reagan: In the Face of Evil” (2004) — Co-Producer
Bannon wrote and directed this documentary, based on the book “Reagan’s War” by Peter Schweizer. It’s heavily conservative and positive about the former Republican president, focusing on his Cold War battle with the Soviet Union. It also holds a fairly abysmal 11 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Watch the trailer here.

“Border War: The Battle Over Illegal Immigration” (2006) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s got a lot of interest in illegal immigration. “Border War” expands its look on illegal immigrants coming from Mexico, trying to include everything from human smuggling and crime to protests and immigration laws. Watch the trailer here.

“Tradition Never Graduates: A Season Inside Notre Dame Football” (2007) — Executive Producer
For the first time since he was producing Shakespeare, Bannon’s filmography takes a break from conservative-leaning movies to talk about how great Notre Dame football is.

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Melissa McCarthy’s Spicer Returns to Send Disney’s Moana to Gitmo (Video)

“The Chaos Experiment” (2009) — Executive Producer
Obviously the best way to improve a “Saw”-style serial killer thriller is with a heavy handed anti-global warming message. Val Kilmer is a deranged global warming scientist who no one will believe. So he locks six people in a steam room to simulate what global warming will eventually do to the world. Watch the trailer here.

“Generation Zero” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
More than one critic called Bannon’s documentary “Generation Zero” a “horror movie” about the US economy. Bannon explains the economic crash of 2008 by blaming the national deficit and bank bailouts, as well as the 1960s and the Baby Boomer generation. But really, this is about the rise of the Tea Party. Watch the trailer here.

“Battle for America” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Bannon tried to get out the conservative vote for the 2010 midterm elections by painting it as a war against the Obama Administration in this documentary. It’s kind of hilarious listening to some of the conservative comments about the radical Obama presidency in the face of Trump’s first seven weeks in office. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Every ‘SNL’ Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

“Fire from the Heartland” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Focusing on women in American conservatism, “Fire from the Heartland” paints the picture of a powerful American cultural movement that draws strength from women’s issues. The movie posits that angry “Mama Grizzly” conservative women are the unforeseen side-effect of feminism in America. Watch the trailer here.

“Sarah Palin: The Undefeated” (2010)
“The Undefeated” chronicles Sarah Palin’s rise in battling the Republican establishment and the liberal media. Bannon’s doc explores her life and history as a politician, painting her as a warrior who went up against special interests and corruption as she rose from Alaska to the national stage. Watch the trailer here.

“The Hope & the Change” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Democrats are disillusioned because of Barack Obama, Bannon works to show in this documentary. Interviewing something like 40 Democrats and Independents, the movie finds people who never got the Hope and Change they were promised. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Joe Scarborough, Steve Bannon Trade Jabs Over Trump’s Senior Policy Adviser

“District of Corruption” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Before he was part of the Trump Administration and the constant allegations of corruption it weathers, Bannon made this doc hammering the Obama Administration with claims of corruption. Bannon wrote and directed this one, working with conservative watch dog group Judicial Watch. Check out the trailer here.

“Occupy Unmasked” (2012) — Writer, Director
Bannon’s documentaries have shown the Tea Party in a positive light, and in “Occupy Unmasked,” he goes after a liberal movement. The movie portrays Occupy as radical, uncontrollable, and dangerous. Watch the trailer here.

“Sweetwater” (2013) — Executive Producer
Taking a break from making documentaries, Bannon produced “Sweetwater.” The Western is all about revenge and murdering bad dudes, and has a pretty notable cast, including heavy hitters like January Jones, Jason Isaacs, Ed Harris and Stephen Root. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: Steve Bannon Rips ‘Opposition Party’ Media at CPAC: ‘It’s Always Wrong’ (Video)

“Rickover: The Birth of Nuclear Power” (2014) — Executive Producer
“Rickover” tells the story of controversial US Navy Admiral Hyman Rickover, who pushed for the first nuclear-powered submarine. After that, Rickover became an entrepreneur and nuclear pioneer, building the first commercial nuclear power plant. The documentary, produced by Bannon, appeared on PBS, of all places.

