Sony Honchos Rally the Troops at All-Hands Meeting (EXCLUSIVE)

Fresh off the box-office success of “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” Sony honchos — chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra, studio chief Tom Rothman and newly-installed TV chief Mike Hopkins — held an all-hands meeting Thursday to talk about how Sony is positioning itself in the era of studio consolidation and fierce competition from streaming giants. […]

Fresh off the box-office success of “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” Sony honchos — chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra, studio chief Tom Rothman and newly-installed TV chief Mike Hopkins — held an all-hands meeting Thursday to talk about how Sony is positioning itself in the era of studio consolidation and fierce competition from streaming giants. […]

Sony Sale Speculation Returns – But Can Japan Let Go of Reborn Studio?

Buzz about the possible sale of Sony Entertainment resurfaced this week after news of their major leadership changes  — but the Japanese company won’t likely catch the media consolidation fever gripping Hollywood, industry experts told TheWrap.

Unlike recent splashy deals — AT&T scooping Time Warner, Disney swallowing most of Fox and the recombination of CBS and Viacom — Sony is likely to hold on to its content and distribution engines as its current CEO Kazuo Hirai steps down in April.

“It would be a slap in the face to sell this company right now. They just got back on their feet,” said one movie producer with several projects on the lot. Sony stock closed six points above average over sale speculation after Hirai announced his resignation.

Also Read: Viacom and CBS Are Seeking to Merge, Insiders Say (Exclusive)

Sony Entertainment has never looked better, especially after an almost insurmountable climb back from the studio’s 2014 hack. The cyberattack’s leak of personnel documents and executive emails scandalized the studio.

Hirai and his then-CEO Michael Lynton stabilized the company, installed Tom Rothman to run the motion picture group and did their best to maintain the success of its TV production business. Lynton was replaced last January by veteran executive Tony Vinciquerra, who seemed to have inherited a brand-new company.

After some devastating losses, Sony Pictures successfully remounted the Spider-Man franchise with the help of Marvel Films. New Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson franchise “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is defying expectations and nearing $850 million at the worldwide box office. Out of nowhere, Rothman also secured distribution rights to the next Quentin Tarantino film about the Manson murders.

“They’ve got a hit with ‘Jumaji,’ prestige with Tarantino, and Spider-Man is working again,” the producer said. “The cylinders are all firing.”

Sony Pictures posted $96 million in operating profit for its last quarter, starkly contrasting with the same period last year when the studio took a $920 million write-down.

Also Read: Massive Playstation Sales, ‘Jumanji’ Power Sony to Record-Setting Third Quarter

Two weeks ago, Vinciquerra himself said he had no interest in  a potential sale, but growth was a concern.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” the executive said at January’s NATPE Conference in Miami. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

That decision, however, now belongs to acting CFO and incoming CEO Kenichiro Yoshida, who in his succession announcement in Tokyo on Friday stressed “an urgent need for change” and that Sony’s “position in the global market is very different to where it was 20 years ago.”

But the very culture of Sony, according Gerber Kawasaki Wealth & Investment Management CEO Ross Gerber, would prohibit any swift action.

“The number-one barrier to spinning off stuff or doing anything bold is that it’s a Japanese company. They care about different things than shareholder value … people keeping their jobs, for example. The minute you sell off a division, people are going to lose their jobs. It’s not that simple in Sony’s mind,” Gerber said.

Also Read: Sony CEO Kaz Hirai Steps Down

Not that it wouldn’t be smart.  Jason Squire, editor of “The Movie Business Book” and Associate Professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, said that in selling, “Sony’s own exposure is reduced. Simply because the environment today for theatrical movies is increasingly intense and competitive. This is because Disney and Warner seems to be ahead of the pack.”

Squire said tech giants like Apple, Amazon and Netflix would be natural buyers, as all are still trying to find footing and infrastructure in show business. Gerber added that Apple already poached two top Sony Pictures Television executives last summer — Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg — so why not complete the set?

