‘Mean Girls,’ ‘Harry Potter’ Top Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards

EXCLUSIVE: Mean Girls led the field by winning eight prizes, including Favorite New Musical, and Harry Potter and the Cursed Child won Favorite New Play in the 18th annual Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards.
The winners were announced today ahead of a…

EXCLUSIVE: Mean Girls led the field by winning eight prizes, including Favorite New Musical, and Harry Potter and the Cursed Child won Favorite New Play in the 18th annual Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards. The winners were announced today ahead of a cocktail reception for winners set for May 24 in Manhattan. The list of winners (see full list below) overlaps to some degree with the Tony Award nominees. But because they were determined by nearly 21,000 fans voting in a…

Blair Brown On Uma Thurman, Queen Lear – And The Mystery Of ‘Molly Dodd’

Blair Brown plays a D.C. doyenne of the right and designated head of the Fed in Beau Willimon’s Broadway play The Parisian Woman. This makes her the foil for Uma Thurman’s ambitious lefty agitator, who hopes Brown will put in a word with the unnamed boss – that would be Donald Trump – advancing her husband’s transition from tax lawyer to a choice judgeship. Fat chance. In what is easily the play’s most crackling scene, the two women engage in a conversational tango…

Blair Brown plays a D.C. doyenne of the right and designated head of the Fed in Beau Willimon’s Broadway play The Parisian Woman. This makes her the foil for Uma Thurman’s ambitious lefty agitator, who hopes Brown will put in a word with the unnamed boss – that would be Donald Trump – advancing her husband’s transition from tax lawyer to a choice judgeship. Fat chance. In what is easily the play’s most crackling scene, the two women engage in a conversational tango…

‘The Parisian Woman’ Broadway Review: Uma Thurman Stirs Up Political Trouble in D.C.

It’s odd that a four-year-old play would need an update for its Broadway premiere. But then Donald Trump got elected president of the United States.

If memory services, “The Parisian Woman” that I reviewed at South Coast Rep in 2013 was not set in a Barack Obama-specific Washington, D.C., but rather a capital city from almost any recent era. After all, in his playwriting effort Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”) was “inspired” by an 1885 play by Henri Becque, titled “La Parisienne.”

Trump’s name is now mentioned only near the very end of this 90-minute play, but along the way we’re treated to mentions of Ivanka, Twitter mania, General Kelly, fake news, Charlottesville, and a White House under siege by a mad-man president — all of which completely overshadows the captivating tale being told on stage at the Hudson Theater, where the newly revised “Parisian Woman” had its Broadway debut Thursday.

Also Read: ‘Meteor Shower’ Broadway Review: Amy Schumer Sizzles, Steve Martin Fizzles

Real-life political drama (Robert Mueller’s investigation, North Korea’s nuclear capability, billionaires’ tax cuts, you name it) dwarfs the story of an ambitious but seductive D.C. housewife (Uma Thurman) who thinks her tax-attorney husband (Josh Lucas) will nab a federal judgeship if she befriends, propositions, screws and blackmails enough influential people.

At South Coast Rep, Dana Delany took an unusual approach to playing the title role, and in a highly stylized performance she spent more time checking out the audience than her fellow actors. With the same glamorous ease and assurance that her character seduces the D.C. elite, Delany seduced us. Few performances stick in the memory, but this truly audacious one continues to reverberate.

Pam MacKinnon directed that world premiere, and she is back at the helm on Broadway with a very different lead actress. Uma Thurman makes her Broadway debut in “The Parisian Woman,” having first appeared on the New York stage in 1999 in Classic Stage Company’s updated “Misanthrope.”

Also Read: ‘Latin History for Morons’ Broadway Review: John Leguizamo Explains It All

It’s not that Thurman doesn’t know what to do with her hands, in the awkward manner of some film actors who ill-advisedly act on stage. It’s that her gestures seem to be completely programmed. She’s a little less calculated with her head tilts and line readings, but the effort shows. And that’s the last thing a play about political manipulation needs.

Blair Brown and Marton Csokas fare much better. Brown brings an Ann Richards toughness to the supporting role of a high-level appointee in the new administration. Making his Broadway debut, Csokas grovels expertly as a spurned suitor. Lucas, however, attempts to make a cipher something other than a cipher, while Phillipa Soo (“Hamilton”) fades into the D.C. landscape as a possible political star whose career appears to be derailing before it even gets started.

Trump isn’t the only outside force working against the new “Parisian Woman.” As famous men are fired on a daily basis for allegations of sexual harassment, the story of a woman’s sexual misconduct is suddenly a tough sell. With the right actors, Willimon’s play might run refreshingly counter to the zeitgeist. With the current cast and script updates, this Parisian Woman” is simply out of sync.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Meteor Shower’ Broadway Review: Amy Schumer Sizzles, Steve Martin Fizzles

Sweet Mother-of-Pearl! ‘SpongeBob Squarepants’ Is a Broadway Musical but Twitter’s Not Happy

‘Latin History for Morons’ Broadway Review: John Leguizamo Explains It All

It’s odd that a four-year-old play would need an update for its Broadway premiere. But then Donald Trump got elected president of the United States.

If memory services, “The Parisian Woman” that I reviewed at South Coast Rep in 2013 was not set in a Barack Obama-specific Washington, D.C., but rather a capital city from almost any recent era. After all, in his playwriting effort Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”) was “inspired” by an 1885 play by Henri Becque, titled “La Parisienne.”

Trump’s name is now mentioned only near the very end of this 90-minute play, but along the way we’re treated to mentions of Ivanka, Twitter mania, General Kelly, fake news, Charlottesville, and a White House under siege by a mad-man president — all of which completely overshadows the captivating tale being told on stage at the Hudson Theater, where the newly revised “Parisian Woman” had its Broadway debut Thursday.

