Sony Honchos Rally the Troops at All-Hands Meeting (EXCLUSIVE)

Fresh off the box-office success of “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” Sony honchos — chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra, studio chief Tom Rothman and newly-installed TV chief Mike Hopkins — held an all-hands meeting Thursday to talk about how Sony is positioning itself in the era of studio consolidation and fierce competition from streaming giants. […]

Fresh off the box-office success of “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” Sony honchos — chairman and CEO Tony Vinciquerra, studio chief Tom Rothman and newly-installed TV chief Mike Hopkins — held an all-hands meeting Thursday to talk about how Sony is positioning itself in the era of studio consolidation and fierce competition from streaming giants. […]

How ‘Jumanji’ Conquered ‘Spider-Man’ To Become Sony’s Highest-Grossing Film Ever At The U.S. Box Office

EXCLUSIVE: It finally happened.
Sony’s Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is officially the studio’s highest-grossing film ever at the domestic box office, overtaking Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man ($403.7 million) which has owned the title for the past 16 years.
Heading into the holiday season, executives across distribution and film finance had a strong feeling that this reboot of Jumanji directed by Jake Kasdan would serve as strong counter-programming to Disney’s Star Wars: The La…

EXCLUSIVE: It finally happened. Sony’s Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is officially the studio’s highest-grossing film ever at the domestic box office, overtaking Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man ($403.7 million) which has owned the title for the past 16 years. Heading into the holiday season, executives across distribution and film finance had a strong feeling that this reboot of Jumanji directed by Jake Kasdan would serve as strong counter-programming to Disney’s Star Wars: The La…

Christine Birch Steps Down as Sony Pictures Domestic Marketing Head

Christine Birch has resigned her post as Sony Pictures president of domestic marketing after a two-week probe into her workplace behavior, including reports that she smoked marijuana at the office, insiders told TheWrap.

Official word of her resignation came down from Sony’s marketing chief Josh Greenstein on Wednesday, who said Birch originally approached him about resigning in January.

In late March, Variety reported that Birch’s marketing subordinates had filed complaints about her behavior — including that she vaped marijuana during work hours, despite numerous warnings to stop.

Also Read: Sony Pictures Names Michael Helfand, Joe Matukewicz Worldwide Acquisitions Heads

Multiple individuals familiar with the workplace downplayed the seriousness of the investigation. Birch was asked to take time off during the probe, one of the insiders said, but was never formally suspended.

That individual, and a second one who spoke to TheWrap, speculated that the press leak likely came from Birch’s staff in an attempt to force her resignation. Andre Caraco, co-president of domestic marketing, will fill Birch’s shoes for now.

Greenstein applauded her recent successes like the record-setting “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” and “Spider-Man: Homecoming.”

Birch herself thanked studio head Tom Rothman and Greenstein, saying “I’m very proud of the team and I’m incredibly grateful … now, I’m ready for a new challenge.”

Also Read: Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

Read the full memo obtained by TheWrap:

Dear colleagues,

Following an extraordinarily impressive run in Columbia’s Domestic Marketing department, Christine Birch is stepping down from her post as President of Domestic Marketing.

Christine approached us about leaving in January 2018, following the record-setting performance of Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. Under her tenure, Sony’s domestic marketing department produced some of its best results in years, including Spider-Man: Homecoming, The Magnificent Seven, Peter Rabbit, and Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.

Below is a short note from Christine regarding her departure:

“The transformation of the Columbia Pictures marketing department has been one of the most rewarding chapters of my career. I’m very proud of the team and I’m incredibly grateful to Tom Rothman and Josh Greenstein for supporting my vision. Now, I’m ready for a new challenge.”

Christine’s direct reports will report to Andre Caraco, Co-President of Domestic Marketing, on an interim basis.

Please join me in thanking Christine for her hard work and dedication to Sony Pictures, and in wishing her all the best in the next chapter of her career.

Josh

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Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

Christine Birch has resigned her post as Sony Pictures president of domestic marketing after a two-week probe into her workplace behavior, including reports that she smoked marijuana at the office, insiders told TheWrap.

