Female Filmmakers Share War Stories, From Breast Feeding on Set to Male Insubordination

Female filmmakers have faced many challenges over the year, but few experienced the outright hostility of their government, as Wanuri Kahiu did on her film, “Rafiki.” a lesbian love story.

Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Lunch at the Toronto Film Festival on Saturday, Kahiu related how Kenya’s censorship board complained that her lesbian love story was too “hopeful” in a country where homosexuality is banned — and that her film could only be released there if she changed her ending.

Homosexuality is banned in Kenya, and so was Kahiu’s film. She said the censorship board complained that her film was too “hopeful,” and that they would allow its release if she changed the ending.

“The [Kenya Film Commission] asked if I had an ending that showed my lead as more remorseful. I said ‘No,’” she told a packed room of top women in the film industry. She also said she had decided to sue the Kenyan government next week to force the release of the film.

Also Read: Elle Fanning Film ‘Teen Spirit’ Nabbed by Mickey Liddell

Other international filmmakers shared their experiences as women behind the camera, from breast-feeding on set to battling male subordinates who seek to undermine their leadership.

“I had a Netflix rider in my contract that there had to be a cooler with ice for breast milk,” Chai Vasarhelyi (“Free Solo”) told moderator Sharon Waxman, the founder and CEO of TheWrap. “I was obsessed with it.”

“I breast-fed during shots,” said Patricia Rozema, whose film “Mouthpiece” is an abstract study of two different versions of the same woman, one inspired and confident and the other decidedly not.

Also Read: Toronto Film Festival Organizers Commit to Gender Parity in Their Ranks

“It’s extremely important that our children see the work we do,” Rozema said. “It’s absurd that we have these precious creatures and put them all in one building to be raised by someone else.”

The panelists, who also included Nadine Labaki (“Capernaum”), agreed that women also face perception problems on set due to the historical lack of leadership opportunities they have received.

“I’ve had people approach me thinking I was with craft services or a unit publicist,” said Molly McGlynn, who directed the feature “Mary Goes Round” and attended the event as ambassador for Share Her Journey, the TIFF nonprofit group aimed at uplifting women in the film business.

Many of those individuals were men, she said, and McGlynn said she deliberately decided to “hold eye contact longer than I should, not to shame them but address the nature of that very question of why I’m there.”

Also Read: Film Critics’ Gender Gap: Men Write 78 Percent of Reviews, Study Finds

Panelists also agreed that women needed to stop asking permission to tell their stories. “The onscreen women we have been learning from are male creations. Everything we say and do are reactions to that gender creation … it’s self-sabotage,” Rozema said.

“I’ve learned to fight, and to speak up, and not be silenced,” Kahiu said.

A second panel on women breaking ground in the tech industry included producer Miranda Bailey, who just launched a women-focused media review website called CherryPicks; Jodi Kovitz of gender-parity nonprofit Move the Dial; and Ashleigh Gardner of the Canadian-based user-generated story website Wattpad Studios.

The event directly followed the festival’s Share Her Journey rally outside festival headquarters in downtown Toronto, which featured top leaders promoting the advancement of women in the film business. Share Her Journey was an official partner on the luncheon.

Others in attendance included Sundance executive director Keri Putnam, Women and Hollywood founder Melissa Silverstein, producer and Women in Film head Cathy Schulman, USC associate professor Stacy Smith, veteran film marketing executive Marian Koltai-Levine and Canadian officials like L.A. Consul General James Villeneuve.

TheWrap’s Power Women series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Organizers Commit to Gender Parity in Their Ranks

Will Oscar Season’s Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

Female filmmakers have faced many challenges over the year, but few experienced the outright hostility of their government, as Wanuri Kahiu did on her film, “Rafiki.” a lesbian love story.

Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Lunch at the Toronto Film Festival on Saturday, Kahiu related how Kenya’s censorship board complained that her lesbian love story was too “hopeful” in a country where homosexuality is banned — and that her film could only be released there if she changed her ending.

Homosexuality is banned in Kenya, and so was Kahiu’s film. She said the censorship board complained that her film was too “hopeful,” and that they would allow its release if she changed the ending.

“The [Kenya Film Commission] asked if I had an ending that showed my lead as more remorseful. I said ‘No,'” she told a packed room of top women in the film industry. She also said she had decided to sue the Kenyan government next week to force the release of the film.

Other international filmmakers shared their experiences as women behind the camera, from breast-feeding on set to battling male subordinates who seek to undermine their leadership.

“I had a Netflix rider in my contract that there had to be a cooler with ice for breast milk,” Chai Vasarhelyi (“Free Solo”) told moderator Sharon Waxman, the founder and CEO of TheWrap. “I was obsessed with it.”

“I breast-fed during shots,” said Patricia Rozema, whose film “Mouthpiece” is an abstract study of two different versions of the same woman, one inspired and confident and the other decidedly not.

“It’s extremely important that our children see the work we do,” Rozema said. “It’s absurd that we have these precious creatures and put them all in one building to be raised by someone else.”

The panelists, who also included Nadine Labaki (“Capernaum”), agreed that women also face perception problems on set due to the historical lack of leadership opportunities they have received.

“I’ve had people approach me thinking I was with craft services or a unit publicist,” said Molly McGlynn, who directed the feature “Mary Goes Round” and attended the event as ambassador for Share Her Journey, the TIFF nonprofit group aimed at uplifting women in the film business.

Many of those individuals were men, she said, and McGlynn said she deliberately decided to “hold eye contact longer than I should, not to shame them but address the nature of that very question of why I’m there.”

Panelists also agreed that women needed to stop asking permission to tell their stories. “The onscreen women we have been learning from are male creations. Everything we say and do are reactions to that gender creation … it’s self-sabotage,” Rozema said.

“I’ve learned to fight, and to speak up, and not be silenced,” Kahiu said.

A second panel on women breaking ground in the tech industry included producer Miranda Bailey, who just launched a women-focused media review website called CherryPicks; Jodi Kovitz of gender-parity nonprofit Move the Dial; and Ashleigh Gardner of the Canadian-based user-generated story website Wattpad Studios.

The event directly followed the festival’s Share Her Journey rally outside festival headquarters in downtown Toronto, which featured top leaders promoting the advancement of women in the film business. Share Her Journey was an official partner on the luncheon.

Others in attendance included Sundance executive director Keri Putnam, Women and Hollywood founder Melissa Silverstein, producer and Women in Film head Cathy Schulman, USC associate professor Stacy Smith, veteran film marketing executive Marian Koltai-Levine and Canadian officials like L.A. Consul General James Villeneuve.

TheWrap’s Power Women series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Organizers Commit to Gender Parity in Their Ranks

Will Oscar Season's Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

Female Digital Entrepreneurs on Creating Inclusive Tech Industry: ‘We Have the Power’ (Video)

Digital entrepreneur Kathryn Finney says she founded Digital Undivided, an incubator for women in tech and startups, so women can help other women and create a more inclusive tech industry.

“I started a fashion blog called Budget Fashionista, and during that time period I noticed that there were virtually no women of color in the startup space, particular in the media side of it,” Finney said Thursday at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “And when I sold [Budget Fashionista] and started BlogHer, I realized there were none of us at conferences, so I went to the founders of BlogHer and said, ‘I want to start something for black women and latina founders.’ I think that’s an important story about how women help other women.” 

Moderator Cathryn Posey then introduced three women guided through Digital Undivided, asking them to weigh in on why they founded their own companies in the tech space. 

Bryanda Law, CEO and founder of Quirktastic, Farah Allen, CEO and founder of The Labz and Valeska Toro, founder of Sola Travelers, all said that they noticed a lack of female diverse representation in their respective fields, and started their companies to fill that void.

See Video: Lea Thompson on Hollywood Sexual Harassment: ‘It Was Like Kryptonite’

“I love to travel and in 2017, I went on a solo trip and while I was out there, I was sexually harassed,” Toro said of the impetus for her Sola Travelers project. “The next day, I met a woman who completely changed the way I looked at the world. She was able to tell me things that I wasn’t able to find anywhere else. She was a woman living in that area, so she was able to tell me where to go, what not to do, and give me all this information that is not available to us.

“Where are women finding this information, especially when you are traveling alone as a woman?” Toro asked. “So I created this community of women who help each other travel, write reviews and recommendations and how to stay safe.”

She said that when she first thought of the name for her company, people told her “sola,” translating to “woman alone,” had a negative connotation. Her response to that is simple: “Just because you are a woman alone doesn’t mean its sad — it’s powerful.”

Law created Quirktastic, a platform that creates media and tech products for “geeks, nerds, alternatives, free spirits, and intellectuals of color,” because she said she could not find a place for “quirky” people like her to express themselves.

See Video: Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf Calls Out Trump on Border Policy: ‘In Oakland, We Put Children in College’

“I created this community of people who felt they were misfits and that their voices weren’t heard,” Law said.

For Allen, The Labz offered a way for creative types to explore their passions while remaining mindful of the nitty-gritty of company-building. “Creatives would never be excited about business processes and my job was to fix that,” she said. “While you’re working, we’re collecting all data for your business processes.”

All three entrepreneurs asked for the support of the audience attending the breakfast. “Right now, there’s a woman obsessed with a town and dreams of going there, but doesn’t know how to start,” said Toro. “We have the power to change that — she doesn’t have to sit there alone.”

Also Read: The Scene With Lea Thompson, Madelyn Deutch at the Power Women Breakfast San Francisco (Exclusive Photos)

The July 12 breakfast was hosted by TheWrap CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Sharon Waxman, at Dolby Laboratories in San Francisco. Actress Lea Thompson and daughter Madelyn Deutch were the keynote speakers, while Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf also discussed their experiences as female leaders.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

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Digital entrepreneur Kathryn Finney says she founded Digital Undivided, an incubator for women in tech and startups, so women can help other women and create a more inclusive tech industry.

“I started a fashion blog called Budget Fashionista, and during that time period I noticed that there were virtually no women of color in the startup space, particular in the media side of it,” Finney said Thursday at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “And when I sold [Budget Fashionista] and started BlogHer, I realized there were none of us at conferences, so I went to the founders of BlogHer and said, ‘I want to start something for black women and latina founders.’ I think that’s an important story about how women help other women.” 

Moderator Cathryn Posey then introduced three women guided through Digital Undivided, asking them to weigh in on why they founded their own companies in the tech space. 

Bryanda Law, CEO and founder of Quirktastic, Farah Allen, CEO and founder of The Labz and Valeska Toro, founder of Sola Travelers, all said that they noticed a lack of female diverse representation in their respective fields, and started their companies to fill that void.

