‘The Orville’: Chris Johnson Set To Recur On Season 2 Of Seth MacFarlane’s Fox Dramedy

Chris Johnson (47 Meters Down) is set for a recurring role on the upcoming second season of The Orville, Seth MacFarlane’s Fox space dramedy.
Johnson will play a new character aboard the ship.
The Orville stars MacFarlane, Adrianne Palicki, Penny Johnson Jerald, Scott Grimes, Peter Macon, Halston Sage, J. Lee, Mark Jackson and Chad L. Coleman. Jessica Szohr was recently announced as a new regular for Season 2. Created and written by MacFarlane, The Orville is produced by…

Chris Johnson (47 Meters Down) is set for a recurring role on the upcoming second season of The Orville, Seth MacFarlane’s Fox space dramedy. Johnson will play a new character aboard the ship. The Orville stars MacFarlane, Adrianne Palicki, Penny Johnson Jerald, Scott Grimes, Peter Macon, Halston Sage, J. Lee, Mark Jackson and Chad L. Coleman. Jessica Szohr was recently announced as a new regular for Season 2. Created and written by MacFarlane, The Orville is produced by…

‘The Orville’: Jessica Szohr Cast As Series Regular For Season 2 Of Fox Series

Jessica Szohr (Showtime’s Shameless) is joining the cast of Seth MacFarlane’s The Orville as a new series regular for the Fox space dramedy’s upcoming second season.
Szohr will play a new member of the crew onboard The Orville.
Gossip Girl alumna Szohr is coming off a season-long arc on the Showtime comedy Shameless. Her series credits also include stints on Twin Peaks and Complications. She is repped by ICM Partners, Atlas Artists and attorney Dave Feldman.
The Orville

Jessica Szohr (Showtime’s Shameless) is joining the cast of Seth MacFarlane’s The Orville as a new series regular for the Fox space dramedy’s upcoming second season. Szohr will play a new member of the crew onboard The Orville. Gossip Girl alumna Szohr is coming off a season-long arc on the Showtime comedy Shameless. Her series credits also include stints on Twin Peaks and Complications. She is repped by ICM Partners, Atlas Artists and attorney Dave Feldman. The Orville

35 Streaming TV Shows You Can Binge Watch in a Weekend (Photos)

Stuck at home for a weekend? It’s a perfect time to binge some great TV, thanks to streaming services like Netflix, HBO Go, Hulu and Amazon Prime. But sometimes you want something short, rather than to get sucked into a seasons-long TV show. Here’s a list of binge-worthy shows you can finish in just a couple days.

“Ozark” (Netflix)
“Ozark” follows a financial planner who launders money for a drug cartel. To avoid getting himself and his whole family murdered, he concocts a scheme to head to Missouri to launder a huge amount of money as fast as he can. If you’re craving the sort of dark, crime-ridden drama you need to check out Netflix’s “Ozark” — it’s like “Breaking Bad” if the whole family was involved.

“Glow” (Netflix)
Jump back to the 1980s to follow the creation of the “Gorgeous Women of Wrestling” in Netflix’s latest comedy. Alison Brie of “Mad Men” and Betty Gilpin of “Nurse Jackie” lead a hilarious cast of inexperienced women trying to figure how to wrestle, under the leadership of an extremely unrefined Marc Maron. It’s a quick and funny run at 10 episodes.

“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Season 2 of Netflix’s 1980s-inspired horror series isn’t due till October, which means you’ve got plenty of time to burn through the first eight episodes. The series takes a page from ’80s movies like “The Goonies” and “ET,” and its great cast plays well with the show’s many takes on supernatural horror.

“Westworld” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO kicked off its robots coming to life series last year with a bang. With mind-bending plots focused on artificial intelligence, sentience, and morality — plus lots of confusing timelines to work through — “Westworld” offers a lot to dig into. If you haven’t started the show yet, you can still get lost in its mysteries on HBO Go and HBO Now.

Also Read: Top 20 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

“Luke Cage” (Netflix)
Spinning off from “Jessica Jones,” Luke Cage takes superheroes to Harlem with a different tone from Netflix’s other Marvel series. There will eventually be more of Luke Cage, but for now the complete first season is a contained story that expands the Marvel universe with perspective that’s especially poignant in the current American political climate.

“Travelers” (Netflix)
Time travelers are popping up in 2017, hoping to stop an apocalyptic future. Netflix grounds the show in the personal struggles of a dedicated team of temporally displaced scientists who are completely out of their elements. “Travelers” also does a great job of giving just enough information to build a fascinating world that leaves a lot of mysteries to solve later on.

“The Night Of” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO’s short miniseries starts with an accusation and a murder, and spirals from there. Naz is a Muslim kid arrested for a murder he can’t remember if he committed, and even before his trial, the situation ripples out to affect everyone even remotely related to him or the crime. It’s a dark and dramatic look into the criminal justice system that goes beyond the usual police procedural.

