‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Trailer: Adam Driver And Jonathan Pryce Get Delusional In Terry Gilliam’s Latest

Read on: Deadline.

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is finally making its way to theaters after an arduous journey — and they have a new trailer to prove it. The film, which made its world premiere at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, will play via…

Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce Lose Sight of Reality in First Trailer for Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Screen Media finally released a trailer Monday for Terry Gilliam’s long-delayed film, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a passion project that has taken the director nearly two decades to get to the screen.

The film stars Jonathan Pryce as the title character alongside Adam Driver, Stellan Skarsgård, Olga Kurylenko and Jordi Mollà. Driver plays a frustrated filmmaker and disillusioned advertising executive who becomes pulled into a world of time-jumping fantasy when a Spanish cobbler (Pryce) who believes he is Don Quixote mistakes Toby for his trusted squire Sancho Panza. Pulled further into the cobbler’s world, Toby gradually becomes unable to tell his dreams from reality.

In 2018, Gilliam lost a legal dispute when a French court ruled that he would have to pay one of the film’s former producer, Paulo Branco, €10,000 ($11,600) for breach of contract. Branco also sought an injunction to prevent “Don Quixote” from being released and from premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, though he was denied that request.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Despite that clash that nearly blocked the completed film from screening, Gilliam’s project finally made its premiere as the closing night film at last year’s Cannes Film Festival in May. But even before it screened, Amazon Studios dropped its planned U.S. distribution of the film.

This is all just the cherry on top of what has historically been one of the most plagued film productions ever, dating all the way back to the late ’90s and including everything from on-set injuries, flash floods, cast changes and even more lawsuits. You can read all about the film’s storied production history here.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Long-Delayed ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Acquired by Screen Media

Directed and written by Gilliam, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is co-written by Tony Grisoni and produced by Mariela Besuievsky, Amy Gilliam, Gerardo Herrero and Gregoire Melin.

Watch the video above.

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The Man Who Killed Don Quixote might actually come out, barring even more ridiculous setbacks

Read on: The A.V. Club.

When future generations look up the word “mess” in some kind of high-tech VR encyclopedia, they will simply redirected to a separate volume that covers the production of Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. He spent nearly two decades just t…

Terry Gilliam’s Long-Delayed ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Acquired by Screen Media

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

U.S. audiences will finally get the chance to see Terry Gilliam’s long-delayed film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a passion project that has taken the director nearly two decades to get to the screen.

Screen Media acquired the North American rights to “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and, barring yet another unforeseen mishap, it is planning a March 2019 theatrical release in partnership with Fathom Events, the company announced Monday.

The film stars Jonathan Pryce as the title character alongside Adam Driver, Stellan Skarsgård, Olga Kurylenko and Jordi Mollà. Driver plays a frustrated filmmaker and disillusioned advertising executive who becomes pulled into a world of time-jumping fantasy when a Spanish cobbler (Pryce) who believes he is Don Quixote mistakes Toby for his trusted squire Sancho Panza. Pulled further into the cobbler’s world, Toby gradually becomes unable to tell his dreams from reality.

Also Read: ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

“Terry Gilliam is a true auteur and his latest film does not disappoint. It is the perfect pairing of a film with a filmmaker, the story of Don Quixote, a man who believes in things that seemingly no one else believes in, until finally, they share his vision,” David Fannon, President of Screen Media, said in a statement. “Screen Media is thrilled that U.S. audiences will finally get to see Terry Gilliam’s quest.”

Despite a legal battle in a French court that nearly blocked the completed film from screening, Gilliam’s project finally made its premiere as the closing night film at this year’s Cannes film festival in May. But even before it screened, Amazon Studios dropped its planned U.S. distribution of the film.

Gilliam then lost a legal battle when a French court ruled that he would have to pay €10,000 ($11,600) to Paulo Branco, a former producer on the movie who sued the “Monty Python” co-creator for breach of contract. Branco also sought an injunction to prevent “Don Quixote” from being released and from premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, though he was denied that request. That series of events opened up Gilliam to distribute the film.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

This is all just the cherry on top of what has historically been one of the most plagued film productions ever, dating all the way back to the late ’90s and including everything from on-set injuries, flash floods, cast changes and even more lawsuits. You can read all about the film’s storied production history here.

Directed and written by Gilliam, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is co-written by Tony Grisoni and produced by Mariela Besuievsky, Amy Gilliam, Gerardo Herrero and Gregoire Melin.

The deal was negotiated by Seth Needle, SVP of Worldwide Acquisitions at Screen Media, with the filmmakers.

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‘Don Quixote’ Producers Hit Back Over Rights Snafu After Paolo Branco Claims Another Court ‘Victory’

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Producer Paolo Branco is not letting up in his pursuit of compensation over The Man Who Killed Don Quixote rights snafu. However, a statement sent to me today from the film’s producers indicates that they are not ceding ground either.

French appeals court takes The Man Who Killed Don Quixote rights away from Terry Gilliam

Read on: The A.V. Club.

Back in May, we reported that a French court had thrown out producer Paulo Branco’s claim that he should own the rights to Terry Gilliam’s long-in-the-works film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote because of a financial agreement Gilliam had made with him …

Terry Gilliam Loses Latest Legal Fight Over ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Terry Gilliam’s latest legal battle over his passion project “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has come to an end, and he’s been ordered to pay his former producer for breach of contract, The Hollywood Reporter reports.

