Q&A: Val Kilmer Talks ‘The Super’ and ‘Top Gun’ Sequel

In his lengthy and varied career, Val Kilmer has played everyone from Jim Morrison to Doc Holliday to Mark Twain – in multiple projects. He’s played Moses in the lavish musical “The Ten Commandments” and voiced KITT the car in the “Knight Rider” reboot…

In his lengthy and varied career, Val Kilmer has played everyone from Jim Morrison to Doc Holliday to Mark Twain – in multiple projects. He’s played Moses in the lavish musical “The Ten Commandments” and voiced KITT the car in the “Knight Rider” reboot. Along the way, he’s worked with filmmakers from Oliver Stone to […]

‘Top Gun’ Sequel Release Pushed Back One Year at Paramount

Paramount Pictures has pushed back an anticipated sequel to “Top Gun” from July 2019 to June 2020, the studio announced on Wednesday.

Extensive visual effects work and complicated flight scenes are said to be at the heart of the production extension, an individual familiar with the project told TheWrap.

The ensemble action film will reunite stars Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer nearly 35 years after the original was released in 1986, when it eventually hits in 2020.

Also Read: Jennifer Connelly in Early Talks to Join Tom Cruise in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’

Joseph Kosinski is directing from a script by Eric Warren Singer, Peter Craig and Justin Marks.  Jerry Bruckheimer is producing for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and David Ellison for Skydance. Cruise also serves as a producer.

More to come …

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Connelly in Early Talks to Join Tom Cruise in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’

Miles Teller Lands Goose’s Son in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’

Kenny Loggins Wants to Make a New ‘Danger Zone’ for ‘Top Gun: Maverick’

Paramount Pictures has pushed back an anticipated sequel to “Top Gun” from July 2019 to June 2020, the studio announced on Wednesday.

Extensive visual effects work and complicated flight scenes are said to be at the heart of the production extension, an individual familiar with the project told TheWrap.

The ensemble action film will reunite stars Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer nearly 35 years after the original was released in 1986, when it eventually hits in 2020.

Joseph Kosinski is directing from a script by Eric Warren Singer, Peter Craig and Justin Marks.  Jerry Bruckheimer is producing for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and David Ellison for Skydance. Cruise also serves as a producer.

More to come …

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Connelly in Early Talks to Join Tom Cruise in 'Top Gun: Maverick'

Miles Teller Lands Goose's Son in 'Top Gun: Maverick'

Kenny Loggins Wants to Make a New 'Danger Zone' for 'Top Gun: Maverick'

Val Kilmer’s Drama ‘The Super’ Bought by Saban Films

Saban Films has acquired U.S. distribution rights to the “The Super,” starring Val Kilmer and John Flueger (“Chicago P.D.”). Stephan Rick directed from a script by John J. McLaughlin. The genre film is based on an idea from &#82…

Saban Films has acquired U.S. distribution rights to the “The Super,” starring Val Kilmer and John Flueger (“Chicago P.D.”). Stephan Rick directed from a script by John J. McLaughlin. The genre film is based on an idea from “Law & Order” creator/producer Dick Wolf, who produced through his company Wolf Entertainment alongside Tom Thayer, Patrick […]

Saban Films Lands U.S. Rights To Val Kilmer Thriller ‘The Super’, Sets October Bow

EXCLUSIVE: Saban Films has acquired U.S. distribution rights to The Super, the Stephan Rick-directed genre thriller that stars Top Gun 2‘s Val Kilmer and Chicago P.D.‘s Patrick John Flueger.  The film was scripted by Black Swan’s John…

EXCLUSIVE: Saban Films has acquired U.S. distribution rights to The Super, the Stephan Rick-directed genre thriller that stars Top Gun 2‘s Val Kilmer and Chicago P.D.‘s Patrick John Flueger.  The film was scripted by Black Swan’s John J. McLaughlin based on an idea by Law & Order creator Dick Wolf, who produced through his company Wolf Entertainment alongside Tom Thayer, Patrick Rizzotti and Brett Forbes. Saban Films has set an October 19 release and the film should play…

Jennifer Connelly On Tarmac For ‘Top Gun 2: Maverick’

EXCLUSIVE: Jennifer Connelly is being set to join Tom Cruise in Top Gun 2: Maverick, the Joseph Kosinski-directed sequel for Paramount Pictures. She will join Cruise, who reprises his Maverick character from the 1986 hit, alongside Val Kilmer who retur…

EXCLUSIVE: Jennifer Connelly is being set to join Tom Cruise in Top Gun 2: Maverick, the Joseph Kosinski-directed sequel for Paramount Pictures. She will join Cruise, who reprises his Maverick character from the 1986 hit, alongside Val Kilmer who returns to play Maverick’s nemesis Iceman. Miles Teller also will star as the son of Maverick’s wingman, played in the original Jerry Bruckheimer-produced film by Anthony Edwards. The sequel takes place as Maverick becomes a Top…

Val Kilmer Calls Anthony Bourdain ‘Selfish’ for Taking His Own Life: ‘You Left Too Soon’

“Did you relapse?” he asks. “Did you cheat on your girl?”

Val Kilmer has reacted to the news of Anthony Bourdain’s apparent suicide with a lengthy, at times rambling Facebook post in which he calls the chef “so selfish” and asks such questions as “did you relapse?” and “did you cheat on your girl?” Kilmer, who has been dealing with throat cancer for the last few years, also compared Bourdain’s struggles to his own and asked whether the “No Reservations” and “Parts Unknown’ host would have taken his own life if he’d dealing with the issues Kilmer himself has faced.

“Oh the darkness. Oh the dark thick pain of loss. The selfishness. How many moments away were you from feeling the love that was universal. From every corner of the world you were loved. So selfish. You’ve given us cause to be so angry,” Kilmer writes.

“I hear you took your life in paris. What hotel? Did you relapse? Did you just get home from the best meal of your life?” he continues. “Did you cheat on your girl. Those of us that knew you are shocked and angry and angry and angry selfishly angry, for what you just did to us. Millions I should think. At least a million people like me who imagine they know you.”

Bourdain was dating Asia Argento at the time of his death, and following yesterday’s news the actress referred to him as “my love, my rock, my protector.”

“Did you bleed out? Did you suffocate? Did you jump. No you didn’t jump. Is it important we know how you did it?” Kilmer asks. “No. But that you did it.” Then, on the subject of his own health problems, he asks, “Would you have taken your life two years ago when like me you were unable to take in food and move it with your tongue over your taste buds because your tongue was too swollen?”

Kilmer eventually adds that Bourdain “left too soon” and that he’s “going to prove it.” Read his full post here.

Actor Val Kilmer Gives Long Facebook Lament On Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide

Val Kilmer lashed out in anger against his friend Anthony Bourdain today, saying the CNN TV star’s suicide was “so selfish” in a rambling online post.
Kilmer made his remarks in a lengthy post on Facebook, mixing anger with spiritual …

Val Kilmer lashed out in anger against his friend Anthony Bourdain today, saying the CNN TV star’s suicide was “so selfish” in a rambling online post. Kilmer made his remarks in a lengthy post on Facebook, mixing anger with spiritual invocations. "Oh the dark thick pain of loss. The selfishness,"…

Val Kilmer Sparks Outrage After Calling Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide ‘Selfish’

Val Kilmer has called Anthony Bourdain’s suicide “selfish” in a lengthy Facebook post in which the actor tells his late friend, “You’ve given us cause to be so angry.”

“From every corner of the world you were loved. So selfish,” Kilmer wrote on Facebook on Friday. “You’ve given us cause to be so angry. A spiritual guide once told me suicide is the most selfish act a human can execute and I was confused but she explained there’s just no mental place further away from humanity and purpose than the hypnotized numbness that creates the false picture of despair, that forces the victim, unaware, to believe, life’s legacy is over.”

