Adam Driver: Auditions ‘Set up for the Actor to Fail’

This year’s Los Cabos Festival hosted two iconic directors in Terry Gilliam and Spike Lee, and the actor who most recently ties the two together, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and “BlacKkKlansman” star, Adam Driver. On Friday evening, overlooking th…

This year’s Los Cabos Festival hosted two iconic directors in Terry Gilliam and Spike Lee, and the actor who most recently ties the two together, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and “BlacKkKlansman” star, Adam Driver. On Friday evening, overlooking the famous coastal rock formations at the Resort at Pedregal, Driver engaged in a career-spanning […]

Terry Gilliam Admits His Films Aren’t For Everyone, Pushes Back on the Kind of Film Criticism He Detests

While promoting “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” which received a mixed reception at Cannes, the director elaborated on the divisive nature of his films.

It’s a dream come true for Terry Gilliam fans: after 25 years of false starts, budget shortfalls, major casting changes, and flooded sets, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is finally here. But when it screened for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival in May, many critics thought it was less a grand slam and more of a bunt.

IndieWire’s Chief Critic Eric Kohn was more generous in his B- review, calling it “sloppy” but “far from a total disappointment” and ultimately concluding that it may be “Gilliam’s most personal film.” Unfortunately, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” also ended up with a score of 56 on Metacritic and 61% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Gilliam knows his films divide people. Talking to Variety while promoting “Don Quixote” in Los Cabos, Mexico, the director of “Brazil” said that even with that classic movie “half the audience would walk out.”

“It doesn’t surprise me,” Gilliam said. “I know that my films work better for some people. There is a certain way of approaching life or looking at the world. They get on the ride with me and go all the way.”

And he feels his films appeal to very specific demographics: “People with a good visual imagination tend to respond… Also I think musicians… I know that creative people, almost 100%, like what I do… I also find children, and I know on this film in particular, they just got it, they went for the ride.”

Gilliam also noted that audiences often respond better to his films than critics. “I don’t mind a bad review when it’s about the film I made. When I read reviews sometimes they just miss the film, I don’t know what they were taking in,” he said. “It’s those cut and paste reviews that I don’t like. There are so many of them that once you get a review out there, there is a laziness in a lot of reviewers, or an inability to have a clear thought about what they are writing about, so they just cut and paste what exists.”

It’s important to note that Gilliam isn’t attacking all film criticism, just a certain kind – he himself has provided some excellent critical appreciations over the years, including of Marcel Carné’s “Children of Paradise” on the Criterion DVD release of that film. And he’s been known to be dismissive of many Hollywood blockbusters in a way many established critics wouldn’t dare to be – Gilliam’s called superhero films “bullshit” and has told their audience to “grow up.” At the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Gilliam said of Marvel Studios’ films, “They have no real tension.”

Gilliam is just as critical of his own films, even calling into question, at the same Los Cabos event, the idea that “Brazil” has reached canonical status: “Now when we show ‘Brazil’ it’s this classic and all that bullshit, all that crap.”

‘I Know My Films Work Better for Some:’ Terry Gilliam on ‘Quixote’ Criticisms

LOS CABOS, Mexico — In town to promote “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” celebrated writer-director Terry Gilliam met with Variety for a conversation in which the Monty Python alum laughed more than he talked, addressed graciously the good and ba…

LOS CABOS, Mexico — In town to promote “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” celebrated writer-director Terry Gilliam met with Variety for a conversation in which the Monty Python alum laughed more than he talked, addressed graciously the good and bad of film criticism, and taking silly work seriously. Gilliam started off stressing that he is not, […]

Terry Gilliam Needs Help Picking the Perfect ‘Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Poster; Check Out the Gorgeous Options

The filmmaker has been posting incredible one-sheets for his passion project on social media.

Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is still in need of a U.S. distributor, but in the meantime the movie is opening in markets around the world, most recently in Belgium and the Netherlands. To celebrate the film’s international roll out, Gilliam has started a poster contest on his official Facebook page.

Since July 27, Gilliam has been debuting gorgeous one-sheets for “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” on social media and asking his nearly 500,000 followers to weigh in with their reactions to the artwork in the comments section. The filmmaker announced he plans to put together a ballot once all the posters are revealed and have fans pick the winning poster.

“Don Quixote” stars Jonathan Pryce as a delusional older man who is convinced he is the title character. After he mistakes a young advertising executive (Adam Driver) to be his loyal squire Sancho Pancho, the two men embark on an odyssey that blends reality and imagination. The film debuted on the closing night of the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Gilliam has been engaged in a war-of-words battle with former producer Paulo Branco for much of the summer. Branco claims he still maintains rights to the film and that it can’t be released without his permission, to which Gilliam and his producer, Mariela Besuievsky, say isn’t the case. The film has already started playing around the world, including France, and is awaiting a U.S. distributor.

Check out the amazing “Don Quixote” posters via Gilliam’s Facebook embeds below.

‘Don Quixote’ Producers Hit Back Over Rights Snafu After Paolo Branco Claims Another Court ‘Victory’

EXCLUSIVE: Producer Paolo Branco is not letting up in his pursuit of compensation over The Man Who Killed Don Quixote rights snafu. However, a statement sent to me today from the film’s producers indicates that they are not ceding ground either.

EXCLUSIVE: Producer Paolo Branco is not letting up in his pursuit of compensation over The Man Who Killed Don Quixote rights snafuHowever, a statement sent to me today from the film’s producers indicates that they are not ceding ground either. According to a statement from Branco on Wednesday, a Madrid court ruling from July 13 backs up previous London and Paris judgments that his Alfama Films has an improperly terminated contract with Don Quixote director Terry…

Terry Gilliam Says ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Was ‘Made Because of Adam Driver’

“He proved to be so much better than I ever imagined,” Gilliam says.

There may be no film in existence that endured a more torturous production than “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” which Terry Gilliam attempted (and failed) to make several times over the course of two decades before finally bringing his passion project to Cannes this year. Its behind-the-scenes story isn’t over — Gilliam recently came out on the losing end of a legal battle with his former producer — but the long-delayed movie has, at the very least, seen the light of day.

To hear Gilliam tell it, that’s largely thanks to its star: Adam Driver.

“This film was made because of Adam Driver,” Gilliam declares in an interview with RogerEbert.com. “I had never seen him do anything, aside from Star Wars, where he’s doing this [opens mouth in screaming pose] a lot, and I was like, ‘Okay, fine. I don’t care.’”

