Pam Grier Plays Down Any Involvement In ‘The L Word’ Reboot Due To ‘Bless This Mess’ Commitments – TCA

Read on: Deadline.

Pam Grier has played down any involvement in the forthcoming reboot of The L Word.
The actress said that she would not be involved in Showtime’s revival of the influential 2000s series as a result of her commitment to ABC comedy Bless This Mess.
Grier …

Pam Grier Says She Will Not Be on Showtime’s ‘The L Word’ Sequel

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Showtime announced a sequel to “The L Word” last week, which will bring back stars Jennifer Beals, Leisha Hailey and Katherine Moennig. On Tuesday, we learned that another series regular who is credited on all 70 episodes of the 2004-2009 show, Pam Grier, will not be a part of the new version.

“No, there will be no ‘L Word’ [for me] because I’m here,” Grier said today at the Television Critics Association press tour, where she was promoting her upcoming ABC sitcom “Bless This Mess.” “And I can’t leave.”

Her words actually sounded a little less sorrowful in person.

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Marja-Lewis Ryan will serves as showrunner on the Showtime sequel and is executive producing.

Per Showtime, “In this revival, Beals, Moennig and Hailey will star on the series as their original characters alongside a new generation of self-possessed LGBTQIA characters experiencing love, heartbreak, sex, setbacks and success in L.A.”

“Marja has brought her unique and contemporary vision to ‘The L Word’ and blended it beautifully into the fabric of Ilene’s groundbreaking series,” Gary Levine, president of entertainment, Showtime Networks Inc., told reporters during the Television Critics Association’s winter press tour Thursday. “This revered show was both entertaining and impactful when it originally ran on Showtime, and we are confident that our new version will do that and more in 2019.”.

We’re Suckers for Paul Scheer’s Movie Pitch About Con Woman Bertha Heyman (Podcast)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Long before Sandra Bullock swiped diamonds in “Ocean’s Eight” or Pam Grier laundered money in “Jackie Brown,” real-life scam queen Bertha Heyman conned men on trains, in synagogues and even in jail. On our latest “Shoot This Now” podcast, “Disaster Artist” and “The League” star Paul Scheer shares his fantastic ideas for turning her life into a movie.

Every week on “Shoot This Now,” we talk about stories that should be made into films — and Scheer’s idea is the best so far. You can listen on Apple or right here.



“She’s the confidence queen,” Scheer said of Heyman, who mastered a con known today as the Nigerian Prince scam more than 150 years ago.

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Impressively, she scammed men without the natural gifts of Bullock or Grier.

“She is this bad-ass con woman who was not conventionally attractive,” Scheer said. “As a matter of fact, the New York Times said this about her: ‘Bertha is a stout, gross-looking woman and it’s difficult to imagine how she succeeded in ensnaring so many victims by appeals to their confidence.’”

Scheer, who researched Heyman thoroughly, explained her modus operandi: “She travels as if she is super, super rich. Her cons basically follow this roadmap of the Nigerian Prince scheme — ‘I have a lot of money that I need to access, but I need money to access that money.’ Back in the day .. she’s the first one, pulling these schemes. She pulls her first con on a train going to Chicago … she cons this train-car conductor, cons him out of all of his money, and she comes to New York and starts pulling the same thing.”

Also Read: We Need a Movie About Jobriath, the Openly Gay ’70s Rocker Who Inspired Morrissey and Def Leppard (Podcast)

There was a defiant feminism to her schemes.

“She said, ‘I didn’t even care if they had money. All I cared about conning men who though they were smarter than me,’” Scheer said.

That’s only the beginning of a story that also involves a talent agent, poetry, a U.S. theatrical tour and a co-ed boxing match.

We also talk about our dream cast and director — and then Scheer tells us about his many recent projects, ranging from the “Unspooled” and “How Did This Get Made” podcasts to the new film “Slice.”

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Rhea Perlman, Pam Grier & ‘13 Reasons Why’s Alisha Boe Join Diane Keaton In ‘Poms’ Comedy

Read on: Deadline.

