Rose McGowan Reads Hollywood Missive In Surprise ‘Letters Live’ NYC Appearance; Joins Benedict Cumberbatch, Edie Falco

Benedict Cumberbatch, Edie Falco, Hugh Dancy and Tony-nominee Tom Hollander were among the famous faces reading famous – or should-be-famous – correspondence from the past at Friday night’s New York City debut of the two-night, Cumber…

Benedict Cumberbatch, Edie Falco, Hugh Dancy and Tony-nominee Tom Hollander were among the famous faces reading famous – or should-be-famous – correspondence from the past at Friday night’s New York City debut of the two-night, Cumberbatch-produced Letters Live event, but it was an unbilled Rose McGowan reading her own incendiary and far-reaching “Dear Hollywood” missive from 2016 that gave an extra jolt to the show. McGowan’s appearance at Manhattan’s Town Hall had been…

‘Citizen Rose’ Producers on How the E! Series Captures Rose McGowan’s Healing, and How She’s Helped Others

“[Rose] feels like she’s lived more in the last couple of months than she’s had in quite a few years,” showrunner Andrea Metz told IndieWire, and the new series explores just how that happened.

Rose McGowan has had quite the year, and we know this because starting back in August 2017, she started letting people into her life on an intimate level. Her Tweets had already grown more personal, she was writing the soon-to-be-published memoir “Brave,” and — perhaps her boldest decision — she had partnered with Bunim-Murray Productions to start following her around as she pursued her activist causes and dealt with years of pain following her alleged sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein.

The result of her having the courage to put her life on display in this way was the docuseries “Citizen Rose,” which initially debuted as a two-hour special in January 2018, and is now joined by three follow-up episodes that begin airing Thursday on E!.

“I think that it was definitely a very eye-opening experience,” showrunner Andrea Metz told IndieWire. “The world had not felt safe for her for so many years. I think that Rose has said that she will always be a victim and a survivor, and they’re kind of intertwined. Her healing and her being a survivor happened at the same time. And you see her start to come out of the darkness and into the light.

“I think that for so long, she was silent, and kind of felt very alone in this journey,” Metz said. “Everything that was happening, in the culmination of everything happening at once, was very triggering for her. And I think that trauma, which is something she didn’t really think about that much; it’s kind of an imprint of the pain and the fear living inside of us.”

The new episodes cover the time between “Citizen Rose’s” initial premiere through the following months, which means that even as she was promoting the release of the documentary as well as her new album and “Brave,” cameras were rolling on her, capturing her reaction as events unfolded.

“She watches her book breathe and the documentary airs in the beginning of the series… So all of that launching at once, plus, obviously Rose being catapulted into the center of this movement that’s a social change,” Metz said. “Rose has said herself that she feels like she’s lived more in the last couple of months than she’s had in quite a few years.”

Bunim-Murray has been producing a wide variety of non-scripted programming for decades, from “The Real World” to Emmy-winning documentaries like “Autism: The Musical.” For “Citizen Rose,” Metz described the process as “pure documentary, it was very raw and real. I definitely felt like I and my [director of photography] were on this journey with her.”

Bunim-Murray co-founder Jon Murray noted that Bunim-Murray’s recent work had given the company new insight into approaching less structured scripted work. “Whenever we have an opportunity to flex our muscles and try and really dig in and discover new ways of doing things, we love that,” he said. “Because we had to do that a little bit with our series, ‘Born this Way’ for A&E. When you’re telling that story about young adults with Down Syndrome, when I saw the first cut of that, there were just too many of the reality cliches, in terms of some of the editing techniques, and we had to strip it out and sort of re-approach how we were gonna tell this story to make it as authentic as it was, as what they caught in the field.”

Added Metz, “It was unlike anything that I’ve done before, just because Rose allowed us to be with her through every step of this and she showed her vulnerabilities and her flaws and wanted us to keep rolling always. So, I think even how we shot it, with a smaller camera, and a lot of times, myself and my DP and Rose and her aunt, Rory, the whole process, it was very intimate. And I think we got very close over the time that we filmed. There was trust that had to be built, and it took a minute to do that. But it was a really unique, life-changing experience.”

Said Murray, “I think our editors loved the challenge of this show and I think all of us are just so happy with the way it looks and the way the story is told. I’m sure you’ll see some of these techniques popping up in either some of our future documentaries or series.”

Murray praised E!’s flexibility when it came to how to structure what they produced. “We decided the best way to tell the story was to start with the two-hour special and then to keep filming and sort of get the next phase of her life and tell that,” he said. “And tell that in three one-hour episodes. So that’s where we ended up and so we think with that the final episode of those three, it really does finish the story.”