“But my daughter, who is one of the producers, said, ‘You gotta meet him,’ and I did initially because he was ‘hot’ [at the time]. You meet the people who are ‘hot’, because that’s how you’ll get the money you need,” Gilliam continues.

“The minute I met him, I thought that there was a quality about this guy that was unlike any other actor I had met. There was a stillness and a genuineness, there was nothing actor-y about him, and he proved to be so much better than I ever imagined.”

Gilliam also refers to his leading man as “such a strange actor, because if you just stand him there, he’s kind of goofy looking — he’s tall and gangly, with a big nose and ears that stick out. He doesn’t look like a movie star, but by the end of this film, he looks like one of the most romantic leading men I’ve seen in a while. He just transforms himself, and it’s not coming from anything external, it’s all coming from inside. It’s fantastic to watch.”

Driver is far from the first actor to take on the role: Johnny Depp, Ewan McGregor, and Jack O’Connell have all been attached at one point or another. “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” was even the subject of a documentary, “Lost in La Mancha,” that charted Gilliam’s failed attempts to complete the film.

Terry Gilliam Hasn’t Lost the Rights to ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,’ Claims His Producer

“It will be released all over the world,” Mariela Besuievsky says in a new interview.

The plot thickens — again. After losing his trial in the Paris Court of Appeals last week, Terry Gilliam also appeared to have lost the rights to his long-in-the-making passion project “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” Former producer Paulo Branco claimed both victory and the rights to the film, which premiered at Cannes last month, but now Gilliam’s producer Mariela Besuievsky is firing back: “We have the rights of ‘Don Quixote’ and it will be released all over the world,” she tells El Español in a new interview.

Branco “had the option to buy, but never exercised that right of purchase,” Besuievsky adds in her translated conversation. Branco and Gilliam have been embroiled in a protracted legal battle over “Don Quixote,” which Gilliam has been laboring to make in one form or another for 25 years; Johnny Depp was originally attached to star, but the version that was finally completed stars Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce.

Besuievsky concedes that “there will be damages and prejudices for having badly rescinded” after last week’s ruling, but that doesn’t mean Gilliam can’t release the movie.

As for why Branco now claims to have the rights to “Don Quixote,”Besuievsky says that the producer “makes a balloon of everything” and goes so far as to invoke slavery when describing working with him: “The era of slavery is over and if I do not want to work with you, you can not force me. You can force me to pay for what you ask, but not for me to work for you because that is slavery and it is impossible to force Terry to make the film, even if it is still in force, and that is what we explain, because the judge leaves open the subject of content.”

Besuievsky also claims that Branco harbors a “desire for revenge” and “against something so irrational, you cannot fight.”

IndieWire has reached out to Gilliam’s reps for comment.

French appeals court takes The Man Who Killed Don Quixote rights away from Terry Gilliam

Back in May, we reported that a French court had thrown out producer Paulo Branco’s claim that he should own the rights to Terry Gilliam’s long-in-the-works film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote because of a financial agreement Gilliam had made with him …

Back in May, we reported that a French court had thrown out producer Paulo Branco’s claim that he should own the rights to Terry Gilliam’s long-in-the-works film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote because of a financial agreement Gilliam had made with him in 2016 during a previous attempt to get the film made. Branco’s…

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Terry Gilliam Loses Latest Legal Fight Over ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

Terry Gilliam’s latest legal battle over his passion project “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has come to an end, and he’s been ordered to pay his former producer for breach of contract, The Hollywood Reporter reports.

This weekend, a French court ruled that Gilliam will have to pay €10,000 ($11,600) to Paulo Branco, the former producer on the movie who sued the “Monty Python” co-creator for breach of contract. Branco also sought an injunction to prevent “Don Quixote” from being released and from premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, though he was denied that request. Gilliam will therefore be able to distribute the film.

Gilliam argued that the contract was voided when Branco and his company, Alfama Films, failed to provide funding for the film’s production, giving him the right to find other producers for the project.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

But Branco told Screen Daily that after this ruling, he will continue to seek legal action against the film’s new producers, French-based film company Kinology, as well as the film’s French distributor, Ocean Films, and even the Cannes Film Festival for premiering the film on its closing night last month.

“The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama. Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorisation of Alfama,” said Branco. “We will be seeking damages with interest from all the people involved in this illegal production and above all, all those who were complicit in its illegal exploitation. We’re holding everyone responsible.”

Cannes, for its part, offered a stern official statement after Branco attempted to block the film’s premiere at the festival, noting that Branco had previously denounced the festival in a press conference a few years ago for breaking an alleged “promise to select” one of his films, something that Cannes said it never made.

Also Read: ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

In the statement, Festival President Pierre Lescure and General Delegate Thierry Frémaux also called Branco “a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat’.”

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” was released wide in France the same weekend as its premiere in Cannes, and was set to be released in the rest of Europe next month. Amazon Studios had claimed the rights to distribute the film in the U.S., but dropped out after Branco sued.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

The film stars Adam Driver as Toby Grisoni, a jaded advertising director who returns to the Spanish village where he made his student film based on Miguel De Cervantes’ famed literary tale “Don Quixote.” While there, he meets the shoemaker who played the titular character in his film (Jonathan Pryce), and who has since come to believe that he truly is Don Quixote come to life.

Believed by “Don” to be his comrade Sancho Panza, Toby is dragged into the shoemaker’s fantasy world and forced to grapple with the consequences of his film. The movie received mixed reviews from critics at Cannes, with some admiring the humor while others criticizing the plot and indulgent run time.

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has earned cult status thanks to Gilliam’s repeated failed attempts to make the film over the course of 29 years. That long odyssey became the subject of a 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

Terry Gilliam’s latest legal battle over his passion project “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has come to an end, and he’s been ordered to pay his former producer for breach of contract, The Hollywood Reporter reports.

This weekend, a French court ruled that Gilliam will have to pay €10,000 ($11,600) to Paulo Branco, the former producer on the movie who sued the “Monty Python” co-creator for breach of contract. Branco also sought an injunction to prevent “Don Quixote” from being released and from premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, though he was denied that request. Gilliam will therefore be able to distribute the film.

Gilliam argued that the contract was voided when Branco and his company, Alfama Films, failed to provide funding for the film’s production, giving him the right to find other producers for the project.

But Branco told Screen Daily that after this ruling, he will continue to seek legal action against the film’s new producers, French-based film company Kinology, as well as the film’s French distributor, Ocean Films, and even the Cannes Film Festival for premiering the film on its closing night last month.