Official word of her resignation came down from Sony’s marketing chief Josh Greenstein on Wednesday, who said Birch originally approached him about resigning in January.

In late March, Variety reported that Birch’s marketing subordinates had filed complaints about her behavior — including that she vaped marijuana during work hours, despite numerous warnings to stop.

Multiple individuals familiar with the workplace downplayed the seriousness of the investigation. Birch was asked to take time off during the probe, one of the insiders said, but was never formally suspended.

That individual, and a second one who spoke to TheWrap, speculated that the press leak likely came from Birch’s staff in an attempt to force her resignation. Andre Caraco, co-president of domestic marketing, will fill Birch’s shoes for now.

Greenstein applauded her recent successes like the record-setting “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” and “Spider-Man: Homecoming.”

Birch herself thanked studio head Tom Rothman and Greenstein, saying “I’m very proud of the team and I’m incredibly grateful … now, I’m ready for a new challenge.”

Read the full memo obtained by TheWrap:

Dear colleagues,

Following an extraordinarily impressive run in Columbia’s Domestic Marketing department, Christine Birch is stepping down from her post as President of Domestic Marketing.

Christine approached us about leaving in January 2018, following the record-setting performance of Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. Under her tenure, Sony’s domestic marketing department produced some of its best results in years, including Spider-Man: Homecoming, The Magnificent Seven, Peter Rabbit, and Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.

Below is a short note from Christine regarding her departure:

“The transformation of the Columbia Pictures marketing department has been one of the most rewarding chapters of my career. I’m very proud of the team and I’m incredibly grateful to Tom Rothman and Josh Greenstein for supporting my vision. Now, I’m ready for a new challenge.”

Christine’s direct reports will report to Andre Caraco, Co-President of Domestic Marketing, on an interim basis.

Please join me in thanking Christine for her hard work and dedication to Sony Pictures, and in wishing her all the best in the next chapter of her career.

Josh

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Pictures Names Michael Helfand, Joe Matukewicz Worldwide Acquisitions Heads

Rupert Everett's Oscar Wilde Movie 'The Happy Prince' Lands at Sony Pictures Classics

Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid 'Floodgates' of Big Media Mergers

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

Sony Sale Speculation Returns – But Can Japan Let Go of Reborn Studio?

Buzz about the possible sale of Sony Entertainment resurfaced this week after news of their major leadership changes  — but the Japanese company won’t likely catch the media consolidation fever gripping Hollywood, industry experts told TheWrap.

Unlike recent splashy deals — AT&T scooping Time Warner, Disney swallowing most of Fox and the recombination of CBS and Viacom — Sony is likely to hold on to its content and distribution engines as its current CEO Kazuo Hirai steps down in April.

“It would be a slap in the face to sell this company right now. They just got back on their feet,” said one movie producer with several projects on the lot. Sony stock closed six points above average over sale speculation after Hirai announced his resignation.

Also Read: Viacom and CBS Are Seeking to Merge, Insiders Say (Exclusive)

Sony Entertainment has never looked better, especially after an almost insurmountable climb back from the studio’s 2014 hack. The cyberattack’s leak of personnel documents and executive emails scandalized the studio.

Hirai and his then-CEO Michael Lynton stabilized the company, installed Tom Rothman to run the motion picture group and did their best to maintain the success of its TV production business. Lynton was replaced last January by veteran executive Tony Vinciquerra, who seemed to have inherited a brand-new company.

After some devastating losses, Sony Pictures successfully remounted the Spider-Man franchise with the help of Marvel Films. New Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson franchise “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is defying expectations and nearing $850 million at the worldwide box office. Out of nowhere, Rothman also secured distribution rights to the next Quentin Tarantino film about the Manson murders.

“They’ve got a hit with ‘Jumaji,’ prestige with Tarantino, and Spider-Man is working again,” the producer said. “The cylinders are all firing.”

Sony Pictures posted $96 million in operating profit for its last quarter, starkly contrasting with the same period last year when the studio took a $920 million write-down.