Also Read: Top 20 Best HBO Original Series, From ‘Six Feet Under’ to ‘Game of Thrones’ (Photos)

“The People vs. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” (Netflix)
Looking back into the American zeitgeist of 1994, FX’s drama adaptation of the trial of the century is an enthralling 10 episodes. It’s brilliantly cast and captures the moment, with all its bizarre and upsetting ins and outs, extremely well.

“Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events” (Netflix)
The book series of the same name contains 13 volumes, but for the moment it’s possible to get through the first four in one binge sitting. Netflix’s adaptation has an amazing cast and is funny throughout for kids and adults. Even though the story isn’t finished by the end of Season 1, it’s worth digging into the plight of the Baudelaire children in one go.

Also Read: TV Shows You Should Binge-Watch Right Now, From ‘OITNB’ to ‘Better Call Saul’ (Photos)

“Shut Eye” (Hulu)
An organized crime drama that’s kinda funny and a bit supernatural. “Shut Eye” is about grifters posing as psychics in Los Angeles, until Jeffrey Donovan (FX’s “Fargo”) hits his head and starts to see the future. Family drama gets out of control, as do murderous crime bosses.

“3%” (Netflix)
The first Brazilian Netflix original imagines a post-apocalyptic world where people compete for a chance to go somewhere better. Only 3 percent of candidates make the cut, and they often have to do so by screwing each other over. The possibility of entering utopia pushes the characters to their brinks and beyond, especially as they decide what they’re willing to do to get there.

“The OA” (Netflix)
Diving deep into the “strange and mysterious serialized show” category is “The OA,” about a kidnapped blind woman who returns to her hometown with the ability to see. The series gets even weirder after that, constantly posing mysterious questions about the woman’s powers and her kidnapping. The strangeness only escalates, so binge now for a mystery to solve ahead of the show’s second season.

Also Read: Every Marvel Comics Live-Action TV Show Ranked, from ‘The Incredible Hulk’ to ‘Iron Fist’ (Photos)

“Black Mirror” (Netflix)
There are actually four seasons’ worth of episodes of “Black Mirror” available on Netflix, but at only six episodes each, the series is just contained enough that you can get through the whole thing in a long weekend without much to do. It’s addictive enough to happen, as “Black Mirror” puts a “Twilight Zone” twist on modern technology and human relationships.

“Fleabag” (Amazon Prime)
British comedy “Fleabag” is only six episodes long, which makes it a perfect binge for a snowy Saturday or a lazy Sunday. Following Fleabag, a cynical, apathetic, perverted woman fighting to deal with modern life in London, the show gives a different take on modern comedies and dealing with issues like depression.

Also Read: 31 ‘Iron Fist’ Characters, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

“The Jinx” (HBO Go and HBO Now)
The story of Robert Durst is a strange one, filled with disappearances, murder, dismemberment, and bad disguises. The six-episode documentary miniseries goes through the story of Durst’s early life and the disappearance of his wife, through two other deaths, and ends with a possible bombshell break in the case. It’s the kind of binge watch material that’s hard to pull away from.

“The Fall” (Netflix)
This British police procedural about a detective hunting a serial killer stars Gillian Anderson of “X-Files” fame and Jamie Dornan of “Fifty Shades of Grey.” Though it covers three total seasons, the shorter series of BBC shows means the grand total is just 17 episodes.

Also Read: 14 Time Travel TV Shows You Should Be Watching Right Now, From ’12 Monkeys’ to ‘Time After Time’ (Photos)

“Band of Brothers” (HBO Go and HBO Now)
Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks produced this drama that follows the 101st Airborne through the European Theater in World War II. Intense, personal and powerful, the 10-part series tells the story of the war in a way that few other movies or series have captured.

“The Crown” (Netflix)
Delving into the story of the English royal family, “The Crown” finds all sorts of drama as Queen Elizabeth II struggles to bear the weight of royal succession. Despite covering the queen’s life over more than 60 years, you’ll still be able to make it through its 10 episodes in a couple days.

“Making a Murderer” (Netflix)
This intensive documentary series covers the story of Steven Avery, who was exonerated of a rape accusation before being arrested for murder. The documentary covers the sorted story of the crime, the investigation, and the prosecution over 10 episodes, raising plenty of questions about whether Avery is guilty along the way.

Also Read: 9 ‘Stranger Things’ Fan Theories About Season 2

“Lady Dynamite” (Netflix)
“Lady Dynamite” teams comedian Maria Bamford and “Arrested Development” creator Mitchell Hurwitz to bring a version of Bamford’s comedy to Netflix. The surreal series follows a version of Bamford after she tries to rebuild her life and comedy career after getting treated for bipolar disorder, and with more episodes on the way, it’s a good one to spend a weekend on.

“Crazy Head” (Netflix)
British horror-comedy “Crazy Head” is about two women who can see demons. At first they think they’re crazy — but then they realize the demons are real. Over six episodes, Amy and Raquel battle the forces of evil, making it a funny experience that’s easy to knock out in a hurry.

