Patricia Arquette, Angela Bassett In Negotiations To Star In Netflix’s Feature Comedy ‘Otherhood’

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EXCLUSIVE: Angela Bassett and Patricia Arquette are in negotiations to star in the feature comedy Otherhood which Cindy Chupack (Modern Family, Sex In The City) is directing for Netflix. The project was adapted by Chupack and Mark Andrus from the William Sutcliffe novel Whatever Makes You Happy. The production is currently looking to cast one other top star in the film which will go for five weeks in New York on June 11.
Producing the film will be Jason Michael Berman…

Patricia Arquette, More Stars Weigh in on Trump-Bannon Breakup: ‘Who Gets Custody of the Nazis?’

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Hollywood is weighing in on the public feud between President Donald Trump and his former chief strategist Steve Bannon.

“In the Trump/Bannon divorce who gets custody of the Nazi’s?” asked actress Patricia Arquette on Twitter Wednesday afternoon.

“Trump claims Bannon, who was his campaign manager for almost the entirety of the general election, ‘had very little to do with our historic victory.’ Does this mean he’s finally about to give credit to Putin as the true architect of his win?” asked “Guardians of the Galaxy” director James Gunn in a tweet.

Also Read: Vox Co-Founder Compares Trump-Bannon Fight to Nazi Purge

On Wednesday, Trump said that Bannon “lost his mind” when he was fired from the White House. He issued the statement in response to comments made by Bannon to journalist Michael Wolff in the author’s soon-to-be published book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.”

“Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my presidency. When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind,” Trump said in a statement. “Steve was a staffer who worked for me after I had already won the nomination by defeating 17 candidates, often described as the most talented field ever assembled in the Republican Party.”

The Guardian published portions of the book Wednesday after obtaining an advanced copy. In the book, Wolff purports that no one believed Trump would win, including Trump himself. In the book, Bannon also calls the now infamous meeting at Trump Tower between Donald Trump Jr. and Russian officials as “unpatriotic” and “treasonous.” (For more revelations from “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” head over here).

Also Read: Trump: Steve Bannon ‘Lost His Mind’

“They’re going to crack Don Junior like an egg on national TV,” Bannon is quoted as saying.

Other Hollywood figures found the news and subsequent feud enlightening.

“The news today is awesome,” tweeted Chelsea Handler. “The constant verification of how dump [sic] and uninterested in govt. this president is is going to be the end of the Republican Party. They can suck it hard. Shame on you for allowing this man to do so much damage.”

Also Read: Steve Bannon Blasts Donald Trump Jr as ‘Treasonous,’ ‘Unpatriotic’ in New Book

See more star reactions below.

In the Trump/Bannon divorce who gets custody of the Nazi’s?

— Patricia Arquette (@PattyArquette) January 3, 2018

Woof, woof !!
Trump claims Bannon has lost his mind. Woof, woof !!
Bankers don’t have to go to jail if their suits are really expensive. Woof, woof !!
Donald’s button is bigger than Kim’s. Woof, woof !!
My lawyer friends all tell me ‘Stay away from the legal system’ Woof, woof !! https://t.co/ybTeaTIFi6

— John Cleese (@JohnCleese) January 3, 2018

Being thrown under the bus by Steve Bannon is Donald Trump, Jr’s first experience with public transportation.

— Frank Conniff (@FrankConniff) January 3, 2018

Also Read: Trump Strips His Own Bed at White House and 8 Other Surprises in Michael Wolff’s Book Excerpt

There is now a book on Trump’s Reading List.

— Jeff Daniels (@Jeff_Daniels) January 3, 2018

Speechless. And disturbed. pic.twitter.com/uT2eMY7KsN

— Debra Messing (@DebraMessing) January 3, 2018

Steve Bannon has lost his mind, unlike the President, who is hosting a fantasy Awards Show for journalists who have wronged him

— Jason O. Gilbert (@gilbertjasono) January 3, 2018

drip, drip, drip … https://t.co/ZLMZ2qvgmP

— Don Cheadle (@DonCheadle) January 3, 2018

Wow. Just wow. https://t.co/0f3sOcMT2K

— Josh Gad (@joshgad) January 3, 2018

Also Read: ‘Morning Joe’: Trump’s Nuclear Button Tweet Suggests President Is ‘Demented and Deranged’

Steve Bannon talking to Mueller right now. pic.twitter.com/flkbtRWGsn

— Zach Braff (@zachbraff) January 3, 2018

#Poke. https://t.co/zgSdKPqMjv

— Jeffrey Wright (@jfreewright) January 3, 2018

Trump claims Bannon, who was his campaign manager for almost the entirety of the general election, “had very little to do with our historic victory.” Does this mean he’s finally about to give credit to Putin as the true architect of his win?