“Taking over Sony Pictures, if that was possible, it would be a great move for Apple because they would have more content to add onto Apple TV or whatever it wants to do with it. That’s the only player I see out there,” Gerber said.

There’s also the question of Sony Music — a profitable division that’s an artist developer, distributor and publishing entity in one. Purview of that company was removed from the Sony Entertainment CEO role after Lynton left, and handed to New York-based exec Ron Stringer.

After Hirai’s big news on Friday, Sony reported Q3 revenue of $23.6 billion. Sales jumped 11.5 percent from the same period last year, while its earnings spiked 1,400 percent year-over-year — and that’s not a typo — thanks to the Playstation 4 unit, music and content.

Umberto Gonzalez contributed to this report. 

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Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

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Buzz about the possible sale of Sony Entertainment resurfaced this week after news of their major leadership changes  — but the Japanese company won’t likely catch the media consolidation fever gripping Hollywood, industry experts told TheWrap.

Unlike recent splashy deals — AT&T scooping Time Warner, Disney swallowing most of Fox and the recombination of CBS and Viacom — Sony is likely to hold on to its content and distribution engines as its current CEO Kazuo Hirai steps down in April.

“It would be a slap in the face to sell this company right now. They just got back on their feet,” said one movie producer with several projects on the lot. Sony stock closed six points above average over sale speculation after Hirai announced his resignation.

Sony Entertainment has never looked better, especially after an almost insurmountable climb back from the studio’s 2014 hack. The cyberattack’s leak of personnel documents and executive emails scandalized the studio.

Hirai and his then-CEO Michael Lynton stabilized the company, installed Tom Rothman to run the motion picture group and did their best to maintain the success of its TV production business. Lynton was replaced last January by veteran executive Tony Vinciquerra, who seemed to have inherited a brand-new company.

After some devastating losses, Sony Pictures successfully remounted the Spider-Man franchise with the help of Marvel Films. New Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson franchise “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is defying expectations and nearing $850 million at the worldwide box office. Out of nowhere, Rothman also secured distribution rights to the next Quentin Tarantino film about the Manson murders.

“They’ve got a hit with ‘Jumaji,’ prestige with Tarantino, and Spider-Man is working again,” the producer said. “The cylinders are all firing.”

Sony Pictures posted $96 million in operating profit for its last quarter, starkly contrasting with the same period last year when the studio took a $920 million write-down.

Two weeks ago, Vinciquerra himself said he had no interest in  a potential sale, but growth was a concern.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” the executive said at January’s NATPE Conference in Miami. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

That decision, however, now belongs to acting CFO and incoming CEO Kenichiro Yoshida, who in his succession announcement in Tokyo on Friday stressed “an urgent need for change” and that Sony’s “position in the global market is very different to where it was 20 years ago.”

But the very culture of Sony, according Gerber Kawasaki Wealth & Investment Management CEO Ross Gerber, would prohibit any swift action.

“The number-one barrier to spinning off stuff or doing anything bold is that it’s a Japanese company. They care about different things than shareholder value … people keeping their jobs, for example. The minute you sell off a division, people are going to lose their jobs. It’s not that simple in Sony’s mind,” Gerber said.

Not that it wouldn’t be smart.  Jason Squire, editor of “The Movie Business Book” and Associate Professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, said that in selling, “Sony’s own exposure is reduced. Simply because the environment today for theatrical movies is increasingly intense and competitive. This is because Disney and Warner seems to be ahead of the pack.”

Squire said tech giants like Apple, Amazon and Netflix would be natural buyers, as all are still trying to find footing and infrastructure in show business. Gerber added that Apple already poached two top Sony Pictures Television executives last summer — Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg — so why not complete the set?

“Taking over Sony Pictures, if that was possible, it would be a great move for Apple because they would have more content to add onto Apple TV or whatever it wants to do with it. That’s the only player I see out there,” Gerber said.

There’s also the question of Sony Music — a profitable division that’s an artist developer, distributor and publishing entity in one. Purview of that company was removed from the Sony Entertainment CEO role after Lynton left, and handed to New York-based exec Ron Stringer.