Also Read: ‘Travelers’ Season 2: 9 Questions We Need Answered (Photos)

“11.22.63” (Hulu)
Adapting Stephen King’s novel of the same name, “11.22.63” sends James Franco back in time from 2016 to the 1960s. The plan: stop the assassination of John F. Kennedy and rewrite the entire future of America for the better. The entire story is perfect weekend material, covered in just eight episodes.

“Iron Fist” (Netflix)
The fourth of Netflix’s Marvel superhero shows is out now, and it’s the last story before the streaming service’s three heroes come together for “The Defenders.” That makes it essential backstory for fans of “Daredevil,” “Luke Cage” and “Jessica Jones,” and binge watch all 13 kung-fu-filled episodes pretty quickly.

“Top of the Lake” (Netflix)
Mix up your police procedurals with a New Zealand perspective with “Top of the Lake.” Its two seasons star Elizabeth Moss of “Mad Men,” with some heavy hitters including Holly Hunter and Nicole Kidman. The two seasons are relatively short, with the whole series totaling 13 episodes.

“Santa Clarita Diet” (Netflix)
Drew Barrymore finds herself sliding toward being an undead cannibal in this Netflix comedy. Killing and eating people shouldn’t be so funny, but her uptight but supportive suburban family make the enterprise of trying to live as a zombie a pretty good time.

“13 Reasons Why” (Netflix)
High school drama “13 Reasons Why” tells the story of a girl who commits suicide, and the tapes she leaves behind for the various people in her life that drove her to that decision. Delivered like a mystery, the show is great weekend binge watch material as it drags you from episode to episode to find out what happened to Hannah Baker.

“Big Little Lies” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO’s scandal- and rumor-fueled dark comedy “Big Little Lies” also became a whodunit as its drama unfolded. With a star-studded cast that includes Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, Alexander Skarsgard and Laura Dern, and clocking in at only seven episodes, “Big Little Lies” is a quick, high-quality watch.

“The Young Pope” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
Jude Law is the first American pope in a dark comedy about religion, authority, politics and backstabbing. “The Young Pope” has its surreal moments as Law’s Pius XIII tries to deflect the machinations of the cardinals around him and figure out what to handle being His Holiness.

“Designated Survivor” (Hulu)
Kiefer Sutherland’s spin as a cabinet member who rises to the presidency after a terrorist bombing wipes out the government mixes a lot of conspiracy theory action with some political drama. The result is a mix of “24” and “The West Wing” that’s exciting and optimistic, especially when scandals swirl in the real-life government.

“Dear White People” (Netflix)
Exploring the realities of navigating race and being Black in America, “Dear White People” delves into the lives of student activists at an Ivy League college that thinks it’s successfully become post-racial. In addition to digging into some tough subjects, the show is also constantly hilarious as each episode focuses on specific characters’ lives and relationships to race.

“Timeless” (Hulu)
NBC’s history-rewriting time travel show adventure show has been rescued from cancellation, securing a second season thanks to fan demand. That means it’s a great time to catch up on “Timeless” while there’s still one season, which is available on Hulu.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Set in a dystopian future in which women are subjugated in America and treated as breeding stock, Hulu’s powerful series can be hard to watch. With an incredible cast that includes Elisabeth Moss, Yvonne Strahovski and Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale” provides a glimpse into a near-future that sometimes feels a little too possible.

“The Keepers” (Netflix)
Netflix’s latest lengthy true crime documentary sets out to try to find the killer of Sister Cathy Cesnick, a Catholic nun and teacher who died in 1969. The show quickly uncovers a sprawling, horrific tale of sexual abuse at a Baltimore Catholic school that might have led to Sister Cathy’s murder, and possibly a cover up.

Stuck at home for a weekend? It’s a perfect time to binge some great TV, thanks to streaming services like Netflix, HBO Go, Hulu and Amazon Prime. But sometimes you want something short, rather than to get sucked into a seasons-long TV show. Here’s a list of binge-worthy shows you can finish in just a couple days.

“Ozark” (Netflix)
“Ozark” follows a financial planner who launders money for a drug cartel. To avoid getting himself and his whole family murdered, he concocts a scheme to head to Missouri to launder a huge amount of money as fast as he can. If you’re craving the sort of dark, crime-ridden drama you need to check out Netflix’s “Ozark” — it’s like “Breaking Bad” if the whole family was involved.

“Glow” (Netflix)
Jump back to the 1980s to follow the creation of the “Gorgeous Women of Wrestling” in Netflix’s latest comedy. Alison Brie of “Mad Men” and Betty Gilpin of “Nurse Jackie” lead a hilarious cast of inexperienced women trying to figure how to wrestle, under the leadership of an extremely unrefined Marc Maron. It’s a quick and funny run at 10 episodes.

“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Season 2 of Netflix’s 1980s-inspired horror series isn’t due till October, which means you’ve got plenty of time to burn through the first eight episodes. The series takes a page from ’80s movies like “The Goonies” and “ET,” and its great cast plays well with the show’s many takes on supernatural horror.

