Netflix Exec Ted Sarandos Made 19 Percent More in 2017 vs Prior Year

It’s still (very) good to work at Netflix. Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos hauled in 19 percent more in total compensation last year versus his 2016 take, topping out at $22.4 million.
While he’s catching up to President, Chairman and CE…

It’s still (very) good to work at Netflix. Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos hauled in 19 percent more in total compensation last year versus his 2016 take, topping out at $22.4 million.

While he’s catching up to President, Chairman and CEO Reed Hastings, Sarandos is not quite there yet. Sarandos scored a cool $24.4 million last year, according to an SEC filing.

Sarandos’ all-in pay basically breaks down like this:
$1 million in salary
$12.4 million in options awards
$9 million in non-equity incentive plan compensation

Sarandos also received $8,100 under the catch-all heading “All Other Compensation,” but Sarandos can just blow that all on hats.

Ted’s boss Mr. Hastings has a lower salary at $850,000, though a massive amount in the options category: $23.5 million, anybody?

Click here for an idea of how much this dynamic duo will ring the cash register for in 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Seven Seconds' Won't Return for a Second Season on Netflix

Netflix Orders Idris Elba Comedy 'Turn Up Charlie,' Duplass Brothers' True Crime Series 'Evil Genius'

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Says Company's Model Inoculates It From Tech's Privacy Woes

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Pay Package Rose 5% in 2017, to $24.4 Million

Reed Hastings’ base salary as chairman and CEO of Netflix actually declined in 2017 — but his overall compensation increased 5%, to $24.4 million, the company disclosed in a proxy filing Monday. Hastings, 57, took home $850,000 in salary (d…

Reed Hastings’ base salary as chairman and CEO of Netflix actually declined in 2017 — but his overall compensation increased 5%, to $24.4 million, the company disclosed in a proxy filing Monday. Hastings, 57, took home $850,000 in salary (down from $900,000 in 2016) and $23.5 million in stock-option awards reflecting the grant-date value during […]

Netflix CEO Set For Series Mania, Marion Cotillard Movie Deal, BBC Orders Margaret Thatcher Doc — Global Briefs

TV festival Series Mania, staged in France, is assembling a heavyweight lineup of speakers including Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, Endemol Shine Group’s Sophie Turner Laing and TF1 Group’s Gilles Pelisson. Hastings will be the subject of a Q&A session. Other panelists are set to include BBC director of policy Claire Sumer and Antony Root, VP, programming and production, HBO Europe. French minister of culture Françoise Nyssen and European Commission VP Andrus Ansip will close…

TV festival Series Mania, staged in France, is assembling a heavyweight lineup of speakers including Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, Endemol Shine Group's Sophie Turner Laing and TF1 Group's Gilles Pelisson. Hastings will be the subject of a Q&A session. Other panelists are set to include BBC director of policy Claire Sumer and Antony Root, VP, programming and production, HBO Europe. French minister of culture Françoise Nyssen and European Commission VP Andrus Ansip will close…

Netflix Stock Hits New High; Market Cap Nearly Tops All Media Rivals’

A day after releasing another sizzling quarterly earnings report, Netflix saw its stock hit a new high, rising 9% to close at $336.06.
During the trading session, it set a new 52-week high of $338.62. A year ago at this time, it was trading at around $140.
Subscriber growth has sparked the investor frenzy, with the global total cracking 125 million in the first quarter, up more than 7.4 million in the first quarter. While many questions remain about the sustainability of…

A day after releasing another sizzling quarterly earnings report, Netflix saw its stock hit a new high, rising 9% to close at $336.06. During the trading session, it set a new 52-week high of $338.62. A year ago at this time, it was trading at around $140. Subscriber growth has sparked the investor frenzy, with the global total cracking 125 million in the first quarter, up more than 7.4 million in the first quarter. While many questions remain about the sustainability of…

Netflix Shares Jump 8 Percent to All-Time High on Subscriber Surge

Shares of Netflix are on fire, jumping 8 percent in early morning trading a day after the streaming giant reported it added 7.4 million new subscribers during its first quarter — second most in the company’s history, behind the 8.3 million added during the final three months of 2017.

The big move had Netflix trading at $332.22 a share, putting it on the verge of passing its $333.98 all-time high. If the gains hold on Tuesday, Netflix would close at its highest mark ever, passing the $331.44 close the company had on March 9.