“The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama. Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorisation of Alfama,” said Branco. “We will be seeking damages with interest from all the people involved in this illegal production and above all, all those who were complicit in its illegal exploitation. We’re holding everyone responsible.”

Cannes, for its part, offered a stern official statement after Branco attempted to block the film’s premiere at the festival, noting that Branco had previously denounced the festival in a press conference a few years ago for breaking an alleged “promise to select” one of his films, something that Cannes said it never made.

In the statement, Festival President Pierre Lescure and General Delegate Thierry Frémaux also called Branco “a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat’.”

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” was released wide in France the same weekend as its premiere in Cannes, and was set to be released in the rest of Europe next month. Amazon Studios had claimed the rights to distribute the film in the U.S., but dropped out after Branco sued.

The film stars Adam Driver as Toby Grisoni, a jaded advertising director who returns to the Spanish village where he made his student film based on Miguel De Cervantes’ famed literary tale “Don Quixote.” While there, he meets the shoemaker who played the titular character in his film (Jonathan Pryce), and who has since come to believe that he truly is Don Quixote come to life.

Believed by “Don” to be his comrade Sancho Panza, Toby is dragged into the shoemaker’s fantasy world and forced to grapple with the consequences of his film. The movie received mixed reviews from critics at Cannes, with some admiring the humor while others criticizing the plot and indulgent run time.

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has earned cult status thanks to Gilliam’s repeated failed attempts to make the film over the course of 29 years. That long odyssey became the subject of a 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Terry Gilliam's Epically Troubled 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:' A Brief History

'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

Terry Gilliam's 'Don Quixote' Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’: Terry Gilliam Loses Court Battle, No Longer Owns Rights to Long-Delayed Film

The making of this film has been nothing if not quixotic.

After a decades-long production process that saw several failed iterations and even a documentary about its making, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” appeared to have a happy ending when it finally premiered at Cannes last month. Mixed reviews followed, and now Gilliam has lost a protracted court battle over the rights to his long-delayed passion project: The Paris Court of Appeal has ruled in favor of former producer Paulo Branco, who sued Gilliam over rights to the project.

The filmmaker has also been ordered to pay Branco’s Alfama Films €10,000 ($11,600) in fees. He previously won a case that allowed him to screen “Don Quixote” at Cannes, though the victory was short-lived. ”The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama. Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorisation of Alfama,” Branco told Screen Daily.

“We will be seeking damages with interest from all the people involved in this illegal production and above all, all those who were complicit in its illegal exploitation. We’re holding everyone responsible.”

By “everyone,” he means not only Gilliam but also “the film’s producers, Kinology, all the others who supported the film, including those who distributed the film in France and the Cannes Film Festival, everyone.”

“The film belongs in its entirety to Alfama,” Branco added. “The film was made illegally. It’s the first time, I’ve ever seen so many people embark on a mission to produce and exploit a film, without holding the rights. It’s a unique case.”

IndieWire has reached out to Gilliam’s representatives for comment.

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Scheduled for Fall Release in Italy Despite Dispute (EXCLUSIVE)

Following its contentious world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been set for a fall release in Italy by M2 Pictures despite an ongoing dispute over rights to the disaster-plagued film. “Don Qui…

Following its contentious world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been set for a fall release in Italy by M2 Pictures despite an ongoing dispute over rights to the disaster-plagued film. “Don Quixote,” which stars Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, and Stellan Skarsgård, screened earlier this month as the […]

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

With the caveat that “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” might be assessed on the most loaded grading curve in contemporary cinema memory, we’ve got to say that Terry Gilliam’s long-awaited adventure tale is an awful lot of fun.

Of course, the fun can be far from perfect. The film is also messy and hysterical in places, and by running an exhausting 132 minutes, it rather insistently overstays its welcome.

Somehow, knowledge of the years of calamity and incident that befell this seemingly perma-doomed production can’t help but turbo-charge our reactions to it. We’re so thrilled by the film’s improbable existence that we’re willing to go wherever Gilliam wants to take us, but respond with an extra degree of disappointment whenever he stumbles along the way.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Knowing full well that the myth of the film’s production is (at least at this point) inseparable from the work itself, Gilliam goes right in and addresses the matter at the start. We open with on a credit that reads “and now … after 25 years of making … and unmaking… a film by Terry Gilliam,” a move that doesn’t exactly deflate expectations but does address the elephant in the room.

What’s more surprising is how many times Gilliam bring it up again. More than anything else, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is fundamentally about its own creation and the obsessions that pushed the director to finally see it through.

Adam Driver plays Toby, a hotshot ad director shooting a Cervantes-themed insurance commercial in La Mancha, Spain. Toby has been this way before — he actually made his name with Quixote-themed student film a decade prior — but the text has seemingly lingered in his mind. At least Toby was able to tackle other projects before inevitably circling back; his thesis film’s leading man, Javier (Jonathan Pryce), has been stuck in the role ever since.

Soon enough, the two are back together, getting into hijinks at a breakneck pace and often shrill pitch. Gilliam’s madman orchestrations occasionally result in individual sequences where the action onscreen is hard enough to make sense of — let alone describe — but the broad sweep is crystal clear.

Also Read: Cannes Confirms ‘Don Quixote’ for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: ‘Cinema Has Regained Its Rights’

What begins in the real world (or as close to the real world as Gilliam can approximate) soon gives way to fantasy. When Toby initially sets off with the ersatz Don Quixote, the film sees things as he does. By the time they end up in an opulent Moorish castle owned by venal cabal of Russian vodka moguls, we’re firmly in fantasia.

But getting there is half the fun, and Gilliam plays to his considerable strengths with long sequences and short interjections that make us question what is real, what is a hallucination — and this world, what is the difference? The director hasn’t lost an inch of his Monty Python irreverence, gleefully poking holes in the narrative by breaking the fourth wall and calling attention to all the artifice.

Both leads visibly have a great time onscreen, though in their frenzied glee, sometimes at the expense of the audience. It’s no surprise that Jonathan Pryce, star of Gilliam’s wonderful “Brazil,” fits easily into the director’s manic play-to-the-rafters approach, while Adam Driver proves no less adept. With last year’s “Logan Lucky” and even in part of “BlacKkKlansman,” the usually moody screen presence has displayed a lighter touch, but he’s never let loose with as much abandon as he does here.