“Clinton Cash” (2016) — Writer, Executive Producer
Ahead of the 2016 election, Bannon wrote a documentary adaptation of the book “Clinton Cash” by Peter Schweizer. The movie focuses on Clinton Foundation corruption and suggests foreign money influences Hillary Clinton in government. Another ironic one, as allegations of ethics breaches and using the presidency for personal enrichment continue to follow the Trump family. Watch the trailer here.

“Torchbearer” (2016) — Writer, Director, Executive Producer
“Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson goes around the world to talk about Christianity and the Bible in this Bannon-directed doc. The Duck Commander uses the Bible to add context to historical sites, pushing the idea of a culture war to get Christians out to the 2016 polls. Watch the trailer here.

Also Read: George Clooney Calls President Trump a Hypocrite: ‘He is a Hollywood Elitist’

“Seinfeld” (1992) — Investor
Bannon’s investment banking company bought a minor stake in Castle Rock Entertainment, the producer behind the show, in 1992. That gave Bannon’s company an undisclosed chunk of the syndication royalties for the show. By 2013, “Seinfeld” reruns had earned $3.1 billion. Even if Bannon only had a one-percent cut of the royalties, “Seinfeld” would have netted him $31 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Twitter Wants Rosie O’Donnell as New ‘SNL’ Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

Before Breitbart, Steve Bannon Wrote a Lot of Messed-Up Screenplays

Steve Bannon’s Ex-Partner: Michael Moore and Leni Riefenstahl Inspired His Look, Approach (Exclusive)

Before he had the ear of the president, Steve Bannon tried his hand at Hollywood. As a producer, he was behind several small movies, but he really hit his movie-making stride writing and directing conservative documentaries aimed at Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Here’s a complete list of every Hollywood project in which Bannon’s had a hand.

“The Indian Runner” (1991) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s first movie as an executive producer was, somewhat ironically, written and directed by famous Trump critic Sean Penn. “The Indian Runner” starred Viggo Mortensen and David Morse as brothers on the opposite sides of the law. Here’s the trailer.

“Titus” (1999) — Co-Executive Producer
Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange star in this modern-styled adaptation of the Shakespeare “Titus Andronicus.” That story packs an interesting mix of 1950s aesthetics and ancient Roman subject matter. Bannon served as co-executive producer on the project, the production of which was his obsession for almost a decade. Watch the trailer here.

“Reagan: In the Face of Evil” (2004) — Co-Producer
Bannon wrote and directed this documentary, based on the book “Reagan’s War” by Peter Schweizer. It’s heavily conservative and positive about the former Republican president, focusing on his Cold War battle with the Soviet Union. It also holds a fairly abysmal 11 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Watch the trailer here.

“Border War: The Battle Over Illegal Immigration” (2006) — Executive Producer
Bannon’s got a lot of interest in illegal immigration. “Border War” expands its look on illegal immigrants coming from Mexico, trying to include everything from human smuggling and crime to protests and immigration laws. Watch the trailer here.

“Tradition Never Graduates: A Season Inside Notre Dame Football” (2007) — Executive Producer
For the first time since he was producing Shakespeare, Bannon’s filmography takes a break from conservative-leaning movies to talk about how great Notre Dame football is.

“The Chaos Experiment” (2009) — Executive Producer
Obviously the best way to improve a “Saw”-style serial killer thriller is with a heavy handed anti-global warming message. Val Kilmer is a deranged global warming scientist who no one will believe. So he locks six people in a steam room to simulate what global warming will eventually do to the world. Watch the trailer here.

“Generation Zero” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
More than one critic called Bannon’s documentary “Generation Zero” a “horror movie” about the US economy. Bannon explains the economic crash of 2008 by blaming the national deficit and bank bailouts, as well as the 1960s and the Baby Boomer generation. But really, this is about the rise of the Tea Party. Watch the trailer here.

“Battle for America” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Bannon tried to get out the conservative vote for the 2010 midterm elections by painting it as a war against the Obama Administration in this documentary. It’s kind of hilarious listening to some of the conservative comments about the radical Obama presidency in the face of Trump’s first seven weeks in office. Watch the trailer here.