Also Read: Martin Scorsese to Direct ‘SCTV’ Comedy Special for Netflix

Netflix’s subscriber gains pushed the company past 125 million customers across the globe. Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos reiterated the company plans to aggressively target international subscribers on its earnings call on Tuesday, with shows natively shot in Brazil, Germany, and Israel, among other countries.

The Los Gatos, California-based company still carries plenty of debt, and is planning on paying up to $8 billion on content in 2018. But Wall Street doesn’t seem to mind, as long as the company is adding both subscribers and revenue at an accelerated pace.

“We continue to believe Netflix will scale to a large and highly profitable business, and 1Q results highlight continued momentum on both scale and margins. In a rare combination, subscriber growth exceeded expectations AND expectations for margin expansion for the year increased,” said Morgan Stanley in a note to clients. “Importantly, as the company pivots its incremental spending from content first towards marketing, there are some early signs that operating leverage is increasing and cash burn perhaps peaking. If Netflix continues to outperform its own expectations for net adds, it is even more likely it will begin expanding margins more rapidly and reducing its cash burn levels.”

Also Read: Netflix Orders Dark Comedy ‘Dead to Me’ From Liz Feldman, Will Ferrell

Goldman Sachs, Piper Jaffray, and J.P. Morgan all increased their price targets above $360 a share for Netflix on Tuesday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Says Company’s Model Inoculates It From Tech’s Privacy Woes

Netflix Stock Surges on Huge Q1 Subscriber Growth

Netflix Earnings Preview: Streaming Giant Looks to Build on Record Subscriber Growth

Shares of Netflix are on fire, jumping 8 percent in early morning trading a day after the streaming giant reported it added 7.4 million new subscribers during its first quarter — second most in the company’s history, behind the 8.3 million added during the final three months of 2017.

The big move had Netflix trading at $332.22 a share, putting it on the verge of passing its $333.98 all-time high. If the gains hold on Tuesday, Netflix would close at its highest mark ever, passing the $331.44 close the company had on March 9.

Netflix’s subscriber gains pushed the company past 125 million customers across the globe. Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos reiterated the company plans to aggressively target international subscribers on its earnings call on Tuesday, with shows natively shot in Brazil, Germany, and Israel, among other countries.

The Los Gatos, California-based company still carries plenty of debt, and is planning on paying up to $8 billion on content in 2018. But Wall Street doesn’t seem to mind, as long as the company is adding both subscribers and revenue at an accelerated pace.

“We continue to believe Netflix will scale to a large and highly profitable business, and 1Q results highlight continued momentum on both scale and margins. In a rare combination, subscriber growth exceeded expectations AND expectations for margin expansion for the year increased,” said Morgan Stanley in a note to clients. “Importantly, as the company pivots its incremental spending from content first towards marketing, there are some early signs that operating leverage is increasing and cash burn perhaps peaking. If Netflix continues to outperform its own expectations for net adds, it is even more likely it will begin expanding margins more rapidly and reducing its cash burn levels.”

Goldman Sachs, Piper Jaffray, and J.P. Morgan all increased their price targets above $360 a share for Netflix on Tuesday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Says Company's Model Inoculates It From Tech's Privacy Woes

Netflix Stock Surges on Huge Q1 Subscriber Growth

Netflix Earnings Preview: Streaming Giant Looks to Build on Record Subscriber Growth

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Says Company’s Model Inoculates It From Tech’s Privacy Woes

In the wake of Facebook’s data scandal with Cambridge Analytica, people have gotten even more paranoid about who has access to their personal data and what they’re using it for.

During Netflix’s quarterly earnings interview on Monday, Netflix chief Reed Hastings was asked by Morgan Stanley analyst Ben Swinburne how the new focus by regulators and consumers might impact the streaming giant.

Hastings is pretty confident it won’t.

Also Read: Netflix Exec Bonuses Were a Sham to Capitalize on Tax Deductions, Shareholder Lawsuit Says

“Well I’m very glad that we’ve built a business not to be ad supported but to be subscription. We’re very different from the ad supported businesses and we’ve always been very big on protecting all of our members’ viewing,” Hastings said, reiterating that Netflix doesn’t sell ad space on the platform. “I think we’re substantially inoculated from the other issues that are happening in the industry, and that’s great.

“Second, I’d point out that we’ll spend over $10 billion on content and marketing and $1.3 billion on tech so just objectively we’re much more of a media company in that way than pure tech, ” he continued. “Now, of course, we want to be great at both, but again, we’re really pretty different from the pure tech companies.”