“Westworld” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO kicked off its robots coming to life series last year with a bang. With mind-bending plots focused on artificial intelligence, sentience, and morality — plus lots of confusing timelines to work through — “Westworld” offers a lot to dig into. If you haven’t started the show yet, you can still get lost in its mysteries on HBO Go and HBO Now.

“Luke Cage” (Netflix)
Spinning off from “Jessica Jones,” Luke Cage takes superheroes to Harlem with a different tone from Netflix’s other Marvel series. There will eventually be more of Luke Cage, but for now the complete first season is a contained story that expands the Marvel universe with perspective that’s especially poignant in the current American political climate.

“Travelers” (Netflix)
Time travelers are popping up in 2017, hoping to stop an apocalyptic future. Netflix grounds the show in the personal struggles of a dedicated team of temporally displaced scientists who are completely out of their elements. “Travelers” also does a great job of giving just enough information to build a fascinating world that leaves a lot of mysteries to solve later on.

“The Night Of” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO’s short miniseries starts with an accusation and a murder, and spirals from there. Naz is a Muslim kid arrested for a murder he can’t remember if he committed, and even before his trial, the situation ripples out to affect everyone even remotely related to him or the crime. It’s a dark and dramatic look into the criminal justice system that goes beyond the usual police procedural.

“The People vs. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” (Netflix)
Looking back into the American zeitgeist of 1994, FX’s drama adaptation of the trial of the century is an enthralling 10 episodes. It’s brilliantly cast and captures the moment, with all its bizarre and upsetting ins and outs, extremely well.

“Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events” (Netflix)
The book series of the same name contains 13 volumes, but for the moment it’s possible to get through the first four in one binge sitting. Netflix’s adaptation has an amazing cast and is funny throughout for kids and adults. Even though the story isn’t finished by the end of Season 1, it’s worth digging into the plight of the Baudelaire children in one go.

“Shut Eye” (Hulu)
An organized crime drama that’s kinda funny and a bit supernatural. “Shut Eye” is about grifters posing as psychics in Los Angeles, until Jeffrey Donovan (FX’s “Fargo”) hits his head and starts to see the future. Family drama gets out of control, as do murderous crime bosses.

“3%” (Netflix)
The first Brazilian Netflix original imagines a post-apocalyptic world where people compete for a chance to go somewhere better. Only 3 percent of candidates make the cut, and they often have to do so by screwing each other over. The possibility of entering utopia pushes the characters to their brinks and beyond, especially as they decide what they’re willing to do to get there.

“The OA” (Netflix)
Diving deep into the “strange and mysterious serialized show” category is “The OA,” about a kidnapped blind woman who returns to her hometown with the ability to see. The series gets even weirder after that, constantly posing mysterious questions about the woman’s powers and her kidnapping. The strangeness only escalates, so binge now for a mystery to solve ahead of the show’s second season.

“Black Mirror” (Netflix)
There are actually four seasons’ worth of episodes of “Black Mirror” available on Netflix, but at only six episodes each, the series is just contained enough that you can get through the whole thing in a long weekend without much to do. It’s addictive enough to happen, as “Black Mirror” puts a “Twilight Zone” twist on modern technology and human relationships.

“Fleabag” (Amazon Prime)
British comedy “Fleabag” is only six episodes long, which makes it a perfect binge for a snowy Saturday or a lazy Sunday. Following Fleabag, a cynical, apathetic, perverted woman fighting to deal with modern life in London, the show gives a different take on modern comedies and dealing with issues like depression.

“The Jinx” (HBO Go and HBO Now)
The story of Robert Durst is a strange one, filled with disappearances, murder, dismemberment, and bad disguises. The six-episode documentary miniseries goes through the story of Durst’s early life and the disappearance of his wife, through two other deaths, and ends with a possible bombshell break in the case. It’s the kind of binge watch material that’s hard to pull away from.

“The Fall” (Netflix)
This British police procedural about a detective hunting a serial killer stars Gillian Anderson of “X-Files” fame and Jamie Dornan of “Fifty Shades of Grey.” Though it covers three total seasons, the shorter series of BBC shows means the grand total is just 17 episodes.

“Band of Brothers” (HBO Go and HBO Now)
Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks produced this drama that follows the 101st Airborne through the European Theater in World War II. Intense, personal and powerful, the 10-part series tells the story of the war in a way that few other movies or series have captured.

“The Crown” (Netflix)
Delving into the story of the English royal family, “The Crown” finds all sorts of drama as Queen Elizabeth II struggles to bear the weight of royal succession. Despite covering the queen’s life over more than 60 years, you’ll still be able to make it through its 10 episodes in a couple days.

“Making a Murderer” (Netflix)
This intensive documentary series covers the story of Steven Avery, who was exonerated of a rape accusation before being arrested for murder. The documentary covers the sorted story of the crime, the investigation, and the prosecution over 10 episodes, raising plenty of questions about whether Avery is guilty along the way.