“Fire from the Heartland” (2010) — Writer, Director, Producer
Focusing on women in American conservatism, “Fire from the Heartland” paints the picture of a powerful American cultural movement that draws strength from women’s issues. The movie posits that angry “Mama Grizzly” conservative women are the unforeseen side-effect of feminism in America. Watch the trailer here.

“Sarah Palin: The Undefeated” (2010)
“The Undefeated” chronicles Sarah Palin’s rise in battling the Republican establishment and the liberal media. Bannon’s doc explores her life and history as a politician, painting her as a warrior who went up against special interests and corruption as she rose from Alaska to the national stage. Watch the trailer here.

“The Hope & the Change” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Democrats are disillusioned because of Barack Obama, Bannon works to show in this documentary. Interviewing something like 40 Democrats and Independents, the movie finds people who never got the Hope and Change they were promised. Watch the trailer here.

“District of Corruption” (2012) — Writer, Director, Producer
Before he was part of the Trump Administration and the constant allegations of corruption it weathers, Bannon made this doc hammering the Obama Administration with claims of corruption. Bannon wrote and directed this one, working with conservative watch dog group Judicial Watch. Check out the trailer here.

“Occupy Unmasked” (2012) — Writer, Director
Bannon’s documentaries have shown the Tea Party in a positive light, and in “Occupy Unmasked,” he goes after a liberal movement. The movie portrays Occupy as radical, uncontrollable, and dangerous. Watch the trailer here.

“Sweetwater” (2013) — Executive Producer
Taking a break from making documentaries, Bannon produced “Sweetwater.” The Western is all about revenge and murdering bad dudes, and has a pretty notable cast, including heavy hitters like January Jones, Jason Isaacs, Ed Harris and Stephen Root. Watch the trailer here.

“Rickover: The Birth of Nuclear Power” (2014) — Executive Producer
“Rickover” tells the story of controversial US Navy Admiral Hyman Rickover, who pushed for the first nuclear-powered submarine. After that, Rickover became an entrepreneur and nuclear pioneer, building the first commercial nuclear power plant. The documentary, produced by Bannon, appeared on PBS, of all places.

“Clinton Cash” (2016) — Writer, Executive Producer
Ahead of the 2016 election, Bannon wrote a documentary adaptation of the book “Clinton Cash” by Peter Schweizer. The movie focuses on Clinton Foundation corruption and suggests foreign money influences Hillary Clinton in government. Another ironic one, as allegations of ethics breaches and using the presidency for personal enrichment continue to follow the Trump family. Watch the trailer here.

“Torchbearer” (2016) — Writer, Director, Executive Producer
“Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson goes around the world to talk about Christianity and the Bible in this Bannon-directed doc. The Duck Commander uses the Bible to add context to historical sites, pushing the idea of a culture war to get Christians out to the 2016 polls. Watch the trailer here.

“Seinfeld” (1992) — Investor
Bannon’s investment banking company bought a minor stake in Castle Rock Entertainment, the producer behind the show, in 1992. That gave Bannon’s company an undisclosed chunk of the syndication royalties for the show. By 2013, “Seinfeld” reruns had earned $3.1 billion. Even if Bannon only had a one-percent cut of the royalties, “Seinfeld” would have netted him $31 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Twitter Wants Rosie O'Donnell as New 'SNL' Steve Bannon After McCarthy Slays as Sean Spicer

Before Breitbart, Steve Bannon Wrote a Lot of Messed-Up Screenplays

Steve Bannon's Ex-Partner: Michael Moore and Leni Riefenstahl Inspired His Look, Approach (Exclusive)

Why Viggo Mortensen Deserves to Win the Oscar for Best Actor — Consider This

The Oscar race for Best Actor has come down to Casey Affleck vs. Denzel Washington, but it’s really Viggo Mortensen’s magical work in “Captain Fantastic” that deserves the gold.

There’s a moment early on in “Captain Fantastic” where Viggo Mortensen’s Ben Cash, still reeling from the news of his wife’s suicide, addresses his children on the matter. “Last night mommy killed herself,” he says, “she finally did it.” The bluntness hits like a shock to the system.