Also Read: Massive Playstation Sales, ‘Jumanji’ Power Sony to Record-Setting Third Quarter

Two weeks ago, Vinciquerra himself said he had no interest in  a potential sale, but growth was a concern.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” the executive said at January’s NATPE Conference in Miami. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

That decision, however, now belongs to acting CFO and incoming CEO Kenichiro Yoshida, who in his succession announcement in Tokyo on Friday stressed “an urgent need for change” and that Sony’s “position in the global market is very different to where it was 20 years ago.”

But the very culture of Sony, according Gerber Kawasaki Wealth & Investment Management CEO Ross Gerber, would prohibit any swift action.

“The number-one barrier to spinning off stuff or doing anything bold is that it’s a Japanese company. They care about different things than shareholder value … people keeping their jobs, for example. The minute you sell off a division, people are going to lose their jobs. It’s not that simple in Sony’s mind,” Gerber said.

Also Read: Sony CEO Kaz Hirai Steps Down

Not that it wouldn’t be smart.  Jason Squire, editor of “The Movie Business Book” and Associate Professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, said that in selling, “Sony’s own exposure is reduced. Simply because the environment today for theatrical movies is increasingly intense and competitive. This is because Disney and Warner seems to be ahead of the pack.”

Squire said tech giants like Apple, Amazon and Netflix would be natural buyers, as all are still trying to find footing and infrastructure in show business. Gerber added that Apple already poached two top Sony Pictures Television executives last summer — Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg — so why not complete the set?

“Taking over Sony Pictures, if that was possible, it would be a great move for Apple because they would have more content to add onto Apple TV or whatever it wants to do with it. That’s the only player I see out there,” Gerber said.

There’s also the question of Sony Music — a profitable division that’s an artist developer, distributor and publishing entity in one. Purview of that company was removed from the Sony Entertainment CEO role after Lynton left, and handed to New York-based exec Ron Stringer.

After Hirai’s big news on Friday, Sony reported Q3 revenue of $23.6 billion. Sales jumped 11.5 percent from the same period last year, while its earnings spiked 1,400 percent year-over-year — and that’s not a typo — thanks to the Playstation 4 unit, music and content.

Umberto Gonzalez contributed to this report. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

Sony Pictures Classics Acquires North American Rights to Glenn Close’s ‘The Wife’

Buzz about the possible sale of Sony Entertainment resurfaced this week after news of their major leadership changes  — but the Japanese company won’t likely catch the media consolidation fever gripping Hollywood, industry experts told TheWrap.

Unlike recent splashy deals — AT&T scooping Time Warner, Disney swallowing most of Fox and the recombination of CBS and Viacom — Sony is likely to hold on to its content and distribution engines as its current CEO Kazuo Hirai steps down in April.

“It would be a slap in the face to sell this company right now. They just got back on their feet,” said one movie producer with several projects on the lot. Sony stock closed six points above average over sale speculation after Hirai announced his resignation.

Sony Entertainment has never looked better, especially after an almost insurmountable climb back from the studio’s 2014 hack. The cyberattack’s leak of personnel documents and executive emails scandalized the studio.

Hirai and his then-CEO Michael Lynton stabilized the company, installed Tom Rothman to run the motion picture group and did their best to maintain the success of its TV production business. Lynton was replaced last January by veteran executive Tony Vinciquerra, who seemed to have inherited a brand-new company.

After some devastating losses, Sony Pictures successfully remounted the Spider-Man franchise with the help of Marvel Films. New Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson franchise “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is defying expectations and nearing $850 million at the worldwide box office. Out of nowhere, Rothman also secured distribution rights to the next Quentin Tarantino film about the Manson murders.

“They’ve got a hit with ‘Jumaji,’ prestige with Tarantino, and Spider-Man is working again,” the producer said. “The cylinders are all firing.”

Sony Pictures posted $96 million in operating profit for its last quarter, starkly contrasting with the same period last year when the studio took a $920 million write-down.

Two weeks ago, Vinciquerra himself said he had no interest in  a potential sale, but growth was a concern.

“If we don’t grow, we will be somebody’s purchase,” the executive said at January’s NATPE Conference in Miami. “I didn’t take the job to do it for a year and sell the company.”