“I love to travel and in 2017, I went on a solo trip and while I was out there, I was sexually harassed,” Toro said of the impetus for her Sola Travelers project. “The next day, I met a woman who completely changed the way I looked at the world. She was able to tell me things that I wasn’t able to find anywhere else. She was a woman living in that area, so she was able to tell me where to go, what not to do, and give me all this information that is not available to us.

“Where are women finding this information, especially when you are traveling alone as a woman?” Toro asked. “So I created this community of women who help each other travel, write reviews and recommendations and how to stay safe.”

She said that when she first thought of the name for her company, people told her “sola,” translating to “woman alone,” had a negative connotation. Her response to that is simple: “Just because you are a woman alone doesn’t mean its sad — it’s powerful.”

Law created Quirktastic, a platform that creates media and tech products for “geeks, nerds, alternatives, free spirits, and intellectuals of color,” because she said she could not find a place for “quirky” people like her to express themselves.

“I created this community of people who felt they were misfits and that their voices weren’t heard,” Law said.

For Allen, The Labz offered a way for creative types to explore their passions while remaining mindful of the nitty-gritty of company-building. “Creatives would never be excited about business processes and my job was to fix that,” she said. “While you’re working, we’re collecting all data for your business processes.”

All three entrepreneurs asked for the support of the audience attending the breakfast. “Right now, there’s a woman obsessed with a town and dreams of going there, but doesn’t know how to start,” said Toro. “We have the power to change that — she doesn’t have to sit there alone.”

The July 12 breakfast was hosted by TheWrap CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Sharon Waxman, at Dolby Laboratories in San Francisco. Actress Lea Thompson and daughter Madelyn Deutch were the keynote speakers, while Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf also discussed their experiences as female leaders.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene With Lea Thompson, Madelyn Deutch at the Power Women Breakfast San Francisco (Exclusive Photos)

Actress and director Lea Thompson spoke at Dolby Laboratories headquarters in San Francisco with her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who she directed in “The Year of Spectacular Men,” which Deutch wrote and in which she starred. They were the keyn…

Actress and director Lea Thompson spoke at Dolby Laboratories headquarters in San Francisco with her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who she directed in “The Year of Spectacular Men,” which Deutch wrote and in which she starred. They were the keynote at the breakfast which also included Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and Compton Mayor Aja Brown, along with a panel of entrepreneurial women of color. The series recognizes  influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands, and is also held in cities like Washington D.C. and New York. Oakland Mayor

 

Lea Thompson on Hollywood Sexual Harassment: ‘It Was Like Kryptonite’ (Video)

Lea Thompson, the veteran actress who has directed her own daughter in her first feature, said on Thursday that getting sexually harassed during auditions “was like Kryptonite” – killing her ability to win roles in her younger years.

“I didn’t realize these things were unacceptable and how they kept me down all these years,” she said, speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “I was in really bad auditions and people would start on me and it would take all my power away to the point where I didn’t get the job. It was like Kryptonite… It was obvious when a director was shopping for a girlfriend.”

See Video: Watch Lea Thompson, Madelyn Deutch at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast SF on Twitter Live

Thompson spoke at Dolby Laboratories headquarters in San Francisco with her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who she directed in “The Year of Spectacular Men,” which Deutch also wrote and scored. They were the keynote at the breakfast which also included Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and Compton Mayor Aja Brown, along with a panel of entrepreneurial women of color. The series recognizes influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands, and is also held in cities like Washington D.C. and New York.

Referring to the #MeToo phenomenon, Deutch, 27,  said, “This movement has made me check myself in how I look at women in positions of power,” adding that she is at times unfair in her criticism of other women. “We are trained in scarcity versus abundance. There’s always been less opportunities so it’s always been, ‘Be the best at your job.’”

Thompson said that the movement has made her see progress in diverse representation and storytelling.

“I had an agent tell me there were three roles I could play:  virgins, whores and mothers,” Thompson said, who may be best known for playing Michael J. Fox’s mother in “Back to the Future.” She added: “That’s maybe why people like ‘Back to the Future’ so much, because I played all three. That’s what’s so great about diversity in storytelling and business — It’s gotten boring doing the same business model and telling the same stories… When you do diversity, you get new business, new stories, new inspiration and you appeal to the new America.”

She added, “I like that now you aren’t considered crazy if you say [on set] ‘Hey, I feel uncomfortable. Maybe we shouldn’t do that.’ I’m glad the conversation has been started.”

Deutch added that she learned a lot from casting her own movie, specifically about the lack of diversity in lead roles. She explained that she had five love interests in the movie, one of which was played by Brandon T. Jackson. When she asked him why he wanted to be a part of this movie, Jackson had a heartbreaking explanation.

“He said, ‘as a person of color, I’ve never been offered a romantic lead. I’ll go and audition for them but I’ve always been offered rapper, drug dealer, or pimp as a person of color.’ Thats what you find when you cut your path — you make discoveries that are inclusive.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf called out Donald Trump’s border policy, saying that her city puts children in college, not cages, referencing immigrant children still in detention. “This [is a] crazy national moment we find ourselves in where my government is putting children in cages,” said Schaaf. “In Oakland, we put children in college, that’s what we’re about.”

Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Schaaf also spoke about the challenges they have faced in their positions because of their gender. Before she went into politics, Brown said she thought she would have to be older to pursue her dream.

See Video: Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf Calls Out Trump on Border Policy: ‘In Oakland, We Put Children in College’

“I assumed I had to be 40,” said the 36-year-old mayor, who was only 31 when she was first elected. “I was always asked, ‘Are you old enough?’ and I would say, ‘I think I am! There’s no age restriction!’ There are just barriers we have to do break through mentally.”

During TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast, three female digital entrepreneurs discussed their reasons for starting their own companies. Bryanda Law, CEO and founder of Quirktastic, Farah Allen, CEO and founder of The Labz and Valeska Toro, founder of Sola Travelers, all said that they started their companies to fill a void of diverse female representation in their respective fields.

“I created this community of people who felt they were misfits and that their voices weren’t heard,” Law said about Quirktastic, a platform that creates media and tech products for “geeks, nerds, alternatives, free spirits, and intellectuals of color.” Toro founded her company, a platform for women to write reviews while traveling, so women could help other women find safe places to travel to and empower each other, conveying the idea that traveling alone doesn’t have to have a negative connotation. 

Allen, a technologist, founded The Labz, so musicians would have an easy way to protect their copyright. “Creatives would never be excited about business processes and my job was to fix that. While you’re working, we’re collecting all data for your business processes.”

“I’ve heard two things today,” Deutch said after listening to the other panels at the breakfast. “I keep hearing that we can’t do it alone and [we need] money. Those are the things I hear on a loop — you need support, scaffolding as you build the building, and you need investors.”

“To be inspired by all of you is wonderful,” Thompson said, addressing the audience. “As Michelle Obama once said, we hold each other to impossible standards and that’s what stops us from helping each other.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Lea Thompson, the veteran actress who has directed her own daughter in her first feature, said on Thursday that getting sexually harassed during auditions “was like Kryptonite” – killing her ability to win roles in her younger years.

“I didn’t realize these things were unacceptable and how they kept me down all these years,” she said, speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “I was in really bad auditions and people would start on me and it would take all my power away to the point where I didn’t get the job. It was like Kryptonite… It was obvious when a director was shopping for a girlfriend.”

Thompson spoke at Dolby Laboratories headquarters in San Francisco with her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who she directed in “The Year of Spectacular Men,” which Deutch also wrote and scored. They were the keynote at the breakfast which also included Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and Compton Mayor Aja Brown, along with a panel of entrepreneurial women of color. The series recognizes influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands, and is also held in cities like Washington D.C. and New York.

Referring to the #MeToo phenomenon, Deutch, 27,  said, “This movement has made me check myself in how I look at women in positions of power,” adding that she is at times unfair in her criticism of other women. “We are trained in scarcity versus abundance. There’s always been less opportunities so it’s always been, ‘Be the best at your job.'”

Thompson said that the movement has made her see progress in diverse representation and storytelling.

“I had an agent tell me there were three roles I could play:  virgins, whores and mothers,” Thompson said, who may be best known for playing Michael J. Fox’s mother in “Back to the Future.” She added: “That’s maybe why people like ‘Back to the Future’ so much, because I played all three. That’s what’s so great about diversity in storytelling and business — It’s gotten boring doing the same business model and telling the same stories… When you do diversity, you get new business, new stories, new inspiration and you appeal to the new America.”

She added, “I like that now you aren’t considered crazy if you say [on set] ‘Hey, I feel uncomfortable. Maybe we shouldn’t do that.’ I’m glad the conversation has been started.”

Deutch added that she learned a lot from casting her own movie, specifically about the lack of diversity in lead roles. She explained that she had five love interests in the movie, one of which was played by Brandon T. Jackson. When she asked him why he wanted to be a part of this movie, Jackson had a heartbreaking explanation.

“He said, ‘as a person of color, I’ve never been offered a romantic lead. I’ll go and audition for them but I’ve always been offered rapper, drug dealer, or pimp as a person of color.’ Thats what you find when you cut your path — you make discoveries that are inclusive.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf called out Donald Trump’s border policy, saying that her city puts children in college, not cages, referencing immigrant children still in detention. “This [is a] crazy national moment we find ourselves in where my government is putting children in cages,” said Schaaf. “In Oakland, we put children in college, that’s what we’re about.”

Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Schaaf also spoke about the challenges they have faced in their positions because of their gender. Before she went into politics, Brown said she thought she would have to be older to pursue her dream.

“I assumed I had to be 40,” said the 36-year-old mayor, who was only 31 when she was first elected. “I was always asked, ‘Are you old enough?’ and I would say, ‘I think I am! There’s no age restriction!’ There are just barriers we have to do break through mentally.”

During TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast, three female digital entrepreneurs discussed their reasons for starting their own companies. Bryanda Law, CEO and founder of Quirktastic, Farah Allen, CEO and founder of The Labz and Valeska Toro, founder of Sola Travelers, all said that they started their companies to fill a void of diverse female representation in their respective fields.

“I created this community of people who felt they were misfits and that their voices weren’t heard,” Law said about Quirktastic, a platform that creates media and tech products for “geeks, nerds, alternatives, free spirits, and intellectuals of color.” Toro founded her company, a platform for women to write reviews while traveling, so women could help other women find safe places to travel to and empower each other, conveying the idea that traveling alone doesn’t have to have a negative connotation. 