— James Gunn (@JamesGunn) January 3, 2018

The news today is awesome. The constant verification of how dump and uninterested in govt. this president is is going to be the end of the Republican Party. They can suck it hard. Shame on you for allowing this man to do so much damage.

— Chelsea Handler (@chelseahandler) January 3, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Vox Co-Founder Compares Trump-Bannon Fight to Nazi Purge

Trump Strips His Own Bed at White House and 8 Other Surprises in Michael Wolff’s Book Excerpt

Trump: Steve Bannon ‘Lost His Mind’

Steve Bannon Blasts Donald Trump Jr as ‘Treasonous,’ ‘Unpatriotic’ in New Book

Donald Trump Tweet-tacks Vanity Fair For “Regret” Over Hillary Clinton Ding

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Donald Trump mocked Vanity Fair Thursday morning, after the Conde Nast publication said it “regrets” a video telling Hillary Clinton to take up knitting and drop politics.
In the video, six Vanity Fair Hive editors suggested New Year’s resolutions for Clinton.  While sipping champagne, they suggested the former Secretary of State and the country’s first female presidential candidate of a major political party drop politics and instead take up knitting, amateur…

Vanity Fair ‘Regrets’ Video Telling Hillary Clinton To Take Up Knitting, Drop Politics

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Vanity Fair has apologized for a video in which six of its Hive editors attempted to make arch New Year’s resolutions for Hillary Clinton, while sipping champagne.
“It was an attempt at humor and we regret that it missed the mark,” the publication said in a master stroke of understatement.
The suggested resolutions, in order:
1. It’s time to start working on your sequel to your book, “What Happened”: “What the Hell Happened.”
2. Get someone on your tech staff to disable…

All 20 Richard Linklater Movies Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)

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With “Last Flag Flying” arriving in theaters, we’re taking on the not-so-simple task of ranking the movies of genre-hopping director Richard Linklater. The top titles on this list could rightfully be called modern classics, but every one of his films somehow evokes the heartfelt philosophy of his hypnotic “Waking Life”: human interaction is the highest form of spiritual communion.

20. “Bad News Bears” (2005)
The 1976 original was a true product of its time, with an all-star lineup led by Walter Matthau and Tatum O’Neal, but this unnecessary remake just felt like it was trying too hard. By 2005, the sight of an aggressively un-PC Little League coach (Billy Bob Thornton) encouraging outrageous behavior in his young team seemed less subversive than sad.

19. “Fast Food Nation” (2006)
When truth is stranger than fiction, why turn it into fiction? Linklater admirably attempted to create a multi-course meal out of Eric Schlosser’s bestselling book, but the movie’s many threads felt disconnected and lacked the power of Schlosser’s stomach-churning fast-food facts.

18. “Last Flag Flying” (2017)
An impressive cast (Steve Carell, Laurence Fishburne, Bryan Cranston) is ill-served in this stagy drama about weary Vietnam vets reuniting to reflect on their lives. Earnest, but underwhelming.

17. “It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books” (1988)
Linklater’s experimental debut is hard to find and tough to get into. But if you can track it down (try Criterion’s “Slacker” set), it’s a pretty cool precursor to the aesthetic and philosophical themes that still interest him. As the director wanders through life and the country, we’re invited to tag along on the journey. Plotless, but hardly pointless.

16. “Inning by Inning: A Portrait of a Coach” (2008)
The title says it all: this doc about Linklater’s friend Augie Garrido is a straightforward tribute to the former Texas Longhorns baseball coach. It doesn’t transcend its focus, but it succeeds on its own terms and is worth a watch for anyone interested in the subject.