He added, “Those of us that knew you are shocked and angry and angry and angry selfishly angry, for what you just did to us… Oh Darkness. My prayer before the light breaks this morning of June 8th, is that it doesn’t ever again fool another warrior like you, who chased the hot slice of momentary satisfaction around the world 15 times, but found no reason for 16.”

See Video: Rose McGowan Mourns Anthony Bourdain in Tearful Video: ‘We Needed You’

Kilmer also alludes to his own battle with throat cancer in his post.

“Would you have taken your life two years ago when like me you were unable to take in food and move it with your tongue over your taste buds because your tongue was too swollen?” he asked. “Is too swollen. I think and dream and plan on eating and tasting and enjoying every meal I’ve ever enjoyed and every meal I’ve learned to enjoy in my imagination, Altho I’ve never met a meal I didn’t like in the last 40 years except anything with too much cilantro. Was that it? You woke up and realized you were no longer hungry.”

People quickly turned to Twitter to comment on Kilmer’s post, shaming him for calling suicide “selfish.”

Also Read: Anthony Bourdain Mourned by Celebrity Chefs, Other Stars: ‘Heartbroken’

It tells me so much about you that in this moment you shame him. The only appropriate response is love. Unfollowing…

— …….. …… (@jennnsolo) June 8, 2018

Suicide is not selfish. The only reason people suicide is to escape the pain.
This tweet is just awful.

— Shireen (@ok2banintrovert) June 8, 2018

Suicide is not selfish. It’s a very personal battle within. Unfortunately, mental illness does not allow you to look past your sorrow and pain. It’s not done out of malice.

— Barbi (@sum1star) June 8, 2018

@valkilmer when I tried to take my own life, I truly felt what I was planning was the most unselfish thing. Everyone would be much happier when I was gone. The veil of delusion is at bottom & only if you make it back to the surface do you realize how selfish it is. 2U

— Chris Bagby (@northwestblnde) June 8, 2018

How can you be mad at someone who killed themselves? Because they were selfish for ending their life? Is it not selfish that you would rather they live in pain than decide to end that pain? Who do you think suffered more? The guy who ended his life or the people who had to mourn?

— Paul Rinn (@PaulRinn) June 8, 2018

Lena Dunham weighed in on the matter of blaming those who commit suicide, though did not mention Kilmer.

People don’t commit suicide because of an event, a person or a thing. You wouldn’t blame a person for someone else’s cancer, nor call someone weak for developing it. Only when we start talking about depression as a disease will stigma be erased.

— ???? Lena Dunham ???? (@lenadunham) June 8, 2018

Bourdain died on Friday at age 61 of suicide. According to the BBC, Bourdain’s body was found in a hotel room in a Strasbourg, France, where he was shooting an episode for CNN’s “Parts Unknown,” now in its 11th season. Many stars took the opportunity to note that Bourdain’s death came just days after that of fashion designer Kate Spade, also by suicide, and underscored the crippling effects of depression.

“You found and showed us pockets of freedom from individuals around the world, from your pirate ship of tv and with a crew of brilliant writers producers camera and sound people, assistants, executives and lawyers who saw you clearly and loved you dearly, and went the extra mile on paper, to enable you to walk there, in the rain, before daylight, and waiting for the sun, reflect quietly on the pageantry, about to unfold,” concluded Kilmer. “You could have and should have given it one more shot. Sometimes we must live in service to another’s life and live with no hope of equality. Life isn’t fair that way. Who says you had a right to take away all this love from us so soon? Oh the darkness. The darkness on the edge of town. ‘There’s a darkness in the edge of town…’ you left too soon my friend. I fell asleep to watching you enjoy Uruguay last night. It was a rerun but I always find something I didn’t see before… you left too soon. And I’m going to prove it…”

See Kilmer’s Facebook post below.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide Prompts Stars to Share Their Own Depression Battles

Anthony Bourdain, Chef and TV Host, Dies of Suicide at 61

Anthony Bourdain Defends #MeToo Accusers From Doubters: ‘They Have Nothing to Gain’

Val Kilmer has called Anthony Bourdain’s suicide “selfish” in a lengthy Facebook post in which the actor tells his late friend, “You’ve given us cause to be so angry.”

“From every corner of the world you were loved. So selfish,” Kilmer wrote on Facebook on Friday. “You’ve given us cause to be so angry. A spiritual guide once told me suicide is the most selfish act a human can execute and I was confused but she explained there’s just no mental place further away from humanity and purpose than the hypnotized numbness that creates the false picture of despair, that forces the victim, unaware, to believe, life’s legacy is over.”

He added, “Those of us that knew you are shocked and angry and angry and angry selfishly angry, for what you just did to us… Oh Darkness. My prayer before the light breaks this morning of June 8th, is that it doesn’t ever again fool another warrior like you, who chased the hot slice of momentary satisfaction around the world 15 times, but found no reason for 16.”

Kilmer also alludes to his own battle with throat cancer in his post.

“Would you have taken your life two years ago when like me you were unable to take in food and move it with your tongue over your taste buds because your tongue was too swollen?” he asked. “Is too swollen. I think and dream and plan on eating and tasting and enjoying every meal I’ve ever enjoyed and every meal I’ve learned to enjoy in my imagination, Altho I’ve never met a meal I didn’t like in the last 40 years except anything with too much cilantro. Was that it? You woke up and realized you were no longer hungry.”

People quickly turned to Twitter to comment on Kilmer’s post, shaming him for calling suicide “selfish.”

Lena Dunham weighed in on the matter of blaming those who commit suicide, though did not mention Kilmer.

Bourdain died on Friday at age 61 of suicide. According to the BBC, Bourdain’s body was found in a hotel room in a Strasbourg, France, where he was shooting an episode for CNN’s “Parts Unknown,” now in its 11th season. Many stars took the opportunity to note that Bourdain’s death came just days after that of fashion designer Kate Spade, also by suicide, and underscored the crippling effects of depression.

“You found and showed us pockets of freedom from individuals around the world, from your pirate ship of tv and with a crew of brilliant writers producers camera and sound people, assistants, executives and lawyers who saw you clearly and loved you dearly, and went the extra mile on paper, to enable you to walk there, in the rain, before daylight, and waiting for the sun, reflect quietly on the pageantry, about to unfold,” concluded Kilmer. “You could have and should have given it one more shot. Sometimes we must live in service to another’s life and live with no hope of equality. Life isn’t fair that way. Who says you had a right to take away all this love from us so soon? Oh the darkness. The darkness on the edge of town. ‘There’s a darkness in the edge of town…’ you left too soon my friend. I fell asleep to watching you enjoy Uruguay last night. It was a rerun but I always find something I didn’t see before… you left too soon. And I’m going to prove it…”

See Kilmer’s Facebook post below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Anthony Bourdain's Suicide Prompts Stars to Share Their Own Depression Battles

Anthony Bourdain, Chef and TV Host, Dies of Suicide at 61

Anthony Bourdain Defends #MeToo Accusers From Doubters: 'They Have Nothing to Gain'

Iceman Returneth: Val Kilmer Back for ‘Top Gun’ Sequel With Tom Cruise (Exclusive)

Val Kilmer will star opposite Tom Cruise in the “Top Gun: Maverick,” an individual with knowledge of the production told TheWrap.

Kilmer will join Cruise in the long-awaited sequel to Tony Scott’s 1986 action blockbuster, in which Cruise’s aviator Pete “Maverick” Mitchell is now a mentor to a new generation of U.S. Navy fighter pilots.