Allen, a technologist, founded The Labz, so musicians would have an easy way to protect their copyright. “Creatives would never be excited about business processes and my job was to fix that. While you’re working, we’re collecting all data for your business processes.”

“I’ve heard two things today,” Deutch said after listening to the other panels at the breakfast. “I keep hearing that we can’t do it alone and [we need] money. Those are the things I hear on a loop — you need support, scaffolding as you build the building, and you need investors.”

“To be inspired by all of you is wonderful,” Thompson said, addressing the audience. “As Michelle Obama once said, we hold each other to impossible standards and that’s what stops us from helping each other.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf Calls Out Trump on Border Policy: ‘In Oakland, We Put Children in College’ (Video)

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf called out President Donald Trump’s border policy on Thursday, saying that her city puts children in college, not cages, referencing immigrant children still in detention.

“This [is a] crazy national moment we find ourselves in where my government is putting children in cages,” said Schaaf at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “In Oakland, we put children in college, that’s what we’re about.”

The mayor was talking about the power of film, with the release of a new independent film highlighting race relations titled “Blindspotting,” which chronicles the changes in Oakland through the eyes of two streetwise best friends, portrayed by Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal.

“I want to give a shout-out to film in general,” Schaaf said, in a conversation with TheWrap’s Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman and Compton Mayor Aja Brown at Dolby Laboratories. “The magic of film, the magic of all of our art forms is what we need in this difficult moment, because it’s a difficult moment — difficult for Oakland as far as speed of change, the rising cost of living, threat of gentrification […] and how we manage it. I want to recognize the power of film for us to move through difficult, uncomfortable moments and the humanity and way that that film lifts up the power and the impacts of implicit bias and institutionalized racism is really important.”

See Video: Watch Lea Thompson, Madelyn Deutch at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast SF on Twitter Live

Brown, who has been Compton’s mayor since 2013 and this year announced a run for the U.S. House of Representatives in California’s 44th congressional district, also talked about the challenges of her position given Compton’s reputation.

“Compton has its own personification — we know it for rap culture and crime,” she said. “That was one of the challenges because that was just one snapshot in its 130-year history. I wasn’t a mayor who had a big budget to expand the police department or anything so I had to look outside of my organization to bring resources back. I would challenge developers, retailers and companies, and having people challenge their paradigm because of power of film — that Compton is not the same city it used to be.”

See Video: Judith Light on What #MeToo Accusers Can Learn From the LGBTQ Community

Both women also explained that they’ve faced challenges in politics given their gender. Schaaf said that she was frequently told she was not “tough enough for this job,” to which she said, “I’ve given birth to two children without drugs. I am pleased to say that I have been tough enough.”

Brown also said she has had to combat ageism since she had decided to wait before entering politics because she said she rarely saw young women in the field.

“I assumed I had to be 40. I was always asked, ‘Are you old enough?’ and I would say, ‘I think I am! There’s no age restriction!’” she said. “There are just barriers we have to do break through mentally.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Women Photographers and Iranian Feminist Author Join Power Women Breakfast Washington DC!

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf called out President Donald Trump’s border policy on Thursday, saying that her city puts children in college, not cages, referencing immigrant children still in detention.

“This [is a] crazy national moment we find ourselves in where my government is putting children in cages,” said Schaaf at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in San Francisco. “In Oakland, we put children in college, that’s what we’re about.”

The mayor was talking about the power of film, with the release of a new independent film highlighting race relations titled “Blindspotting,” which chronicles the changes in Oakland through the eyes of two streetwise best friends, portrayed by Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal.

“I want to give a shout-out to film in general,” Schaaf said, in a conversation with TheWrap’s Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman and Compton Mayor Aja Brown at Dolby Laboratories. “The magic of film, the magic of all of our art forms is what we need in this difficult moment, because it’s a difficult moment — difficult for Oakland as far as speed of change, the rising cost of living, threat of gentrification […] and how we manage it. I want to recognize the power of film for us to move through difficult, uncomfortable moments and the humanity and way that that film lifts up the power and the impacts of implicit bias and institutionalized racism is really important.”

Brown, who has been Compton’s mayor since 2013 and this year announced a run for the U.S. House of Representatives in California’s 44th congressional district, also talked about the challenges of her position given Compton’s reputation.

“Compton has its own personification — we know it for rap culture and crime,” she said. “That was one of the challenges because that was just one snapshot in its 130-year history. I wasn’t a mayor who had a big budget to expand the police department or anything so I had to look outside of my organization to bring resources back. I would challenge developers, retailers and companies, and having people challenge their paradigm because of power of film — that Compton is not the same city it used to be.”

Both women also explained that they’ve faced challenges in politics given their gender. Schaaf said that she was frequently told she was not “tough enough for this job,” to which she said, “I’ve given birth to two children without drugs. I am pleased to say that I have been tough enough.”

Brown also said she has had to combat ageism since she had decided to wait before entering politics because she said she rarely saw young women in the field.

“I assumed I had to be 40. I was always asked, ‘Are you old enough?’ and I would say, ‘I think I am! There’s no age restriction!'” she said. “There are just barriers we have to do break through mentally.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch the video above.

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Lea Thompson, Madelyn Deutch Join Power Women Breakfast San Francisco

Lea Thompson and Madelyn Deutch, the mother-daughter filmmaking team behind the new release “The Year of Spectacular Men,” join Power Women Breakfast San Francisco on July 12, the fourth in TheWrap’s 2018 event series featuring inspiring women of achievement.

They join Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf as keynote speakers at what promises to be an impactful morning at the Dolby Laboratories Headquarters in San Francisco.

Wrap Editor-in-Chief Sharon Waxman will interview Thompson and Deutch about collaborating on their film, “The Year of Spectacular Men,” and the joys and pitfalls of mothers and daughters working together in Hollywood. Written by Madelyn Deutch, the film – released June 15 – is a personal look at the life, language and loves of millennial women. It was directed and produced by Thompson who co-stars along with Madelyn and her sister, Zoey Deutch, who also serves as producer.

Also Read: The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

They join a stellar lineup of female influencers including Aja Brown and Libby Schaaf, the mayors of the California cities of Compton and Oakland, who will share the stage for a conversation about their progressive visions for elevating and improving the lives of their constituents. Kathryn Finney, founder of digitalundivided, will share data from the group’s most recent Project Diane report on the state of Black and Latinx women in the entrepreneurship and innovation economies.

Also Read: The Scene at the Power Women Breakfast NYC (Exclusive Photos)

The breakfast in San Francisco follows on the heels of two recent Power Women events in Washington DC and New York City, which welcomed Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Iranian activist Masih Alinejad and Emmy-winning actress Judith Light.

To find out more about Power Women Breakfast and to get your ticket to Power Women Breakfast San Francisco,

ABOUT POWER WOMEN BREAKFAST
TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Scene at the Power Women Breakfast NYC (Exclusive Photos)

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Lea Thompson and Madelyn Deutch, the mother-daughter filmmaking team behind the new release “The Year of Spectacular Men,” join Power Women Breakfast San Francisco on July 12, the fourth in TheWrap’s 2018 event series featuring inspiring women of achievement.

They join Compton Mayor Aja Brown and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf as keynote speakers at what promises to be an impactful morning at the Dolby Laboratories Headquarters in San Francisco.

Wrap Editor-in-Chief Sharon Waxman will interview Thompson and Deutch about collaborating on their film, “The Year of Spectacular Men,” and the joys and pitfalls of mothers and daughters working together in Hollywood. Written by Madelyn Deutch, the film – released June 15 – is a personal look at the life, language and loves of millennial women. It was directed and produced by Thompson who co-stars along with Madelyn and her sister, Zoey Deutch, who also serves as producer.

They join a stellar lineup of female influencers including Aja Brown and Libby Schaaf, the mayors of the California cities of Compton and Oakland, who will share the stage for a conversation about their progressive visions for elevating and improving the lives of their constituents. Kathryn Finney, founder of digitalundivided, will share data from the group’s most recent Project Diane report on the state of Black and Latinx women in the entrepreneurship and innovation economies.

The breakfast in San Francisco follows on the heels of two recent Power Women events in Washington DC and New York City, which welcomed Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Iranian activist Masih Alinejad and Emmy-winning actress Judith Light.

To find out more about Power Women Breakfast and to get your ticket to Power Women Breakfast San Francisco,

ABOUT POWER WOMEN BREAKFAST
TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Scene at the Power Women Breakfast NYC (Exclusive Photos)

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

ClassPass Founder Payal Kadakia on the Advice That Got Her to Launch the Hit Fitness App (Video)

ClassPass founder Payal Kadakia on Friday revealed that her iconic fitness app almost never came to be.
Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in New York City, Kadakia said she almost abandoned her vision to launch the company to take a sen…

ClassPass founder Payal Kadakia on Friday revealed that her iconic fitness app almost never came to be.

Speaking at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in New York City, Kadakia said she almost abandoned her vision to launch the company to take a senior role at Spotify — but stopped after receiving some sage advice from her mentor, venture capitalist Anjula Acharia.

“I had the idea of ClassPass — it actually started with a different name — about eight years ago and I hadn’t yet started it,” Kadakia told the audience at New York’s Time Warner Center in a discussion moderated by Shalini Sharma, Fast Company’s director of digital video. “But I had an offer potentially from another big startup called Spotify when they were launching here — they had four people here in their office in New York.”

Acharia, a partner at the Silicon Valley firm Trinity Ventures, told Kadakia that ClassPass would be a nonstarter if she went to work elsewhere.

“Payal, if you take this job, I or no one else will invest in you or your company,” she recalled Acharia telling her. “I remember that moment changed my life.”

“What she was telling me was if you don’t bet on yourself, why would anyone else?” she added. “And that was the moment for me that I just knew I had to build this company and I was going to fight through everything that stood in my way to get there.”

Payal sent Acharia a business plan that very same evening — and the result is a company now estimated to be worth nearly half a billion dollars.

Acharia said that after she struck it big herself, it was important for her to provide aspiring women entrepreneurs the leg up that she said she never had.

“I feel like women have just become my calling. In my career, women didn’t come out and help me and I felt very bitter,” Acharia told the audience at the Time Warner Center. “My mom always says you have to be the change and when you look at the injustice toward women and women of color, I’m going to be the change.”

Acharia said that she picked people to invest in over the long haul and beyond any single idea or pitch, a concept she picked up from her mentor, record mogul Jimmy Iovine, who told her that he invested in “albums, not singles.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch video of the panel above.