It won’t be the last we encounter Ben’s child-rearing directness. Over the course of the film, he sticks firmly to his “no lying” mantra, going as far as to tell his young daughter about sexual intercourse after she asks. But that initial encounter is critical. As played by the extraordinary Mortensen, it’s a moment of deep tragedy. He gives the line a no-nonsense edge that proves euphemisms don’t run in this family, but his swelling eyes hint at how crippling that can be. It’s at this moment that “Captain Fantastic” asks its big question: How does a parent live with himself when the way he has raised his children begins to betray them all?

READ MORE: ‘Captain Fantastic’ Review: Viggo Mortensen Turns a Hokey Premise Into Something Magical

The answer to that question is charted by Mortensen over the rest of the film in a performance defined by affection and heartbreak. His work has landed him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor, the second of his career, though he is hardly a frontrunner. By most accounts, the race has boiled down to “Manchester By the Sea” star Casey Affleck, winner of over 30 awards this season, and Denzel Washington, a last-minute threat for “Fences” who most recently won the SAG Award.

But Viggo doesn’t just deserve to be in the frontrunner conversation with them — he deserves to win. With Ben Cash, he finds a way to undercut our expectations of him as an actor, and he becomes more vulnerable on screen than we’ve ever seen him before.

"Manchester By the Sea"

“Manchester By the Sea”

The same can’t really be said for Affleck, whose role in “Manchester by the Sea” embodies his strengths as an actor. Affleck has long excelled at tapping into the emotional despondency of his characters. His withdrawn nature makes him a natural fit for writer-director Kenneth Lonergan’s material. His detachment is a peculiarity as the film begins, but it develops into an embodiment of inescapable grief when his tragic past comes to light. It’s an ideal pairing of character and performer that is heart-shattering. The same goes for Denzel Washington — who directs himself in “Fences” — as Troy Maxon, resulting in the fusion of a major American actor with a major August Wilson character. Both actors are tremendous, but they’re not exactly exploring new territory.

READ MORE: 2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor

Mortensen, however, challenges our perception of him as an actor the more “Captain Fantastic” progresses. The story follows Ben and his children as they leave their isolated home in the Pacific Northwest and travel to New Mexico to attend the funeral. The more the family is put up against the real world, the more Ben is forced to reconcile with the way he decided to raise his kids. The Ben Cash we meet at the start of the picture — covered in dirt, knifing the heart out of a deer and feeding it to his son — may be jarringly left-of-center, but he’s so in line with the protective, masculine strength Mortensen has built a career out of that it makes it easy to see past, and even fall for, his extremeness.

As director Matt Ross told IndieWire last summer, “There’s something about Viggo — he’s a man’s man and believes intellectually the words coming out of his mouth.” We may identify celebrating “Noam Chomsky Day” or faking a heart attack to steal groceries from a supermarket as questionable parenting choices, but Mortensen makes it all charming.

But slowly Ben is pulled apart by the real world, and the power of the performance is how far Mortensen goes to make the character morally complex, to turn everything we’ve come to admire about him (his no-bullshit charm, for instance) into things we can’t quite trust anymore.

“Captain Fantastic”

Erik Simkins / Bleecker Street

The centerpiece of the movie finds Ben’s father-in-law (Frank Langella) threatneing to gain custody of his children, and it’s a brutal moment of truth. Mortensen turns Ben into a complicated, self-realized anti-hero. We find ourselves no longer able to fully sympathize with Ben, just as he realizes he can’t sympathize with his decisions, either. He has blindly led his children down a dangerous path he was too scared to acknowledge himself. The internal confusion Mortensen plays with here is undeniably effective. Is he guilty of child abuse? As Ben wrestles with that question, the question lingers to powerful effect.

No other actor in the Oscar race has an arc this tricky to maneuver, and Mortensen does it with such reserved emotion that you almost take it for granted. It’s not until Ben stops lying to himself that the full power of Mortensen’s work becomes impossible to ignore. “I’ll ruin your lives,” he says to his children about why they can’t keep living with him. The silent emotional turmoil that follows as Ben drives away might just be the most bare one minute of Mortensen’s career.  He once again forces us to reconsider our sympathy for the character in a single glance. He manages to break down Ben to his essential core — a parent who loves his children and just wants to do right by them, no matter the cost — and gets the viewer aching for his redemption.