A rep for Paramount declined to comment on the casting of Kilmer, who has been spotted around the San Diego hotel the studio has been using since production began last week.

Kilmer, who played aviator Tom “Iceman” Kazansky and Cruise’s chief rival in the original film, is repped by CAA and Hirsch Wallerstein Hayum Matlof and Fishman.

Also Read: Tom Cruise Feels the Need for Speed in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ Production Start Tease (Photo)

Titled “Top Gun: Maverick,” the new film is set to hit theaters July 12, 2019. Joseph Kosinski is directing from a script by Eric Warren Singer, Peter Craig and Justin Marks. (Tony Scott had been circling the sequel project before his death in 2012.)

The original action movie — which also starred Anthony Edwards and Kelly McGillis — followed the exploits of a flight academy and its students.

Kilmer previously teased on Facebook that he was  “offered ‪#‎topgun2‬ — not often you get to say ‘yes’ without reading the script…”

Also Read: ‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout’ Trailer Goes to New Heights With Tom Cruise (Video)

Shortly after the post, however, Kilmer updated his Facebook post and said he had been premature in making the announcement: “This is a long way off so calm down. This has been talked about for a long long time and being offered a role is very different from doing a role. I jumped the gun with my post. I jumped the topgun… An innocent mistake. It was just such a wonderful phone call with my agent…”

“Top Gun: Maverick” is being produced by Jerry Bruckheimer for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and David Ellison for Skydance. Cruise also serves as a producer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tom Cruise Feels the Need for Speed in ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ Production Start Tease (Photo)

‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout’ Trailer Goes to New Heights With Tom Cruise (Video)

Razzies: ‘Emoji Movie,’ Tom Cruise Named Among the Worst in 2017 Films

Val Kilmer will star opposite Tom Cruise in the “Top Gun: Maverick,” an individual with knowledge of the production told TheWrap.

Kilmer will join Cruise in the long-awaited sequel to Tony Scott’s 1986 action blockbuster, in which Cruise’s aviator Pete “Maverick” Mitchell is now a mentor to a new generation of U.S. Navy fighter pilots.

A rep for Paramount declined to comment on the casting of Kilmer, who has been spotted around the San Diego hotel the studio has been using since production began last week.

Kilmer, who played aviator Tom “Iceman” Kazansky and Cruise’s chief rival in the original film, is repped by CAA and Hirsch Wallerstein Hayum Matlof and Fishman.

Titled “Top Gun: Maverick,” the new film is set to hit theaters July 12, 2019. Joseph Kosinski is directing from a script by Eric Warren Singer, Peter Craig and Justin Marks. (Tony Scott had been circling the sequel project before his death in 2012.)

The original action movie — which also starred Anthony Edwards and Kelly McGillis — followed the exploits of a flight academy and its students.

Kilmer previously teased on Facebook that he was  “offered ‪#‎topgun2‬ — not often you get to say ‘yes’ without reading the script…”

Shortly after the post, however, Kilmer updated his Facebook post and said he had been premature in making the announcement: “This is a long way off so calm down. This has been talked about for a long long time and being offered a role is very different from doing a role. I jumped the gun with my post. I jumped the topgun… An innocent mistake. It was just such a wonderful phone call with my agent…”

“Top Gun: Maverick” is being produced by Jerry Bruckheimer for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and David Ellison for Skydance. Cruise also serves as a producer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tom Cruise Feels the Need for Speed in 'Top Gun: Maverick' Production Start Tease (Photo)

'Mission: Impossible – Fallout' Trailer Goes to New Heights With Tom Cruise (Video)

Razzies: 'Emoji Movie,' Tom Cruise Named Among the Worst in 2017 Films

Mira Sorvino, Val Kilmer To Star In The Indie Film ‘Riptide’

Oscar winner Mira Sorvino, Val Kilmer, Michael Chiklis (The Shield), and Clifton Collins Jr (Star Trek) have signed on to topline the indie film Riptide, from producer Sam Khoze and LA Independent Film and Entertainment. Shaun Hart wrote and is directing the pic, which will begin filming this summer.
It follows two sons of a biker drug trafficker who hold opposing views of their father’s lifestyle. When the father’s operation is raided by the ATF, the youngest looks to…

Oscar winner Mira Sorvino, Val Kilmer, Michael Chiklis (The Shield), and Clifton Collins Jr (Star Trek) have signed on to topline the indie film Riptide, from producer Sam Khoze and LA Independent Film and Entertainment. Shaun Hart wrote and is directing the pic, which will begin filming this summer. It follows two sons of a biker drug trafficker who hold opposing views of their father's lifestyle. When the father's operation is raided by the ATF, the youngest looks to…

Why the Plot of ‘The Snowman’ Makes No Sense, According to the Director of ‘The Snowman’

“The Snowman” is one of the most fascinatingly awful movies of the past few years, for several reasons. It’s got a pretty solid director, Tomas Alfredson of “Let the Right One In” and “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” fame. It’s got a really quality cast, with Michael Fassbender, Rebecca Ferguson, Charlotte Gainsbourg, JK Simmons, Val Kilmer and Toby Jones. And it’s based on the seventh book in the acclaimed Harry Hole series of Norwegian mystery novels by Jo Nesbø.

And yet the movie, about an elite crime squad’s hunt for a serial killer, is a total disaster, with a plot that makes absolutely no sense and impossibly bad ADR for a couple characters that makes their scenes feel like jokes. And it sports a 7 percent rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes.

The whole thing is incredibly interesting, which is how I’m justifying to myself having watched it four times since it came out on home video this month. Since the movie flopped pretty hard theatrically, pulling in just $6.7 million domestically, I decided to revisit this point now since far more people will watch it on home video — an ecosystem in which a lot more folks go into movies blind, oblivious to the madness they’re about to experience.

In any case, “The Snowman” is that rare bad movie where somebody involved actually tried to explain why it’s bad. Usually the people involved just pretend it’s just a regular competently made movie. But not so here.  Here’s what Alfredson said about the behind-the-scenes struggles to the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (or NRK) back when the movie was first released in October.

Also Read: ‘The Snowman’ Review: Michael Fassbender Thriller Melts in a Pool of Slushy Writing

First, they apparently got off to a bad start, not having enough prep time before being sent off to shoot the movie.

“It happened very abruptly,” Alfredson said, as translated by Yahoo! Movies UK. “Suddenly we got notice that we had the money and could start the shoot in London.”

And once they got started, Alfredson said, they apparently didn’t have enough time to actually shoot the whole script.

“Our shoot time in Norway was way too short. We didn’t get the whole story with us and when we started cutting we discovered that a lot was missing,” Alfredson said, estimating that as much as 15 percent of the screenplay was missing from the footage they’d shot.

“It’s like when you’re making a big jigsaw puzzle and a few pieces are missing so you don’t see the whole picture.”

Which, yes, that’s exactly what the movie feels like. When I tried to describe it to my friends I compared it to a hypothetical version of “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” that was missing all the little parts that tie the thing together into a coherent whole.

It’s not clear exactly where he’s laying the blame for these issues — whether it be the studio (Universal) or one or more of the production companies involved (Working Title, Perfect World, Another Park). But he is definitely not blaming himself or screenwriters Peter Straughan, Hossein Amini and Søren Svestrup.

“The Snowman” is one of the most fascinatingly awful movies of the past few years, for several reasons. It’s got a pretty solid director, Tomas Alfredson of “Let the Right One In” and “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” fame. It’s got a really quality cast, with Michael Fassbender, Rebecca Ferguson, Charlotte Gainsbourg, JK Simmons, Val Kilmer and Toby Jones. And it’s based on the seventh book in the acclaimed Harry Hole series of Norwegian mystery novels by Jo Nesbø.