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Judith Light on What #MeToo Accusers Can Learn From the LGBTQ Community (Video)

Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actress Judith Light spoke out on Friday about how her own advocacy within the LGBT community has helped inform her views on the #MeToo movement and women stepping forward to identify incidents of harassment and worse at the hands of men.

“I am so relieved and grateful and joy filled that these stories are being told,” Light told TheWrap editor in chief Sharon Waxman on Friday at the Power Women Breakfast NYC.

Light, a longtime advocate for LGBTQ issues, said that watching women share their experiences recalled for her how the questions that many people were asking during the early days of the gay-rights movement.

“It goes back to the thing I was talking about the LGBTQ community,” she said. “Who will you be? Who is your authentic self? If you have secrets you need to tell them. You need to talk about them and that’s what’s happening and that is something that really thrills me.”

Also Read: Anti-Gun Violence Advocate Shannon Watts on How Change Will Come by Thinking Small (Video)

“Women need to be heard, their stories need to be told,” said the actress, who stars in “Transparent” as well as “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.” “I feel a difference in the way I am relating to the women that I know.”

Light appeared on stage at New York City’s Time Warner Center for an in-depth one-on-one focusing on Light’s career and her years of advocacy for the causes she cares about.

Light also revealed that her strong desire to help transgender individuals helped her land the role of Shelly on the Amazon series, “Transparent.”

“You always have to figure that there are a ton of people vying for any role,” said Light, who said that all she did in her audition call was talk about her work as an LGBTQ advocate.

Also Read: How the Cast of ‘Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Followed a Killer’s Spiral Into Madness

“That was my audition, I didn’t read the script,” she said. “The community which I think is the most inspiring and extraordinary community was being shoved away, shoved in the closet. There was a level of homophobia that still runs deep in this country.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

You can watch a live stream of the whole event here.

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Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actress Judith Light spoke out on Friday about how her own advocacy within the LGBT community has helped inform her views on the #MeToo movement and women stepping forward to identify incidents of harassment and worse at the hands of men.

“I am so relieved and grateful and joy filled that these stories are being told,” Light told TheWrap editor in chief Sharon Waxman on Friday at the Power Women Breakfast NYC.

Light, a longtime advocate for LGBTQ issues, said that watching women share their experiences recalled for her how the questions that many people were asking during the early days of the gay-rights movement.

“It goes back to the thing I was talking about the LGBTQ community,” she said. “Who will you be? Who is your authentic self? If you have secrets you need to tell them. You need to talk about them and that’s what’s happening and that is something that really thrills me.”

“Women need to be heard, their stories need to be told,” said the actress, who stars in “Transparent” as well as “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.” “I feel a difference in the way I am relating to the women that I know.”

Light appeared on stage at New York City’s Time Warner Center for an in-depth one-on-one focusing on Light’s career and her years of advocacy for the causes she cares about.

Light also revealed that her strong desire to help transgender individuals helped her land the role of Shelly on the Amazon series, “Transparent.”

“You always have to figure that there are a ton of people vying for any role,” said Light, who said that all she did in her audition call was talk about her work as an LGBTQ advocate.

“That was my audition, I didn’t read the script,” she said. “The community which I think is the most inspiring and extraordinary community was being shoved away, shoved in the closet. There was a level of homophobia that still runs deep in this country.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

You can watch a live stream of the whole event here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Anti-Gun Violence Advocate Shannon Watts on How Change Will Come by Thinking Small (Video)

Anti-gun violence advocate Shannon Watts offered a blunt message for people looking to move the needle on gun violence: Start local.

“Congress is not where this work begins but where it ends,” Watts said during a panel discussion at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Friday at New York City’s Time Warner Center. “We are fighting in the states.”

Watts said her organization, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense, had “a 90 percent track record of killing NRA bills” at the state level but had also played an instrumental role in passing “good bills” across the country to restrict access to firearms. Watts cited laws across the country that closed background-check loopholes and disarmed domestic abusers.

Also Read: Iranian Feminist on How Western Liberals Are Making Women’s Lives Worse in Her Country (Video)

“We are winning,” she added. “But we need everyone to get off the sidelines to get involved.”

“There is nothing in my mind more powerful than a mom who is mad,” said TheWrap editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman, who moderated the panel.

Watts was joined on stage at the breakfast by Shenee Johnson, a gun safety advocate whose son was killed in gun violence, actress Alysia Reiner and Marti Noxon, executive producer of “Dietland,” who shared their stories about the effects of gun violence and the need for change.

Johnson said she was spurred to join the movement after her own son, Kedrick Morrow, was shot and killed in Queens, New York, in 2010. “Once Kendrick was murdered I was completely devastated,” she told breakfast attendees. “I wanted to die myself.”

Johnson said her son had been a star student and earned an academic scholarship to St. Johns university in New York City, but his life was tragically cut short after he was shot when a fight broke out at a graduation party. “We have to end violence and we can together,” Johnson said. “It’s a marathon not a sprint.”

Also Read: TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Noxon said she, like so many others, was galvanized after the 2012 mass shooting at an elementary school Newtown, Massachusetts, which left 28 dead.

“After Newtown, I went online and I couldn’t find a robust community to join of people wanting gun reform or gun safety and I was frustrated … I thought this is crazy, nothing comes up except the NRA,” said Noxon, who also relayed her own harrowing story about when her mother and daughter were trapped during an active-shooter incident as Los Angeles International Airport several years ago. Both mother and daughter escaped unharmed, but shaken.

“It was such a terrifying experience. Those are kids to whom nothing happened and that is happening every day in our country,” Noxon said.

“It’s happening to children of color. Every marginalized population, it happens every single day. Somebody in their community dies. Its about 96 people a day. This is an epidemic. It’s one of the most important civil rights issues we can attack and until we do it feels like we are asleep at the f—ing wheel.”

Also Read: Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Photographed by Sara Azoulay for TheWrap

Payal Kadakia, the founder and executive chairman of the fitness app ClassPass, and Anjula Acharia, a partner at the Silicon Valley venture-capital firm Trinity Ventures, discussed the challenges of female entrepreneurs in another panel, moderated by Fast Company’s director of video partnerships, Shalini Sharma.

“First time I have ever been on a panel with two South Asian women,” said Sharma, marking the moment to applause.

Acharia, who was an early investor in ClassPass, said that supporting Katakia was an easy decision for her because of some wisdom she once received from record producer Jimmy Iovine.

Photograph by Sara Azoulay for TheWrap

“A mentor to me is Jimmy Iovine and he was one of the investors for my first company. He told me weeks after giving me a lot of money that my company is going to fail,” said Acharia, who added that when she asked why he would invest in someone with an idea he thought would fail, he used a musical metaphor.

“He said, ‘I believe in albums, not singles,’” said Acharia. “That really informed the way I invest in people. If I see talent in somebody, I am going to double-down on that.”

Kadakia said part of the reason she started ClassPass was to celebrate her culture. 

“Dance is the reason I started my company,” she said. “I have found a way and style through my dance company to share the beauty and heritage of my ancestors with other people.”

Also Read: Sen. Amy Klobuchar Channeled Dr. Seuss to Convince Congress to Let Babies on Senate Floor (Exclusive Video)

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast also featured a one-on-one interview between Sharon Waxman and Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light.

In her remarks, Light spoke about her passionate advocacy for the LGBTQ community and how their struggles related to the #MeToo movement amonmg women now sweeping the nation.

“I am so relieved and grateful and joy filled that these stories are being told. It goes back to the thing I was talking about, the LGBTQ community.” Light said. “Who will you be? Who is your authentic self?”

The actress encouraged women to break the silence. “If you have secrets, you need to tell them. You need to talk about them and that’s what happened and that is something that really thrills me,” she said. 

“Women need to be heard, their stories need to be told,” she said, adding, “I feel a difference in the way I am relating to the women that I know.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Anti-gun violence advocate Shannon Watts offered a blunt message for people looking to move the needle on gun violence: Start local.

“Congress is not where this work begins but where it ends,” Watts said during a panel discussion at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Friday at New York City’s Time Warner Center. “We are fighting in the states.”

Watts said her organization, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense, had “a 90 percent track record of killing NRA bills” at the state level but had also played an instrumental role in passing “good bills” across the country to restrict access to firearms. Watts cited laws across the country that closed background-check loopholes and disarmed domestic abusers.

“We are winning,” she added. “But we need everyone to get off the sidelines to get involved.”

“There is nothing in my mind more powerful than a mom who is mad,” said TheWrap editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman, who moderated the panel.

Watts was joined on stage at the breakfast by Shenee Johnson, a gun safety advocate whose son was killed in gun violence, actress Alysia Reiner and Marti Noxon, executive producer of “Dietland,” who shared their stories about the effects of gun violence and the need for change.

Johnson said she was spurred to join the movement after her own son, Kedrick Morrow, was shot and killed in Queens, New York, in 2010. “Once Kendrick was murdered I was completely devastated,” she told breakfast attendees. “I wanted to die myself.”

Johnson said her son had been a star student and earned an academic scholarship to St. Johns university in New York City, but his life was tragically cut short after he was shot when a fight broke out at a graduation party. “We have to end violence and we can together,” Johnson said. “It’s a marathon not a sprint.”

Noxon said she, like so many others, was galvanized after the 2012 mass shooting at an elementary school Newtown, Massachusetts, which left 28 dead.

“After Newtown, I went online and I couldn’t find a robust community to join of people wanting gun reform or gun safety and I was frustrated … I thought this is crazy, nothing comes up except the NRA,” said Noxon, who also relayed her own harrowing story about when her mother and daughter were trapped during an active-shooter incident as Los Angeles International Airport several years ago. Both mother and daughter escaped unharmed, but shaken.

“It was such a terrifying experience. Those are kids to whom nothing happened and that is happening every day in our country,” Noxon said.

“It’s happening to children of color. Every marginalized population, it happens every single day. Somebody in their community dies. Its about 96 people a day. This is an epidemic. It’s one of the most important civil rights issues we can attack and until we do it feels like we are asleep at the f—ing wheel.”

Photographed by Sara Azoulay for TheWrap

Payal Kadakia, the founder and executive chairman of the fitness app ClassPass, and Anjula Acharia, a partner at the Silicon Valley venture-capital firm Trinity Ventures, discussed the challenges of female entrepreneurs in another panel, moderated by Fast Company’s director of video partnerships, Shalini Sharma.