This weekend, a French court ruled that Gilliam will have to pay €10,000 ($11,600) to Paulo Branco, the former producer on the movie who sued the “Monty Python” co-creator for breach of contract. Branco also sought an injunction to prevent “Don Quixote” from being released and from premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, though he was denied that request. Gilliam will therefore be able to distribute the film.

Gilliam argued that the contract was voided when Branco and his company, Alfama Films, failed to provide funding for the film’s production, giving him the right to find other producers for the project.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

But Branco told Screen Daily that after this ruling, he will continue to seek legal action against the film’s new producers, French-based film company Kinology, as well as the film’s French distributor, Ocean Films, and even the Cannes Film Festival for premiering the film on its closing night last month.

“The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama. Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorisation of Alfama,” said Branco. “We will be seeking damages with interest from all the people involved in this illegal production and above all, all those who were complicit in its illegal exploitation. We’re holding everyone responsible.”

Cannes, for its part, offered a stern official statement after Branco attempted to block the film’s premiere at the festival, noting that Branco had previously denounced the festival in a press conference a few years ago for breaking an alleged “promise to select” one of his films, something that Cannes said it never made.

Also Read: ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

In the statement, Festival President Pierre Lescure and General Delegate Thierry Frémaux also called Branco “a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat’.”

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” was released wide in France the same weekend as its premiere in Cannes, and was set to be released in the rest of Europe next month. Amazon Studios had claimed the rights to distribute the film in the U.S., but dropped out after Branco sued.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

The film stars Adam Driver as Toby Grisoni, a jaded advertising director who returns to the Spanish village where he made his student film based on Miguel De Cervantes’ famed literary tale “Don Quixote.” While there, he meets the shoemaker who played the titular character in his film (Jonathan Pryce), and who has since come to believe that he truly is Don Quixote come to life.

Believed by “Don” to be his comrade Sancho Panza, Toby is dragged into the shoemaker’s fantasy world and forced to grapple with the consequences of his film. The movie received mixed reviews from critics at Cannes, with some admiring the humor while others criticizing the plot and indulgent run time.

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has earned cult status thanks to Gilliam’s repeated failed attempts to make the film over the course of 29 years. That long odyssey became the subject of a 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Scheduled for Fall Release in Italy Despite Dispute (EXCLUSIVE)

Read on: Variety.

Following its contentious world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been set for a fall release in Italy by M2 Pictures despite an ongoing dispute over rights to the disaster-plagued film. “Don Qui…

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

With the caveat that “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” might be assessed on the most loaded grading curve in contemporary cinema memory, we’ve got to say that Terry Gilliam’s long-awaited adventure tale is an awful lot of fun.

Of course, the fun can be far from perfect. The film is also messy and hysterical in places, and by running an exhausting 132 minutes, it rather insistently overstays its welcome.

Somehow, knowledge of the years of calamity and incident that befell this seemingly perma-doomed production can’t help but turbo-charge our reactions to it. We’re so thrilled by the film’s improbable existence that we’re willing to go wherever Gilliam wants to take us, but respond with an extra degree of disappointment whenever he stumbles along the way.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Knowing full well that the myth of the film’s production is (at least at this point) inseparable from the work itself, Gilliam goes right in and addresses the matter at the start. We open with on a credit that reads “and now … after 25 years of making … and unmaking… a film by Terry Gilliam,” a move that doesn’t exactly deflate expectations but does address the elephant in the room.

What’s more surprising is how many times Gilliam bring it up again. More than anything else, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is fundamentally about its own creation and the obsessions that pushed the director to finally see it through.

Adam Driver plays Toby, a hotshot ad director shooting a Cervantes-themed insurance commercial in La Mancha, Spain. Toby has been this way before — he actually made his name with Quixote-themed student film a decade prior — but the text has seemingly lingered in his mind. At least Toby was able to tackle other projects before inevitably circling back; his thesis film’s leading man, Javier (Jonathan Pryce), has been stuck in the role ever since.

Soon enough, the two are back together, getting into hijinks at a breakneck pace and often shrill pitch. Gilliam’s madman orchestrations occasionally result in individual sequences where the action onscreen is hard enough to make sense of — let alone describe — but the broad sweep is crystal clear.

Also Read: Cannes Confirms ‘Don Quixote’ for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: ‘Cinema Has Regained Its Rights’

What begins in the real world (or as close to the real world as Gilliam can approximate) soon gives way to fantasy. When Toby initially sets off with the ersatz Don Quixote, the film sees things as he does. By the time they end up in an opulent Moorish castle owned by venal cabal of Russian vodka moguls, we’re firmly in fantasia.

But getting there is half the fun, and Gilliam plays to his considerable strengths with long sequences and short interjections that make us question what is real, what is a hallucination — and this world, what is the difference? The director hasn’t lost an inch of his Monty Python irreverence, gleefully poking holes in the narrative by breaking the fourth wall and calling attention to all the artifice.

Both leads visibly have a great time onscreen, though in their frenzied glee, sometimes at the expense of the audience. It’s no surprise that Jonathan Pryce, star of Gilliam’s wonderful “Brazil,” fits easily into the director’s manic play-to-the-rafters approach, while Adam Driver proves no less adept. With last year’s “Logan Lucky” and even in part of “BlacKkKlansman,” the usually moody screen presence has displayed a lighter touch, but he’s never let loose with as much abandon as he does here.

The scene where he mugs and whoops and dances a full Eddie Cantor routine in order to shock Javier out of a stupor just about sums up the project. It’s too much, it’s out of step with today and it’s oddly endearing.

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