After Hirai’s big news on Friday, Sony reported Q3 revenue of $23.6 billion. Sales jumped 11.5 percent from the same period last year, while its earnings spiked 1,400 percent year-over-year — and that’s not a typo — thanks to the Playstation 4 unit, music and content.

Umberto Gonzalez contributed to this report. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid 'Floodgates' of Big Media Mergers

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

Sony Pictures Classics Acquires North American Rights to Glenn Close's 'The Wife'

Sony CEO Kaz Hirai Steps Down

Kaz Hirai, President and CEO of Sony since 2012, is resigning his post and will be replaced by Sony CFO Kenichiro Yoshida, the company announced Thursday night.

Yoshida will assume his new role effective April 1. Hirai will transition to a chairman emeritus position.

The 57-year-old Hirai presided over Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton in 2014, when the company suffered the worst cyberattack in U.S. corporate history — a hacking scandal that saw thousands of personnel records and damaging emails from executives released.

Also Read: Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

It’s unclear what immediate effect the leadership change will have on the company’s American assets — which were rumored to be up for sale last year, when Lynton stepped down and Tony Vinicquerra came on board to manage the film and TV groups.

Control of Sony Music was removed from the purview of the Sony Entertainment CEO role. That group is now managed by Rob Stringer, who recently assumed the job from longtime executive Doug Morris.

Sony has essentially rebounded after a long and troubled road back from the hack. Thanks to the blockbuster success of “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” big-screen TV and video game sales the company posted $18.2 billion in earnings last quarter. Sony Pictures specifically posted a 140 percent gain year-over-year with $68 million in operating income.

The film unit is enjoying unexpected staying power with “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” — a family franchise reboot that is currently at $340 million domestic after nine weeks in release. Sony Pictures, run by Tom Rothman, also baffled industry watchers by landing the new Quentin Tarantino film following the director’s separation from the disgraced Harvey Weinstein. The project surrounds the Manson Murders and will star Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio.

A spokesperson for Vinciquerra did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Also Read: Sony Pushes ‘Barbie’ Release Date to May 2020

In a statement, Sony said it was Hirai who proposed stepping down as CEO; Sony’s Board of Directors approved the plan at a meeting held earlier Thursday.

“Ever since my appointment as President and CEO in April 2012, I have stated that my mission is to ensure Sony continues to be a company that provides customers with kando – to move them emotionally – and inspires and fulfills their curiosity,” Hirai said in a statement. “To this end, I have dedicated myself to transforming the company and enhancing its profitability, and am very proud that now, in the third and final year of our current mid-range corporate plan, we are expecting to exceed our financial targets.”

“And,” Hirai’s statement continued, “it excites me to hear more and more people enthuse that Sony is back again. As the company approaches a crucial juncture, when we will embark on a new mid-range plan, I consider this to be the ideal time to pass the baton of leadership to new management, for the future of Sony and also for myself to embark on a new chapter in my life.”

Hirai also said in his statement that Yoshida “has supported me closely since returning to Sony in December 2013, contributing extensively beyond his remit as CFO and acting as valuable confidant and business partner, as we took on the challenge of transforming Sony together.”

“As Chairman, I will of course offer my full support to Mr. Yoshida and the new management team, and do all I can to facilitate a smooth transition and ensure their future success.” Hirai’s statement concluded.

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Kaz Hirai, President and CEO of Sony since 2012, is resigning his post and will be replaced by Sony CFO Kenichiro Yoshida, the company announced Thursday night.

Yoshida will assume his new role effective April 1. Hirai will transition to a chairman emeritus position.

The 57-year-old Hirai presided over Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton in 2014, when the company suffered the worst cyberattack in U.S. corporate history — a hacking scandal that saw thousands of personnel records and damaging emails from executives released.

It’s unclear what immediate effect the leadership change will have on the company’s American assets — which were rumored to be up for sale last year, when Lynton stepped down and Tony Vinicquerra came on board to manage the film and TV groups.