15. “Everybody Wants Some!!” (2016)
A boys-will-be-boys lark, in which a bunch of mostly-likeable unknowns play collegiate baseball stars in 1980. Without any truly standout moments, though, it ultimately comes across as a minor-league “Dazed and Confused.”

14. “Tape” (2001)
A love it-or-hate it experience that will depend largely on your tolerance for being locked in a single room, in real time, with grandstanding frenemies Ethan Hawke and Robert Sean Leonard. Uma Thurman provides a necessary balance, and there’s no doubt this one sticks with you afterwards.

13. “Me and Orson Welles” (2008)
The “Me” is Zac Efron, as a wide-eyed young actor who stumbles into a major Broadway production in 1937. But if you see this nostalgic theatrical bauble, do it for the “Orson Welles,” as played by Christian McKay with an unforgettable ferocity.

12. “The Newton Boys” (1998)
Linklater’s understated Western is as easygoing as Matthew McConaughey’s drawl. The payout isn’t huge, but it’s fun to follow the bank-robbing brothers (played by McConaughey, Ethan Hawke, Skeet Ulrich, and Vincent D’Onofrio) as they try not to behave too badly.

11. “SubUrbia” (1996)
Linklater has always been an actor’s director, and it’s undeniably entertaining to watch him deftly juggle differing personalities in this adaptation of Eric Bogosian’s play about post-adolescent angst. Parker Posey, Steve Zahn, and Giovanni Ribisi are among the disillusioned twentysomethings with nowhere to go and nothing to do.

10. “A Scanner Darkly” (2006)
This trippy adaptation of a Philip K. Dick story revisits the innovative rotoscope animation of “Waking Life,” but adds a lot more action. Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr., Woody Harrelson, and Winona Ryder are among the apparent drug addicts in a nightmarish dystopia that constantly doubles back on itself. Of course, this is a Linklater movie, so the sci-fi set pieces are less Michael Bay than “My Dinner with Andre.”

9. “Waking Life” (2001)
It’s not for everyone, but it’s definitely for Linklater fans. No movie he’s made better encapsulates his themes than this inventively animated, existentialist rap session. Best watched in a college dorm room, late at night.

8. “Bernie” (2011)
This layered dark comedy provides an ideal showcase for Jack Black, as a beloved Texas mortician who shocks everyone by befriending an unpopular small-town widow (Shirley MacLaine). Of course, it’s what happens later that really counts. A still-hidden gem, and well worth discovering.

7. “School of Rock” (2003)
If only all family films were actually this much fun for the whole family. Jack Black couldn’t be more in his element, as a middle-school substitute who teaches his students how to rock, while learning a few lessons from them, too.

6. “Slacker” (1991)
Linklater’s surreal calling card served as a mash note to the weirdness of his beloved Austin, an affectionate call-out on Gen-X self-absorption, and inspiration for a generation of indie filmmakers. A decisively specific time capsule that still feels insightful, original, and utterly relevant.

5. “Dazed and Confused” (1993)
You didn’t have to graduate in 1976 to relate to the characters in this timeless celebration of adolescent madness. Whether you connect with the stoners, the jocks, the new kids, or the outcasts, there’s no denying that Linklater perfectly captures the heady nightmare we call high school. The pitch-perfect cast includes newcomers Matthew McConaughey, Parker Posey, Ben Affleck, and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her Renee Zellweger.

4. “Before Sunrise” (1995)
Anyone who’s ever fallen in love will relate to the pure exuberance of the first entry in Linklater’s “Before” trilogy. It’s in the surprise that suffuses Ethan Hawke’s face, after he realizes he’s experiencing something new. It’s in the tentative joy behind Julie Delpy’s eyes, as she wonders whether to trust in someone else. Even their irritating narcissism is indispensable; it’s the honesty that makes these movies so essential in the first place.

3. “Before Midnight” (2013)
It’s one thing to thrill to the exhilarating connection of new love. But will you also have the patience and courage to revive it once it fades? That’s a tough question, and this is surely the toughest of the “Before” movies to watch. (Each was shot nine years after the last.) It’s also the most incisive and — depending on one’s stage in life — the most haunting, too.