As for the future of “Citizen Rose” as a show, while it is technically a limited series, Murray said that if the opportunity to revisit McGowan’s story came in a year or so, he’d “love to. I’d love to if it makes sense. I think that nice thing about this, it’s not like a reality show where, oh, ‘we have to come up with something each week, what can Rose do now?’ That was never what this show was about. It was about telling a very real story and really when we set out on this journey, we didn’t know where the story was going to take us. So, yeah, so I think now well, these three episodes will play out and then we’ll see whether there’s a reason to come back to tell more.”

In the meantime, Metz remains truly affected by the experience of following McGowan for months, not just because of McGowan’s personal journey, but how living that journey publicly affected the people around her. “So many women and men came up to her, everywhere we went, globally,” she said.

In the season finale, this includes McGowan attending a Women’s March on International Women’s Day on March 8 in Rome with director/actor Asia Argento (who was a major part of the first installment of “Citizen Rose” and the ongoing #MeToo movement). “Seeing the thousands and thousands of women in Rome, marching together and having that moment when Rose kind of looked back and saw everyone marching and said to me, ‘Wow, you know, here we are after all of this.’ It just seemed the global impact that it’s had was so powerful.”

Added Murray, “It was just so gratifying that people seemed really open up to the show. I’ve talked to a lot of people — each person who’s seen it, they could relate to some aspect of Rose’s journey. It was great at getting people to open up about their own experiences.”

The Inside Story of How E! Landed ‘Citizen Rose’

Critics have wondered why the industry-focused channel is airing an outspoken, justice-oriented limited series. “It is, ultimately, an ‘E! True Hollywood Story,'” the channel’s head of programming says.read more


Critics have wondered why the industry-focused channel is airing an outspoken, justice-oriented limited series. "It is, ultimately, an 'E! True Hollywood Story,'" the channel's head of programming says.

read more

‘Citizen Rose’ Trailer: Rose McGowan Offers a Lesson in Compassion in New Look at E! Docuseries — Watch

Since the debut episode aired in January, much has unfolded in the #MeToo movement.

In a just-released promo for the second episode of Rose McGowan’s E! docuseries “Citizen Rose,” the network stages a social experiment. E! took over a Los Angeles parking lot at night and projected a series of questions onto the side of a building, such as “What would you call someone who speaks up when no one else will?” Passersby stepped up to a microphone to respond, unaware that they were being prompted to form conclusions about the former “Charmed” star.

McGowan says Harvey Weinstein raped her at the Sundance Film Festival in 1997. On October 12, one week after the New York Times reported that she had accepted a $100,000 settlement from the fired studio chairman, McGowan tweeted the accusation she had long hinted at.

The voiced opinions in the promo are at odds with one another: Is the actress-turned-activist “inspiring” and a “champion,” or “damaged” and “misunderstood”? E! ends the spot with the tagline, “It’s easy to label someone, but we are all more than a label,” which follows voiceover from McGowan’s compelling speech at the Women’s Convention in Detroit this October.

“Citizen Rose” is a five-part endeavor. The series launched with a two-hour premiere on January 30, the date she published her New York Times bestselling memoir, “Brave.” In that episode, viewers learned that an MTV film crew had accompanied her at Sundance the day of her alleged assault, and McGowan was told that Weinstein’s legal team had obtained a large portion of her manuscript.

“When I found out that the monster stole the first 125 pages of my book to discredit and destroy my voice, I can’t tell you how violating it felt,” she said in the premiere.

The second installment of “Citizen Rose” airs Thursday, May 17 at 10 p.m. Watch the teaser below. 

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Rose McGowan’s ‘Citizen Rose’ Limited Series Gets Air Date On E!

E! has slotted a May airdate for Rose McGowan’s limited series Citizen Rose. The three-part special begins at 10 PM Thursday, May 17, and picks up where January’s two-hour documentary left off, with McGowan set to launch her memoir/manifest…

E! has slotted a May airdate for Rose McGowan’s limited series Citizen Rose. The three-part special begins at 10 PM Thursday, May 17, and picks up where January’s two-hour documentary left off, with McGowan set to launch her memoir/manifesto, Brave. Per E!, the limited series deals with McGowan’s “emotional toll of having to constantly revisit her painful past, all the while launching a book that is one of her proudest achievements. Rose takes her social movement…

Former Berlin Film Festival Director Defends Harvey Weinstein From ‘Lynch Mob’: ‘Simply Disgusting’

Former Berlin Film Festival director Moritz de Hadeln has issued a defense of Harvey Weinstein, praising the disgraced Hollywood mogul for his “professional achievements” and noting that he has not been convicted of any crime.