The scene where he mugs and whoops and dances a full Eddie Cantor routine in order to shock Javier out of a stupor just about sums up the project. It’s too much, it’s out of step with today and it’s oddly endearing.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 10: What Will Win the Palme d’Or?

‘Whitney’ Cannes Review: Beyond the Bombshells Is a Straightforward Music Documentary

John Travolta, Spike Lee and 31 More Portraits From TheWrap’s Studio at The Girls’ Lounge Cannes (Exclusive Photos)

With the caveat that “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” might be assessed on the most loaded grading curve in contemporary cinema memory, we’ve got to say that Terry Gilliam’s long-awaited adventure tale is an awful lot of fun.

Of course, the fun can be far from perfect. The film is also messy and hysterical in places, and by running an exhausting 132 minutes, it rather insistently overstays its welcome.

Somehow, knowledge of the years of calamity and incident that befell this seemingly perma-doomed production can’t help but turbo-charge our reactions to it. We’re so thrilled by the film’s improbable existence that we’re willing to go wherever Gilliam wants to take us, but respond with an extra degree of disappointment whenever he stumbles along the way.

Knowing full well that the myth of the film’s production is (at least at this point) inseparable from the work itself, Gilliam goes right in and addresses the matter at the start. We open with on a credit that reads “and now … after 25 years of making … and unmaking… a film by Terry Gilliam,” a move that doesn’t exactly deflate expectations but does address the elephant in the room.

What’s more surprising is how many times Gilliam bring it up again. More than anything else, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is fundamentally about its own creation and the obsessions that pushed the director to finally see it through.

Adam Driver plays Toby, a hotshot ad director shooting a Cervantes-themed insurance commercial in La Mancha, Spain. Toby has been this way before — he actually made his name with Quixote-themed student film a decade prior — but the text has seemingly lingered in his mind. At least Toby was able to tackle other projects before inevitably circling back; his thesis film’s leading man, Javier (Jonathan Pryce), has been stuck in the role ever since.

Soon enough, the two are back together, getting into hijinks at a breakneck pace and often shrill pitch. Gilliam’s madman orchestrations occasionally result in individual sequences where the action onscreen is hard enough to make sense of — let alone describe — but the broad sweep is crystal clear.

What begins in the real world (or as close to the real world as Gilliam can approximate) soon gives way to fantasy. When Toby initially sets off with the ersatz Don Quixote, the film sees things as he does. By the time they end up in an opulent Moorish castle owned by venal cabal of Russian vodka moguls, we’re firmly in fantasia.

But getting there is half the fun, and Gilliam plays to his considerable strengths with long sequences and short interjections that make us question what is real, what is a hallucination — and this world, what is the difference? The director hasn’t lost an inch of his Monty Python irreverence, gleefully poking holes in the narrative by breaking the fourth wall and calling attention to all the artifice.

Both leads visibly have a great time onscreen, though in their frenzied glee, sometimes at the expense of the audience. It’s no surprise that Jonathan Pryce, star of Gilliam’s wonderful “Brazil,” fits easily into the director’s manic play-to-the-rafters approach, while Adam Driver proves no less adept. With last year’s “Logan Lucky” and even in part of “BlacKkKlansman,” the usually moody screen presence has displayed a lighter touch, but he’s never let loose with as much abandon as he does here.

The scene where he mugs and whoops and dances a full Eddie Cantor routine in order to shock Javier out of a stupor just about sums up the project. It’s too much, it’s out of step with today and it’s oddly endearing.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 10: What Will Win the Palme d'Or?

'Whitney' Cannes Review: Beyond the Bombshells Is a Straightforward Music Documentary

John Travolta, Spike Lee and 31 More Portraits From TheWrap's Studio at The Girls' Lounge Cannes (Exclusive Photos)

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

Delusions of grandeur, old-fashioned ideals of romance and justice, the eternal clash between cynicism and dreams — these are the themes of not just comic hero Don Quixote, but also the career of director Terry Gilliam, for whom a film about the delusi…

Delusions of grandeur, old-fashioned ideals of romance and justice, the eternal clash between cynicism and dreams — these are the themes of not just comic hero Don Quixote, but also the career of director Terry Gilliam, for whom a film about the delusional knight-errant, seemed like the perfect match of artist to material, to the extent […]

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Review: Terry Gilliam’s Long-Delayed Passion Project Is Sloppy, But Not a Total Disappointment

Gilliam’s famously troubled project is finally finished and closing out the Cannes Film Festival. It’s far from perfect, but it might be his most personal movie.

At this point, the very existence of “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is a triumph, and Terry Gilliam knows it. “After 25 years of waiting,” announces an opening credit for the director’s completed version of his Spain-set odyssey, which faced a pileup of production woes over the decades. “Finally … a Terry Gilliam film.” He could have rolled the rest of the credits right there and moved on.

As chronicled in the 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha,” Gilliam’s initial 2000 attempt to bring the project to fruition fell apart in several ways, from location shooting issues to injured star Jean Rouchefort dropping out, transforming the project into a catastrophe of mythic proportions. As it turns out, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” sits alongside much of Gilliam’s late period work as a messy but singular achievement that strains to make its disparate parts fit together, but there’s a noble spirit of invention to its wackiness anyway.

At the same time, this is a more personal work than anything in Gilliam’s oeuvre to date, an indictment of the capitalist forces exploiting storytellers and the self-involved creatives swept up in the madness. Aided by a loopy Jonathan Pryce in a role originally conceived for Jean Rochefort and Adam Driver as a subtler version of whatever Johnny Depp had in mind, the completed work takes on more personal ramifications that anything else in Gilliam’s filmography. It’s sloppy and amateurish in parts, but always reaching for something, often resulting in a fascinating half-formed beast working through a lot of baggage: a vanity project about the nature of vanity, centered around one of literature’s most famous examples, in the context of the most famous vanity projects of all time coming to fruition. The whole thing is very Gilliamesque.

The filmmaker’s contemporary riff on Miguel de Cervantes’ windmill-chasing lore finally exists, but it got a major update on the way to the green light: Gilliam’s original treatment contained an aspect of “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” with an advertising executive sent to a past where he encounters the fabled knight errant and his partner Sancho. Now, “Don Quixote” exists exclusively in the present day, with Driver as Toby, a power-hungry film director (hint, hint) currently in the process of making a bland adaptation of Cervantes’ original text.

