Neve Campbell Loves the ‘Party of Five’ Reboot Idea So Much She Might Come Back as Julia (Video)

Not every actor is a fan of rebooting a beloved series that launched their career (we’re looking at you, OG “Charmed” stars). But Neve Campbell is all in for the recently-announced reincarnation of “Party of Five.”

When the actress — who played Julia Salinger on the ’90s Fox drama — appeared on “Watch What Happens Live” Tuesday, she said that she’s totally supportive of the reboot that the original series’ creators have in development at Freeform and she’d love to stop by if she was asked.

“I love the idea of the new reboot because it’s very timely,” Campbell said to host Andy Cohen. “From what I understand [after talking with series co-creator] Chris Keyser… they’re doing it with a Mexican family whose parents have been sent across the border, and they have to figure out how to stay together and be a family and raise each other. I think that’s really poignant and important, and I’m really impressed. So if they want me to come… and do a scene in it, I probably would.”

Also Read: ‘Party of Five’ Reboot From Original Creators Gets Pilot Order at Freeform

As TheWrap previously reported in January, a reboot of the series, from writer-executive producers Chris Keyser and Amy Lippman, was given a put pilot commitment at Freeform. As Campbell noted, the new show would follow the Buendias siblings as they navigate daily life struggles to survive as a family unit after their parents are suddenly deported back to Mexico.

Rodrigo Garcia will direct the pilot and serve as executive producer. Michael Zebede will also co-executive produce the project from Sony Pictures Television.

“Party of Five,” which premiered in 1994 and ran for six seasons on Fox, starred Campbell, Scott Wolf, Matthew Fox, and Lacey Chabert as siblings who reunited after the sudden death of their parents. A spinoff titled “Time of Your Life,” which starred Jennifer Love Hewitt, premiered in 1999 but was canceled after one season.

Also Read: The CW Renews ‘iZombie,’ Orders ‘Charmed’ and ‘Roswell’ Reboots to Series

Watch the interview above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Party of Five’ Reboot From Original Creators Gets Pilot Order at Freeform

Hulu Strikes Deal With Sony for ‘The Shield,’ ‘Party of Five,’ ‘Dawson’s Creek’

Scott Wolf Discusses Potential ‘Party of Five’ Reunion (Video)

Not every actor is a fan of rebooting a beloved series that launched their career (we’re looking at you, OG “Charmed” stars). But Neve Campbell is all in for the recently-announced reincarnation of “Party of Five.”

When the actress — who played Julia Salinger on the ’90s Fox drama — appeared on “Watch What Happens Live” Tuesday, she said that she’s totally supportive of the reboot that the original series’ creators have in development at Freeform and she’d love to stop by if she was asked.

“I love the idea of the new reboot because it’s very timely,” Campbell said to host Andy Cohen. “From what I understand [after talking with series co-creator] Chris Keyser… they’re doing it with a Mexican family whose parents have been sent across the border, and they have to figure out how to stay together and be a family and raise each other. I think that’s really poignant and important, and I’m really impressed. So if they want me to come… and do a scene in it, I probably would.”

As TheWrap previously reported in January, a reboot of the series, from writer-executive producers Chris Keyser and Amy Lippman, was given a put pilot commitment at Freeform. As Campbell noted, the new show would follow the Buendias siblings as they navigate daily life struggles to survive as a family unit after their parents are suddenly deported back to Mexico.

Rodrigo Garcia will direct the pilot and serve as executive producer. Michael Zebede will also co-executive produce the project from Sony Pictures Television.

“Party of Five,” which premiered in 1994 and ran for six seasons on Fox, starred Campbell, Scott Wolf, Matthew Fox, and Lacey Chabert as siblings who reunited after the sudden death of their parents. A spinoff titled “Time of Your Life,” which starred Jennifer Love Hewitt, premiered in 1999 but was canceled after one season.

Watch the interview above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Party of Five' Reboot From Original Creators Gets Pilot Order at Freeform

Hulu Strikes Deal With Sony for 'The Shield,' 'Party of Five,' 'Dawson's Creek'

Scott Wolf Discusses Potential 'Party of Five' Reunion (Video)

Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Skyscraper’ Blazes to $1.95 Million at Thursday Box Office

Dwayne Johnson’s “Skyscraper” grossed $1.95 million at the Thursday box office, while Sony’s “Hotel Transylvania 3” earned $2.6 million in previews.

In comparison, Johnson’s last movie “Rampage” earned $2.4 million in previews before opening to $35.8 million. Perhaps another comparison is “The Legend of Tarzan,” which earned $2.6 million in previews before grossing $38.5 million its opening weekend in 2016.