And yet the movie, about an elite crime squad’s hunt for a serial killer, is a total disaster, with a plot that makes absolutely no sense and impossibly bad ADR for a couple characters that makes their scenes feel like jokes. And it sports a 7 percent rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes.

The whole thing is incredibly interesting, which is how I’m justifying to myself having watched it four times since it came out on home video this month. Since the movie flopped pretty hard theatrically, pulling in just $6.7 million domestically, I decided to revisit this point now since far more people will watch it on home video — an ecosystem in which a lot more folks go into movies blind, oblivious to the madness they’re about to experience.

In any case, “The Snowman” is that rare bad movie where somebody involved actually tried to explain why it’s bad. Usually the people involved just pretend it’s just a regular competently made movie. But not so here.  Here’s what Alfredson said about the behind-the-scenes struggles to the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (or NRK) back when the movie was first released in October.

First, they apparently got off to a bad start, not having enough prep time before being sent off to shoot the movie.

“It happened very abruptly,” Alfredson said, as translated by Yahoo! Movies UK. “Suddenly we got notice that we had the money and could start the shoot in London.”

And once they got started, Alfredson said, they apparently didn’t have enough time to actually shoot the whole script.

“Our shoot time in Norway was way too short. We didn’t get the whole story with us and when we started cutting we discovered that a lot was missing,” Alfredson said, estimating that as much as 15 percent of the screenplay was missing from the footage they’d shot.

“It’s like when you’re making a big jigsaw puzzle and a few pieces are missing so you don’t see the whole picture.”

Which, yes, that’s exactly what the movie feels like. When I tried to describe it to my friends I compared it to a hypothetical version of “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” that was missing all the little parts that tie the thing together into a coherent whole.

It’s not clear exactly where he’s laying the blame for these issues — whether it be the studio (Universal) or one or more of the production companies involved (Working Title, Perfect World, Another Park). But he is definitely not blaming himself or screenwriters Peter Straughan, Hossein Amini and Søren Svestrup.

Golden Globes 2018: W Magazine’s ‘Best Performances’ Bash, ‘It Girls’ Lunch Return (Exclusive)

The big knock on the Golden Globes is that it’s a frothy celebrity pep rally, fueled by bottomless afternoon champagne.

If you ever won a middle school election or higher, you racked up more total votes than the vote threshold needed to win a Globe from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

However, by distilling the entire film and television industries to just 1,200 of the most essential people in the Beverly Hilton’s ballroom, the HFPA throws one hell of a head-turning party. The same goes for the week of satellite events.

James Brolin, Hirshberg, Streisand, and Tonchi (Donato Sardella/Getty Images)

Quietly, and without a red carpet, W Magazine’s Best Performances party at Chateau Marmont has become a crown jewel social huddle of the weekend. On Jan. 4, Stefano Tonchi and Lynn Hirschberg will again host an intimate gathering of cultural captains at the Chateau, The Party Report has learned.

W Mag Best Performances 2017 at the Chateau

Last year, Barbra Streisand appeared out of nowhere, strolling out onto the balcony with publicist Ken Sunshine. The notoriously private singer even posed for a cellphone picture, albeit with Chris Pine.

How W rewrapped the Chateau penthouse in 2017. (W Mag)

As André Balazs danced in the living room where future Oscar winners Emma Stone and Mahershala Ali chatted, Rami Malek came bounding into the lounge with had good news for host Hirschberg: he would be playing Freddie Mercury in the Queen biopic.

Months later, we learned how that turned out.

Also Read: Bryan Singer Fired From Freddie Mercury Biopic ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’

Lynn Hirschberg and Rami Malek 

From a healthy Val Kilmer to a “what’s-she-doing-here” Paris Hilton, even a seasoned party observer doesn’t know who will turn up to pack the penthouse.

“We always have a few surprises and special guests in the mix – stay tuned!” Tonchi, the Editor In Chief, told The Party Report over email this morning.

Although he was there last year,  I’m assuming Bob Weinstein is off the list.

Hotelier Andre Balazs dancing in the living room of his own hotel. (BFA)

The glossy mag’s Best Performances portfolio, which will be unveiled during the first week of January when Hollywood gets back to work, will feature 15 Golden Globe nominees. Hirschberg deserves a spot on Gold Derby’s round-up of awards experts for her track record. She has to cast and shoot the portfolio months before any voting, putting her in the same position as AFI Fest and the fall film festivals in separating the contenders from the pretenders.

New this year, W will publish a special, limited-edition Best Performances broadsheet, sponsored by Dior, which will be distributed during Golden Globes week and available at the party.

Audi will shuttle the talent to the Chateau on Jan. 4, returning for their second year. It’s a smart match for the industry-connected luxury brand, after previously hosting their own Globes bash for many years. While known for talent integrations and a year-round partnership with the Emmys, this is a more precise play to have couples like Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake rolling in with you.

Hirschberg bases the annual Golden Globes weekend luncheon on the Interview magazine “It Girl” feature profiles (Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images)

On Saturday, Jan. 6, Hirschberg will host her annual “It Girl” luncheon at A.O.C. in partnership with Dior. Historically, attendees have included both Golden Globes nominees and new, emerging talent — handpicked by Hirschberg as the next wave of “It Girls” to watch. It’s a sanctuary from the noise of the louder and more heavily trafficked events orbiting glitzy weekend.

Get ready for the 2018 Golden Globes by checking out TheWrap’s round-up of nominees’ reactions:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Art Basel Party Report: Drake, 50 Cent and Ricky Martin Rock South Beach (Photos)

Oscars 2018 Party Report: ‘The Final Year’, ‘Call Me by Your Name’ and Brooklynn Prince on the Scene (Photos)

Oscars 2018 Party Report: Contenders From Emma Stone to Jake Gyllenhaal Hit the Scene (Photos)

The big knock on the Golden Globes is that it’s a frothy celebrity pep rally, fueled by bottomless afternoon champagne.

If you ever won a middle school election or higher, you racked up more total votes than the vote threshold needed to win a Globe from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

However, by distilling the entire film and television industries to just 1,200 of the most essential people in the Beverly Hilton’s ballroom, the HFPA throws one hell of a head-turning party. The same goes for the week of satellite events.

James Brolin, Hirshberg, Streisand, and Tonchi (Donato Sardella/Getty Images)

Quietly, and without a red carpet, W Magazine’s Best Performances party at Chateau Marmont has become a crown jewel social huddle of the weekend. On Jan. 4, Stefano Tonchi and Lynn Hirschberg will again host an intimate gathering of cultural captains at the Chateau, The Party Report has learned.

W Mag Best Performances 2017 at the Chateau

Last year, Barbra Streisand appeared out of nowhere, strolling out onto the balcony with publicist Ken Sunshine. The notoriously private singer even posed for a cellphone picture, albeit with Chris Pine.

How W rewrapped the Chateau penthouse in 2017. (W Mag)

As André Balazs danced in the living room where future Oscar winners Emma Stone and Mahershala Ali chatted, Rami Malek came bounding into the lounge with had good news for host Hirschberg: he would be playing Freddie Mercury in the Queen biopic.

Months later, we learned how that turned out.

Lynn Hirschberg and Rami Malek 

From a healthy Val Kilmer to a “what’s-she-doing-here” Paris Hilton, even a seasoned party observer doesn’t know who will turn up to pack the penthouse.

“We always have a few surprises and special guests in the mix – stay tuned!” Tonchi, the Editor In Chief, told The Party Report over email this morning.

Although he was there last year,  I’m assuming Bob Weinstein is off the list.