“First time I have ever been on a panel with two South Asian women,” said Sharma, marking the moment to applause.

Acharia, who was an early investor in ClassPass, said that supporting Katakia was an easy decision for her because of some wisdom she once received from record producer Jimmy Iovine.

Photograph by Sara Azoulay for TheWrap

“A mentor to me is Jimmy Iovine and he was one of the investors for my first company. He told me weeks after giving me a lot of money that my company is going to fail,” said Acharia, who added that when she asked why he would invest in someone with an idea he thought would fail, he used a musical metaphor.

“He said, ‘I believe in albums, not singles,'” said Acharia. “That really informed the way I invest in people. If I see talent in somebody, I am going to double-down on that.”

Kadakia said part of the reason she started ClassPass was to celebrate her culture. 

“Dance is the reason I started my company,” she said. “I have found a way and style through my dance company to share the beauty and heritage of my ancestors with other people.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast also featured a one-on-one interview between Sharon Waxman and Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light.

In her remarks, Light spoke about her passionate advocacy for the LGBTQ community and how their struggles related to the #MeToo movement amonmg women now sweeping the nation.

“I am so relieved and grateful and joy filled that these stories are being told. It goes back to the thing I was talking about, the LGBTQ community.” Light said. “Who will you be? Who is your authentic self?”

The actress encouraged women to break the silence. “If you have secrets, you need to tell them. You need to talk about them and that’s what happened and that is something that really thrills me,” she said. 

“Women need to be heard, their stories need to be told,” she said, adding, “I feel a difference in the way I am relating to the women that I know.”

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

The Scene at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Watch Judith Light, Shannon Watts Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast NYC on Facebook Live (Video)

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in New York City kicked off on Friday with opening remarks from AMC chief transformation officer Jennifer Caserta.

In addition to Caserta, the event features a spotlight interview with Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light. Light will discuss her longtime advocacy for LGBTQ issues as well as the goal of achieving 50/50 gender parity in the entertainment industry by 2020.

The star, who has received two Emmy nominations and a Golden Globe nomination for her role in Jill Soloway’s “Transparent,” and who is garnering critical raves for her powerful performance as Marilyn Miglin in FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” She will be interviewed by TheWrap Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman at the event, held at the Time Warner Center.

Also Read: The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

Waxman will also moderate a panel on eradicating gun violence that will include, Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, Shenee Johnson, a gun safety advocate, actress Alysia Reiner and Marti Noxon, executive producer of “Dietland”

The breakfast also welcomed an entrepreneurship panel moderated by Shalini Sharma, director of video partnerships at Fast Company, which included Payal Kadakia, founder and executive chairman of Classpass and Anjula Acharia, a partner at Trinity ventures.

The June 15 breakfast is hosted by TheWrap CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Sharon Waxman, at New York’s Time Warner Center.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Women Photographers and Iranian Feminist Author Join Power Women Breakfast Washington DC!

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in New York City kicked off on Friday with opening remarks from AMC chief transformation officer Jennifer Caserta.

In addition to Caserta, the event features a spotlight interview with Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light. Light will discuss her longtime advocacy for LGBTQ issues as well as the goal of achieving 50/50 gender parity in the entertainment industry by 2020.

The star, who has received two Emmy nominations and a Golden Globe nomination for her role in Jill Soloway’s “Transparent,” and who is garnering critical raves for her powerful performance as Marilyn Miglin in FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” She will be interviewed by TheWrap Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman at the event, held at the Time Warner Center.

Waxman will also moderate a panel on eradicating gun violence that will include, Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, Shenee Johnson, a gun safety advocate, actress Alysia Reiner and Marti Noxon, executive producer of “Dietland”

The breakfast also welcomed an entrepreneurship panel moderated by Shalini Sharma, director of video partnerships at Fast Company, which included Payal Kadakia, founder and executive chairman of Classpass and Anjula Acharia, a partner at Trinity ventures.

The June 15 breakfast is hosted by TheWrap CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Sharon Waxman, at New York’s Time Warner Center.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Scene at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast Washington DC (Photos)

TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Women Photographers and Iranian Feminist Author Join Power Women Breakfast Washington DC!

Iranian Feminist on How Western Liberals Are Making Women’s Lives Worse in Her Country

Masih Alinejad has a blunt message for Western feminists trying to help her country’s women: You’re making it worse.
“I keep hearing in the West especially, Western feminists who go to my country — the female politicians —…

Masih Alinejad has a blunt message for Western feminists trying to help her country’s women: You’re making it worse.

“I keep hearing in the West especially, Western feminists who go to my country — the female politicians — we don’t want to break the country’s law,” Alinejad said at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, noting that many well-intentioned foreigners choose to wear veils when traveling in Islamic-dominated countries like Iran.

“Women of Iran don’t want to be slaves,” she said. “They don’t want to be told by men or the law of the Islamic Republic of Iran what to wear.”

Too often, Alinejad said, women seeking to be culturally sensitive in fact manage to exacerbate the problem.

“In America when I talk about compulsory hijab, I often get this question that, ‘You know, this is a cultural issue.’ It’s not,” Alinejad said. “Before the revolution we had the right to choose what we wanted to wear in Iran. Compulsion was never part of Iranian culture.”

In addition, Alinejad said some Western feminists resisted legitimate criticism of the regime out of a desire not to appear in line with the policies of President Donald Trump. This too, she said, was a mistake.

Alinejad, an activist and author of the new book “The Wind in My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran,” has launched a social media campaign against the compulsory head covering, which has often put her on the wrong side of the nation’s ruling clerics.

But her prolific use of social media to connect women in the country has nevertheless made her a powerful force to be reckoned with. She currently lives in exile in Brooklyn, New York.

Alinejad told attendees that she got much of her strength — and wisdom — from her mother.

“If you let your fear win, then the darkness can devour you,” she said her mother told her. “I experienced a lot of darkness in my life. I got expelled from my high school because I had too many questions. I got expelled from parliament again because I had too many questions.”

Michèle Flournoy, a former Under Secretary of Defense also on the panel, shared her own story of being a woman in the Middle East.

“A lot of Western women who go to the Middle East think that they’re being culturally respectful — that’s what you’re told — to put on a scarf, not a hijab necessarily, to cover your hair in some way,” Floournoy said. “I think there is a misunderstanding.

“When I would go to Saudi Arabia, I would not put on a hijab and I would not put on a scarf,” she said, adding she was once told she was able to get away with it because she was an “honorary man.”

“It was supposed to be a great compliment,” said Flournoy.

The Power Women Breakfast series brings together influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in key cities to network and connect. TheWrap has built a broad power base of professional women who are decision makers and mothers, leaders and wives, innovators and activists. The franchise is now in six cities including Los Angeles, New York, Austin, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. and Miami.

In addition to Alinejad and Flournoy, the event hosted panels and welcomed speakers on the Times Up movement in Hollywood and how women photographers and explorers were pushing the envelope for National Geographic. Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar also spoke at the event.

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TimesUp Fund Logs 3,000 Complaints Since Launch, Leaders Say at Power Women Breakfast DC (Video)

More than 3,000 women have reached out for help to combat sexual abuse or assault in the six months since the TimesUp Legal Defense Fund was launched by a group of Hollywood women, a panel of the group’s leading activists said on Wednesday.

“We’ve had 3,000 women contact us, and we’ve had over 700 attorneys join the network,” Sharyn Tejani, the executive director of the TimesUp Legal Defense Fund, said at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C. The lawyers offer a free consultation to those who contact the fund, which has raised over $20 million to help low-income and underprivileged women address sexual abuse, she said.

Tejane was joined on the panel by actress and TimesUp co-founder Amber Tamblyn and Democratic and TimesUp activist Hilary Rosen, who described the progress the fund has made providing services to low-income women from all professions seeking redress for harassment claims.

“A patriarchy’s worst fear was that we are all going to get into a room together and start talking,”  Tamblyn said during a panel discussion moderated by Washington Post gender columnist Monica Hesse. “For me, TimesUp exists so that no woman or man ever has to say MeToo again, that’s the fundamental soul of what we’re doing.”

Also Read: Sen. Amy Klobuchar Channeled Dr Seuss to Convince Congress to Let Babies on Senate Floor (Exclusive Video)

In a standing-room only ballroom at the W Hotel, the breakfast event also featured a panel of National Geographic photographers and explorers, including Asha Stuart, Beverly Joubert, Erika Larsen, Hannah Reyes Morales and Jess Cramp. The panel was moderated the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Susan Goldberg.

Iranian feminist and author Masih Alinejad and national security specialist Michele Flournoy also spoke passionately about women’s right in Iran.

National Geographic CEO Courteney Monroe and Senator Amy Klobuchar each made welcome remarks to the room filled with more than 100 influential women in media, film and politics.

Also Read: Male Movie Critics Outnumber Women Nearly 4 to 1, New Study Says

The Power Women Breakfast series brings together influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in key cities to network and connect. TheWrap has built a broad power base of professional women who are decision makers and mothers, leaders and wives, innovators and activists. The franchise is now in six cities including Los Angeles, New York, Austin, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. and Miami.

“TimesUp really was created as an organization for empowerment for gender equity in the workplace, for changing behavior in the workplace,” Rosen said. “Every single day, I pay homage to these privileged women in the entertainment industry whose gift was really to figure out how to help low wage workers.”

On the photography panel, the women shared often-harrowing stories of their experiences living among different cultures and in some cases overcoming adversity they themselves have faced.

“I live in the South Pacific and there is a romanticized view of what that means. One in three women in the Pacific are victims of domestic violence,” said Cramp, who is a shark researcher. “That’s prevalent throughout the community. Women are not seen as strong, they’re not seen as leaders … there is a culture of shame and silence. You really have an oppressed society.”

Also Read: ‘Half the Picture’ Film Review: Women Directors Tell All in Illuminating, Infuriating Doc

Morales, who comes from the Philippines and focuses on human trafficking in her work, said she often faced unique struggles as a women in her home country. “In the Philippines, women who are in the sex trade are often viewed as gold diggers … but when you talk to many of them there’s a common thread that they are breadwinners,” she said.

All of the women agreed that social media was an incredibly powerful took but that it needed to be employed cautiously.

“I work as a digital nomad,” said Stuart, who has documented rural village voodoo ceremonies in Haiti and acid attack burn wards in India. “One of the things that I’ve seen in the connectivity of being able to post a video on Facebook and come back and see millions of views is incredible. Media can go all across the world in a second.”