As our story begins, Toby’s shooting a thinly-conceived windmill chase outdoor that ends poorly, which gives him his cue to curse out the crew and sashay off-set with an attractive young production assistant. It’s an impressive opener, bringing us deeper into lore of the project and suggesting a playful deconstruction of filmmaking pomposity in the vein of Robert Altman’s “The Player” with a Euro update for the age of co-productions.

Then the cynical framework winds into more earnest territory, with Toby taking a break from fooling around with the seductive wife of his unnamed studio boss (Stellan Skårsgard) to rewatch an old student film — called, of all things, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” The black-and-white project found Toby running around Spain shooting a scrappy interpretation of the Don Quixote story, and in a flashback, Toby recalls finding an old shoeshiner named Javier (Pryce, superb) while traveling Europe with his crew to play the lead part. In due time, Toby’s guiding the feeble man through a Don Quixote acting workshop. These scenes unfold with some of the most engaging filmmaking Gilliam has given us in decades — playful, nostalgic moments that attest to the thrill of creating something on the fly — and it’s enough to send Toby on a soul-searching mission back to the small town, where he finds echoes of the old project waiting for him.

"The Man Who Killed Don Quixote"

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote”

Amazon Studios

There’s a romantic subplot involving Angelica (Joana Ribeiro), the tough-minded woman whom Toby seduced as a teen, and her father the barkeep, similarly frozen in time and wandering the same dusty roads and empty vistas where Toby once discovered his calling. But more important, there’s Pryce, now a raving madman wearing battle armor — convinced he’s Don Quixote, and that Toby is his long-lost Sancho Panza. A few klutzy exchanges later, and he’s set his entire encampment aflame, assaulted some police officers, and dragged Toby along with him as the pair suddenly become the exact wayward adventurers that Pryce’s character believes them to be.

From there, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” lurches through a peculiar set of circumstances, with Toby battling to wake up his old star from the spell and the self-professed Quixote running amok. For a project that took so long to come together, it’s a wonder why the movie has such severe issues in its second act, lurching to a halt as the men argue through their delusions in the middle of nowhere. Padding out the two hour-plus running time, Pryce deepens his formidable performance, and Driver maintains his willingness to push his deadpan style to goofy extremes (he actually sings show tunes, which is as eerie as it sounds), but Gilliam fails to mine much substance from this kooky dilemma, and the rekindling of Toby’s romance with Angelica feels equally half-baked.

Fortunately, this is a Terry Gilliam movie, so some surreal outré treats await. When this trio finally arrives for a party at an ancient castle — how they get there doesn’t quite add up — they find it presided over by a Trumpian businessman (Sergi López) whom Toby’s boss is keen on impressing so they can score more cash for their project. But for the Don Quixote of the group, it’s a medieval setting for the final battle. It’s here that “Don Quixote” finds a fresh stride, with Nicola Percorini’s cinematography transforming the castle into a Grand Guignol showdown of gladiatorial battles, fiery eruptions and romantic declarations, with a woozy overtone that implies the whole scenario exists in someone’s mind — Toby’s, perhaps, or the man who invented him, as Javier confronts the tragic possibility that his valiant mindset comes across to everyone as one giant punchline. The assessment really resonates in a movie written by an ex-Monty Python guy.

Ultimately, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” falls short of crystalizing into a satisfying narrative whole, but it’s clear that Gilliam developed a genuine relationship to this material from his own creative yearning. The movie ends on a striking note of poignant wonder, somewhere between utter absurdity and sincere soul-searching, like so much of Gilliam’s work going back to the days of “Time Bandits” and “Brazil.” It may not reach those same levels of inspired lunacy, but it offers a more melancholic alternative, which makes plenty of sense in the context of a work that the director clearly had to finish regardless of the end result.

As Quixote and his Sancho ride off into the sunset (which is not the spoiler it may sound like), “The Man Who Kills Don Quixote” lands on a tantalizing possibility: No matter the completed movie that has finally arrive, some aspect of this drama will never end for the tortured artist, and on some level it never will.

Grade: B-

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” premiered as the closing night selection of the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. It is currently seeking distribution outside of France and China.

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Terry Gilliam ‘Doesn’t Give A Sh*t Anymore’ About ‘Don Quixote’ Troubles, Really Hopes the Film Becomes A ‘Commercial Success’

After two decades of trying to get it made and a months-long legal battle against a former producer, Terry Gilliam finally premieres “Don Quixote” at Cannes this weekend.

Terry Gilliam is closing the 2018 Cannes Film Festival with the world premiere of “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” which is a major miracle considering it has taken the director two decades of development issues and legal battles to get the film made and ready for release. The long-delayed “Don Quixote” production is one of the most famous in film history, and Gilliam is happy to finally be putting it behind him.

“That this film is out in the world is all I really care about,” Gilliam told Deadline about the long road to the film’s Cannes premiere. “I don’t give a shit anymore. My opinion doesn’t count. I just want people to see the thing. And what I’d like, more than anything, is for it to become a commercial success. It would make life easier on the next one. The last couple of films I’ve done have not done well. You pay the price for that.”

While Gilliam is now looking to the future, he did take time to celebrate the legal victory that made it possible for “Don Quixote” to premiere at Cannes this year. Paulo Branco, a former producer on the project, took Gilliam to court over claims that the director could not premiere the movie without Branco’s permission. A May 9 court decision ruled in Gilliam’s favor.

“The triumph of this has been extraordinary,” Gilliam said about the verdict and legal battle. “The way everybody stood up for it and said, ‘Fuck off.’ And they’ve even taken away [Branco’s] protocol now. I’m told his booth in the market, Alfama Films, has been removed. I haven’t experienced it firsthand but I was told by two people that it happened.”

“There’s a side of me I feel a tiny, tiny grain of sympathy—so small I can hardly find it,” he continued. “[Branco] always announced himself as the guy who has made over 275 films, and that he’s always had more films in competition here than any other producer on the planet, and to self-immolate like he’s done with this, I have no idea. It’s a bit like Harvey in a sense; there’s a certain point where karma catches up, folks.”

As for the rumors about Gilliam’s health following a “little trip to the hospital” earlier this month, Gilliam said: “I’m fine. It will probably wreak its revenge when the festival is over, but right now I’m operating fine.”

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” debuts May 19 at Cannes. The movie is now playing in France. Head over to Deadline to read Gilliam’s interview in its entirety.