“Lady Dynamite” (Netflix)
“Lady Dynamite” teams comedian Maria Bamford and “Arrested Development” creator Mitchell Hurwitz to bring a version of Bamford’s comedy to Netflix. The surreal series follows a version of Bamford after she tries to rebuild her life and comedy career after getting treated for bipolar disorder, and with more episodes on the way, it’s a good one to spend a weekend on.

“Crazy Head” (Netflix)
British horror-comedy “Crazy Head” is about two women who can see demons. At first they think they’re crazy — but then they realize the demons are real. Over six episodes, Amy and Raquel battle the forces of evil, making it a funny experience that’s easy to knock out in a hurry.

“11.22.63” (Hulu)
Adapting Stephen King’s novel of the same name, “11.22.63” sends James Franco back in time from 2016 to the 1960s. The plan: stop the assassination of John F. Kennedy and rewrite the entire future of America for the better. The entire story is perfect weekend material, covered in just eight episodes.

“Iron Fist” (Netflix)
The fourth of Netflix’s Marvel superhero shows is out now, and it’s the last story before the streaming service’s three heroes come together for “The Defenders.” That makes it essential backstory for fans of “Daredevil,” “Luke Cage” and “Jessica Jones,” and binge watch all 13 kung-fu-filled episodes pretty quickly.

“Top of the Lake” (Netflix)
Mix up your police procedurals with a New Zealand perspective with “Top of the Lake.” Its two seasons star Elizabeth Moss of “Mad Men,” with some heavy hitters including Holly Hunter and Nicole Kidman. The two seasons are relatively short, with the whole series totaling 13 episodes.

“Santa Clarita Diet” (Netflix)
Drew Barrymore finds herself sliding toward being an undead cannibal in this Netflix comedy. Killing and eating people shouldn’t be so funny, but her uptight but supportive suburban family make the enterprise of trying to live as a zombie a pretty good time.

“13 Reasons Why” (Netflix)
High school drama “13 Reasons Why” tells the story of a girl who commits suicide, and the tapes she leaves behind for the various people in her life that drove her to that decision. Delivered like a mystery, the show is great weekend binge watch material as it drags you from episode to episode to find out what happened to Hannah Baker.

“Big Little Lies” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
HBO’s scandal- and rumor-fueled dark comedy “Big Little Lies” also became a whodunit as its drama unfolded. With a star-studded cast that includes Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, Alexander Skarsgard and Laura Dern, and clocking in at only seven episodes, “Big Little Lies” is a quick, high-quality watch.

“The Young Pope” (HBO Go, HBO Now)
Jude Law is the first American pope in a dark comedy about religion, authority, politics and backstabbing. “The Young Pope” has its surreal moments as Law’s Pius XIII tries to deflect the machinations of the cardinals around him and figure out what to handle being His Holiness.

“Designated Survivor” (Hulu)
Kiefer Sutherland’s spin as a cabinet member who rises to the presidency after a terrorist bombing wipes out the government mixes a lot of conspiracy theory action with some political drama. The result is a mix of “24” and “The West Wing” that’s exciting and optimistic, especially when scandals swirl in the real-life government.

“Dear White People” (Netflix)
Exploring the realities of navigating race and being Black in America, “Dear White People” delves into the lives of student activists at an Ivy League college that thinks it’s successfully become post-racial. In addition to digging into some tough subjects, the show is also constantly hilarious as each episode focuses on specific characters’ lives and relationships to race.

“Timeless” (Hulu)
NBC’s history-rewriting time travel show adventure show has been rescued from cancellation, securing a second season thanks to fan demand. That means it’s a great time to catch up on “Timeless” while there’s still one season, which is available on Hulu.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Set in a dystopian future in which women are subjugated in America and treated as breeding stock, Hulu’s powerful series can be hard to watch. With an incredible cast that includes Elisabeth Moss, Yvonne Strahovski and Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale” provides a glimpse into a near-future that sometimes feels a little too possible.

“The Keepers” (Netflix)
Netflix’s latest lengthy true crime documentary sets out to try to find the killer of Sister Cathy Cesnick, a Catholic nun and teacher who died in 1969. The show quickly uncovers a sprawling, horrific tale of sexual abuse at a Baltimore Catholic school that might have led to Sister Cathy’s murder, and possibly a cover up.

Seth MacFarlane says The Orville’s second season will be longer, more heavily sci-fi

From the jump, Seth MacFarlane’s new hour-long Fox series, The Orville, has been a beast serving two masters, as the urge to fill its scripts with Family Guy-esque sex jokes and asides warred with what seemed like a pretty sincere attempt to recreate the basic beats of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Now, MacFarlane…

Read more…

From the jump, Seth MacFarlane’s new hour-long Fox series, The Orville, has been a beast serving two masters, as the urge to fill its scripts with Family Guy-esque sex jokes and asides warred with what seemed like a pretty sincere attempt to recreate the basic beats of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Now, MacFarlane…

Read more...