Legendary and Universal’s “Skyscraper” is looking to open in the $35 million to $40 million range, against a reported budget of $120 million.

Also Read: Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Skyscraper’ Performance Praised by Critics as Support for ‘Silly’ Movie

The action film stars Johnson as Will Sawyer, a former FBI agent and amputee who gets a job as head of security for the tallest building in the world. But when terrorists attack the building and frame him for the crime, Sawyer must both clear his name and save his family from danger. Rawson Marshall Thurber wrote and directed the film, which has a 52 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes. Neve Campbell also stars.

The animated film “Hotel Transylvania 3” is also opening this weekend and is expected to open in a similar range as “Skyscraper,” with both films contending against “Ant-Man and the Wasp” for the No. 1 spot. $35-40 million opening would be a solid start for “Hotel Transylvania 3,” given it had a budget of $65 million.

By comparison, the first “Hotel Transylvania” opened to $42 million in 2012, while the 2015 sequel opened to $48 million, the best opening for an animated Sony release.

Also Read: Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Improbable’ Crane Jump in ‘Skyscraper’: ‘We Did the Math,’ Says Director Rawson Thurber

“Hotel Transylvania 3” sees Count Dracula (Adam Sandler) and his family take a break from running the monster getaway spot and head on a cruise vacation. Along the way, Dracula falls in love with the ship’s captain, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn), not knowing she is the great-granddaughter of Dracula’s archrival, Abraham Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan).

Genndy Tartakovsky directed the film and co-wrote it with Michael McCullers. The film also stars an ensemble cast featuring  Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James, David Spade, Steve Buscemi, Keegan-Michael Key, Molly Shannon, Fran Drescher, and Mel Brooks, all of whom reprise their roles from the previous films in the series. The film has a 59 percent RT score.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Improbable’ Crane Jump in ‘Skyscraper’: ‘We Did the Math,’ Says Director Rawson Thurber

‘Skyscraper’ to Have Shaky Box Office Start for Dwayne Johnson

‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ Film Review: Adam Sandler’s Groovy Ghoulies Take a Wacky Vacation

Dwayne Johnson’s “Skyscraper” grossed $1.95 million at the Thursday box office, while Sony’s “Hotel Transylvania 3” earned $2.6 million in previews.

In comparison, Johnson’s last movie “Rampage” earned $2.4 million in previews before opening to $35.8 million. Perhaps another comparison is “The Legend of Tarzan,” which earned $2.6 million in previews before grossing $38.5 million its opening weekend in 2016.

Legendary and Universal’s “Skyscraper” is looking to open in the $35 million to $40 million range, against a reported budget of $120 million.

The action film stars Johnson as Will Sawyer, a former FBI agent and amputee who gets a job as head of security for the tallest building in the world. But when terrorists attack the building and frame him for the crime, Sawyer must both clear his name and save his family from danger. Rawson Marshall Thurber wrote and directed the film, which has a 52 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes. Neve Campbell also stars.

The animated film “Hotel Transylvania 3” is also opening this weekend and is expected to open in a similar range as “Skyscraper,” with both films contending against “Ant-Man and the Wasp” for the No. 1 spot. $35-40 million opening would be a solid start for “Hotel Transylvania 3,” given it had a budget of $65 million.

By comparison, the first “Hotel Transylvania” opened to $42 million in 2012, while the 2015 sequel opened to $48 million, the best opening for an animated Sony release.

“Hotel Transylvania 3” sees Count Dracula (Adam Sandler) and his family take a break from running the monster getaway spot and head on a cruise vacation. Along the way, Dracula falls in love with the ship’s captain, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn), not knowing she is the great-granddaughter of Dracula’s archrival, Abraham Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan).

Genndy Tartakovsky directed the film and co-wrote it with Michael McCullers. The film also stars an ensemble cast featuring  Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James, David Spade, Steve Buscemi, Keegan-Michael Key, Molly Shannon, Fran Drescher, and Mel Brooks, all of whom reprise their roles from the previous films in the series. The film has a 59 percent RT score.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson's 'Improbable' Crane Jump in 'Skyscraper': 'We Did the Math,' Says Director Rawson Thurber

'Skyscraper' to Have Shaky Box Office Start for Dwayne Johnson

'Hotel Transylvania 3' Film Review: Adam Sandler's Groovy Ghoulies Take a Wacky Vacation

Neve Campbell on Why She Left Hollywood After ‘Scream’

Neve Campbell said on Stephen Colbert’s ‘The Late Show’ that she left Hollywood for London because she “was feeling a bit unhappy.”read more


Neve Campbell said on Stephen Colbert's 'The Late Show' that she left Hollywood for London because she "was feeling a bit unhappy."