In a March interview with Recode’s Kara Swisher, Apple boss Tim Cook said: “I wouldn’t be in this situation,” referring to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Also Read: Mark Zuckerberg Hit Back at ‘Extremely Glib’ Apple Boss Tim Cook

He also noted that Apple’s business is fundamentally different from the ad-driven juggernaut Zuckerberg built. “The truth is, we could make a ton of money if we monetized our customer — if our customer was our product,” Cook added. “We’ve elected not to do that.”

During Netflix’s 2018 first quarter ending on March 31, it reported revenue of $3.7 billion and earnings of 64 cents a share, just edging analyst estimates of 63 cents a share and $3.69 billion in revenue. The Los Gatos, California-based company increased revenue 43 percent year-over-year.

Also Read: Netflix Stock Surges on Huge Q1 Subscriber Growth

The key for investors was the 1.96 million U.S. subscribers and 5.46 million internationally that Netflix added during the quarter. Those additions pushed the company past 124 million overall members. Analysts had anticipated 1.45 million domestic subs and 4.9 million internationally.

Netflix’s international subscriber base now accounts for 50 percent of the company’s revenue, Netflix said in a statement.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ian Somerhalder to Lead Netflix Vampire Drama Series ‘V-Wars’

Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

Marvel’s ‘Jessica Jones’ Gets Third Season at Netflix

In the wake of Facebook’s data scandal with Cambridge Analytica, people have gotten even more paranoid about who has access to their personal data and what they’re using it for.

During Netflix’s quarterly earnings interview on Monday, Netflix chief Reed Hastings was asked by Morgan Stanley analyst Ben Swinburne how the new focus by regulators and consumers might impact the streaming giant.

Hastings is pretty confident it won’t.

“Well I’m very glad that we’ve built a business not to be ad supported but to be subscription. We’re very different from the ad supported businesses and we’ve always been very big on protecting all of our members’ viewing,” Hastings said, reiterating that Netflix doesn’t sell ad space on the platform. “I think we’re substantially inoculated from the other issues that are happening in the industry, and that’s great.

“Second, I’d point out that we’ll spend over $10 billion on content and marketing and $1.3 billion on tech so just objectively we’re much more of a media company in that way than pure tech, ” he continued. “Now, of course, we want to be great at both, but again, we’re really pretty different from the pure tech companies.”

In a March interview with Recode’s Kara Swisher, Apple boss Tim Cook said: “I wouldn’t be in this situation,” referring to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

He also noted that Apple’s business is fundamentally different from the ad-driven juggernaut Zuckerberg built. “The truth is, we could make a ton of money if we monetized our customer — if our customer was our product,” Cook added. “We’ve elected not to do that.”

During Netflix’s 2018 first quarter ending on March 31, it reported revenue of $3.7 billion and earnings of 64 cents a share, just edging analyst estimates of 63 cents a share and $3.69 billion in revenue. The Los Gatos, California-based company increased revenue 43 percent year-over-year.

The key for investors was the 1.96 million U.S. subscribers and 5.46 million internationally that Netflix added during the quarter. Those additions pushed the company past 124 million overall members. Analysts had anticipated 1.45 million domestic subs and 4.9 million internationally.

Netflix’s international subscriber base now accounts for 50 percent of the company’s revenue, Netflix said in a statement.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ian Somerhalder to Lead Netflix Vampire Drama Series 'V-Wars'

Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

Marvel's 'Jessica Jones' Gets Third Season at Netflix

Netflix’s Reed Hastings See Plenty More Runway; Ted Sarandos Says Day-And-Date Movies “Will Be More And More Accepted”

As an old Wall Street saying goes, the market climbs a wall of worry. In the case of Netflix, the more people worry about the company exhausting its potential (or cash reserves), the higher it seems to climb.
Founder and CEO Reed Hastings said during today’s earnings video conference that he sees plenty more upside. “Whether our share grows or shrinks is really down to, do we make great content, market it well, serve it up beautifully?” he said. If they don’t, he…

As an old Wall Street saying goes, the market climbs a wall of worry. In the case of Netflix, the more people worry about the company exhausting its potential (or cash reserves), the higher it seems to climb. Founder and CEO Reed Hastings said during today’s earnings video conference that he sees plenty more upside. “Whether our share grows or shrinks is really down to, do we make great content, market it well, serve it up beautifully?” he said. If they don’t, he…