Watch Seth MacFarlane Nerd-Out in ‘Star Trek’ Fan Film as a Teen (Video)

Seth MacFarlane made a “Star Trek” fan film when he was a teenager… and that might be all we need to say about that, but we’ll go on.

The fan fic video a teenaged MacFarlane made in tribute to the Enterprise recently resurfaced online, with the comedian starring as Captain James T. Kirk. And you might want to step aside, William Shatner, cause “The Orville” star is taking his leadership role very seriously.

Sadly, the clip, posted by TrekGenius News, doesn’t look like a complete version of MacFarlane’s nerdy endeavor, leaving us hanging with Spock and Uhura (played by MacFarlane’s friends) stuck on the ship, outside the realms of time and space. However, it was enough for users to estimate MacFarlane was around 14 or 15 when the video was made.

Also Read: ‘The Orville,’ ‘SWAT,’ ‘Ballers’ Score California Tax Credits

Luckily, we know MacFarlane has had many more chances to boldly go where he had clearly gone before, with “Star Trek” spoofs on “Family Guy” and space adventures in his new “Star Trek”-esque Fox comedy series.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Black Mirror’ EP Insists ‘USS Callister’ Is Not a Satire of ‘Star Trek’

Paramount Taps ‘Revenant’ Screenwriter Mark L. Smith to Pen Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Star Trek’ Idea

Inside Doug Jones’ Amazing Year, From ‘Star Trek’ to ‘Twin Peaks’ to Senate

Quentin Tarantino Has a ‘Star Trek’ Idea, JJ Abrams to Put Together Writer’s Room

Seth MacFarlane made a “Star Trek” fan film when he was a teenager… and that might be all we need to say about that, but we’ll go on.

The fan fic video a teenaged MacFarlane made in tribute to the Enterprise recently resurfaced online, with the comedian starring as Captain James T. Kirk. And you might want to step aside, William Shatner, cause “The Orville” star is taking his leadership role very seriously.

Sadly, the clip, posted by TrekGenius News, doesn’t look like a complete version of MacFarlane’s nerdy endeavor, leaving us hanging with Spock and Uhura (played by MacFarlane’s friends) stuck on the ship, outside the realms of time and space. However, it was enough for users to estimate MacFarlane was around 14 or 15 when the video was made.

Luckily, we know MacFarlane has had many more chances to boldly go where he had clearly gone before, with “Star Trek” spoofs on “Family Guy” and space adventures in his new “Star Trek”-esque Fox comedy series.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Mirror' EP Insists 'USS Callister' Is Not a Satire of 'Star Trek'

Paramount Taps 'Revenant' Screenwriter Mark L. Smith to Pen Quentin Tarantino's 'Star Trek' Idea

Inside Doug Jones' Amazing Year, From 'Star Trek' to 'Twin Peaks' to Senate

Quentin Tarantino Has a 'Star Trek' Idea, JJ Abrams to Put Together Writer's Room

From ‘The Orville’ to ‘Star Trek: Discovery,’ ‘Librarians’ Director Jonathan Frakes Has Found Massive Range Within the Realm of Sci-Fi

The ‘Next Generation’ star, who established a reputation as one of TV’s most versatile directors, says there’s room for both ‘Orville’ and ‘Discovery.’

In case there’s any lingering debate between “The Orville” and “Star Trek: Discovery” fans, Jonathan Frakes has given his blessing to both.

Frakes might be most familiar to sci-fi fans as Commander William T. Riker, but the former star of “Star Trek: The Next Generation” has also been one of TV’s go-to directors for more than 27 years. Most recently, he was behind “The Librarians” episode “…And the Silver Screen,” an homage to classic Hollywood written by executive producer/star Noah Wyle.

In the episode, Flynn Carsen (Wyle) and his team find themselves sucked into a wild range of classic film genres, including ’40s film noir, B-movie sci-fi, and even a cowboy musical.

Mimicking a variety of styles is something that the veteran director is quite used to doing. In just the last year, Jonathan Frakes directed five episodes of television, including both “The Orville” and “Star Trek: Discovery,” perhaps serving as the ultimate bridge between the two fall TV homages to the “Star Trek” franchise. And according to Frakes, there’s room for both.

“Stylistically, your responsibility as an episodic television director [is] when you do a show like ‘The Orville,’ you want that show to look like ‘Next Generation,'” he said. “And when you go to Canada to do ‘Star Trek: Discovery,’ they want that show to have the feeling, and look, and vibe of the J.J. [Abrams]-era ‘Star Trek.’ Much more cinematic, a lot of crane work, and a lot of movement, a lot of dutch angles. On ‘Next Generation,’ the traditional framing, and the things we became accustomed to as fans of the show, we see in [‘The Orville’] because that’s the look.”

When it came to “The Orville,” Frakes said that “I was afraid that it was going to be like ‘Family Guy,’ and it’s not really, but it’s also not really as serious as ‘Next Generation.’ I think Seth [MacFarlane], and Brannon [Braga], and whoever else is involved in all this, they found a tone that clicks with this audience, either the millennial audience or the old school audience. Everyone is very pleasantly surprised at how well the show has been received. I’m happy to see the homage, and I’m happy to see success for whoever wants to steal good ideas.”