Also Read: Broadway Gender Gap: Women Had 37 Percent of Principal Roles in Last Season’s New Shows

Courteney Monroe, Power Women Breakfast D.C.

Iranian feminist and human rights activist Masih Alinejad talked about her battle to win the right to remove her head covering, the hijab,   in her conservative religious country. Alinejad now lives in exile in the United States, but cannot leave the country because of the travel ban.

“Being a woman in Iran means that you’re not allowed to show your hair,” she said, angrily. “You’re not allowed to sing solo. You’re not allowed to ride a bicycle freely. You’re not allowed to have the custody of your child. You’re not allowed to get a passport without permission from your husband.”

“This is also coming as the law,” she said. “the law actually sees us as a disabled person.”

Also Read: Time’s Up on Electronic Dance Music: 2018 EDC Festival Opens With Most Female Artists Ever

Alinejad, an activist and author of “The Wind in My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran,” has launched a social media campaign against the compulsory head covering, which has often put her on the wrong side of the nation’s ruling clerics. In addition to promoting her cause, she also had tough words for Western feminists arguing they they often did more harm then good.

“In America when I talk about compulsory hijab, I often get this question that you know this is a cultural issue. It’s not. Before the revolution we had the right to choose what we wanted to wear in Iran. Compulsion was never part of Iranian culture,” she said.

Alinejad was joined on the panel by veteran national security policy expert Michele Flournoy, a former Undersecretary of Defense during the Obama administration.

The breakfast was sponsored by National Geographic and Creative Future.

Watch video of the event above.

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar Channeled Dr Seuss to Convince Congress to Let Babies on Senate Floor (Exclusive Video)

More than 3,000 women have reached out for help to combat sexual abuse or assault in the six months since the TimesUp Legal Defense Fund was launched by a group of Hollywood women, a panel of the group’s leading activists said on Wednesday.

“We’ve had 3,000 women contact us, and we’ve had over 700 attorneys join the network,” Sharyn Tejani, the executive director of the TimesUp Legal Defense Fund, said at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C. The lawyers offer a free consultation to those who contact the fund, which has raised over $20 million to help low-income and underprivileged women address sexual abuse, she said.

Tejane was joined on the panel by actress and TimesUp co-founder Amber Tamblyn and Democratic and TimesUp activist Hilary Rosen, who described the progress the fund has made providing services to low-income women from all professions seeking redress for harassment claims.

“A patriarchy’s worst fear was that we are all going to get into a room together and start talking,”  Tamblyn said during a panel discussion moderated by Washington Post gender columnist Monica Hesse. “For me, TimesUp exists so that no woman or man ever has to say MeToo again, that’s the fundamental soul of what we’re doing.”

In a standing-room only ballroom at the W Hotel, the breakfast event also featured a panel of National Geographic photographers and explorers, including Asha Stuart, Beverly Joubert, Erika Larsen, Hannah Reyes Morales and Jess Cramp. The panel was moderated the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Susan Goldberg.

Iranian feminist and author Masih Alinejad and national security specialist Michele Flournoy also spoke passionately about women’s right in Iran.

National Geographic CEO Courteney Monroe and Senator Amy Klobuchar each made welcome remarks to the room filled with more than 100 influential women in media, film and politics.

The Power Women Breakfast series brings together influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in key cities to network and connect. TheWrap has built a broad power base of professional women who are decision makers and mothers, leaders and wives, innovators and activists. The franchise is now in six cities including Los Angeles, New York, Austin, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. and Miami.

“TimesUp really was created as an organization for empowerment for gender equity in the workplace, for changing behavior in the workplace,” Rosen said. “Every single day, I pay homage to these privileged women in the entertainment industry whose gift was really to figure out how to help low wage workers.”

On the photography panel, the women shared often-harrowing stories of their experiences living among different cultures and in some cases overcoming adversity they themselves have faced.

“I live in the South Pacific and there is a romanticized view of what that means. One in three women in the Pacific are victims of domestic violence,” said Cramp, who is a shark researcher. “That’s prevalent throughout the community. Women are not seen as strong, they’re not seen as leaders … there is a culture of shame and silence. You really have an oppressed society.”

Morales, who comes from the Philippines and focuses on human trafficking in her work, said she often faced unique struggles as a women in her home country. “In the Philippines, women who are in the sex trade are often viewed as gold diggers … but when you talk to many of them there’s a common thread that they are breadwinners,” she said.

All of the women agreed that social media was an incredibly powerful took but that it needed to be employed cautiously.

“I work as a digital nomad,” said Stuart, who has documented rural village voodoo ceremonies in Haiti and acid attack burn wards in India. “One of the things that I’ve seen in the connectivity of being able to post a video on Facebook and come back and see millions of views is incredible. Media can go all across the world in a second.”

Courteney Monroe, Power Women Breakfast D.C.

Iranian feminist and human rights activist Masih Alinejad talked about her battle to win the right to remove her head covering, the hijab,   in her conservative religious country. Alinejad now lives in exile in the United States, but cannot leave the country because of the travel ban.

“Being a woman in Iran means that you’re not allowed to show your hair,” she said, angrily. “You’re not allowed to sing solo. You’re not allowed to ride a bicycle freely. You’re not allowed to have the custody of your child. You’re not allowed to get a passport without permission from your husband.”

“This is also coming as the law,” she said. “the law actually sees us as a disabled person.”

Alinejad, an activist and author of “The Wind in My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran,” has launched a social media campaign against the compulsory head covering, which has often put her on the wrong side of the nation’s ruling clerics. In addition to promoting her cause, she also had tough words for Western feminists arguing they they often did more harm then good.

“In America when I talk about compulsory hijab, I often get this question that you know this is a cultural issue. It’s not. Before the revolution we had the right to choose what we wanted to wear in Iran. Compulsion was never part of Iranian culture,” she said.

Alinejad was joined on the panel by veteran national security policy expert Michele Flournoy, a former Undersecretary of Defense during the Obama administration.

The breakfast was sponsored by National Geographic and Creative Future.

Watch video of the event above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Male Movie Critics Outnumber Women Nearly 4 to 1, New Study Says

Sen. Amy Klobuchar Channeled Dr Seuss to Convince Congress to Let Babies on Senate Floor (Exclusive Video)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar Channeled Dr Seuss to Convince Congress to Let Babies on Senate Floor (Exclusive Video)

U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) took an unusual approach to overturning the Senate’s longstanding ban on babies appearing on the floor of the U.S. Senate in the Capitol.

To convince a group of older male colleagues, the senator recited a poem in the style of Dr. Seuss, she told a standing-room-only crowd at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. It went like this:

“She’s not going to change the diaper on the floor
She won’t be breastfeeding by the door
She’s not going to change the baby’s clothes in the house;
And she’ll be as quiet as a mouse,
She wont burp the baby at work;
Stop being such a jerk.”

Also Read: Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

The poem elicited wide laughter from the assembled audience at the breakfast on Wednesday.

“So that did it and we passed it,” said Klobuchar, noting that Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D – Ill.) in April became the first sitting senator to bring her baby to the floor after the rules change.

Klobuchar added that she was still optimistic about working with Republicans in a body which has increasingly become known for partisan contentiousness and dysfunction.

Also Read: Male Movie Critics Outnumber Women Nearly 4 to 1, New Study Says

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch video of Sen. Klobuchar’s remarks above.

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U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) took an unusual approach to overturning the Senate’s longstanding ban on babies appearing on the floor of the U.S. Senate in the Capitol.

To convince a group of older male colleagues, the senator recited a poem in the style of Dr. Seuss, she told a standing-room-only crowd at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. It went like this:

“She’s not going to change the diaper on the floor
She won’t be breastfeeding by the door
She’s not going to change the baby’s clothes in the house;
And she’ll be as quiet as a mouse,
She wont burp the baby at work;
Stop being such a jerk.”

The poem elicited wide laughter from the assembled audience at the breakfast on Wednesday.

“So that did it and we passed it,” said Klobuchar, noting that Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D – Ill.) in April became the first sitting senator to bring her baby to the floor after the rules change.

Klobuchar added that she was still optimistic about working with Republicans in a body which has increasingly become known for partisan contentiousness and dysfunction.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Watch video of Sen. Klobuchar’s remarks above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Male Movie Critics Outnumber Women Nearly 4 to 1, New Study Says

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap's Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

Women in Film Elects Amy Baer as Board President

TV Power Women StudioWrap Portraits, From Alison Brie to Zazie Beetz (Exclusive Photos)

Watch Sen Amy Klobuchar, Amber Tamblyn Speak at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast on Facebook Live (Video)

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C., kicked off Wednesday with opening remarks from Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.
In addition to Klobuchar, the event features a panel of award-winning photographers, a panel on how Hollywood is l…

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C., kicked off Wednesday with opening remarks from Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

In addition to Klobuchar, the event features a panel of award-winning photographers, a panel on how Hollywood is leading the #TimesUp movement and an interview with Iranian feminist and author Masih Alinejad.

Susan Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of National Geographic, will moderate a discussion of “The Female Gaze: Photographers, Storytellers and Explorers” with filmmakers and photographers such as Asha Stewart, Beverly Joubert, Erika Larsen and Hannah Reyes.

“#TimesUp: How a Hollywood Moment is Becoming a National Movement,” with Amber Tamblyn, author and actress, Hilary Rosen, political commentator, CNN & Partner and Managing Director, SKDNickerbocker and Sharyn Tejani, Director of the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, moderated by Washington Post reporter Sarah Ellison.

Wrap Editor-in-Chief Sharon Waxman will also interview Alinejad, whose memoir, “The Wind In My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran,” was released last week. She will be joined by Michèle Flournoy, former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy for the Obama administration and founding partner of WestExec Advisors.

The June 13 breakfast is hosted by TheWrap CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Sharon Waxman, at the capital city’s W Hotel.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect. All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

You can watch a live stream above.

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Senator Amy Klobuchar, Women Photographers and Iranian Feminist Author Join Power Women Breakfast Washington DC!

WrapWomen is pleased to announce exciting additions to the Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C. next Wednesday, June 13, including a panel of award-winning photographers, Iranian feminist and author Masih Alinejad and Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)….

WrapWomen is pleased to announce exciting additions to the Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C. next Wednesday, June 13, including a panel of award-winning photographers, Iranian feminist and author Masih Alinejad and Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN).