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Victory Lap Couldn’t Be Stopped By Lawsuits, Health Scares Or The Loss Of Amazon – Cannes Q&A

At the start of Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. “And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film.” The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt M…

At the start of Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. "And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film." The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt Miguel de Cervantes' seminal novel is the stuff of legend, beginning in 1989. He first got it into production in 2000, when Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp were cast as Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza. The derailing of that shoot…

Chinese Distributor Turbo Film Launches VFX Facility (EXCLUSIVE)

China’s Turbo Film is to expand from movie distribution into visual effects provision for the film, TV and commercial industries. The company is in the process of opening a large facility in Wuhan, central China. Turbo grabbed attention this week with …

China’s Turbo Film is to expand from movie distribution into visual effects provision for the film, TV and commercial industries. The company is in the process of opening a large facility in Wuhan, central China. Turbo grabbed attention this week with emergence of its acquisition of rights to Cannes Film Festival closing title “The Man […]

‘Lost in La Mancha’ Sequel to Capture Terry Gilliam’s Most Recent Struggles Making ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

“He Dreamed of Giants” is the third documentary from directing duo Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe.

Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe’s early-aughts documentary “Lost in La Mancha” chronicled the time Terry Gilliam assembled a star-studded cast for “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” shot footage, and failed to complete the film. Yet the director had almost two decades of Sisyphean struggles ahead of him, which continued into this very week: Gilliam suffered a stroke shortly before learning that a Paris court — overriding objections from his former producer — had granted him the right to premiere the epic as the Cannes Film Festival’s May 19 closer. As “Quixote” saga winds down, the documentarians have announced plans to expand their version of what happened.

Variety reports that a second documentary, “He Dreamed of Giants,” is in the editing phase. The second film includes dispatches from the final “Quixote” set, where production wrapped in June. “The conflicts raging around Terry right now of making the movie are not nearly as interesting as what’s going on inside his head,” Pepe told the trade, explaining how the follow-up will be more introspective, and perhaps, more upbeat. “I’ve noticed his spirits have certainly been plucked up again by all of this conflict. [It] is the opposite of Kryptonite for him.” On Wednesday, the 77-year-old Oscar nominee (“Brazil”) even tweeted a post-stroke photo of himself meditating while clad in a shirt that read, “I’m not dead yet.”

Gilliam’s film currently has distribution in France and China, but not the United States; a source knowledgable about the production told IndieWire that Amazon Studios — which contributed significant funding backed out after the creative team was unable to deliver a finished product. “Star Wars” veteran Adam Driver stepped into the role that once belonged to Johnny Depp: a marketing executive who is transported back in time and accosted by a raving man (Jonathan Pryce) who calls himself Don Quixote.  

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Cannes 2018: Here Are the Cameras Used To Shoot 32 of This Year’s Films

Cinematography Survey: The world’s best cinematographers explain how they created looks for Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,” “Under the Silver Lake,” and more.

IndieWire reached out to the filmmakers with films premiering at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival to ask which cameras and lenses they used and, more importantly, why they were the right ones for their movies.

A few trends emerged. Once again, ARRI’s digital cameras reign supreme as the choice of international auteurs and their cinematographers. Meanwhile, 13 cinematograhers shot on celluloid, including eight of the 21 competition films gunning for the Palme d’Or: “Ash is the Purest White,” “Shoplifters,” “BlacKkKlansman,” “Lazzaro Felice,” “Sorry Angel,” “Leto,” “Knife + Heart” and “Ayka.”

A handful of films relied on smaller, less expensive cameras that fit their budgets and circumstances, including two documentaries that used outdated DVCAM and HDV formats when they began as one-person shoots many years ago. Iranian director Jafar Panahi, who is still banned from making films in his home country, used Canon 5d mark and Sony a7s, while Terry Gilliam mixed in a little GoPro footage with his more traditional cinema cameras (using Vittorio Storaro’s one-of-a-kind handmade lenses from ‘Apocalypse Now’) while shooting “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.”

(Answers have been edited for length and clarity)

Competition Films

“3 Faces”

3 Faces

“3 Faces”

Memento Films

Dir: Jafar Panahi
DP: Amin Jafari
Format: 4k H264
Camera: Canon 5d mark 4, Sony a7s mark ll
Lens: Zeiss Compact Prime CP.2

Jafari: Sony A7s series is very good for low light (mostly used at night) in low budget movies. We used small equipment because of the scenes in the car and the limited budget we had.

“At War”

"At War" (En Guerre)

“At War” (En Guerre)

Nord-Ouest Films

Dir: Stéphane Brizé
DP: Eric Dumont
Format: 3.2K, PRORES 4444 HQ for the days, ARRIRAW for the nights
Camera: ARRI Alexa mini
Lens: Sigma Cine Prime Zooms (18-35mm T2, 50-100mm T2), Sigma Cine Primes (14,20, 24, 50, 85mm, T1.5), Zeiss Compact zoom (70-200mm T2.9)

Dumont: The choice of the camera and lenses were driven by the director’s vision of the whole movie: handheld camera, “plan séquence” [a long take that constitutes an entire scene], and no makeup for actors. Reality at its best. For “At War,” Stéphane Brizé wanted to shoot the film in long-sequence shots that would last 30 to 40 minutes. Alexa Mini seemed the obvious choice for me. It’s lightweight and easy to operate on the go. I chose the Sigma Ciné lenses, and most especially the 50/100mm T2 zoom — which I used for most of the film — because to me, they were the fastest, softest, most compact zooms and gave a smooth sharpness to the picture.

I rated the camera mostly at 1600 ISO, even by daylight, because I wanted to add grain and texture in this ultra-realistic setup. We were at the border between documentary and fiction, acting and reality, so this helped me to go more into the fiction. This texture and grain helped me to have a softer and deeper image while using zoom lenses.

I had to light every set at every angle, 360-degree cover, to fit the sequence shot format, using only indirect light to give a very natural and realistic feel.

“Ayka”

Ayka

“Ayka”

Courtesy of the Cannes Film Festival

Dir: Sergey Dvortsevoy
DP: Jolanta Dylewska
Format: IAR: 1.78:1; Super 16 mm Film, Kodak Vision 3 7219+7207; Fuji 500 D 8692, RAWFILES
Camera: Aaton LTR Super 16 + Blackmagic Pocket Cinema
Lens: Carl Zeiss Distagon 16 +25 mm/1:1.2

Dylewska: My motto during the shooting was the hyperrealism of the image, and my dream was that winter, snow and chill would correlate (as in Shakespeare) with what is happening in the soul and heart of the main character. The heroes of our film — the Kyrgyz gastarbeiters — resembled to me the background figures from Dutch paintings: a little invisible, always in the shade, a bit out of focus, covered with grain. I managed to create pictorial texture of the image by pushing both the Super 16mm film stock and the BPC sensor. The old, worn-out Zeiss lenses gave us a softer look as compared to the latest generation of primes. I hope that this will help to generate a deeper relation between the viewers and the characters of our film.