Rhea Perlman, Pam Grier, and Alisha Boe (13 Reasons Why) have joined Poms, the comedy starring Diane Keaton and Jacki Weaver, which is in production in Atlanta. Celia Weston, Phyllis Somerville, Charlie Tahan and Bruce McGill are part of the cast for t…

‘Bless This Mess’: Pam Grier, JT Neal & Christina Offley Cast In Fox Comedy Pilot

Read on: Deadline.

Former Jackie Brown star Pam Grier, JT Neal (Roommates) and up-and-comer Christina Offley (Atypical) round out the series regular cast of the Fox single-camera comedy pilot Bless This Mess, starring, co-written and directed by Lake Bell. Grier, Neal an…

9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

On this day in 1946, the bikini made its debut. To celebrate #NationalBikiniDay, let’s take a look back at some of the most iconic swimsuits–both one- and two-piece–in film and television, from the 1930s to the present.

1930s: Jean Harlow

In the 1930s, before her death at age 26, film actress Jean Harlow was a Hollywood sex symbol. According to Redbook, she was also one of the earliest stars to be photographed in a swimsuit.

1940s: Betty Grable

Betty Grable was celebrated in the 1930s and 40s for her “million dollar legs.” Though this yellow bikini is not as famous as Grable’s famous one-piece and high heels attire, it’s iconic in its own right.

1950s: Esther Williams

1960s: Ursula Andress (first Bond girl)

This Swiss actress catapulted to fame as the first “Bond girl” in the 1962 film, “Dr. No.” The scene where Andress rises out of the ocean in this white two-piece is considered one of the most iconic in film history.

1970s: Pam Grier

1980s: Phoebe Cates from “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”

Phoebe Cates sported this red bikini in her role as Linda Barrett in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High.” The famous pool scene later inspired the music video for the song, “Stacy’s Mom,” by Fountains of Wayne.

1990s: Pamela Anderson in “Baywatch”

Pamela Anderson, who played lifeguard C.J. Parker on “Baywatch,” helped re-popularize one-piece swimsuits in the 1990s. Variations of this red suit are still sold by retailers, such as Forever 21 and Zara.

2000s: Halle Berry in Die Another Day

Another “Bond girl” with an iconic swimsuit, Halle Berry sported this orange bikini and belt/knife holder combo in 2002’s “Die Another Day.”

2010s: Brooklyn Decker

‘70s Screen Icon Pam Grier Speaks On Sex Harassment & Her Biopic With Jay Pharoah Playing Richard Pryor

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: After publishing a memoir that bared her rise as a ’70s screen siren and a private life that included love affairs with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Richard Pryor and Freddie Prinze, Pam Grier is focused on Pam, the working title of a biopic that will bring her life story to the screen. A script by Bennie Richburg is about to be shopped, one that Jay Pharoah read and attached himself to play Pryor, whom Grier saw at his best and worst.
Grier met Pharoah when they were…

‘Jackie Brown’ at 20: Pam Grier Has a Better Idea for an Ending

Read on: Variety.

Quentin Tarantino’s acclaimed crime thriller “Jackie Brown,” which celebrates its 20th anniversary on Christmas Day, was the filmmaker’s valentine to stars Pam Grier and Robert Forster. Grier came to fame as the groundbreaking female action superstar of such Blaxploitation films as 1973’s “Coffy” and 1974’s “Foxy Brown.” Though Grier continued working in film and television, […]

9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

On this day in 1946, the bikini made its debut. To celebrate #NationalBikiniDay, let’s take a look back at some of the most iconic swimsuits–both one- and two-piece–in film and television, from the 1930s to the present.

1930s: Jean Harlow

In the 1930s, before her death at age 26, film actress Jean Harlow was a Hollywood sex symbol. According to Redbook, she was also one of the earliest stars to be photographed in a swimsuit.