2. “Boyhood” (2014)
It would be easy for a formally experimental filmmaker to prioritize style over substance. But Linklater succeeds on all fronts here, having filmed his cast over the course of a remarkable 12 years to capture the titular experience. (Thanks to poignant turns from Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke, the movie might just as aptly have been called “Parenthood.”)

1. “Before Sunset” (2004)
It comes down to this: Has cinema ever given us a more substantive expression of romantic love than the “Before” trilogy? Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke, Linklater’s collaborative soul mates, find their purest connection here, in the brief but beautiful space between youthful naiveté and middle-aged cynicism. Throughout the movies’ decades-long history, their intimacy and truthfulness have repeatedly served as the ultimate retort to Hollywood bombast.

Mayim Bialik ‘Truly Sorry for Causing So Much Pain’ With NY Times Op-Ed on Sexual Assault

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Mayim Bialik apologized on Wednesday for an opinion piece she wrote for the New York Times, in which the “Big Bang Theory” actress spoke about making “self-protecting and wise” choices as a woman in Hollywood.

Many people took her column reacting to the Harvey Weinstein scandal to be of the “victim-blaming” variety, and the response on social media was highly critical.

“Let me say clearly and explicitly that I am very sorry,” the “Blossom” alum posted yesterday to Twitter. “What you wear and how you behave does not provide any protection from assault, nor does the way you dress or act in any way make you responsible for being assaulted.”

Also Read: Mayim Bialik on Backlash Over NYT Opinion Piece: ‘It’s So Sad How Vicious People Are Being’

Bialik then applauded the women who have come forward against Weinstein and others, concluding her new message: “I am truly sorry for causing so much pain, and I hope you can all forgive me.”

Here’s Bialik’s full Twitter mea culpa:

pic.twitter.com/vXmKO1jv7m

— Mayim Bialik (@missmayim) October 18, 2017

Read her original Times contribution, “Being a Feminist in Harvey Weinstein’s World,” .

Also Read: ‘Big Bang Theory’ Star Mayim Bialik Wants Ariana Grande to Keep Her Clothes On

Previously, Bialik had addressed the negative response to her op-ed, titled Being a Feminist in Harvey Weinstein’s World,” by suggesting that the “Hollywood Machine” took her words “out of context.”

“I also see a bunch of people have taken my words out of the context of the Hollywood machine and twisted them to imply that God forbid I would blame a woman for her assault based on her clothing or behavior,” she had initially explained. “Anyone who knows me and my feminism knows that’s absurd and not at all what this piece was about. It’s so sad how vicious people are being when I basically live to make things better for women.”

And on Monday, Bialik hosted a Facebook Live event to discuss her piece and its pushback. Readers can watch that below.

Also Read: How the Harvey Weinstein Scandal Has Rippled Beyond Hollywood

Also Read: Peter Bart Accused of Coddling Harvey Weinstein as Variety Editor

“My mom didn’t let me wear makeup or get manicures,” Bialik had written. “She encouraged me to be myself in audition rooms, and I followed my mother’s strong example to not put up with anyone calling me ‘baby’ or demanding hugs on set. I was always aware that I was out of step with the expected norm for girls and women in Hollywood.”

“I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with,” the comedic actress and real-life neuroscientist continued. “I dress modestly. I don’t act flirtatiously with men as a policy.”

That didn’t sit will with many, including fellow actresses like Patricia Arquette and Emily Ratajkowski, whose original reactions are posted beneath one last “Also Read.”

Also Read: Channing Tatum Cuts Ties With The Weinstein Company

.@missmayim I have to say I was dressed non provocatively at 12 walking home from school when men masturbated at me. It’s not the clothes.

— Patricia Arquette (@PattyArquette) October 14, 2017

VIctim blaming at its finest @missmmayim https://t.co/8DWw6BgRRl

— Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) October 15, 2017

Unfortunately for Bialik, there were plenty more were those came from.