That decision, however, now belongs to acting CFO and incoming CEO Kenichiro Yoshida, who in his succession announcement in Tokyo on Friday stressed “an urgent need for change” and that Sony’s “position in the global market is very different to where it was 20 years ago.”

But the very culture of Sony, according Gerber Kawasaki Wealth & Investment Management CEO Ross Gerber, would prohibit any swift action.

“The number-one barrier to spinning off stuff or doing anything bold is that it’s a Japanese company. They care about different things than shareholder value … people keeping their jobs, for example. The minute you sell off a division, people are going to lose their jobs. It’s not that simple in Sony’s mind,” Gerber said.

Not that it wouldn’t be smart.  Jason Squire, editor of “The Movie Business Book” and Associate Professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, said that in selling, “Sony’s own exposure is reduced. Simply because the environment today for theatrical movies is increasingly intense and competitive. This is because Disney and Warner seems to be ahead of the pack.”

Squire said tech giants like Apple, Amazon and Netflix would be natural buyers, as all are still trying to find footing and infrastructure in show business. Gerber added that Apple already poached two top Sony Pictures Television executives last summer — Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amburg — so why not complete the set?

“Taking over Sony Pictures, if that was possible, it would be a great move for Apple because they would have more content to add onto Apple TV or whatever it wants to do with it. That’s the only player I see out there,” Gerber said.

There’s also the question of Sony Music — a profitable division that’s an artist developer, distributor and publishing entity in one. Purview of that company was removed from the Sony Entertainment CEO role after Lynton left, and handed to New York-based exec Ron Stringer.

After Hirai’s big news on Friday, Sony reported Q3 revenue of $23.6 billion. Sales jumped 11.5 percent from the same period last year, while its earnings spiked 1,400 percent year-over-year — and that’s not a typo — thanks to the Playstation 4 unit, music and content.

Umberto Gonzalez contributed to this report. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid 'Floodgates' of Big Media Mergers

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins Jumps to Become Sony Pictures TV Chairman

Sony Pictures Classics Acquires North American Rights to Glenn Close's 'The Wife'

Sony CEO Kaz Hirai Steps Down

Kaz Hirai, President and CEO of Sony since 2012, is resigning his post and will be replaced by Sony CFO Kenichiro Yoshida, the company announced Thursday night.

Yoshida will assume his new role effective April 1. Hirai will transition to a chairman emeritus position.

The 57-year-old Hirai presided over Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton in 2014, when the company suffered the worst cyberattack in U.S. corporate history — a hacking scandal that saw thousands of personnel records and damaging emails from executives released.

Also Read: Sony Pictures CEO Admits Need to Grow Studio Amid ‘Floodgates’ of Big Media Mergers

It’s unclear what immediate effect the leadership change will have on the company’s American assets — which were rumored to be up for sale last year, when Lynton stepped down and Tony Vinicquerra came on board to manage the film and TV groups.

Control of Sony Music was removed from the purview of the Sony Entertainment CEO role. That group is now managed by Rob Stringer, who recently assumed the job from longtime executive Doug Morris.

Sony has essentially rebounded after a long and troubled road back from the hack. Thanks to the blockbuster success of “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” big-screen TV and video game sales the company posted $18.2 billion in earnings last quarter. Sony Pictures specifically posted a 140 percent gain year-over-year with $68 million in operating income.

The film unit is enjoying unexpected staying power with “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” — a family franchise reboot that is currently at $340 million domestic after nine weeks in release. Sony Pictures, run by Tom Rothman, also baffled industry watchers by landing the new Quentin Tarantino film following the director’s separation from the disgraced Harvey Weinstein. The project surrounds the Manson Murders and will star Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio.

A spokesperson for Vinciquerra did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Also Read: Sony Pushes ‘Barbie’ Release Date to May 2020

In a statement, Sony said it was Hirai who proposed stepping down as CEO; Sony’s Board of Directors approved the plan at a meeting held earlier Thursday.

“Ever since my appointment as President and CEO in April 2012, I have stated that my mission is to ensure Sony continues to be a company that provides customers with kando – to move them emotionally – and inspires and fulfills their curiosity,” Hirai said in a statement. “To this end, I have dedicated myself to transforming the company and enhancing its profitability, and am very proud that now, in the third and final year of our current mid-range corporate plan, we are expecting to exceed our financial targets.”