Control of Sony Music was removed from the purview of the Sony Entertainment CEO role. That group is now managed by Rob Stringer, who recently assumed the job from longtime executive Doug Morris.

Sony has essentially rebounded after a long and troubled road back from the hack. Thanks to the blockbuster success of “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” big-screen TV and video game sales the company posted $18.2 billion in earnings last quarter. Sony Pictures specifically posted a 140 percent gain year-over-year with $68 million in operating income.

The film unit is enjoying unexpected staying power with “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” — a family franchise reboot that is currently at $340 million domestic after nine weeks in release. Sony Pictures, run by Tom Rothman, also baffled industry watchers by landing the new Quentin Tarantino film following the director’s separation from the disgraced Harvey Weinstein. The project surrounds the Manson Murders and will star Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio.

A spokesperson for Vinciquerra did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

In a statement, Sony said it was Hirai who proposed stepping down as CEO; Sony’s Board of Directors approved the plan at a meeting held earlier Thursday.

“Ever since my appointment as President and CEO in April 2012, I have stated that my mission is to ensure Sony continues to be a company that provides customers with kando – to move them emotionally – and inspires and fulfills their curiosity,” Hirai said in a statement. “To this end, I have dedicated myself to transforming the company and enhancing its profitability, and am very proud that now, in the third and final year of our current mid-range corporate plan, we are expecting to exceed our financial targets.”

“And,” Hirai’s statement continued, “it excites me to hear more and more people enthuse that Sony is back again. As the company approaches a crucial juncture, when we will embark on a new mid-range plan, I consider this to be the ideal time to pass the baton of leadership to new management, for the future of Sony and also for myself to embark on a new chapter in my life.”

Hirai also said in his statement that Yoshida “has supported me closely since returning to Sony in December 2013, contributing extensively beyond his remit as CFO and acting as valuable confidant and business partner, as we took on the challenge of transforming Sony together.”

“As Chairman, I will of course offer my full support to Mr. Yoshida and the new management team, and do all I can to facilitate a smooth transition and ensure their future success.” Hirai’s statement concluded.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Apple Says 'Meltdown' Flaw Could Expose Your Mac, iPhone to Hackers

CNN Says Anderson Cooper's Twitter Hacked: 'We're Working With Twitter To Secure The Account'

HBO Hacker Charged Over $6 Million Extortion Attempt, 'Game of Thrones' Script Leak

Uber Covered Up Hack of 57 Million Users For More Than a Year

Sony Pictures Chief Tony Vinciquerra On Merger Scenarios, #MeToo And The Road Back From The Hack — NATPE

Sony Pictures boss Tony Vinciquerra said while he talks regularly with CBS chief Leslie Moonves, the two have not talked specifically about a merger, despite rumors to the contrary.
Even so, he said, “The thing that keeps me up at night is, we have to have scale. We’re a really tiny company” compared with tech giants. “If they want to step on us, they can.” He added, “If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase.” Moreover, ” I didn’t take the job to do it for a year…

Sony Pictures boss Tony Vinciquerra said while he talks regularly with CBS chief Leslie Moonves, the two have not talked specifically about a merger, despite rumors to the contrary. Even so, he said, "The thing that keeps me up at night is, we have to have scale. We're a really tiny company" compared with tech giants. "If they want to step on us, they can." He added, "If we don't grow, we will be somebody's purchase." Moreover, " I didn't take the job to do it for a year…

Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

Sony Pictures Chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra said the company has reached its moment of truth: it’s time to grow or be bought out, per media reports of his conversation at the NATPE conference in Miami on Wednesday.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” said Vinciquerra. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

Vinciquerra told moderator Soledad O’Brien mergers will continue to rise among entertainment giants, and Sony has to be expand if it doesn’t want to become another acquisition.

Also Read: ‘Jumanji’ Poised to Repeat as Box Office Champ

“There are six major film studios right now, and in a few years there will be three or four,” continued Vinciquerra. “There are hundreds of TV studios. And there will still be a ton, but there will be a few big ones and many small, specialized ones.”