Related stories from TheWrap:

LA City Attorney Asks for Harvey Weinstein Victims to Come Forward, Says He ‘Will Prosecute’

Kevin Smith Says He Will Donate His Future Weinstein Residuals to Women in Film

Rae Dawn Chong on Why Harvey Weinstein Scandal Is Only ‘Tip of an Ugly Iceberg’ (Guest Blog)

Mayim Bialik on Backlash Over NYT Opinion Piece: ‘It’s So Sad How Vicious People Are Being’

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“The Big Bang Theory” actress Mayim Bialik has responded to backlash over a New York Times opinion piece she wrote, saying her words were taken out of context.

“I also see a bunch of people have taken my words out of the context of the Hollywood machine and twisted them to imply that God forbid I would blame a woman for her assault based on her clothing or behavior,” she wrote. “Anyone who knows me and my feminism knows that’s absurd and not at all what this piece was about. It’s so sad how vicious people are being when I basically live to make things better for women.”

She also announced she would be doing a Facebook Live with the New York Times on Monday.

Also Read: ‘Big Bang Theory’ Star Mayim Bialik Wants Ariana Grande to Keep Her Clothes On

The actress wrote an opinion piece about the Harvey Weinstein scandal, which ran on Friday. In the article, she discussed her discomfort of being “employed in an industry that profits on the objectification of women.”

“My mom didn’t let me wear makeup or get manicures,” Bialik wrote. “She encouraged me to be myself in audition rooms, and I followed my mother’s strong example to not put up with anyone calling me ‘baby’ or demanding hugs on set. I was always aware that I was out of step with the expected norm for girls and women in Hollywood.”

Also Read: That Time the New York Post Dismissed Harvey Weinstein Accuser as ‘Grope Beauty’

She added, “I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with. I dress modestly. I don’t act flirtatiously with men as a policy.”

Bialik’s piece was faced with criticism, and actresses like Patricia Arquette and Emily Ratajkowski tweeted about the article.

.@missmayim I have to say I was dressed non provocatively at 12 walking home from school when men masturbated at me. It’s not the clothes.

— Patricia Arquette (@PattyArquette) October 14, 2017

VIctim blaming at its finest @missmmayim https://t.co/8DWw6BgRRl

— Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata) October 15, 2017

The schadenfruede that Mayim Bialik seems to have over the fact that she thinks that only pretty girls are sexually assaulted is gross

— Ijeoma Oluo (@IjeomaOluo) October 15, 2017

Lots wrong with Mayim Bialik’s op-ed but one quick thing: Being an awkward girl with a big nose never protected me from harassment. https://t.co/C0oA7zxAab

— Jessica Valenti (@JessicaValenti) October 14, 2017

This is a terrible and dangerous opinion. “You wouldn’t get assaulted if you weren’t so pretty.” https://t.co/yhl0UYBSIj

— a damn kobold (@skinnyghost) October 14, 2017

“I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with. I dress modestly.” This is disgusting. @missmayim is placing blame on victims and forgetting that rape and assault are about power, not about desire. https://t.co/gVFoct2QyQ

— wikipedia brown (@eveewing) October 14, 2017

“I tried being sexy. It didn’t work for me. So now I’m going to bash all the women who I think are sexy and victim blame.” – @missmayim pic.twitter.com/3UXbuuUMQc

— Monique Judge (@thejournalista) October 15, 2017

Mayim Bialik missed the perfect opportunity to call out men in Hollywood. Instead she blames women. https://t.co/kBJPGXhwI1

— Ines Helene (@inihelene) October 14, 2017

Weinstein was fired from The Weinstein Company and is under criminal investigation in New York and London after several women came forward to accuse him of sexual misconduct, including harassment and rape. A representative for Weinstein has stated, “Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances.”

See Bialik’s post below.

Being told my @NYTimes piece resonated w/ so many. Also see some have taken my words out of the context of the Hollywood machine. See below: pic.twitter.com/0NmxtAF1vP

— Mayim Bialik (@missmayim) October 15, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

Al Michaels Apologizes for Harvey Weinstein Joke on ‘Sunday Night Football’

Gawker-Killer Lawyer Leaves Harvey Weinstein’s Legal Team Without Suing NY Times

France to Strip Harvey Weinstein of Legion of Honor