"Captain Fantastic"

“Captain Fantastic”

"Captain Fantastic"

That moment is the last step in Ben’s transformation and represents how radically Mortensen has broken down a character that started so safely in his wheelhouse. Back when “Captain Fantastic” was playing Cannes, the actor openly admitted to taking on roles that were “off the beaten path,” and that’s certainly the wild man we first meet.

But the story forces Ben — and, by default, Viggo — to get on the damn path. The final image says it all (spoiler warning): Ben, having just packed school lunches, sits in peace as his kids do their homework while eating breakfast. It’s the kind of domestic bliss you’d rarely associate Viggo with. He’s no longer a “man’s man,” but a domestic man. The magic of his performance isn’t just how right he makes this endpoint feel for the character, but also how rewarding he makes the journey to it.

READ MORE: Viggo Mortensen Doesn’t Need to Make Big Movies Anymore

There’s a moment earlier in the film where Ben’s daughter analyzes Professor Humbert from “Lolita.” “I hate him and feel sorry for him at the same time,” she says. A variation of that sentiment could apply to Ben as well. We don’t necessarily hate him, but our loyalty to him and his loyalty to himself is constantly being challenged, and it’s in this moral grey area where Mortensen’s performance thrives. He takes the viewer on a shapeshifting emotional journey, forcing us to admire, distrust, and ultimately put our faith in Ben. What other Best Actor nominee can you say that about? Mortensen taps into a paternal humanity so real, so honest that it more than holds its own against both frontrunners.

Power to Viggo, stick it to the Oscars!

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‘Lord of the Rings’ Stars Reunite, Reenact Battle Scene With Silverware

It’s enough to make LOTR fans lose their minds.

Alumni of the “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” reunited to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the film that kicked off Peter Jackson’s hit trilogy.

And five actors who played members of the famed Fellowship had a lot fun with their reunion, reenacting the first big battle scene… with silverware.

Also Read: ‘Lord of the Rings’ 15th Anniversary: 15 Facts About ‘Fellowship of the Ring’ (Photos)

Dominic Monaghan, who played Merry, posted pics on Instagram of him meeting up with Billy Boyd, a.k.a. Pippin. They were joined by Viggo Mortensen and Orlando Bloom, who played the warriors Aragorn and Legolas, respectively, and Frodo Baggins himself, Elijah Wood.

My captain. My king. @theoneringnet @empiremagazine

A photo posted by Dominic Monaghan (@dom_monaghan_) on Jan 30, 2017 at 8:05pm PST

Along with posing for selfies to the delight of “LOTR” fans everywhere, the group joined together for a picture of them holding forks and knives out like swords at the ready. Monaghan captioned the pic with the famous phrase, “They have a cave troll!,” calling back to the famous battle scene between the Fellowship and a horde of orcs in the mines of Moria.

Also Read: 14 Actors Who Were Almost Cast in ‘The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring’

If you’re wondering what the stars of “LOTR” are up to now, they have a lot of recent work you can check out. Mortensen got a surprise Oscar nomination last week for his performance in “Captain Fantastic.” Wood most recently starred as an eccentric metalhead turned vigilante who teams up with a mild-mannered lady to “get rid of a**holes” in society in “I Don’t Feel At Home in This World Anymore,” which won the U.S. Dramatic Prize at Sundance this week. (You can see it on Netflix later this month.)

Orlando Bloom will be returning to his other claim to fame, “Pirates of the Caribbean,” in the Disney series’ fifth installment, “Dead Men Tell No Tales,” due out this summer. As for Monaghan, you can see him in the darkly humorous SXSW thriller “Pet,” in which he plays a stalker who becomes obsessed with and captures a girl named Holly.

And if you want to experience the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy all over again, you can get the extended edition box set on Blu-Ray in stores now.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Lord of the Rings’ 15th Anniversary: 15 Facts About ‘Fellowship of the Ring’ (Photos)

14 Actors Who Were Almost Cast in ‘The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring’

Turkish Court to Decide if ‘Lord of The Rings” Gollum Insults Country’s President

It’s enough to make LOTR fans lose their minds.

Alumni of the “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” reunited to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the film that kicked off Peter Jackson’s hit trilogy.