Hotelier Andre Balazs dancing in the living room of his own hotel. (BFA)

The glossy mag’s Best Performances portfolio, which will be unveiled during the first week of January when Hollywood gets back to work, will feature 15 Golden Globe nominees. Hirschberg deserves a spot on Gold Derby’s round-up of awards experts for her track record. She has to cast and shoot the portfolio months before any voting, putting her in the same position as AFI Fest and the fall film festivals in separating the contenders from the pretenders.

New this year, W will publish a special, limited-edition Best Performances broadsheet, sponsored by Dior, which will be distributed during Golden Globes week and available at the party.

Audi will shuttle the talent to the Chateau on Jan. 4, returning for their second year. It’s a smart match for the industry-connected luxury brand, after previously hosting their own Globes bash for many years. While known for talent integrations and a year-round partnership with the Emmys, this is a more precise play to have couples like Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake rolling in with you.

Hirschberg bases the annual Golden Globes weekend luncheon on the Interview magazine “It Girl” feature profiles (Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images)

On Saturday, Jan. 6, Hirschberg will host her annual “It Girl” luncheon at A.O.C. in partnership with Dior. Historically, attendees have included both Golden Globes nominees and new, emerging talent — handpicked by Hirschberg as the next wave of “It Girls” to watch. It’s a sanctuary from the noise of the louder and more heavily trafficked events orbiting glitzy weekend.

Get ready for the 2018 Golden Globes by checking out TheWrap’s round-up of nominees’ reactions:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Art Basel Party Report: Drake, 50 Cent and Ricky Martin Rock South Beach (Photos)

Oscars 2018 Party Report: 'The Final Year', 'Call Me by Your Name' and Brooklynn Prince on the Scene (Photos)

Oscars 2018 Party Report: Contenders From Emma Stone to Jake Gyllenhaal Hit the Scene (Photos)

Val Kilmer Tells Great Stories From A Terrific Career: Q&A

EXCLUSIVE: When Val Kilmer was presented with the Grand Honorary Award for outstanding contribution to cinema at the Sitges genre festival in Spain last month, he wanted to do one interview about his career. The catch was, it had to be done in an email back and forth, because he is recovering from cancer treatments to his throat and did not have his voice at the time. That festival also premiered The Super, a Stephan Rick-directed genre film Kilmer stars in with Chicago…

EXCLUSIVE: When Val Kilmer was presented with the Grand Honorary Award for outstanding contribution to cinema at the Sitges genre festival in Spain last month, he wanted to do one interview about his career. The catch was, it had to be done in an email back and forth, because he is recovering from cancer treatments to his throat and did not have his voice at the time. That festival also premiered The Super, a Stephan Rick-directed genre film Kilmer stars in with Chicago…

A former actress says Val Kilmer punched her while she auditioned for The Doors

In a BuzzFeed story, a former actress named Caitlin O’Heaney has accused Val Kilmer of punching her while she was auditioning for The Doors while director Oliver Stone allegedly “just stood there the whole time laughing.” O’Heaney was auditioning for the role of Pamela, Doors frontman Jim Morrison’s girlfriend, and…

Read more…

In a BuzzFeed story, a former actress named Caitlin O’Heaney has accused Val Kilmer of punching her while she was auditioning for The Doors while director Oliver Stone allegedly “just stood there the whole time laughing.” O’Heaney was auditioning for the role of Pamela, Doors frontman Jim Morrison’s girlfriend, and…

Read more...

Former Actress Breaks NDA to Share Story of Being Physically Assaulted by Val Kilmer During ‘Doors’ Auditions

Caitlin O’Heaney alleges that Kilmer punched her during an audition scene for the Oliver Stone film, leading to a confidential settlement and an NDA she now regrets signing.

Former actress Caitlin O’Heaney has joined the chorus of women speaking out about their experiences being assaulted in the entertainment industry. The “Tales of the Gold Monkey” star spoke to BuzzFeed — breaking a decades-old settlement and nondisclosure agreement in order to do so — about an alleged assault at the hands of actor Val Kilmer during an early audition for the Oliver Stone docudrama film “The Doors.”

In 1989, O’Heaney was set to audition for the lead female role in the film about Jim Morrison and his sixties-era rock band, Morrison’s girlfriend Pamela Courson (the role later played by Meg Ryan in the film). Her audition pages included a scene in which Morrison and Pamela get into an argument, and while the scene involves the throwing of objects at each other, it does not include any hitting or slapping.

O’Heaney explained that “during the audition, Kilmer unexpectedly struck her in the face and knocked her to the ground.” She added, “When I got to the room and Val Kilmer picked me up and shaked me, throwing me down to the floor…Stone just stood there the whole time laughing.”

The actress filed a preliminary police report for battery with the Los Angeles Police Department about a month after the incident occurred. O’Heaney provided the outlet with a number of supporting documents, including “a police report from the time, the confidential settlement signed by her, Stone, and Kilmer, and a check made to her from a company attached to the film for $24,500.”

BuzzFeed notes that “the agreement absolves Stone and Kilmer from any wrongdoing and forbids O’Heaney from ever discussing the allegations and the settlement publicly. The agreement does not outline the details mentioned in the police report…The agreement goes on to state that all parties agree to keep the settlement confidential and won’t disclose it or the allegations to anyone else.”

O’Heaney said that she regrets entering into the settlement. “I was so traumatized that, against my better judgment, I signed that document, which says I can never speak about this,” she told BuzzFeed. “If this was something that happened nowadays, I wouldn’t sign it.”

She no longer works in the industry, and says that her acting prospects dried up soon after she signed the agreement.

While neither Kilmer nor Stone have so far answered BuzzFeed’s request for comment, lawyer Norman Oberstein, who represented the pair at the time, attempted to paint the incident as a “workplace mishap,” telling the outlet that this particular case is “not one of them,” in reference to the uptick in stories about sexual abuse in the workplace. “I doubt your article is exploring workplace mishaps during the acting out of a scene,” he wrote to BuzzFeed in an email.

BuzzFeed also spoke with Risa Bramon Garcia, the casting director for “The Doors,” who was also present during the audition. She told the outlet that “she was surprised by O’Heaney’s allegations because the actor ‘seemed fine when she left’ the audition.”

O’Heaney told the outlet that “she is speaking out now because the women who came forward to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault and harassment gave her the courage to do so.” On the heels of copious allegations against powerful men, including Harvey Weinstein, Bill O’Reilly, and James Toback, more and more victims are feeling empowered to speak out. Earlier this week, a former Weinstein assistant also broke her own NDA to share her story.

“Women have come together, saying, ‘We’re not going to be fucked by you,'” O’Heaney told BuzzFeed. “I finally have the confidence to speak about this. It’s too long that I’ve sat on this story.”

You can read the full BuzzFeed article — and see the accompanying documents — right here.

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

‘The Snowman’ Review: Michael Fassbender Thriller Melts in a Pool of Slushy Writing

Harry Hole is Norway’s most famous detective, as created in a long-running series of best-selling books by author Jo Nesbø. Following on, very slowly, from the successful 2011 adaptation of Nesbo’s novel “Headhunters” (from director Morten Tyldum, who would go on to make “The Imitation Game” and “Passengers”), the first English-language film version of Nesbø’s work now arrives in the shape of “The Snowman.”

Michael Fassbender plays the maverick, alcoholic, chain-smoking Oslo cop, probably hoping, along with producers Working Title, that this could be the start of long-running franchise, something to get him out of the X-Men costume, at least. Hole (technically, it’s pronounced ho-leh) is on the trail of a serial killer who leaves figures of snowmen outside the houses from where he snatches his female victims, or where he slices them up. We’re not sure for a while if this is, indeed, a serial killer case, and we’ve certainly no idea how he makes the stupid snowmen.