Added Frakes, “It was a very conscious, and I think quite successful, homage. ‘Orville’s’ coming back for a second season, so is ‘Discovery.’ There’s room, obviously, in the fans’ hearts for both types of ‘Star Trek.'”

Read More: ‘The Librarians’ Star Noah Wyle: What’s Driving Him to Save Family Friendly TV

As for “The Librarians,” the show — which tracks the extraordinary adventures of a team investigating weird and magical events in our world — is a continuation of a long-running franchise starring Noah Wyle that began in 2004. It stands out among cable TV offerings for its family-friendly approach.

“…And the Silver Screen,” was right in Wyle’s wheelhouse, Frakes said: “He’s a huge movie buff. He’s down to combine the genres.”

There are plenty of touches in “…And the Silver Screen” that film nerds will appreciate, such as the shifting of aspect ratios depending on the type of genre being depicted, including 4:3 for the film noir sections and full-on widescreen during the Western musical. Also, “we shot consciously day for night for the outdoor chaps in chaps,” Frakes said. “We did the campfire scene by day and it has that wonderful cheesy color timing in it, so it looks like Technicolor… [The episode is] filled with Easter eggs.”

And according to Frakes, the days spent shooting “…And the Silver Screen” were a lot of fun for both the cast and crew. “People on both sides of the camera were having a ball with this. The crew was fully engaged,” he said. “The cinematographer, Dave Connell, and the gaffer deal had a field day lighting old school black-and-white. They broke out all this equipment that they hadn’t used in a long time. The same is true for the costumers. It was one of those great opportunities where everybody making the show enjoyed it.”

The day they filmed the sci-fi homage, Frakes noted, was the same day that they shot their crew photo, meaning that enough staff was present to make the set feel like it had a live studio audience — just as they were preparing to film a big master shot.

“So I said [to the cast], ‘Do you guys want to perform for everybody?’ And they said, ‘Sure, let’s just go ahead and do it,'” he said. “And they did this long take of that scene, and the whole company applauded. It was like we were doing a play. It was a synchronous moment. The episode is very special for a lot of us.”

Frakes credited Wyle for what he believes is the best season yet of “The Librarians.”

“He’s become sort of this Orson Welles. He wrote, produced, directed, and starred, and he is the heart and soul. He is the Librarian, because he’s owned that part of Flynn Carsen since that first movie. That’s what’s kept the entire franchise alive.”

“The Librarians” airs Wednesdays on TNT. Catch up on the TNT website now

The Most Disappointing TV Shows of 2017

Dashed dreams cut deep, and these series left a scar on 2017’s TV heart.

In the age of peak TV, there’s a lot of bad television out there. But rather than take the time to highlight what everyone should already be forgetting, IndieWire is examining the heartbreaking misses of 2017; the shows that felt like they had something special — either in concept, talent, or early episodes — but failed to fulfill that promise.

For the shows that weren’t cancelled, hope rings eternal. TV is a medium that allows for development, improvement, and the virtual erasure of bad first impressions. The shows below might be a long way from getting good, but their break bad hurt enough that even for the most disappointing, we still hope for the best.

And if you like any shows on the list, then good luck and godspeed. You found something there that we only wish we could have seen. Maybe next year.

16. “Powerless”

"Powerless"

“Powerless”

Chris Haston/NBC

On the basis of its cast alone, “Powerless” should have had a real shot. Unfortunately, Vanessa Hudgens, Danny Pudi, Christina Kirk, Ron Funches, and Alan Tudyk can’t save a show that undergoes significant retooling and still fails to find its place. As DC Comics searches for its own way of achieving what Marvel has accomplished across film and television, “Powerless” not only felt out of place in NBC’s midseason schedule, but within the greater DC universe, as well. On paper, “Powerless” seemed like a lot of fun, but its wobbly creative start never gave it the momentum necessary to become a stand-out hit and survive beyond its first season.

15. “Santa Clarita Diet”

"Santa Clarita Diet"

“Santa Clarita Diet”

Saeed Adyani / Netflix

Those who enjoy Victor Fresco’s dark suburban comedy will likely point to its unique premise and equally distinct tone. Those who don’t like it will say those two things never come together, and, worse yet, the premise isn’t all that original when you strip away the quirks. We won’t go any further, for fear of ruining the best part of the series — the twist — but perhaps the most frustrating element of “Santa Clarita Diet” comes from its star, Drew Barrymore. While her onscreen partner, Timothy Olyphant, bites into every scene with the exploratory vigor needed to make this off-kilter comedy charming, Barrymore shows no interest in playing along. She’s very much who she always is, leaving the comedy duo half-cocked. “Santa Clarita Diet” needs a more adventurous performance from its headliner if it ever hopes to appeal to more than just a cult crowd.