And the light? When shooting exteriors, our lamp was the sun covered with a thick layer of clouds. The interior lighting was based on practicals. We worked with non-professional actors, and with actors with no previous film experience. We were shooting one-take scenes and one-take sequences. The technology behind the filmmaking could not intimidate our actors.

“BlacKkKlansman”

"BlacKkKlansman"

“BlacKkKlansman”

David Lee/Focus Features

Dir: Spike Lee
DP: Chayse Irvin
Format: Kodak 35mm Film
Camera: Panavision XL2, Arricam LT, Aaton Penelope
Lens: Panavision PVintage Lenses

Irvin: It wasn’t really that I chose these tools, they chose us. I experimented with many ideas in pre-production, video, 16mm, 35mm, Ektachrome, anamorphic lenses, spherical lenses, modern lenses, vintage lenses. Then I viewed the footage naked, free of an obstructed view about a format or practice. I was really hypnotized by the 35mm images, and additionally when it was flashed with a Panaflasher 3. Somehow it felt fresh to me, it challenged me. Kodak had just opened a new Lab in NYC and I interpreted all these signs as the film telling us this is what it needed to be. It’s a very Wu Wei approach to filmmaking, but I never want the images to feel contrived and symbolic, to avoid that I have to let it all grow from within the process.

The choice to shoot film became a freeing process to me. Free not in the sense of free from constraints, but the opposite, being subject to the hardness and the laws around shooting film that don’t exist in filmmaking much anymore. We as a crew of all artists all knew our feeling of freedom, of creation and control in our craft, reaches its pinnacle when we have stopped doing anything voluntarily and instead do everything necessary. Film created this sense of necessity, and it made us all stronger and more determined. The excitement and enthusiasm it gave us really inspired this Spike Lee Joint.

“Dogman”

Dogman

“Dogman”

ARCHIMEDE S.r.l. - LE PACTE S.a.s

Dir: Matteo Garrone
DP: Nicolaj Bruel
Format: 3.4 K ArriRaw
Camera: Arri Alexa Mini
Lens: Cooke SF Anamorphics

Bruel: Arri Alexa cameras are, in my opinion, the best option there is, if you have to shoot digital. It has the best reproduction of skin tones, which is very important. I believe the human eye is extremely advanced when it comes to reading another human being’s reactions. Skin has so many colors and tones that other digital cameras, up until now, have had difficulty reproducing in a satisfying way.

In this case, the choice of lenses came from the desire to get a good balance between softness and contrast. I’m generally not so fond of the otherwise quite hip soft ’70s look with lots of flares and blue streaks. I guess it depends on the movie, but in this case, this was not what we were after. I like the 2.40:1 aspect ratio and the way the anamorphic lenses have a shallower depth of field. I feel it helps me bring the actors forward in frame, making them stand out from the background. The Cooke SF Anamorphics holds a nice contrast, while they still look soft enough on skin. It was important to keep a lot of darkness in “Dogman,” but at the same time we wanted to show the somewhat rough locations around Naples in a respectful way. That, and the fact that the first note I got from Matteo was that he saw the film as a kind of a modern western, made me quite sure that the anamorphic format was what we should go for. It was not an easy choice, actually. “Dogman” had a relatively small budget and I knew that much of the film Matteo would operate handheld himself. The 65 mm macro, which we both learned to love, is a beast, but luckily Matteo is super strong… and handsome and clever ;0)”

“Girls of the Sun”

Director Eva Husson and DP Mattias Troelstrup shooting "Girls of the Sun"

Director Eva Husson and DP Mattias Troelstrup shooting “Girls of the Sun”

Dina Oganova

Dir: Eva Husson
DP: Mattias Troelstrup
Format: 2.8K ProRes
Camera: Arri Alexa Mini
Lens: Cooke Anamorphic

Troelstrup: “In a earlier stage, the director Eva Husson and I chose to shoot 2.39:1 — we both wanted a more cinematic feel rather than going documentary on this film. We tested this format from all of our stills from our scout. This film was mostly about faces and feelings, therefore we chose the Alexa Mini with Cooke Anamorphic lenses. I find the Alexa a great choice for skin tones and highlights. I tend not to shoot with soft filters, and the Cooke lenses have a great soft feeling to skin tones. We worked with a Lut created with my colorist Lionel Kopp and DIT. The look of the film was created from stills from our scout, where we explored how the light behaved in each locations. We did not have a great lighting budget, so we went to a flea market to come up with ideas to light the set. The night scenes were especially tricky, because who would turn on a light in a war zone where the enemy would spot you?

“Everybody Knows”

Everybody Knows

“Everybody Knows”

© Teresa Isasi

Dir: Asghar Farhadi
DP: José Luis Alcaine
Format: 16 x 9
Camera: Arri Alexa Mini
Lens: Cooke S4

Alcaine: If you shoot on 2.35:1, it’s problematic — and in the end, many screens can’t accommodate the whole picture; you lose the edges. We chose to shoot 16 x 9, which offers the same quality without the problems. The Alexa Mini is small and light. Almost all of Asghar’s scenes are shot handheld, and with another camera this becomes very tiring. The Cooke S4 lens offers a beautiful quality for the actors’ skin. Digital provides almost too much detail. The Cooke S4 is much subtler and softer for capturing the skin tones.

“Lazzaro Felice”

"Lazzaro Felice" DP Hélène Louvart

“Lazzaro Felice” DP Hélène Louvart

Simona Pampallona

Dir: Alice Rohrwacher
DP: Hélène Louvart
Format: Super 16 mm, 1.85:1
Camera: Arri 416 /super 16mm
Lens: Ultra Prime Zeiss (35mm lenses)

Louvart: For the director, Alice, she used to shoot in Super 16mm. It’s something very important for her; the 16mm’s feeling is the right answer for her visual world. Not totally perfect, grainy sometimes, slightly out of focus sometimes, but gives a deep feeling of something “organic.” And we are still surprised with the “16mm feeling” because we can’t control it 100 percent. We used the 416 Arri camera because the eyepiece is bright and very precise. And these sort of lenses get the best resolution, especially for the wide shots.