Real-life political drama (Robert Mueller’s investigation, North Korea’s nuclear capability, billionaires’ tax cuts, you name it) dwarfs the story of an ambitious but seductive D.C. housewife (Uma Thurman) who thinks her tax-attorney husband (Josh Lucas) will nab a federal judgeship if she befriends, propositions, screws and blackmails enough influential people.

At South Coast Rep, Dana Delany took an unusual approach to playing the title role, and in a highly stylized performance she spent more time checking out the audience than her fellow actors. With the same glamorous ease and assurance that her character seduces the D.C. elite, Delany seduced us. Few performances stick in the memory, but this truly audacious one continues to reverberate.

Pam MacKinnon directed that world premiere, and she is back at the helm on Broadway with a very different lead actress. Uma Thurman makes her Broadway debut in “The Parisian Woman,” having first appeared on the New York stage in 1999 in Classic Stage Company’s updated “Misanthrope.”

It’s not that Thurman doesn’t know what to do with her hands, in the awkward manner of some film actors who ill-advisedly act on stage. It’s that her gestures seem to be completely programmed. She’s a little less calculated with her head tilts and line readings, but the effort shows. And that’s the last thing a play about political manipulation needs.

Blair Brown and Marton Csokas fare much better. Brown brings an Ann Richards toughness to the supporting role of a high-level appointee in the new administration. Making his Broadway debut, Csokas grovels expertly as a spurned suitor. Lucas, however, attempts to make a cipher something other than a cipher, while Phillipa Soo (“Hamilton”) fades into the D.C. landscape as a possible political star whose career appears to be derailing before it even gets started.

Trump isn’t the only outside force working against the new “Parisian Woman.” As famous men are fired on a daily basis for allegations of sexual harassment, the story of a woman’s sexual misconduct is suddenly a tough sell. With the right actors, Willimon’s play might run refreshingly counter to the zeitgeist. With the current cast and script updates, this Parisian Woman” is simply out of sync.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Meteor Shower' Broadway Review: Amy Schumer Sizzles, Steve Martin Fizzles

Sweet Mother-of-Pearl! 'SpongeBob Squarepants' Is a Broadway Musical but Twitter's Not Happy

'Latin History for Morons' Broadway Review: John Leguizamo Explains It All

Broadway Review: Uma Thurman In Beau Willimon’s ‘The Parisian Woman’

Beau Willimon has written the story of a D.C. couple whose power grab pitches them against unexpected roadblocks along the Via Dolorosa that is the Beltway, before reaching their destination. That’s of course an apt description of Willimon’s Netflix series House of Cards, but it also works for The Parisian Woman, which opened tonight on Broadway in a production starring Uma Thurman, making her Broadway debut in the title role.
Her name is Chloe, and she’s the soignée wife…

Beau Willimon has written the story of a D.C. couple whose power grab pitches them against unexpected roadblocks along the Via Dolorosa that is the Beltway, before reaching their destination. That’s of course an apt description of Willimon’s Netflix series House of Cards, but it also works for The Parisian Woman, which opened tonight on Broadway in a production starring Uma Thurman, making her Broadway debut in the title role. Her name is Chloe, and she’s the soignée wife…

Broadway Review: Uma Thurman in ‘The Parisian Woman’

Writer Beau Willimon made his mark on the stage with “Farragut North,” which shape-shifted into the film “Ides of March,” starring George Clooney, and led to his role as the creator of Netflix’s “House of Cards.”  If his 2013 play, “The Parisian Woman,” leads anywhere, it will be down the drain. Naming no names here, […]

Writer Beau Willimon made his mark on the stage with “Farragut North,” which shape-shifted into the film “Ides of March,” starring George Clooney, and led to his role as the creator of Netflix’s “House of Cards.”  If his 2013 play, “The Parisian Woman,” leads anywhere, it will be down the drain. Naming no names here, […]

Stagecraft Podcast: Beau Willimon on How Trump Changed ‘The Parisian Woman’ (Listen)

Trump has changed a lot of things in this country — and one of those things is “The Parisian Woman,” the Broadway play that stars Uma Thurman. According to Beau Willimon, the playwright who is also the creator of “House of Cards” and the upcoming Hulu series “The First,” his latest play was already on […]

Trump has changed a lot of things in this country — and one of those things is “The Parisian Woman,” the Broadway play that stars Uma Thurman. According to Beau Willimon, the playwright who is also the creator of “House of Cards” and the upcoming Hulu series “The First,” his latest play was already on […]

Broadway’s Hudson Theatre Set For Beau Willimon’s ‘Parisian Woman’ With Uma Thurman

The producers of Beau Willimon‘s political dramedy The Parisian Woman, with Uma Thurman making her Broadway debut in the title role, have booked Ambassador Theatre Group’s Hudson Theatre. Previews begin November 7 at the 970-seat house, with the opening slated for November 30.
Josh Lucas and Blair Brown recently joined the company, with additional casting to be announced. Pam MacKinnon directs. The creative team includes Derek McLane (scenic design), Jane Greenwood…

The producers of Beau Willimon's political dramedy The Parisian Woman, with Uma Thurman making her Broadway debut in the title role, have booked Ambassador Theatre Group’s Hudson Theatre. Previews begin November 7 at the 970-seat house, with the opening slated for November 30. Josh Lucas and Blair Brown recently joined the company, with additional casting to be announced. Pam MacKinnon directs. The creative team includes Derek McLane (scenic design), Jane Greenwood…