“The lynch mob he is now experiencing is simply disgusting,” de Hadeln wrote in an op-ed titled “Weinstein’s Genius” in German for the Swiss paper Die Weltwoche.

De Hadeln, who ran the Berlin Film Festival for more than 20 years before leaving in 2001, pointed to the infamous Le Monde letter written by French women including Catherine Deneuve that called the #MeToo movement “puritanical” and a “witch hunt.”

See Video: Rose McGowan Offers Birthday Wishes to Harvey Weinstein

“Weinstein’s private life was influenced by the environment in which they worked,” wrote de Hadeln, who also ran the Venice Film Festival for two years. “You cannot justify everything, but you cannot completely hide it. Film is an art that evokes the emotions of the audience. It sometimes demands everything from the actors, sometimes also expressing eroticism in front of the camera. And then the public demands that in private life they should resist any temptation and be icons of puritanism. That is simply hypocritical.”

De Hadeln also noted that Weinstein — who has been accused by dozens of women of sexual misconduct ranging from harassment and assault — “has not yet been convicted by a court of law for the crimes that numerous women accuse him of, the people’s voice denies him the right not to be guilty.”

De Hadeln argued that Weinstein’s contributions to cinema should prevent people from rushing to judgment before courts have weighed in.

Also Read: Weinstein Co Bankruptcy Means Harvey’s Accusers May Never Get Paid by Studio

“At the risk of recharging the wrath of some feminists: I wish they could do a more balanced job with Harvey Weinstein, whose professional achievements are undeniable,” he said. “When there are criminal offenses, the judiciary must intervene, but producers, associations, institutions and media should not presume to replace the judiciary.”

Weinstein, who was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company last October, has denied all allegations of criminal wrongdoing.

The New York Police Department has also launched an investigation into Weinstein, as well as police in Los Angeles and London. L.A. and Beverly Hills police have sent five cases to the Los Angeles County District Attorney for review.

Related stories from TheWrap:

NY Governor Second Guesses DA in Harvey Weinstein Case

Time’s Up Demands ‘Independent Investigation’ of NY District Attorney Over Failure to Prosecute Harvey Weinstein

NYPD Detective Says Harvey Weinstein Case Has ‘Considerable Evidence’

Former Berlin Film Festival director Moritz de Hadeln has issued a defense of Harvey Weinstein, praising the disgraced Hollywood mogul for his “professional achievements” and noting that he has not been convicted of any crime.

“The lynch mob he is now experiencing is simply disgusting,” de Hadeln wrote in an op-ed titled “Weinstein’s Genius” in German for the Swiss paper Die Weltwoche.

De Hadeln, who ran the Berlin Film Festival for more than 20 years before leaving in 2001, pointed to the infamous Le Monde letter written by French women including Catherine Deneuve that called the #MeToo movement “puritanical” and a “witch hunt.”

“Weinstein’s private life was influenced by the environment in which they worked,” wrote de Hadeln, who also ran the Venice Film Festival for two years. “You cannot justify everything, but you cannot completely hide it. Film is an art that evokes the emotions of the audience. It sometimes demands everything from the actors, sometimes also expressing eroticism in front of the camera. And then the public demands that in private life they should resist any temptation and be icons of puritanism. That is simply hypocritical.”

De Hadeln also noted that Weinstein — who has been accused by dozens of women of sexual misconduct ranging from harassment and assault — “has not yet been convicted by a court of law for the crimes that numerous women accuse him of, the people’s voice denies him the right not to be guilty.”

De Hadeln argued that Weinstein’s contributions to cinema should prevent people from rushing to judgment before courts have weighed in.

“At the risk of recharging the wrath of some feminists: I wish they could do a more balanced job with Harvey Weinstein, whose professional achievements are undeniable,” he said. “When there are criminal offenses, the judiciary must intervene, but producers, associations, institutions and media should not presume to replace the judiciary.”

Weinstein, who was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company last October, has denied all allegations of criminal wrongdoing.

The New York Police Department has also launched an investigation into Weinstein, as well as police in Los Angeles and London. L.A. and Beverly Hills police have sent five cases to the Los Angeles County District Attorney for review.

Related stories from TheWrap:

NY Governor Second Guesses DA in Harvey Weinstein Case

Time's Up Demands 'Independent Investigation' of NY District Attorney Over Failure to Prosecute Harvey Weinstein

NYPD Detective Says Harvey Weinstein Case Has 'Considerable Evidence'