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‘Skyscraper’ Film Review: Dwayne Johnson Checks All the Boxes in a Satisfying Summer Thriller

“Skyscraper” doesn’t expand the scope or the rules of the summer action blockbuster, but it does follow the recipe in a supremely satisfying way.

So yes, you’ll recognize the DNA of other movies here — not just obvious antecedents like “Die Hard” and “The Towering Inferno,” but also “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol” and even “The Lady from Shanghai” — but that familiarity won’t interfere with the vertiginous thrills, the breathtaking stunts (and CG), and the near-constant state of adrenaline-fueled action.

Writer-director Rawson Marshall Thurber (“Central Intelligence”) sets up the pins to knock them down later: there’s nothing we learn in the first 10 minutes of the film that won’t come up again in the last 10 minutes. Still, he sets up an impressive array of obstacles, as well as characters who are solid enough to overcome them.

Watch Video: ‘Skyscraper’ Trailer Shows Dwayne Johnson Can Still Kick Butt With Prosthetic Leg

In an opening flashback 10 years earlier, FBI agent Will Sawyer (Dwayne Johnson) loses a leg when a hostage situation goes from bad to worse. Sarah (Neve Campbell), the surgeon who stitches him up, becomes his wife, and as the film opens, they’re in Hong Kong, where Will is up for a job as chief of security for The Pearl, a mega-high-rise that’s three times as tall as the Empire State Building.

It turns out, of course, that Will is being set up as patsy by a group of no-goodniks led by international mobster Kores Botha (Roland Møller, “The Commuter”) who wants a MacGuffin that’s locked up in a safe nestled in the penthouse owned by the Pearl’s billionaire builder Zhao Long Ji (Chin Han, “Marco Polo”). Ultimately, the plot is there merely as connective tissue between the stunts that involve getting Will back into a burning skyscraper (via a crane 100 stories above the ground) and his eventual rescue of Sarah and their twin children (McKenna Roberts and Noah Cottrell).

Also Read: Idris Elba in Final Negotiations to Star as Villain in Dwayne Johnson ‘Fast and Furious’ Spinoff

Sarah, it’s worth nothing, is nobody’s victim; a Navy surgeon who served three tours in Afghanistan, she’s just as capable as Will when it comes to facing whatever catastrophes come her way. (There’s one less element of surprise for the Sawyers in the casting of the bad guys; some of them are supposed to be reveals along the way, but the actors in question do everything but twirl their mustaches.) Will’s prosthetic leg, in the meantime, winds up being more of a secret weapon than an impediment, as the script cleverly finds ways for it, and for duct tape, to come to the rescue.

(It’s worth noting that “Skyscraper” is hitting theaters the same weekend as “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” which features Joaquin Phoenix as quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan. The casting of these actors as characters with disabilities will and should stoke the conversation about whether or not such roles should be played by able-bodied performers.)

Also Read: Gal Gadot Joins Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Red Notice’

Cinematographer Robert Elswit (“Inherent Vice”) makes great use of the anamorphic screen, whether he’s capturing the vast, vertical wonders of the Pearl or creating those heart-in-throat shots of Will dangling outside its windows. The raging fire against the backdrop of the night sky (and the bright lights of downtown Kowloon) give the story a dazzling and occasionally terrifying backdrop.

“Skyscraper” doesn’t change the action-movie game the way “Die Hard” did, but it’s a solidly entertaining summer diversion best enjoyed on the biggest theater — or even better, drive-in — screen you can find. And if you’re afraid of heights, make sure there’s an armrest — or even better, an arm — that you can grab.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson Moves to Los Angeles in ‘Ballers’ Season 4 First Look Trailer (Video)

Dwayne Johnson’s Next Movie Deal Included $1 Million for His Own Ad Agency

John Cena and Dwayne Johnson Team Up for Universal’s ‘The Janson Directive’

Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Fighting With My Family’ Pushed to 2019

“Skyscraper” doesn’t expand the scope or the rules of the summer action blockbuster, but it does follow the recipe in a supremely satisfying way.

So yes, you’ll recognize the DNA of other movies here — not just obvious antecedents like “Die Hard” and “The Towering Inferno,” but also “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol” and even “The Lady from Shanghai” — but that familiarity won’t interfere with the vertiginous thrills, the breathtaking stunts (and CG), and the near-constant state of adrenaline-fueled action.

Writer-director Rawson Marshall Thurber (“Central Intelligence”) sets up the pins to knock them down later: there’s nothing we learn in the first 10 minutes of the film that won’t come up again in the last 10 minutes. Still, he sets up an impressive array of obstacles, as well as characters who are solid enough to overcome them.