And five actors who played members of the famed Fellowship had a lot fun with their reunion, reenacting the first big battle scene… with silverware.

Dominic Monaghan, who played Merry, posted pics on Instagram of him meeting up with Billy Boyd, a.k.a. Pippin. They were joined by Viggo Mortensen and Orlando Bloom, who played the warriors Aragorn and Legolas, respectively, and Frodo Baggins himself, Elijah Wood.

My captain. My king. @theoneringnet @empiremagazine

A photo posted by Dominic Monaghan (@dom_monaghan_) on

Along with posing for selfies to the delight of “LOTR” fans everywhere, the group joined together for a picture of them holding forks and knives out like swords at the ready. Monaghan captioned the pic with the famous phrase, “They have a cave troll!,” calling back to the famous battle scene between the Fellowship and a horde of orcs in the mines of Moria.

If you’re wondering what the stars of “LOTR” are up to now, they have a lot of recent work you can check out. Mortensen got a surprise Oscar nomination last week for his performance in “Captain Fantastic.” Wood most recently starred as an eccentric metalhead turned vigilante who teams up with a mild-mannered lady to “get rid of a**holes” in society in “I Don’t Feel At Home in This World Anymore,” which won the U.S. Dramatic Prize at Sundance this week. (You can see it on Netflix later this month.)

Orlando Bloom will be returning to his other claim to fame, “Pirates of the Caribbean,” in the Disney series’ fifth installment, “Dead Men Tell No Tales,” due out this summer. As for Monaghan, you can see him in the darkly humorous SXSW thriller “Pet,” in which he plays a stalker who becomes obsessed with and captures a girl named Holly.

And if you want to experience the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy all over again, you can get the extended edition box set on Blu-Ray in stores now.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Lord of the Rings' 15th Anniversary: 15 Facts About 'Fellowship of the Ring' (Photos)

14 Actors Who Were Almost Cast in 'The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring'

Turkish Court to Decide if 'Lord of The Rings" Gollum Insults Country's President

‘Eastern Promises’ Sequel Set to Film in Spring

“Body Cross” is written by original screenwriter and “Peaky Blinders” creator Steven Knight.

Just in time for renewed fears of Russia’s growing influence, production is set to begin on “Body Cross,” the follow-up to David Cronenberg’s Russian gangster thriller “Eastern Promises,” starring Viggo Mortensen and Vincent Cassel. The script is written by original screenwriter Steven Knight (“Peaky Blinders,” Tom Hardy’s “Taboo”), but no word on Cronenberg’s involvement.

READ MORE: ‘Taboo’ Review: Tom Hardy is a Powder Keg Primed to Explode in Macho FX Miniseries

In an interview with IndieWire Knight gave in 2014, the writer expressed high hopes for the project: “I can say the script for the second one is much better that the first. Honestly it’s one of the things I’ve written that I most like and it’s driving me mad… so I’ve got to get it made.”

An earlier attempt at a remake was stymied by budget disagreements with Focus Features, Cronenberg told IndieWire in 2012. “I really wanted to see Nikolia go back to Russia, because one of the things I wanted in the first movie was that you see a bunch of Russians in London but you never see them in Russia. In other words you experience their exile and they are trying to recreate some of Russia within London,” he said.

READ MORE: David Cronenberg Joins Cast of Sarah Polley’s ‘Alias Grace’ Series

The casting notice for “Body Cross,” however, tells a  much different story: “The sequel picks up where the 2007 film left off — with the incompetent underboss Kirill thinking that he and his henchman driver Nikolai really have inherited the throne from his crime-lord father, without knowing that Nikolai is actually a clandestine agent working undercover in Russia’s federal security service.”

The return of Kirill and Nikolai suggests Mortensen and Cassell are on board to reprise their roles. No mention of an email hacking sub-plot, but there’s still time.

Golden Globes Party Scene with ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Westworld’ and Oprah (Photos)

The BAFTA LA Awards Season Tea Party at the Four Seasons

“Stranger Things” gang Noah Schnapp (left) and Fin Wolfhard (right) recruited a new member of the team: Sunny Pawar, who played the lost little boy in “Lion”…

Meanwhile, Millie Bobby Brown recruited Schnapp for a bigger prized target: Ryan Gosling.Meanwhile, Millie Bobby Brown recruited Schnapp for a bigger prized target: Ryan Gosling.