A panel of award-winning female photographers will discuss their work  “The Female Gaze: Photographers, Storytellers and Explorers.” Susan Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of National Geographic, will moderate a panel discussion including:

* Asha Stuart, Documentary Photographer and Filmmaker

* Beverly Joubert, Wildlife Filmmaker and Conservationist

* Erika Larsen, Photographer

* Hannah Reyes Morales, Documentary Photographer

* Jess Cramp, Shark Researcher and Marine Conservationist

Wrap Editor-in-Chief Sharon Waxman will interview feminist author and activist Masih Alinejad, whose memoir, “The Wind In My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran,” was released last week. She will be joined by Michèle Flournoy, former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy for the Obama administration and founding partner of WestExec Advisors.

Alinejad is an award-winning Iranian journalist, broadcaster, blogger and founder of the My Stealthy Freedom movement, which encourages Iranian women to express their personal freedom. Alinejad has been forced to live in exile in Brooklyn, New York following her criticism of the Iranian regime. She currently reports and presents a weekly TV segment on VOA, called Tablet, where she mixes hard news and satire.

Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), a member of the Senate Judiciary, Rules and Commerce Committees, will make welcome remarks.

They join a full program on women’s leadership, including “#TimesUp: How a Hollywood Moment is Becoming a National Movement,” with Amber Tamblyn, author and actress, Hilary Rosen, political commentator, CNN & Partner and Managing Director, SKDNickerbocker and Sharyn Tejani, Director of the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, moderated by Washington Post reporter Sarah Ellison.

 

ABOUT POWER WOMEN BREAKFAST

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

All ticket proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Judith Light, #TimesUp Leaders, Mayors of Compton and Oakland to Headline Power Women Breakfasts

TheWrap on Monday announced a lineup of speakers for three Power Women Breakfast events in Washington, D.C., New York and San Francisco.

On June 13, National Geographic Global Networks CEO Courteney Monroe will co-host a Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C.

The event, to be held at the W Hotel, will also feature a panel focusing on next steps in the #TimesUp Initiative with political strategist Hilary Rosen, National Women’s Law Center president and CEO Fatima Goss Graves and members of TimesUp Legal Defense Fund — an organization that helps individuals find legal representation after experiencing sexual misconduct including assault, abuse or harassment in the workplace.

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival Signs Pledge for More Women Directors, More Transparency

Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light will be a featured headliner at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast New York on June 15 to discuss her longtime advocacy for LGBTQ issues as well as the goal of achieving 50/50 gender parity in the entertainment industry by 2020.

The star, who has received two Emmy nominations and a Golden Globe nomination for her role in Jill Soloway’s “Transparent,” and who is garnering critical raves for her powerful performance as Marilyn Miglin in FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” will join in conversation with TheWrap Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman at the event, held at the Time Warner Center.

Also Read: WrapWomen Launches Power Women Summit for 1,000 Leaders in Media and Entertainment

Then on July 12, Aja Brown and Libby Schaaf, the mayors of the California cities of Compton and Oakland, will share the stage at Dolby Laboratories in San Francisco for a conversation about their progressive visions for elevating and improving the lives of citizens.

The three events are part of TheWrap’s ongoing series of Power Women Breakfasts to help build a broad network and power base of professional women who are decision-makers and mothers, leaders and wives, innovators and activists.

The WrapWomen initiative is gearing up for the Power Women Summit on November 1-2 in Los Angeles, continuing to help women address the challenges of gender equality and to seek solutions to build a more fair and balanced workplace for all.

Also Read: 15 Survivors of Weinstein Sexual Abuse Share Experience, Hope at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Los Angeles (Video)

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

For the first time in the series history, tickets are available on a donation basis to attend the Power Women Breakfast Series with 100 percent of proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Courteney Monroe oversees all aspects of entertainment and business operations for National Geographic Global Networks, which includes National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo People and Nat Geo MUNDO.

In April 2017, she launched the network’s first-ever scripted anthology series, “Genius,” which nominated for 10 Emmys; and propelled by the tremendous success of the first season, this spring, the network premiered season two “Genius: Picasso,” starring Antonio Banderas as Pablo Picasso.

Fatima Goss Graves, who has served in numerous roles at NWLC for more than a decade, has spent her career fighting to advance opportunities for women and girls. She has a distinguished track record working across a broad set of issues central to women’s lives, including income security, health and reproductive rights, education access, and workplace fairness.

Also Read: BE Conference 2018 Portraits: Rachel Bloom, Andrea Razzaghi and More Mentors (Photos)

Hilary Rosen is a well-known Washington, D.C., strategist who navigates the intersection of communications, media and politics. She is an on-air CNN political analyst and a partner at SKDKnickerbocker, the 2016 Holmes Report Public Affairs Agency of the year.

In addition to her work on “Transparent,” Judith Light recently finished filming the CBS All Access drama series “The Good Fight,” by the creators of “The Good Wife,” and the upcoming Lifetime film “Nellie Bly” opposite Christina Ricci. She also appears in the upcoming indie movies “Ms. White Light” and “Hot Air” with Steve Coogan.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf was inaugurated in January 2015 and launched an agenda to elevate one of America’s most diverse and progressive cities into an equitable and resilient city. Born and raised in Oakland, Schaaf has led new initiatives to offset the cost-of-living crisis, reduce crime, improve transit and infrastructure, and expand educational and career opportunities for the city’s most vulnerable residents.

Aja Brown made history at the age of 31 when she was elected as the youngest mayor in the Compton. Her hands-on approach to governance has garnered national recognition and a home in the hearts of change-makers across the globe.

Her 12-point ‘New Vision for Compton’ revitalization strategy has guided improvements in quality of life, economic development, infrastructural growth, policy reform, and strategic partnerships. As a millennial mayor, she has attracted several Fortune 500 companies and notables like Andre “Dr. Dre” Young and the Williams Sister to reinvest in the social fabric of the city.

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TheWrap on Monday announced a lineup of speakers for three Power Women Breakfast events in Washington, D.C., New York and San Francisco.

On June 13, National Geographic Global Networks CEO Courteney Monroe will co-host a Power Women Breakfast in Washington, D.C.

The event, to be held at the W Hotel, will also feature a panel focusing on next steps in the #TimesUp Initiative with political strategist Hilary Rosen, National Women’s Law Center president and CEO Fatima Goss Graves and members of TimesUp Legal Defense Fund — an organization that helps individuals find legal representation after experiencing sexual misconduct including assault, abuse or harassment in the workplace.

Emmy- and Tony-winning actress Judith Light will be a featured headliner at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast New York on June 15 to discuss her longtime advocacy for LGBTQ issues as well as the goal of achieving 50/50 gender parity in the entertainment industry by 2020.

The star, who has received two Emmy nominations and a Golden Globe nomination for her role in Jill Soloway’s “Transparent,” and who is garnering critical raves for her powerful performance as Marilyn Miglin in FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” will join in conversation with TheWrap Editor in Chief Sharon Waxman at the event, held at the Time Warner Center.

Then on July 12, Aja Brown and Libby Schaaf, the mayors of the California cities of Compton and Oakland, will share the stage at Dolby Laboratories in San Francisco for a conversation about their progressive visions for elevating and improving the lives of citizens.

The three events are part of TheWrap’s ongoing series of Power Women Breakfasts to help build a broad network and power base of professional women who are decision-makers and mothers, leaders and wives, innovators and activists.

The WrapWomen initiative is gearing up for the Power Women Summit on November 1-2 in Los Angeles, continuing to help women address the challenges of gender equality and to seek solutions to build a more fair and balanced workplace for all.

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast series is connecting and inspiring the leading influential women of entertainment, media, technology and brands in the key cities where those women work, create, gather, network and connect.

For the first time in the series history, tickets are available on a donation basis to attend the Power Women Breakfast Series with 100 percent of proceeds go directly to benefit women’s leadership programs and gender equity initiatives via WrapWomen Foundation.

Courteney Monroe oversees all aspects of entertainment and business operations for National Geographic Global Networks, which includes National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo People and Nat Geo MUNDO.

In April 2017, she launched the network’s first-ever scripted anthology series, “Genius,” which nominated for 10 Emmys; and propelled by the tremendous success of the first season, this spring, the network premiered season two “Genius: Picasso,” starring Antonio Banderas as Pablo Picasso.

Fatima Goss Graves, who has served in numerous roles at NWLC for more than a decade, has spent her career fighting to advance opportunities for women and girls. She has a distinguished track record working across a broad set of issues central to women’s lives, including income security, health and reproductive rights, education access, and workplace fairness.

Hilary Rosen is a well-known Washington, D.C., strategist who navigates the intersection of communications, media and politics. She is an on-air CNN political analyst and a partner at SKDKnickerbocker, the 2016 Holmes Report Public Affairs Agency of the year.

In addition to her work on “Transparent,” Judith Light recently finished filming the CBS All Access drama series “The Good Fight,” by the creators of “The Good Wife,” and the upcoming Lifetime film “Nellie Bly” opposite Christina Ricci. She also appears in the upcoming indie movies “Ms. White Light” and “Hot Air” with Steve Coogan.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf was inaugurated in January 2015 and launched an agenda to elevate one of America’s most diverse and progressive cities into an equitable and resilient city. Born and raised in Oakland, Schaaf has led new initiatives to offset the cost-of-living crisis, reduce crime, improve transit and infrastructure, and expand educational and career opportunities for the city’s most vulnerable residents.

Aja Brown made history at the age of 31 when she was elected as the youngest mayor in the Compton. Her hands-on approach to governance has garnered national recognition and a home in the hearts of change-makers across the globe.

Her 12-point ‘New Vision for Compton’ revitalization strategy has guided improvements in quality of life, economic development, infrastructural growth, policy reform, and strategic partnerships. As a millennial mayor, she has attracted several Fortune 500 companies and notables like Andre “Dr. Dre” Young and the Williams Sister to reinvest in the social fabric of the city.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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‘The Iceman Cometh’ Broadway Review: Denzel Washington Is on a Mission

Actors’ Equity has petitioned the Tonys to add an ensemble-acting award to its annual spring contest. That request couldn’t have any stronger support than George C. Wolfe’s revelatory staging of “The Iceman Cometh,” which opened Thursday at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre. In a Broadway season filled with fine performances, Wolfe pushes his cast, led by Denzel Washington, to uncommon excellence.

Back in the days when Theater of the Absurd was all the rage on college campuses, Eugene O’Neill’s classic used to be taught as the ultimate in theatrical naturalism. It is four-plus hours of talk among a bunch of drunks in a dead-end bar sit around waiting for Hickey, the traveling hardware salesman, who occasionally stops in to buy everyone drinks at Harry Hope’s hotel and otherwise enliven their collective hangover.