The exec — who took over for Michael Lynton last year — denied a potential merger with CBS, but said partnerships with other companies are a possibility. He pointed to the stalled $85 billion deal between AT&T and Time Warner as a major indicator of where the industry is headed.

“Repercussions of the deal going through are that it will open the floodgates to other mergers,” he said. “If it doesn’t happen, I think people will be forced to think about how to make things happen on a more creative scale.”

Also Read: Turner CEO John Martin ‘Hopeful’ Time Warner-AT&T Merger Will Go Through

The 45 minute discussion was Vinciquerra’s first extended conversation since taking the reins last June. Vinciquerra touted the recent success of “Jumanji,” and “Spider-Man” when talking about the company’s performance at the box office. He added the 2014 hack by North Korean cybercriminals was “still reverberating around the lot,” and that he has to think “more deeply” about the projects Sony pursues.

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Sony Pictures Chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra said the company has reached its moment of truth: it’s time to grow or be bought out, per media reports of his conversation at the NATPE conference in Miami on Wednesday.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” said Vinciquerra. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

Vinciquerra told moderator Soledad O’Brien mergers will continue to rise among entertainment giants, and Sony has to be expand if it doesn’t want to become another acquisition.

“There are six major film studios right now, and in a few years there will be three or four,” continued Vinciquerra. “There are hundreds of TV studios. And there will still be a ton, but there will be a few big ones and many small, specialized ones.”

The exec — who took over for Michael Lynton last year — denied a potential merger with CBS, but said partnerships with other companies are a possibility. He pointed to the stalled $85 billion deal between AT&T and Time Warner as a major indicator of where the industry is headed.

“Repercussions of the deal going through are that it will open the floodgates to other mergers,” he said. “If it doesn’t happen, I think people will be forced to think about how to make things happen on a more creative scale.”

The 45 minute discussion was Vinciquerra’s first extended conversation since taking the reins last June. Vinciquerra touted the recent success of “Jumanji,” and “Spider-Man” when talking about the company’s performance at the box office. He added the 2014 hack by North Korean cybercriminals was “still reverberating around the lot,” and that he has to think “more deeply” about the projects Sony pursues.

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Steve Mosko in Talks to Join Jeff Robinov’s Studio 8

Former Sony Pictures Television head Steve Mosko is in negotiations to join Jeff Robinov’s production company Studio 8.

Set up on the Culver City, Ca. Sony Pictures lot that Mosko used to call home, Studio 8 would welcome Mosko as movie producer Robinov’s counterpart in the TV space, multiple individuals familiar with the talks told TheWrap.

The well liked and hard-charging Mosko exited SPE in June 2016, after contract discussions with then-Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton broke down. His dearture made waves after nearly 25 years on the lot.

Also Read: Steve Mosko Goes Shopping: Tribune Media Tops on His List (Exclusive)

While Sony Pictures will distribute Studio 8 films like Kodi Smitt-McPhee’s “Alpha” and Matthew McConaughey’s “White Boy Rick” this year, their first-look deal is up for renewal toward the end of 2018, the insiders said. It’s unclear if the company would stick around, though Lynton has long since departed as SPE CEO and has since been replaced by Tony Vinciquerra.

It’s safe to say Mosko has had his pick of opportunities, including a possible acquisition of embattled Tribune Media that Mosko engaged Moelis & Co.and Guggenheim Partners in, TheWrap exclusively reported at the time.

Robinov formed Studio 8 after a long run at Warner Bros., where he departed in 2013 as Warner Bros. Picture Group President. The company was a minority investor in the Sony-distributed Ange Lee film “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.”

News of the Mosko discussions was first reported by Variety.

Former Sony Pictures Television head Steve Mosko is in negotiations to join Jeff Robinov’s production company Studio 8.

Set up on the Culver City, Ca. Sony Pictures lot that Mosko used to call home, Studio 8 would welcome Mosko as movie producer Robinov’s counterpart in the TV space, multiple individuals familiar with the talks told TheWrap.