It’s only when homicide department newcomer Katrine, played by Rebecca Ferguson, detects a recurring pattern in the disappearances of pregnant women that Hole comes out of his vodka-soaked fug to get interested in solving crimes once more. “I’m sorry about Oslo’s low murder rate,” concedes his long-suffering police chief, “but I need you to turn up for work.”

Watch Video: ‘Snowman’: Michael Fassbender Hunts a Serial Killer in Terrifying First Trailer

The scent of a hunt seems to energize Harry Hole, although it doesn’t help matters in his chaotic private life, which involves an art dealer ex-lover played by Charlotte Gainsbourg, her son Oleg, and her current husband, a slimy doctor called Matthias (Jonas Karlsson).

Meanwhile, a grinning — and therefore obviously evil — industrialist called Arve Stop (J.K. Simmons, using a sinister Nordic accent) is masterminding Oslo’s bid for the World Winter Games. In his downtime, this powerful tycoon enjoys taking photos of scared young women on his mobile phone and inviting them to his hotel room. The women are seemingly procured for him by a dodgy fertility doctor called Vetleser, played by David Dencik, the actor who was so creepy as Pus in “Top of the Lake: China Girl.”

What can it all mean? As is now customary in the Scandi noir genre, all is not white amid the driven snows of the Norwegian winters. Blood soaks through, crows peck at the ice, and long-buried secrets emerge.

READ MORE

See The Snowman’s latest POWER MOVE.

PowerRank:

707

Katrine and her newly-issued but incredibly clunky-looking EviSync machine go about their data-recording detective business; the fact that we learn this gizmo needs fingerprint ID to function will obviously come back with grisly consequences later on. The Snowman, you see, is not averse to incorporating real body parts in his snow sculpture work.

A strong-on-paper cast includes appearances from Scandi noir queen herself, Sofia Helin (star of the original “The Bridge”), as well as Chloe Sevigny, Toby Jones, Anne Reid and a ridiculous-looking Val Kilmer whose face is so frozen, he can barely speak. (Must be very chilly in Norway this time of year.)

This should have been a success. The screenwriters include Oscar nominees Peter Straughan (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”) and Hossein Amini (“Drive”); Martin Scorsese exec produces; Dion Beebe takes on photography duties and award-winning Maria Djurkovic (“A Bigger Splash”) goes to town with the Ikea-catalogue production design. Director Tomas Alfredson and his producers strain for a magic blend of his stylish ensemble noir “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and his macabre Swedish vampire fable “Let The Right One In.” But you can hear the ice crack under the weight of all that expectation.

Also Read: J.K. Simmons’ ‘The Bachelors’ Acquired by Freestyle Digital Media (Exclusive)

For all his red-eyed, hangover acting, Fassbender cannot make his detective interesting; Hole is about the right name for this characterless performance. Even the dependable Ferguson looks lost in the snowdrifts of the script. All around them, sub-plots, tangents and flashbacks feel casually cobbled together, a smorgasbord where all the herrings are red and the krispbread clichés gone stale.

When you’re playing it casual with sexual assault, female trafficking, dismemberment, and institutional corruption, it quickly becomes an exercise in bad judgement and bad taste. A hurriedly assembled final edit looks as messy as the serial killer’s crime scenes, with expository, over-dubbed dialogue needed to float over plot holes of logic, such as: “All the helicopters are grounded because of the bad weather,” or “But you can’t get here because you’re at a stupid, bloody conference.”

In a film that revels in the gruesome nature of its deaths and the impenetrable mysteries of murder, the climactic showdown is so unimaginative it should be sent to the bottom of the screenwriting class and made to repeat the year.

The glaring inadequacies of “The Snowman” are the only things shocking about it. Harry Hole’s film career could not have gotten off to a more inauspicious start. Its future is certainly on thin ice now, and you don’t need Saga Noren, Lisbeth Salander or even Kurt Wallander to work that one out.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Sets ‘Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ Sequel With New Director, Cast

Eckhart Tolle Bestseller ‘A New Earth’ In Works as Movie (Exclusive)

‘The Bridge’ EP Elwood Reid on Ditching the Scandinavian Original: ‘I’m Tired of Copying Them’

Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese Reteam on Teddy Roosevelt Biopic

Harry Hole is Norway’s most famous detective, as created in a long-running series of best-selling books by author Jo Nesbø. Following on, very slowly, from the successful 2011 adaptation of Nesbo’s novel “Headhunters” (from director Morten Tyldum, who would go on to make “The Imitation Game” and “Passengers”), the first English-language film version of Nesbø’s work now arrives in the shape of “The Snowman.”

Michael Fassbender plays the maverick, alcoholic, chain-smoking Oslo cop, probably hoping, along with producers Working Title, that this could be the start of long-running franchise, something to get him out of the X-Men costume, at least. Hole (technically, it’s pronounced ho-leh) is on the trail of a serial killer who leaves figures of snowmen outside the houses from where he snatches his female victims, or where he slices them up. We’re not sure for a while if this is, indeed, a serial killer case, and we’ve certainly no idea how he makes the stupid snowmen.

It’s only when homicide department newcomer Katrine, played by Rebecca Ferguson, detects a recurring pattern in the disappearances of pregnant women that Hole comes out of his vodka-soaked fug to get interested in solving crimes once more. “I’m sorry about Oslo’s low murder rate,” concedes his long-suffering police chief, “but I need you to turn up for work.”

The scent of a hunt seems to energize Harry Hole, although it doesn’t help matters in his chaotic private life, which involves an art dealer ex-lover played by Charlotte Gainsbourg, her son Oleg, and her current husband, a slimy doctor called Matthias (Jonas Karlsson).

Meanwhile, a grinning — and therefore obviously evil — industrialist called Arve Stop (J.K. Simmons, using a sinister Nordic accent) is masterminding Oslo’s bid for the World Winter Games. In his downtime, this powerful tycoon enjoys taking photos of scared young women on his mobile phone and inviting them to his hotel room. The women are seemingly procured for him by a dodgy fertility doctor called Vetleser, played by David Dencik, the actor who was so creepy as Pus in “Top of the Lake: China Girl.”

What can it all mean? As is now customary in the Scandi noir genre, all is not white amid the driven snows of the Norwegian winters. Blood soaks through, crows peck at the ice, and long-buried secrets emerge.

READ MORE

See The Snowman's latest POWER MOVE.

PowerRank:

707

Katrine and her newly-issued but incredibly clunky-looking EviSync machine go about their data-recording detective business; the fact that we learn this gizmo needs fingerprint ID to function will obviously come back with grisly consequences later on. The Snowman, you see, is not averse to incorporating real body parts in his snow sculpture work.

A strong-on-paper cast includes appearances from Scandi noir queen herself, Sofia Helin (star of the original “The Bridge”), as well as Chloe Sevigny, Toby Jones, Anne Reid and a ridiculous-looking Val Kilmer whose face is so frozen, he can barely speak. (Must be very chilly in Norway this time of year.)

This should have been a success. The screenwriters include Oscar nominees Peter Straughan (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”) and Hossein Amini (“Drive”); Martin Scorsese exec produces; Dion Beebe takes on photography duties and award-winning Maria Djurkovic (“A Bigger Splash”) goes to town with the Ikea-catalogue production design. Director Tomas Alfredson and his producers strain for a magic blend of his stylish ensemble noir “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and his macabre Swedish vampire fable “Let The Right One In.” But you can hear the ice crack under the weight of all that expectation.

For all his red-eyed, hangover acting, Fassbender cannot make his detective interesting; Hole is about the right name for this characterless performance. Even the dependable Ferguson looks lost in the snowdrifts of the script. All around them, sub-plots, tangents and flashbacks feel casually cobbled together, a smorgasbord where all the herrings are red and the krispbread clichés gone stale.