“Leto”

Leto Cannes Film Festival

“Leto”

courtesy of the Cannes Film Festival

Dir: Kirill Serebrennikov
DP: Vladislav Opeliants
Format: ARRIRAW, 16mm Film
Camera: ARRI Alexa Mini. For the colored fragments we used a 16mm Eclair camera.
Lens: Hawk Anamorphic and Angénieux lenses with the 16mm Eclair

Opeliants: All my latest films were shot with the Alexa Mini. As we have a black & white film, it was very important for us to have the whole spectrum from white to black. I also made the choice towards Alexa Mini as I had a lot of handheld camera and the camera moving together with the actors. For me it was really important that the camera is light. I also think the Alexa Mini has an ideal matrix for a perfect color correction. Our 16mm camera and lenses dated back to 1973. We used an old camera to ensure that the image corresponds to that era and that we could get as close as possible to the image of that time. We used 16mm Kodak film, of course.

“Shoplifters”

Shoplifters, KORE-EDA Hirokazu. Cannes

“Shoplifters”

Dir: Hirokazu Kore-eda
DP: Kondo Ryuto
Format: 35mm Film, 3 perf
Camera: ArriCam ST
Lens: Leica Summicron-C prime lenses

Ryuto: I knew that director Kore-eda loves shooting with 35mm film, but for this film I also thought that 35mm film was the best choice because the texture of the surface and the color that a grain of the stock (EK5219) gives was the best suited to the film. My senior Japanese cinematographer said about 35mm film: “The color captured in 35mm film is the color which is in our memory.” By using the power of 35mm film, I tried to capture every moment of this family living in a corner of modern Tokyo.

Under the Silver Lake

Andrew Garfield, David Robert Mitchell and DP Mike Gioulakis on the set of "Under the Silver Lake"

Andrew Garfield, David Robert Mitchell, and DP Mike Gioulakis on the set of “Under the Silver Lake”

Courtesy of A24

Dir: David Robert Mitchell
DP: Michael Gioulakis
Format: ProRes XQ, 2.35 aspect ratio
Camera: ARRI Alexa Mini
Lens: Cooke S4

“The Wild Pear Tree”

"The Wild Pear Tree" director Nuri Bilge Ceylan

“The Wild Pear Tree” director Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Morteza Atabaki

Dir: Nuri Bilge Ceylan
DP: Gökhan Teriyaki
Format: Redraw 6K 3.1 compress, 2.39:1 aspect ratio. Second camera: DJI 4K DNG RAW MF 4:3 Sensor, 2.39:1 aspect ratio
Camera: Red Weapon 6K and DJI Osmo handle zenmuse X5R camera 4K
Lens: Zeiss master prime spherical set for Red camera. Olympus MF 4/3 lances for DJI camera.

Teriyaki: Digital cameras have similar range to each other. Our priority is to have a big sensor [and] considering red color data on shades of skin. RED is very good for shades of skin, and we are satisfied from its bigger sensor (larger than super 35). I think that, in general, the mode of the movie is independent from camera and it is related to light and frame. We used the DJI osmo handle instead of Steadicam, because our director requested practical solutions for long takes.

“Yomeddine”

Yomeddine

“Yomeddine”

Desert Highway Pictures

Dir: A.B Shawky
DP: Federico Cesca
Format: ProRes 4444, Log-c, 2K
Camera: ARRI Alexa Classic Pro
Lens: Master Primes

Cesca: “Yomeddine” is probably the hardest film I’ve shot, and it was only my third feature. We were working with animals, and children, and the cast was in its majority made of non-actors. In many ways, it felt like a documentary. All of the film was shot on location, with a rather minimal lighting package and minimal crew, so I needed a camera that could keep up with the pace and the conditions as an extension of my shoulder. So I knew I would need a very reliable camera — and I don’t mean just not overheating, or breaking down due to dust or other environment circumstance. I mean also a sensor that would give me the best latitude and most natural color rendering. So the Alexa was my first choice. Perhaps if I were to shoot it today, I would go for the Amira or even the Mini, but Arri’s sensor is still the one that I believe delivers the most natural-looking images. I paired it with Master Primes because we got a deal on those and I really liked them, although I would generally go for softer, old lenses to give the image a gentler quality. I used Glimmerglass diffusion to counter the extreme sharpness of the lenses. Ultimately, I hope the resulting image feels honest and direct and helps the audience feel the emotion and texture of that rich and complex world in which our heroes’ journey take place.

Next Page: “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and Cannes Special Screenings

Terry Gilliam’s Quixotic Journey Chronicled in New Film From ‘Lost in La Mancha’ Team (EXCLUSIVE)

The story behind “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and its impact on director Terry Gilliam will be revealed in the new documentary “He Dreams of Giants,” a film-behind-the-film from the same team that made 2002’s “Lost in La Mancha,” an earlier l…

The story behind “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” and its impact on director Terry Gilliam will be revealed in the new documentary “He Dreams of Giants,” a film-behind-the-film from the same team that made 2002’s “Lost in La Mancha,” an earlier look at Gilliam’s disaster-plagued movie. Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe direct “He Dreams […]

Terry Gilliam Wears ‘I’m Not Dead Yet’ Shirt After Stroke Rumors, Promises He’s ‘Well Again’ and Ready for Cannes

“We are legally victorious!” Gilliam wrote on Twitter following the announcement that “Don Quixote” will officially close the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Terry Gilliam has a message for fans following the reports that he suffered a stroke: “I’m not dead yet.” The filmmaker posted a photo to his official Twitter page in which those words were written on his shirt. News broke May 8 that Gilliam had suffered a stroke ahead of the verdict announcing whether or not he would be allowed to debut his passion project, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” at Cannes. The film’s producer Jeremy Thomas confirmed to Deadline that Gilliam did not suffer a stroke but was hospitalized due to an unspecified illness and stress.

“After days of rest and prayers to the gods I am restored and well again,” Gilliam said. “So is ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.’ We are legally victorious! We will go to the ball, dressed as the closing film at Festival de Cannes! May 19. Thanks for all your support.”

The Cannes premiere of “Don Quixote” was trying to be blocked by Paolo Branco, a former producer on the film. Branco, who helped Gilliam develop the film years ago and left after pre-production disputes, alleged that Gilliam could not debut the film without his permission. A May 9 court ruling determined Branco’s claims were unfounded and that Gilliam had the right to premiere “Don Quixote” at Cannes.

Gilliam will be in attendance at the movie’s May 19 premiere. “Don Quixote” opens in French cinemas the same day.