1940s: Betty Grable

Betty Grable was celebrated in the 1930s and 40s for her “million dollar legs.” Though this yellow bikini is not as famous as Grable’s famous one-piece and high feels attire, it’s iconic in its own right.

1950s: Esther Williams

1960s: Ursula Andress (first Bond girl)

This Swiss actress catapulted to fame as the first “Bond girl” in the 1962 film, “Dr. No.” The scene where Andress rises out of the ocean in this white two-piece is considered one of the most iconic in film history.

1970s: Pam Grier

1980s: Phoebe Cates from “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”

Phoebe Cates sported this red bikini in her role as Linda Barrett in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High.” The famous pool scene later inspired the music video for the song, “Stacy’s Mom,” by Fountains of Wayne.

1990s: Pamela Anderson in “Baywatch”

Pamela Anderson, who played lifeguard C.J. Parker on “Baywatch,” helped re-popularize one-piece swimsuits in the 1990s. Variations of this red suit are still sold by retailers, such as Forever 21 and Zara.

2000s: Halle Berry in Die Another Day

Another “Bond girl” with an iconic swimsuit, Halle Berry sported this orange bikini and belt/knife holder combo in 2002’s “Die Another Day.”

2010s: Brooklyn Decker

Every Quentin Tarantino Movie Ranked From ‘Reservoir Dogs’ to ‘Hateful Eight’ (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

TheWrap movie critic Inkoo Kang reassesses the director Quentin Tarantino’s 23-year career, from “Reservoir Dogs” to “The Hateful Eight”

8. “Death Proof”(2007)

Despite some truly audacious stunt work by Zoe Bell on the hood of a careening Dodge Challenger, Tarantino’s homage to grindhouse fails to transcend that leering genre. If anything, “Death Proof” unintentionally makes the case for exploitation flicks’ niche appeal with its cardboard characters and lurid set pieces.

 

7. “Reservoir Dogs” (1992)

Tarantino’s directorial debut inaugurates the self-assured vision of a filmmaker who knows exactly what kind of movies he wants to make. Vicious and nihilistic, the crime thriller is also largely an exercise in style despite fantastic performances by Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Steve Buscemi, and Michael Madsen.

6. “Kill Bill, Vols. 1 & 2” (2003-04)

Tarantino’s movies are never short of watchable, but this two-part, four-hour pastiche epic is the director at his second most fanboyish (after “Death Proof”). Tarantino himself has said of the Uma Thurman vehicle that it’s “not about real life, it’s just about other movies” — and it shows. As a primer on Tarantino’s favorite movies, it’s enjoyable enough. As a standalone film, it fails to register beyond the over-the-top fight scenes.

5. “The Hateful Eight” (2015)

Thinly drawn characters and a three-hour-plus running time make this Western an inessential and interminable chamber drama. After the peaks of “Inglourious Basterds” and “Django Unchained,” it’s disappointing to see Tarantino return to pointlessly bloody form, especially given the film’s promisingly fertile post-Civil War setting.

4. “Pulp Fiction”(1994)

Arguably the most important movie of the ’90s, this smirking Palme d’Or winner now feels slightly rambling and repetitive. Still, its instantly recognizable lines, characters, and scenes must be acknowledged, and Samuel L. Jackson‘s alert but world-weary hitman gives this tale of L.A. lowlifes an emotional weightiness Tarantino’s lesser efforts don’t quite achieve.

3. “Inglourious Basterds” (2009)

This alternate-history cartoon is Tarantino at his most entertaining, featuring a continent full of snappily sketched characters and star-making (or -remaking) turns by Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, Michael Fassbender, Diane Kruger, and Melanie Laurent. But whacking Nazis with bats and setting them on fire don’t add up to much more than a hollow revenge fantasy, however funnily or majestically rendered.

2. “Jackie Brown”(1997)

Tarantino’s only attempt at a real love story (sorry, “Django” doesn’t count), “Jackie Brown” is in many ways the director’s most human film. The soundtrack is flawless, Pam Grier‘s in top form, and the tangled busyness of the criminal escapades just make Jackie and her would-be bail-bondsman suitor’s (Robert Forster) middle-aged melancholy that much more moving.