Justin Timberlake, Maisie Williams, and Andrew Garfield

These were just three of the big names filling the Four Seasons Ballroom at BAFTA LA’s Saturday afternoon tea party that spilled out in to the courtyard where…

Justin Timberlake, Maisie Williams, and Andrew Garfield

These were just three of the big names filling the Four Seasons Ballroom at BAFTA LA’s Saturday afternoon tea party that spilled out in to the courtyard where…

People were so glad to run in to one another, it took a long time for people to actually make it in to the ballroom.

Thandie Newton, Edwina Findley, Ryan Michelle Bathe, Sterling K. Brown, Mahershala Ali and Tichina Arnold in the foyer, which had all the action for the first hour.

People were so glad to run in to one another, it took a long time for people to actually make it in to the ballroom.

Octavia Spencer, Andrew Garfield, and Niecy Nash

Also Read: Golden Globes Scene: Inside TV and Film’s Once a Year Power Lunch (Photos)

Michelle Williams, Thandie Newton, and Naomie Harris

All thee of these women are up for Golden Globes on Sunday, with Williams (“Manchester by the Sea”) and Harris (“Moonlight”) going head to head for supporting actress. At BAFTA though, it was all love.

BAFTA CEO Kieran Breen

For once, the crowd actually shut up and listened to their host after several people hit the champagne glasses. Breen highlighted BAFTA’s year-round involvement in the community.

Team “Westworld”: Evan Rachel Wood, Thandie Newton, and Angela Sarafyan

The authentic off-screen friendship between on-screen allies Newton and Sarafyan proved to be an enriching sight, even holding hands as they guided each other through the crowd. The two were in lockstep all day on Saturday, attending the W It Girl Luncheon together earlier.

Mahershala Ali and Ryan Gosling

If forecasts are correct, you may be looking at the 2017 Oscar winners for Best Supporting and Best Lead actor.Along with “Welsh Rarebit”, “Open Faced Coronation Chicken Sandwiches” on the catering table reminded you of the British hosts.

Harvey Weinstein, director Garth Davis, and Riz Ahmed

Weinstein and company are still actively campaigning “Lion”, even holding a screening on Friday night of Golden Globes weekend at the IAC building in West Hollywood, with a party at Estrella afterwards.

Speaking of Ahmed…

He spent time with the other most most lauded “defendant” on TV this year, “The People v. O.J. Simpson’s” Cuba Gooding Jr.  Sterling K. Brown lifted Gooding off his feet when they met up on the way in to the party.

Justin Timberlake and Viggo Mortensen

Timberlake is on the trail for his vocal contributions to “Trolls”, while Mortensen is quietly nominated for a Golden Globe Best Actor (Drama) for “Captain Fantastic”. He’s up against the much more publicized Casey Affleck, Andrew Garfield, Denzel Washington, and…

Joel Edgerton

To make it over to Lionsgate’s “La La Land” party at Cecconi’s, Gosling would leave the BAFTA event through what I call “The Leo Door”: a hidden door in the corner of the ballroom that “The Revenant” actor has used at the same event in the past.

Leave through the Leo door = win an Oscar? We’ll find out on February 26.Jeffrey Tambor, Kasia Ostlun, Gosling and BAFTA LA President Chantal RickardEarlier, Film Independent President Josh Welsh, Issa Rae, and Sterling K. Brown toasted the Spirit Award nominees at Boa on Sunset.Ruth Negga, Michael Shannon, and Peggy Siegal

Ava DuVernay and Craig Robinson

The prime purpose of the Spirit brunch was to present three $75,000 grants to filmmakers. Here, Anna Rose Holmer. Piaget, American Airlines, Piaget, and Jeep sponsored the brunch and help fund those significant grants.