When you’re playing it casual with sexual assault, female trafficking, dismemberment, and institutional corruption, it quickly becomes an exercise in bad judgement and bad taste. A hurriedly assembled final edit looks as messy as the serial killer’s crime scenes, with expository, over-dubbed dialogue needed to float over plot holes of logic, such as: “All the helicopters are grounded because of the bad weather,” or “But you can’t get here because you’re at a stupid, bloody conference.”

In a film that revels in the gruesome nature of its deaths and the impenetrable mysteries of murder, the climactic showdown is so unimaginative it should be sent to the bottom of the screenwriting class and made to repeat the year.

The glaring inadequacies of “The Snowman” are the only things shocking about it. Harry Hole’s film career could not have gotten off to a more inauspicious start. Its future is certainly on thin ice now, and you don’t need Saga Noren, Lisbeth Salander or even Kurt Wallander to work that one out.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Sets 'Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' Sequel With New Director, Cast

Eckhart Tolle Bestseller 'A New Earth' In Works as Movie (Exclusive)

'The Bridge' EP Elwood Reid on Ditching the Scandinavian Original: 'I'm Tired of Copying Them'

Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese Reteam on Teddy Roosevelt Biopic

Film News Roundup: ‘License to Drive’ Gets Female-Driven Film Reboot

In today’s roundup, Fox is remaking its 1988 coming-of-age comedy “License to Drive,” Val Kilmer is starring in a new comedy, and Spirit Award nominations have opened.  FILM DEVELOPMENT Fox is rebooting the 1988 teen comedy “License to Drive,” which starred Corey Feldman, Corey Haim, and Heather Graham. The studio has set up the project… Read more »

In today’s roundup, Fox is remaking its 1988 coming-of-age comedy “License to Drive,” Val Kilmer is starring in a new comedy, and Spirit Award nominations have opened.  FILM DEVELOPMENT Fox is rebooting the 1988 teen comedy “License to Drive,” which starred Corey Feldman, Corey Haim, and Heather Graham. The studio has set up the project... Read more »

Val Kilmer: Kurt Russell Didn’t Direct ‘Tombstone’ but Was ‘Solely Responsible’ for Film’s Success

Did Kurt Russell actually direct the 1993 Western classic “Tombstone” instead of credited director George Cosmatos? That story has followed the film around since its release in 1993, and even Russell himself pretty much said it was true in a 2006 interview.

But according to Russell’s “Tombstone” costar Val Kilmer, it’s not quite true. Cosmatos actually did direct it, Kilmer says in a post to his personal blog. But it was Russell who did the lion’s share of behind-the-scenes work that made the film’s completion possible, and he is “solely responsible” for its success.

“I’ll be clear,” Kilmer said. “Kurt is solely responsible for Tombstone’s success, no question.”

“I was there every minute and although Kurt’s version differs slightly from mine,” he explained. “The one thing he’s totally correct about is, how hard he worked the day before, for the next day’s shot list, and tremendous effort he and I both put into editing, as the studio wouldn’t give us any extra time to make up for the whole month we lost with the first director.”

Also Read: Watch Kurt Russell Beat the Living Hell Out of James Corden (Video)

The first director, screenwriter Kevin Jarre, was fired a month into filming. His replacement, Cosmatos, came in according to Kilmer with only two days’ prep time. “I watched Kurt sacrifice his own role and energy to devote himself as a storyteller, even going so far as to draw up shot lists to help our replacement director,” Kilmer added.

Kilmer mentioned how supportive costars Powers Booth and Bill Paxton were during such a difficult shoot, then added that “Kurt did this for the film virtually every hour.”

“That’s probably how it’s become a story that Kurt directed it,” he said. “I have such admiration for Kurt as he basically sacrificed lots of energy that would have gone into his role, to save the film.

“Everyone cared, don’t get me wrong, but Kurt put his money where his mouth was, and not a lot of stars extend themselves for the cast and crew. Not like he did … Kurt was responsible for the film’s success.”

So there you have it. Russell didn’t direct it, though he did practically everything necessary to make sure the film got made right down to providing the director with direction of his own. Question answered … unless Russell weighs in, of course.

Also Read: Bill Paxton’s 20 Best Roles, From ‘Aliens’ to ‘Titanic’ to ‘Big Love’ (Photos)

Kilmer also had kind words for costars Paxton and Boothe, both of whom died earlier this year.

“Back to Powers for a moment, such a gracious actor and if you love acting go back and check out his early Emmy winning roles, he’s the real deal,” he said. “And Bill Paxton, like a cheerleader for all film, for all Creativity. Always happy like it was his first job. He would have been happy if you had lit him on fire and hung him upside down, as long as there was a camera running. Just like a perfect thespian. ALL THE WAY. SUPPORTIVE. Sweet.”

“We all miss them both,” Kilmer continued. “They were good men. The kind that make you proud of the ‘craft.’”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jeremy Renner to Star as Doc Holliday in New Western

‘The Son’ First Look: 10 Stills From Pierce Brosnan AMC Western (Exclusive Photos)

Kit Harington, Dakota Fanning Western ‘Brimstone’ Lands US Distribution

Did Kurt Russell actually direct the 1993 Western classic “Tombstone” instead of credited director George Cosmatos? That story has followed the film around since its release in 1993, and even Russell himself pretty much said it was true in a 2006 interview.

But according to Russell’s “Tombstone” costar Val Kilmer, it’s not quite true. Cosmatos actually did direct it, Kilmer says in a post to his personal blog. But it was Russell who did the lion’s share of behind-the-scenes work that made the film’s completion possible, and he is “solely responsible” for its success.

“I’ll be clear,” Kilmer said. “Kurt is solely responsible for Tombstone’s success, no question.”

“I was there every minute and although Kurt’s version differs slightly from mine,” he explained. “The one thing he’s totally correct about is, how hard he worked the day before, for the next day’s shot list, and tremendous effort he and I both put into editing, as the studio wouldn’t give us any extra time to make up for the whole month we lost with the first director.”

The first director, screenwriter Kevin Jarre, was fired a month into filming. His replacement, Cosmatos, came in according to Kilmer with only two days’ prep time. “I watched Kurt sacrifice his own role and energy to devote himself as a storyteller, even going so far as to draw up shot lists to help our replacement director,” Kilmer added.

Kilmer mentioned how supportive costars Powers Booth and Bill Paxton were during such a difficult shoot, then added that “Kurt did this for the film virtually every hour.”

“That’s probably how it’s become a story that Kurt directed it,” he said. “I have such admiration for Kurt as he basically sacrificed lots of energy that would have gone into his role, to save the film.

“Everyone cared, don’t get me wrong, but Kurt put his money where his mouth was, and not a lot of stars extend themselves for the cast and crew. Not like he did … Kurt was responsible for the film’s success.”

So there you have it. Russell didn’t direct it, though he did practically everything necessary to make sure the film got made right down to providing the director with direction of his own. Question answered … unless Russell weighs in, of course.

Kilmer also had kind words for costars Paxton and Boothe, both of whom died earlier this year.

“Back to Powers for a moment, such a gracious actor and if you love acting go back and check out his early Emmy winning roles, he’s the real deal,” he said. “And Bill Paxton, like a cheerleader for all film, for all Creativity. Always happy like it was his first job. He would have been happy if you had lit him on fire and hung him upside down, as long as there was a camera running. Just like a perfect thespian. ALL THE WAY. SUPPORTIVE. Sweet.”