1. “Django Unchained” (2012)

The rare Tarantino movie to actually be “about” something, “Django Unchained” explores the still-taboo topic of black anger at white Southerners for slavery with wit, ferocity, and cinematic flair. Jamie Foxx and Leonardo DiCaprio deliver career-best performances in this delirious rhapsody, and for once the director’s signature hyper-violence has a point beyond its own sake. If only Tarantino would allow himself to be so ambitious with every project.

 

‘Foxy Brown’ TV Series Starring Meagan Good in the Works at Hulu

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

A “Foxy Brown” TV series is in development at Hulu with Meagan Good attached to star and produce, TheWrap has confirmed.

The original 1974 film followed Brown (played by Pam Grier) as she fought back against the drug dealers who murdered her boyfriend. The character has become a cultural icon, inspiring Quentin Tarantino’s “Jackie Brown,” also starring Grier, as well as Beyonce’s character Foxxy Cleopatra in “Austin Powers Goldmember,” among others.

Malcolm Spellman and Ben Watkins are attached to write and executive produce, with Good producing. Jason Weinberg and Evan Hainey will also executive produce. Drew Comins will serve as co-executive producer.

Also Read: Blaxploitation Streaming Service Brown Sugar Launches Online

MGM originally released “Foxy Brown” in 1974 and still owns the rights, leading to the TV series adaptation.

Good most recently starred on Fox’s “Minority Report” TV series adaptation, based on the Steven Spielberg film of the same name, and also headlined NBC’s “Deception.” Her film credits include “Think Like a Man Too” and indie “A Girl Like Grace,” which she co-produced.

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‘Like Netflix, Only Blacker’: Brown Sugar Blaxploitation-Movie Subscription VOD Service Launches

Read on: Variety.

Can you dig it? Blaxploitation films have a new digital home. African-American network Bounce TV is jumping into the subscription VOD biz with Brown Sugar, a $3.99-per-month service with mostly ’70s-era blaxploitation films including “Shaft,” “Foxy Brown,” “Super Fly,” “Cleopatra Jones,” “Blacula” and “The Mack.” At launch, Brown Sugar has 111 movie titles. A rep said several… Read more »

Blaxploitation Streaming Service Brown Sugar Launches Online

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Brown Sugar, a streaming service featuring classic blaxploitation movies, launched on Thursday.

The service is now available for mobile phones and tablets in the Google Play Store and iTunes App Store and for computers at BrownSugar.com. There is a free initial trial period for subscribers with a retail price of $3.99 per month thereafter.

Brown Sugar features an extensive library of iconic black movies, all un-edited and commercial-free. Classics available now include: “Foxy Brown,” “Shaft,” “Super Fly,” “Dolemite,” “Cotton Comes to Harlem,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” “Cooley High,” “Black Caesar,” “Cleopatra Jones,” “Mandingo,” “Car Wash” and many more.

Also Read: Could ‘Fences’ and ‘Hidden Figures’ Replace #OscarsSoWhite With #OscarsSoBlack?

Fred “The Hammer” Williamson and Pam Grier, both stars of numerous films in the genre, are official spokespeople for Brown Sugar, as is contemporary rap artist and producer Rick Ross.

“Brown Sugar is just like Netflix, only blacker,” said Grier. “These movies are entertaining and fun, but they were also empowering to the black community as they depicted African Americans as strong leading characters and heroes for the first time.”

“You wonder why we call it Brown Sugar? Because it’s bad ass – like me,” said Williamson. “Brown Sugar is the coolest streaming movie service on the planet.”

Also Read: It Doesn’t Matter If Lil Wayne Isn’t Cool With Black Lives Matter (Commentary)

Ross commented, “You can see the influence of these movies in every aspect of rap and hip-hop; in the music, the lyrics, the fashion and overall style – the Blaxploitation genre is where it all began.”

Brown Sugar is owned by Bounce TV.

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