Amy Landecker speaks for us all.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Inside Golden Globe Pre-Parties: Barbra Streisand, Chris Pine Duet While Movie Stars Mingle (Photos)

Golden Globes Scene: Inside TV and Film’s Once a Year Power Lunch (Photos)

The BAFTA LA Awards Season Tea Party at the Four Seasons

“Stranger Things” gang Noah Schnapp (left) and Fin Wolfhard (right) recruited a new member of the team: Sunny Pawar, who played the lost little boy in “Lion”…

Meanwhile, Millie Bobby Brown recruited Schnapp for a bigger prized target: Ryan Gosling.Meanwhile, Millie Bobby Brown recruited Schnapp for a bigger prized target: Ryan Gosling.

Justin Timberlake, Maisie Williams, and Andrew Garfield

These were just three of the big names filling the Four Seasons Ballroom at BAFTA LA’s Saturday afternoon tea party that spilled out in to the courtyard where…

Justin Timberlake, Maisie Williams, and Andrew Garfield

These were just three of the big names filling the Four Seasons Ballroom at BAFTA LA’s Saturday afternoon tea party that spilled out in to the courtyard where…

People were so glad to run in to one another, it took a long time for people to actually make it in to the ballroom.

Thandie Newton, Edwina Findley, Ryan Michelle Bathe, Sterling K. Brown, Mahershala Ali and Tichina Arnold in the foyer, which had all the action for the first hour.

People were so glad to run in to one another, it took a long time for people to actually make it in to the ballroom.

Octavia Spencer, Andrew Garfield, and Niecy Nash

Michelle Williams, Thandie Newton, and Naomie Harris

All thee of these women are up for Golden Globes on Sunday, with Williams (“Manchester by the Sea”) and Harris (“Moonlight”) going head to head for supporting actress. At BAFTA though, it was all love.

BAFTA CEO Kieran Breen

For once, the crowd actually shut up and listened to their host after several people hit the champagne glasses. Breen highlighted BAFTA’s year-round involvement in the community.

Team “Westworld”: Evan Rachel Wood, Thandie Newton, and Angela Sarafyan

The authentic off-screen friendship between on-screen allies Newton and Sarafyan proved to be an enriching sight, even holding hands as they guided each other through the crowd. The two were in lockstep all day on Saturday, attending the W It Girl Luncheon together earlier.

Mahershala Ali and Ryan Gosling

If forecasts are correct, you may be looking at the 2017 Oscar winners for Best Supporting and Best Lead actor.Along with “Welsh Rarebit”, “Open Faced Coronation Chicken Sandwiches” on the catering table reminded you of the British hosts.

Harvey Weinstein, director Garth Davis, and Riz Ahmed

Weinstein and company are still actively campaigning “Lion”, even holding a screening on Friday night of Golden Globes weekend at the IAC building in West Hollywood, with a party at Estrella afterwards.

Speaking of Ahmed…

He spent time with the other most most lauded “defendant” on TV this year, “The People v. O.J. Simpson’s” Cuba Gooding Jr.  Sterling K. Brown lifted Gooding off his feet when they met up on the way in to the party.

Justin Timberlake and Viggo Mortensen

Timberlake is on the trail for his vocal contributions to “Trolls”, while Mortensen is quietly nominated for a Golden Globe Best Actor (Drama) for “Captain Fantastic”. He’s up against the much more publicized Casey Affleck, Andrew Garfield, Denzel Washington, and…

Joel Edgerton

To make it over to Lionsgate’s “La La Land” party at Cecconi’s, Gosling would leave the BAFTA event through what I call “The Leo Door”: a hidden door in the corner of the ballroom that “The Revenant” actor has used at the same event in the past.

Leave through the Leo door = win an Oscar? We’ll find out on February 26.Jeffrey Tambor, Kasia Ostlun, Gosling and BAFTA LA President Chantal RickardEarlier, Film Independent President Josh Welsh, Issa Rae, and Sterling K. Brown toasted the Spirit Award nominees at Boa on Sunset.Ruth Negga, Michael Shannon, and Peggy Siegal

Ava DuVernay and Craig Robinson

The prime purpose of the Spirit brunch was to present three $75,000 grants to filmmakers. Here, Anna Rose Holmer. Piaget, American Airlines, Piaget, and Jeep sponsored the brunch and help fund those significant grants.

Amy Landecker speaks for us all.

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