“We all miss them both,” Kilmer continued. “They were good men. The kind that make you proud of the ‘craft.'”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jeremy Renner to Star as Doc Holliday in New Western

'The Son' First Look: 10 Stills From Pierce Brosnan AMC Western (Exclusive Photos)

Kit Harington, Dakota Fanning Western 'Brimstone' Lands US Distribution

‘Tombstone’: Val Kilmer Says Kurt Russell Is ‘Solely Responsible’ for the Film’s Success, Implying He All but Directed It

The film’s initial director was replaced a month into production.

Not unlike “Poltergeist,” 1993’s “Tombstone” has long provoked discussion about who truly deserves to be credited as director. Kevin Jarre, who wrote the screenplay to the classic Western, was initially set to pull double duty; he was replaced by George Cosmatos after falling behind schedule.

According to Val Kilmer — who, if you haven’t seen the movie, is your huckleberry — it’s star Kurt Russell who most helped bring “Tombstone” into the world.

“Kurt is solely responsible for Tombstone’s success, no question,” wrote Kilmer on his blog yesterday; the unequivocal statement was in response to a question about Russell’s behind-the-scenes role. “I watched Kurt sacrifice his own role and energy to devote himself as a storyteller, even going so far as to draw up shot lists to help our replacement director, George Cosmatos, who came in with only two days prep.” Russell has no directing credits to his name, but he did write the story to the woefully underrated “Escape From LA.”

Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, and Powers Boothe co-star in “Tombstone,” which was narrated by Robert Mitchum. According to Kilmer, Russell did as much — if not more — behind the camera as he did in front of it.

“I have such admiration for Kurt as he basically sacrificed lots of energy that would have gone into his role, to save the film,” he continued. “Everyone cared, don’t get me wrong, but Kurt put his money where his mouth was, and not a lot of stars extend themselves for the cast and crew. Not like he did.” Read his full comments here.

Tom Cruise ‘Top Gun’ Sequel Gets Release Date From Paramount

A sequel to Tom Cruise’s fighter pilot classic “Top Gun” will hit theaters two summers from now.

Paramount will release the film on July 12, 2019. The film will go head-to-head with Disney’s live-action take on “The Lion King,” directed by Jon Favreau.

While the project has been in active development at the studio for some time, Cruise himself let the cat out of the bag in May on the press tour for Universal’s “The Mummy.”

Also Read: What Happens to Universal’s Dark Universe After Meh ‘Mummy’ Opening?

Cruise told an Australian morning show that the film was “definitely happening,” and that he would “start filming it probably in the next year.” The original 1986 action movie followed the exploits of a Naval flight academy and its students.

There have been several attempts to bring a “Top Gun” sequel to life, but interest from key players appeared to increase in recent years.

Speculation that the project was on — finally — picked up late last year after Val Kilmer, who played Cruise’s rival Iceman in the original film, said on Facebook that he’d been offered a role in a sequel.

In January, producer Jerry Bruckheimer tweeted a picture of himself with Cruise, saying “just got back from a weekend in New Orleans to see my old friend Tom Cruise and discuss a little Top Gun 2.”

Cruise will next be seen in Doug Liman’s “American Made,” opening this September.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Is It Time for Tom Cruise to Do TV?

‘The Mummy’ Review: Tom Cruise Kicks Off Universal’s ‘Dark Universe’ With Epic Monstrosity

Tom Cruise Teases There ‘May Be a Volleyball’ in ‘Top Gun’ Sequel

A sequel to Tom Cruise’s fighter pilot classic “Top Gun” will hit theaters two summers from now.

Paramount will release the film on July 12, 2019. The film will go head-to-head with Disney’s live-action take on “The Lion King,” directed by Jon Favreau.

While the project has been in active development at the studio for some time, Cruise himself let the cat out of the bag in May on the press tour for Universal’s “The Mummy.”

Cruise told an Australian morning show that the film was “definitely happening,” and that he would “start filming it probably in the next year.” The original 1986 action movie followed the exploits of a Naval flight academy and its students.

There have been several attempts to bring a “Top Gun” sequel to life, but interest from key players appeared to increase in recent years.

Speculation that the project was on — finally — picked up late last year after Val Kilmer, who played Cruise’s rival Iceman in the original film, said on Facebook that he’d been offered a role in a sequel.

In January, producer Jerry Bruckheimer tweeted a picture of himself with Cruise, saying “just got back from a weekend in New Orleans to see my old friend Tom Cruise and discuss a little Top Gun 2.”

Cruise will next be seen in Doug Liman’s “American Made,” opening this September.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Is It Time for Tom Cruise to Do TV?

'The Mummy' Review: Tom Cruise Kicks Off Universal's 'Dark Universe' With Epic Monstrosity

Tom Cruise Teases There 'May Be a Volleyball' in 'Top Gun' Sequel

‘Top Gun’: 30 Things You Didn’t Know About the Tom Cruise Classic (Photos)

As “Top Gun” nears its thirtieth anniversary, The Wrap counts down thirty facts about the iconic movie you may not have known.

The facts not directly cited in this gallery came from the 30th anniversary edition Blu-ray/DVD of “Top Gun.”

The role of Maverick was written expressly for Cruise — whose performance in “All the Right Moves” gave the writers inspiration for the part.

Also Read: ‘Top Gun’ 30th Anniversary: Anatomy of the Iconic (and Homoerotic) Volleyball Scene

Thirty years ago, “Top Gun” took the world by surprise and launched the careers of Anthony Edwards, Tim Robbins and Meg Ryan, while cementing Tom Cruise‘s superstar status after “Risky Business” and “All the Right Moves.”

Val Kilmer initially turned down the role of Iceman until director Tony Scott tracked him down and passionately recruited him.

Also Read: Jerry Bruckheimer Teases ‘Top Gun 2’ in New Photo With Tom Cruise (Photo)

When it was in the casting phase, “Top Gun” became the hot title around town. Nearly all of young Hollywood men wanted to be involve, including a very young Charlie Sheen, who was said to be willing to take any part, even a small one. (He didn’t, but he later made the “Top Gun” parody “Hot Shots” and “Hot Shots Part Deux.”)

Also Read: TV Sports Anchor Recreates ‘Top Gun’ Volley Ball Scene With Nudists (Video)

Kelly McGillis’ love-interest character, Charlie, was originally supposed to be an officer. But the Navy wouldn’t approve a script involving two officers fraternizing. Filmmakers needed the Navy’s involvement, so they changed her profession to that of a Navy consultant, one who assesses pilot performance.

As “Top Gun” nears its thirtieth anniversary, The Wrap counts down thirty facts about the iconic movie you may not have known.

The facts not directly cited in this gallery came from the 30th anniversary edition Blu-ray/DVD of “Top Gun.”

The role of Maverick was written expressly for Cruise — whose performance in “All the Right Moves” gave the writers inspiration for the part.

Thirty years ago, “Top Gun” took the world by surprise and launched the careers of Anthony Edwards, Tim Robbins and Meg Ryan, while cementing Tom Cruise‘s superstar status after “Risky Business” and “All the Right Moves.”

Val Kilmer initially turned down the role of Iceman until director Tony Scott tracked him down and passionately recruited him.

When it was in the casting phase, “Top Gun” became the hot title around town. Nearly all of young Hollywood men wanted to be involve, including a very young Charlie Sheen, who was said to be willing to take any part, even a small one. (He didn’t, but he later made the “Top Gun” parody “Hot Shots” and “Hot Shots Part Deux.”)

Kelly McGillis’ love-interest character, Charlie, was originally supposed to be an officer. But the Navy wouldn’t approve a script involving two officers fraternizing. Filmmakers needed the Navy’s involvement, so they changed her profession to that of a Navy consultant, one who assesses pilot performance.