“And,” Hirai’s statement continued, “it excites me to hear more and more people enthuse that Sony is back again. As the company approaches a crucial juncture, when we will embark on a new mid-range plan, I consider this to be the ideal time to pass the baton of leadership to new management, for the future of Sony and also for myself to embark on a new chapter in my life.”

Hirai also said in his statement that Yoshida “has supported me closely since returning to Sony in December 2013, contributing extensively beyond his remit as CFO and acting as valuable confidant and business partner, as we took on the challenge of transforming Sony together.”

“As Chairman, I will of course offer my full support to Mr. Yoshida and the new management team, and do all I can to facilitate a smooth transition and ensure their future success.” Hirai’s statement concluded.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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CNN Says Anderson Cooper’s Twitter Hacked: ‘We’re Working With Twitter To Secure The Account’

HBO Hacker Charged Over $6 Million Extortion Attempt, ‘Game of Thrones’ Script Leak

Uber Covered Up Hack of 57 Million Users For More Than a Year

Kaz Hirai, President and CEO of Sony since 2012, is resigning his post and will be replaced by Sony CFO Kenichiro Yoshida, the company announced Thursday night.

Yoshida will assume his new role effective April 1. Hirai will transition to a chairman emeritus position.

The 57-year-old Hirai presided over Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton in 2014, when the company suffered the worst cyberattack in U.S. corporate history — a hacking scandal that saw thousands of personnel records and damaging emails from executives released.

It’s unclear what immediate effect the leadership change will have on the company’s American assets — which were rumored to be up for sale last year, when Lynton stepped down and Tony Vinicquerra came on board to manage the film and TV groups.

Control of Sony Music was removed from the purview of the Sony Entertainment CEO role. That group is now managed by Rob Stringer, who recently assumed the job from longtime executive Doug Morris.

Sony has essentially rebounded after a long and troubled road back from the hack. Thanks to the blockbuster success of “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” big-screen TV and video game sales the company posted $18.2 billion in earnings last quarter. Sony Pictures specifically posted a 140 percent gain year-over-year with $68 million in operating income.

The film unit is enjoying unexpected staying power with “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” — a family franchise reboot that is currently at $340 million domestic after nine weeks in release. Sony Pictures, run by Tom Rothman, also baffled industry watchers by landing the new Quentin Tarantino film following the director’s separation from the disgraced Harvey Weinstein. The project surrounds the Manson Murders and will star Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio.

A spokesperson for Vinciquerra did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

In a statement, Sony said it was Hirai who proposed stepping down as CEO; Sony’s Board of Directors approved the plan at a meeting held earlier Thursday.

“Ever since my appointment as President and CEO in April 2012, I have stated that my mission is to ensure Sony continues to be a company that provides customers with kando – to move them emotionally – and inspires and fulfills their curiosity,” Hirai said in a statement. “To this end, I have dedicated myself to transforming the company and enhancing its profitability, and am very proud that now, in the third and final year of our current mid-range corporate plan, we are expecting to exceed our financial targets.”

“And,” Hirai’s statement continued, “it excites me to hear more and more people enthuse that Sony is back again. As the company approaches a crucial juncture, when we will embark on a new mid-range plan, I consider this to be the ideal time to pass the baton of leadership to new management, for the future of Sony and also for myself to embark on a new chapter in my life.”

Hirai also said in his statement that Yoshida “has supported me closely since returning to Sony in December 2013, contributing extensively beyond his remit as CFO and acting as valuable confidant and business partner, as we took on the challenge of transforming Sony together.”