The well liked and hard-charging Mosko exited SPE in June 2016, after contract discussions with then-Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton broke down. His dearture made waves after nearly 25 years on the lot.

While Sony Pictures will distribute Studio 8 films like Kodi Smitt-McPhee’s “Alpha” and Matthew McConaughey’s “White Boy Rick” this year, their first-look deal is up for renewal toward the end of 2018, the insiders said. It’s unclear if the company would stick around, though Lynton has long since departed as SPE CEO and has since been replaced by Tony Vinciquerra.

It’s safe to say Mosko has had his pick of opportunities, including a possible acquisition of embattled Tribune Media that Mosko engaged Moelis & Co.and Guggenheim Partners in, TheWrap exclusively reported at the time.

Robinov formed Studio 8 after a long run at Warner Bros., where he departed in 2013 as Warner Bros. Picture Group President. The company was a minority investor in the Sony-distributed Ange Lee film “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.”

News of the Mosko discussions was first reported by Variety.

Bob Iger, Kathleen Kennedy Form Hollywood Sexual Misconduct Commission Chaired by Anita Hill

Hollywood top executives — including Disney CEO Bob Iger, Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy and WME’s Ari Emanuel — have formed and are funding a special commission to combat sexual misconduct in the industry.

The commission is chaired by Anita Hill, who made headlines with sexual harassment accusations against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas during Thomas’ confirmation hearings in the early 1990s.

“We will be focusing on issues ranging from power disparity, equity and fairness, safety, sexual harassment guidelines, education and training, reporting and enforcement, ongoing research, and data collection,” said Ms. Hill in a late Friday statement. “It is time to end the culture of silence. I’ve been at this work for 26 years. This moment presents us with an unprecedented opportunity to make real change.”

Also Read: Did Minnie Driver Drag Matt Damon Over Sexual Misconduct Comments?

Dubbed The Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, it also includes members Bryan Lourd, Co- Chairman, Creative Artists Agency; Jeff Shell, Chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group; Jim Gianopulos, Chairman/CEO, Paramount; Leslie Moonves, Chairman/CEO. CBS Corp.; Carol Lombardini, President, Alliance Motion Picture and Television Producers; and Chris Silbermann, Founding Partner, ICM Partners, among others. (See full list below). 

The Commission aims to “lead the entertainment industry toward alignment in achieving safer, fairer, more equitable and accountable workplaces — particularly for women and marginalized people,” according to a statement obtained by TheWrap. The goal is “to tackle the broad culture of abuse and power disparity.”

“The Commission will not seek just one solution, but a comprehensive strategy to address the complex and inter-related causes of the problems of parity and power,” Kennedy said. “The fact that so many industry leaders–across film, television, music, digital, unions, agencies, ATA, AMPAS, television academy and guilds–came together, in one room, to explore solutions speaks to a new era.”

Also Read: Warner Bros. Records EVP Jeff Fenster to Be Disciplined Over Sexual Misconduct Accusation (Report)

The commission will reconvene immediately after the first of the year.

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct scandal, women and men alike have been more vocal about speaking out against unwanted sexual advances and contact. And Hollywood and media figures have been at the center of the storm of news coverage for several weeks, now. The accusations have been many, and the reaction and fallout has been swift across the industry.

See the full list of committee members here:

Ari Emanuel, Co-Chair, William Morris Endeavor; Bob Iger, Chairman/CEO, Disney; Bryan Lourd, Co-Chairman, Creative Artists Agency; Carol Lombardini, President, Alliance Motion Picture and Television Producers; Chris Silbermann, Founding Partner, ICM Partners; David Young, Executive Director, Writers Guild of America; Dawn Hudson, CEO, Academy Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences; Gabrielle Carteris, President, Screen Actors Guild / AFTRA; Jeff Blackburn, SVP Business Development, Amazon; Jeff Shell, Chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group; Jeremy Zimmer, CEO, United Talent Agency; Jim Gianopulos, Chairman/CEO, Paramount; Karen Stuart, Executive Director, Association of Talent Agents; Kevin Tsujihara, Chairman/CEO, Warner Bros; Maury McIntyre, President/COO, Television Academy; Mike Miller, 4th International VP/Dept. Director, Motion Picture & TV Production/IATSE; Russ Hollander, Executive Director, Directors Guild of America; Sir Lucian Grainge, Chairman/CEO, Universal Music Group; Susan Sprung, Associate Executive Director, Producers Guild of America; Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer, Netflix; Tony Vinciquerra, Chairman/CEO, Sony; Julie Greenwald, Chairman/COO, Atlantic Records; Leslie Moonves, Chairman/CEO. CBS Corp., Neil Portnow, President, Recording Academy NARAS.   