14. “White Famous”

White Famous Jay Pharoah Jamie Foxx Showtime

“White Famous”

Michael Desmond / Showtime

For a “Californication” apologist, it’s painful to cite David Duchovny’s Showtime series as a reason to steer clear of the creator’s new show. But they share a lot of the same basic plot points, with zero updates made to mask the flaws in an original that’s aging poorly. Worse than Tom Kapinos’ self-plagiarism is the rage-curdling missed opportunity which “White Famous” represents. There’s an interesting story here about black entertainers who have to conform to the old and white ways of an old and white film industry, but “White Famous” is barely interested in discussing these systematic issues. If anything, it glosses over them in provocative fashion so ill-informed it feels like trolling. Jay Pharoah can do better, and Hank Moody deserves better in 2017.

13. “Liar”

Joanne Froggatt as Laura Nielson, Ioan Gruffudd as Andrew Earlham - Liar _ Season 1 - Photo Credit: Joss Barratt/Two Brothers Pictures/ITV/SundanceTV

“Liar”

Joss Barratt/Two Brothers Pictur

Initially sold to audiences as a he said/she said drama that aimed to dig into the misunderstandings surrounding a date gone wrong for Laura (Joanna Froggatt) and Andrew (Ioan Gruffudd), “Liar” ended up betraying that initial intrigue. Thanks to a few key turning points in the Sundance TV drama, the series pulled away from what could have been truly intense, meaty material when it comes to the concept of consent in these complicated modern times. Instead, it became a much more straightforward thriller; one which technically wrapped up every important detail of the narrative until, that is, a surprise ending that will remain unexplained until the premiere of Season 2, which won’t even go into production until January 2019. So fans will have to wait… but viewers may honestly not be all that interested in what comes next.

12. “I’m Dying Up Here”

I'm Dying Up Here Showtime RJ Cyler Michael Angarano Clark Duke

Sure, this Showtime dramedy had all the trappings of a ‘70s L.A. story. But if you’re going to make a show about scrappy stand-ups navigating the Sunset Strip scene in hopes of stardom, they better be funny enough to be worth spending time with. The success of a show like this is always going to hinge on how many of the characters in this ragtag group of would-be comedians were worth following. From very early on, “I’m Dying Up Here” proved to be a premise in search of a more focused approach to its overstuffed cast list. With Jim Carrey’s involvement as a producer, a supporting turn from Melissa Leo, and a roster of character actors who have shined elsewhere, this opening season turned out to be less than the sum of its parts.

11. “24: Legacy”

24 Legacy Corey Hawkins Season 1 Episode 1 Pilot

“24: Legacy”

Guy D'Alema/FOX

The stage was set for a new way forward for the old CTU gang, and trading in show staple Kiefer Sutherland for the young, talented Corey Hawkins seemed like just the right amount of reset. But what the show managed to swap out in cast members (Hey, look! Miranda Otto and Jimmy Smits, too!), it felt like a lot of the same from a show that just can’t be the same series it was in 2001. Without updating its approach for a 2017 world, “Legacy” catered to an audience that can easily find more nuanced thrillers elsewhere and was likely burnt out by a “24” that had largely run its natural course. Given the groundbreaking format of its opening seasons and the go-for-broke bonkers nature of its action, “Legacy” still felt overstretched, even at half the usual number of episodes.

10. “Z: The Beginning of Everything”

Z: The Beginning of Everything Christina Ricci David Hoflin

“Z: The Beginning of Everything”

Amazon Studios

It’s hard to say who was more in love with Zelda Fitzgerald nee Sayre: her famous husband F. Scott Fitzgerald or this somewhat enjoyable but ultimately superficial Amazon biopic. Even if one gets over Christina Ricci’s clunky Alabaman accent, the series never really feels authentic, as if it’s playing more in the world of the Fitzgeralds than inhabiting it. Beautifully made, it’s a treat to watch, but its lack of heft and a strong point of view makes all the effort forgettable. Apparently, would-be viewers felt the same: In the end “Z: The Beginning of Everything” met its untimely end as one of the elite group of canceled Amazon original series.

9. “The Last Tycoon”

The Last Tycoon Matt Bomer & Kelsey Grammer

“The Last Tycoon”

Amazon Studios

Given the sumptuous pedigree of the (albeit unfinished) work of one of the great American novelists and with a thoroughly handsome production design to boot, it’s disheartening that this show felt so empty after its full nine-episode run. Bomer is charming and Kelsey Grammer makes for a decent villain, but more than any show in 2017, “The Last Tycoon” became a glaring paragon of the just-good-enough dramas that have zapped away precious viewing hours in a time when there’s an armada of more worthy shows. With a goofy cliffhanger ending and a handful of twists drenched in misplaced melodrama, this seems like a show without an audience — even before it was canceled by Amazon. Above all, Jennifer Beals’ performance deserved a better show around it; burying what could have been one of the year’s most compelling storylines was perhaps the show’s most egregious misstep.