“As Chairman, I will of course offer my full support to Mr. Yoshida and the new management team, and do all I can to facilitate a smooth transition and ensure their future success.” Hirai’s statement concluded.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Apple Says 'Meltdown' Flaw Could Expose Your Mac, iPhone to Hackers

CNN Says Anderson Cooper's Twitter Hacked: 'We're Working With Twitter To Secure The Account'

HBO Hacker Charged Over $6 Million Extortion Attempt, 'Game of Thrones' Script Leak

Uber Covered Up Hack of 57 Million Users For More Than a Year

Leonardo DiCaprio in Talks to Headline Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Manson’ Film

Leonardo DiCaprio will reunite with Quentin Tarantino and star in the filmmaker’s  Charles Manson themed film, an individual with knowledge of the project tells TheWrap.

The film will be DiCaprio’s first film since winning the Oscar for “The Revenant.”

The untitled film is set in Los Angeles in the 1960s and ’70s and is believed to involve the actress and model Sharon Tate, who was murdered by members of Charles Manson’s notorious “family” in 1969. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Also Read: Paramount Taps ‘Revenant’ Screenwriter Mark L. Smith to Pen Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Star Trek’ Idea

The film will be released on August 9, 2019. Perhaps not coincidentally, August 9, 2019, will mark the 50th anniversary of Tate’s death.

The movie, which will be the first for Tarantino without his longtime producer-distributor Harvey Weinstein, does not yet have a cast. Tarantino will produce along with David Heyman and Shannon McIntosh. Georgia Kacandes will serve as executive producer.

Sony studio boss Tom Rothman, working with marketing and distribution president Josh Greenstein, beat out virtually every major studio (save Disney) for rights to the film, the ninth feature by the acclaimed director and his first since the 2015 Western “The Hateful Eight.”

Deadline first broke the news of Tarantino’s casting.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Quentin Tarantino Has a ‘Star Trek’ Idea, JJ Abrams to Put Together Writer’s Room

Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Film to Premiere on 50th Anniversary of Sharon Tate’s Death

Quentin Tarantino Explains Why He Still Doesn’t Have a Netflix Account (Video)

Leonardo DiCaprio will reunite with Quentin Tarantino and star in the filmmaker’s  Charles Manson themed film, an individual with knowledge of the project tells TheWrap.

The film will be DiCaprio’s first film since winning the Oscar for “The Revenant.”

The untitled film is set in Los Angeles in the 1960s and ’70s and is believed to involve the actress and model Sharon Tate, who was murdered by members of Charles Manson’s notorious “family” in 1969. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The film will be released on August 9, 2019. Perhaps not coincidentally, August 9, 2019, will mark the 50th anniversary of Tate’s death.

The movie, which will be the first for Tarantino without his longtime producer-distributor Harvey Weinstein, does not yet have a cast. Tarantino will produce along with David Heyman and Shannon McIntosh. Georgia Kacandes will serve as executive producer.

Sony studio boss Tom Rothman, working with marketing and distribution president Josh Greenstein, beat out virtually every major studio (save Disney) for rights to the film, the ninth feature by the acclaimed director and his first since the 2015 Western “The Hateful Eight.”

Deadline first broke the news of Tarantino’s casting.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Quentin Tarantino Has a 'Star Trek' Idea, JJ Abrams to Put Together Writer's Room

Quentin Tarantino's Manson Film to Premiere on 50th Anniversary of Sharon Tate's Death

Quentin Tarantino Explains Why He Still Doesn't Have a Netflix Account (Video)

How Ridley Scott, Dan Friedkin, Runner-Up Christopher Plummer & $10M Reshoot Ransomed Getty Kidnap Pic Back From Kevin Spacey Scandal Death Sentence

Director Ridley Scott unveiled his new film All the Money in the World to press and for consideration by the Producers Guild over the weekend. By his estimate, that meant staging “200 interviews in the last two days, and seven screenings.” Scott said the film got as strong a reaction as it did when a wet print was shown the previous week to the Hollywood Foreign Press and elicited three Golden Globe nominations.
“I think the press are genuinely taken with the movie,…

Director Ridley Scott unveiled his new film All the Money in the World to press and for consideration by the Producers Guild over the weekend. By his estimate, that meant staging “200 interviews in the last two days, and seven screenings." Scott said the film got as strong a reaction as it did when a wet print was shown the previous week to the Hollywood Foreign Press and elicited three Golden Globe nominations. "I think the press are genuinely taken with the movie,”…