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Hollywood top executives — including Disney CEO Bob Iger, Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy and WME’s Ari Emanuel — have formed and are funding a special commission to combat sexual misconduct in the industry.

The commission is chaired by Anita Hill, who made headlines with sexual harassment accusations against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas during Thomas’ confirmation hearings in the early 1990s.

“We will be focusing on issues ranging from power disparity, equity and fairness, safety, sexual harassment guidelines, education and training, reporting and enforcement, ongoing research, and data collection,” said Ms. Hill in a late Friday statement. “It is time to end the culture of silence. I’ve been at this work for 26 years. This moment presents us with an unprecedented opportunity to make real change.”

Dubbed The Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, it also includes members Bryan Lourd, Co- Chairman, Creative Artists Agency; Jeff Shell, Chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group; Jim Gianopulos, Chairman/CEO, Paramount; Leslie Moonves, Chairman/CEO. CBS Corp.; Carol Lombardini, President, Alliance Motion Picture and Television Producers; and Chris Silbermann, Founding Partner, ICM Partners, among others. (See full list below). 

The Commission aims to “lead the entertainment industry toward alignment in achieving safer, fairer, more equitable and accountable workplaces — particularly for women and marginalized people,” according to a statement obtained by TheWrap. The goal is “to tackle the broad culture of abuse and power disparity.”

“The Commission will not seek just one solution, but a comprehensive strategy to address the complex and inter-related causes of the problems of parity and power,” Kennedy said. “The fact that so many industry leaders–across film, television, music, digital, unions, agencies, ATA, AMPAS, television academy and guilds–came together, in one room, to explore solutions speaks to a new era.”

The commission will reconvene immediately after the first of the year.

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct scandal, women and men alike have been more vocal about speaking out against unwanted sexual advances and contact. And Hollywood and media figures have been at the center of the storm of news coverage for several weeks, now. The accusations have been many, and the reaction and fallout has been swift across the industry.

See the full list of committee members here:

Ari Emanuel, Co-Chair, William Morris Endeavor; Bob Iger, Chairman/CEO, Disney; Bryan Lourd, Co-Chairman, Creative Artists Agency; Carol Lombardini, President, Alliance Motion Picture and Television Producers; Chris Silbermann, Founding Partner, ICM Partners; David Young, Executive Director, Writers Guild of America; Dawn Hudson, CEO, Academy Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences; Gabrielle Carteris, President, Screen Actors Guild / AFTRA; Jeff Blackburn, SVP Business Development, Amazon; Jeff Shell, Chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group; Jeremy Zimmer, CEO, United Talent Agency; Jim Gianopulos, Chairman/CEO, Paramount; Karen Stuart, Executive Director, Association of Talent Agents; Kevin Tsujihara, Chairman/CEO, Warner Bros; Maury McIntyre, President/COO, Television Academy; Mike Miller, 4th International VP/Dept. Director, Motion Picture & TV Production/IATSE; Russ Hollander, Executive Director, Directors Guild of America; Sir Lucian Grainge, Chairman/CEO, Universal Music Group; Susan Sprung, Associate Executive Director, Producers Guild of America; Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer, Netflix; Tony Vinciquerra, Chairman/CEO, Sony; Julie Greenwald, Chairman/COO, Atlantic Records; Leslie Moonves, Chairman/CEO. CBS Corp., Neil Portnow, President, Recording Academy NARAS.   

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