Each of the four acts plays in real time. Wolfe’s approach is occasionally to suggest the surface realism of “Iceman,” but more often he is stripping it away to expose the play’s absurdist core. Maybe this is the “Iceman” that Samuel Beckett saw in his mind’s eye that led him to write his own masterpieces, particularly “Waiting for Godot.” Illusion and reality. O’Neill and Beckett’s characters are flattened by the one, and so they can’t live without the other.

Also Read: ‘Saint Joan’ Broadway Review: Condola Rashad Burns Up the Stage

In the beginning, Santo Loquasto’s set for this “Iceman” revival suggests more of a wasteland than a tavern, everyone lit with an unhealthy glow by the designers Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhauer. Ann Roth’s costumes hint at anything but the recent past, that is, until the whores show up an hour into the first act and we are clearly in the 1912 timeframe of O’Neill’s play.

Over the course of that very long first act, before Washington’s Hickey shows up, most of the 17 actors on stage look as though were painted by George Grosz or James Ensor. This is not the West Side of Manhattan, much less anywhere in America.

The exception is Austin Butler’s Don Parritt. He’s the one newcomer to the bar, the teenage snitch who has turned in his own anarchist mother to the authorities. Butler is an Edward Hopper portrait come to life, and embodies that painter’s sense of urban alienation from the moment he opens his mouth. It’s an important Broadway debut in the role that a pre-“Streetcar” Marlon Brandon rejected in 1946. (He found the drama a long, gaseous exercise, and passed on appearing in the world premiere.)

Also Read: ‘Travesties’ Broadway Review: Tom Hollander Pulls Out All the Stoppard

Parritt calls the denizens of Harry Hope’s bar “a bunch of cuckoos.” It’s a gross understatement. Under Wolfe’s direction, the actors convey an expressionistic freak show. There is Neal Huff’s wannabe attorney, Clark Middleton’s totally toasted editor, Michael Potts’s broke gambler, Frank Wood’s former captain, Reg Rogers’s fired war correspondent, Tammy Blanchard’s weary street walker, Bill Irwin’s circus has-been.

Sometimes these actors don’t even register as quite human, their respective physical features often obliterated. They all give the kind of transformational performances that have you checking the Playbill at intermission to identify who’s who, even if you’ve seen them many times in other plays.

The role of Hickey has two goal posts. The first is the character’s need to take a nap shortly after he enters the bar. It always takes audiences by surprise. Not in the case of Washington. His Hickey is a fired-up evangelist on the loose, and after a boisterous round of free drinks for everybody, he more than needs a nap. This man has done one of two things: won the lottery or murdered somebody. Washington makes it clear it’s not the former. He is ready to die, not sleep.

Also Read: ‘Summer’ Broadway Review: It’s Winter for Queen of Disco Donna Summer

The other goal post is Hickey’s admission that he killed his wife because he hated her limitless forgiveness and extreme pity. That break in Hickey’s façade is O’Neill being less than subtle. As delivered by Washington, the revelation is almost old news. He made hisreal feelings for Evelyn evident long before the final act.

The beauty of Wolfe’s direction is that he’s able to accommodate different acting styles in his often surreal vision. Washington’s missionary Hickey makes the perfect counterpart to his nemesis, David Morse, who brings understatement to the disillusioned anarchist Larry Slade. And lost between them is the enabler Harry Hope himself, always ready with the booze, played with Irish grandeur by Colm Meaney. Wolfe achieves with actors what other fine directors this Broadway season do with turntables, wires, elevators, and dry-ice fog.

Near the end of “Iceman,” it seems perfectly natural that Washington begins his long confession by pulling a chair up to the edge of the stage to address the audience directly. In the theater next door, Glenda Jackson is giving a performance of equally high voltage in “Three Tall Women.” One of these days we can expect an earthquake on West 45th Street.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Saint Joan’ Broadway Review: Condola Rashad Burns Up the Stage

‘Travesties’ Broadway Review: Tom Hollander Pulls Out All the Stoppard

‘Summer’ Broadway Review: It’s Winter for Queen of Disco Donna Summer

‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ Broadway Review: JK Rowling’s Wizards in a Father-Son Battle

Actors’ Equity has petitioned the Tonys to add an ensemble-acting award to its annual spring contest. That request couldn’t have any stronger support than George C. Wolfe’s revelatory staging of “The Iceman Cometh,” which opened Thursday at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre. In a Broadway season filled with fine performances, Wolfe pushes his cast, led by Denzel Washington, to uncommon excellence.

Back in the days when Theater of the Absurd was all the rage on college campuses, Eugene O’Neill’s classic used to be taught as the ultimate in theatrical naturalism. It is four-plus hours of talk among a bunch of drunks in a dead-end bar sit around waiting for Hickey, the traveling hardware salesman, who occasionally stops in to buy everyone drinks at Harry Hope’s hotel and otherwise enliven their collective hangover.

Each of the four acts plays in real time. Wolfe’s approach is occasionally to suggest the surface realism of “Iceman,” but more often he is stripping it away to expose the play’s absurdist core. Maybe this is the “Iceman” that Samuel Beckett saw in his mind’s eye that led him to write his own masterpieces, particularly “Waiting for Godot.” Illusion and reality. O’Neill and Beckett’s characters are flattened by the one, and so they can’t live without the other.

In the beginning, Santo Loquasto’s set for this “Iceman” revival suggests more of a wasteland than a tavern, everyone lit with an unhealthy glow by the designers Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhauer. Ann Roth’s costumes hint at anything but the recent past, that is, until the whores show up an hour into the first act and we are clearly in the 1912 timeframe of O’Neill’s play.

Over the course of that very long first act, before Washington’s Hickey shows up, most of the 17 actors on stage look as though were painted by George Grosz or James Ensor. This is not the West Side of Manhattan, much less anywhere in America.

The exception is Austin Butler’s Don Parritt. He’s the one newcomer to the bar, the teenage snitch who has turned in his own anarchist mother to the authorities. Butler is an Edward Hopper portrait come to life, and embodies that painter’s sense of urban alienation from the moment he opens his mouth. It’s an important Broadway debut in the role that a pre-“Streetcar” Marlon Brandon rejected in 1946. (He found the drama a long, gaseous exercise, and passed on appearing in the world premiere.)

Parritt calls the denizens of Harry Hope’s bar “a bunch of cuckoos.” It’s a gross understatement. Under Wolfe’s direction, the actors convey an expressionistic freak show. There is Neal Huff’s wannabe attorney, Clark Middleton’s totally toasted editor, Michael Potts’s broke gambler, Frank Wood’s former captain, Reg Rogers’s fired war correspondent, Tammy Blanchard’s weary street walker, Bill Irwin’s circus has-been.

Sometimes these actors don’t even register as quite human, their respective physical features often obliterated. They all give the kind of transformational performances that have you checking the Playbill at intermission to identify who’s who, even if you’ve seen them many times in other plays.

The role of Hickey has two goal posts. The first is the character’s need to take a nap shortly after he enters the bar. It always takes audiences by surprise. Not in the case of Washington. His Hickey is a fired-up evangelist on the loose, and after a boisterous round of free drinks for everybody, he more than needs a nap. This man has done one of two things: won the lottery or murdered somebody. Washington makes it clear it’s not the former. He is ready to die, not sleep.

The other goal post is Hickey’s admission that he killed his wife because he hated her limitless forgiveness and extreme pity. That break in Hickey’s façade is O’Neill being less than subtle. As delivered by Washington, the revelation is almost old news. He made hisreal feelings for Evelyn evident long before the final act.

The beauty of Wolfe’s direction is that he’s able to accommodate different acting styles in his often surreal vision. Washington’s missionary Hickey makes the perfect counterpart to his nemesis, David Morse, who brings understatement to the disillusioned anarchist Larry Slade. And lost between them is the enabler Harry Hope himself, always ready with the booze, played with Irish grandeur by Colm Meaney. Wolfe achieves with actors what other fine directors this Broadway season do with turntables, wires, elevators, and dry-ice fog.

Near the end of “Iceman,” it seems perfectly natural that Washington begins his long confession by pulling a chair up to the edge of the stage to address the audience directly. In the theater next door, Glenda Jackson is giving a performance of equally high voltage in “Three Tall Women.” One of these days we can expect an earthquake on West 45th Street.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Saint Joan' Broadway Review: Condola Rashad Burns Up the Stage

'Travesties' Broadway Review: Tom Hollander Pulls Out All the Stoppard

'Summer' Broadway Review: It's Winter for Queen of Disco Donna Summer

'Harry Potter and the Cursed Child' Broadway Review: JK Rowling's Wizards in a Father-Son Battle

The Scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast Austin 2018 (Photos)

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin took place on March 11, concurrent with the 2018 SXSW Film Festival.

Katie Couric speaking at the Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Attendees checking in at the Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The table setting at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

TheWrap’s CEO and editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman welcoming attendees at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Katie Couric speaking with other attendees at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Katie Couric listening to Jayna Zweiman and Gabriella Schwarz.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Sharon Waxman and Katie Couric taking a selfie at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Sharon Waxman announcing TheWrap’s Power Women Summit.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Attendee asking Katie Couric a question at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

#MeToo Panel at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Nancy Giordano speaking on the#MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

#MeToo Panel at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The Pink Ceiling CEO Cindy Whitehead listening to #MeToo panel.

The Pussyhat Project founder Jayna Zweiman listening to the #MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

President and CCO of Fusion Media Camila Jimenez Villa speaking on the #MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin took place on March 11, concurrent with the 2018 SXSW Film Festival.

Katie Couric speaking at the Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Attendees checking in at the Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The scene at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The table setting at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast, Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

TheWrap’s CEO and editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman welcoming attendees at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Katie Couric speaking with other attendees at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Katie Couric listening to Jayna Zweiman and Gabriella Schwarz.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Sharon Waxman and Katie Couric taking a selfie at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Sharon Waxman announcing TheWrap’s Power Women Summit.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Attendee asking Katie Couric a question at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

#MeToo Panel at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Nancy Giordano speaking on the#MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

#MeToo Panel at TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in Austin.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

The Pink Ceiling CEO Cindy Whitehead listening to #MeToo panel.

The Pussyhat Project founder Jayna Zweiman listening to the #MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap

President and CCO of Fusion Media Camila Jimenez Villa speaking on the #MeToo panel.

Photographed by Nathan Rocky for TheWrap