In an opening flashback 10 years earlier, FBI agent Will Sawyer (Dwayne Johnson) loses a leg when a hostage situation goes from bad to worse. Sarah (Neve Campbell), the surgeon who stitches him up, becomes his wife, and as the film opens, they’re in Hong Kong, where Will is up for a job as chief of security for The Pearl, a mega-high-rise that’s three times as tall as the Empire State Building.

It turns out, of course, that Will is being set up as patsy by a group of no-goodniks led by international mobster Kores Botha (Roland Møller, “The Commuter”) who wants a MacGuffin that’s locked up in a safe nestled in the penthouse owned by the Pearl’s billionaire builder Zhao Long Ji (Chin Han, “Marco Polo”). Ultimately, the plot is there merely as connective tissue between the stunts that involve getting Will back into a burning skyscraper (via a crane 100 stories above the ground) and his eventual rescue of Sarah and their twin children (McKenna Roberts and Noah Cottrell).

Sarah, it’s worth nothing, is nobody’s victim; a Navy surgeon who served three tours in Afghanistan, she’s just as capable as Will when it comes to facing whatever catastrophes come her way. (There’s one less element of surprise for the Sawyers in the casting of the bad guys; some of them are supposed to be reveals along the way, but the actors in question do everything but twirl their mustaches.) Will’s prosthetic leg, in the meantime, winds up being more of a secret weapon than an impediment, as the script cleverly finds ways for it, and for duct tape, to come to the rescue.

(It’s worth noting that “Skyscraper” is hitting theaters the same weekend as “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” which features Joaquin Phoenix as quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan. The casting of these actors as characters with disabilities will and should stoke the conversation about whether or not such roles should be played by able-bodied performers.)

Cinematographer Robert Elswit (“Inherent Vice”) makes great use of the anamorphic screen, whether he’s capturing the vast, vertical wonders of the Pearl or creating those heart-in-throat shots of Will dangling outside its windows. The raging fire against the backdrop of the night sky (and the bright lights of downtown Kowloon) give the story a dazzling and occasionally terrifying backdrop.

“Skyscraper” doesn’t change the action-movie game the way “Die Hard” did, but it’s a solidly entertaining summer diversion best enjoyed on the biggest theater — or even better, drive-in — screen you can find. And if you’re afraid of heights, make sure there’s an armrest — or even better, an arm — that you can grab.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson Moves to Los Angeles in 'Ballers' Season 4 First Look Trailer (Video)

Dwayne Johnson's Next Movie Deal Included $1 Million for His Own Ad Agency

John Cena and Dwayne Johnson Team Up for Universal's 'The Janson Directive'

Dwayne Johnson's 'Fighting With My Family' Pushed to 2019

‘Skyscraper’ Trailer Shows Dwayne Johnson Can Still Kick Butt With Prosthetic Leg (Video)

Dwayne Johnson proves he can still kick butt even with a prosthetic leg in the new full trailer for his summer action movie “Skyscraper.”

The Universal/Legendary Pictures production stars Johnson as Will Ford, a former FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran who now assesses security for skyscrapers.

In China, he finds the tallest and safest building on the planet suddenly ablaze — and he’s the only one who can deal with the the threat and save his family from a bunch of terrorists (led by Roland Moller) and unravel whatever conspiracy is going on. “There’s a reason they chose this building,” Chin Han’s wealthy developer tells him.

Also Read: ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Is Now Dwayne Johnson’s Biggest Domestic Release

Further details are pretty scant in this trailer, so we’ll have to wait to find out more about the apparent “Die Hard”-esque plot. So, for now, lots of shots of bad guys shooting guns and The Rock doing crazy stunts will have to suffice.

The new trailer, which debuted during “The Tonight Show” after the Super Bowl, shows Ford struggling to survive as he dangles from a cord thousands of feet above the ground — and then leaping off a very-high-off-the-ground crane into open air.

Rawson M. Thurber wrote and directed the “Die Hard”-like thriller, with Neve Campbell, Chin Han, and Pablo Schreiber also starring.

“Skyscraper” hits theaters July 18. Watch the trailer in the embedded video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Is Now Dwayne Johnson’s Biggest Domestic Release

Emily Blunt to Star in Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Jungle Cruise’

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Says He Has ‘No Plans’ to Make Another ‘Journey’ Movie

Dwayne Johnson Won’t Run for President… Because of Kevin Hart (Video)

Dwayne Johnson proves he can still kick butt even with a prosthetic leg in the new full trailer for his summer action movie “Skyscraper.”

The Universal/Legendary Pictures production stars Johnson as Will Ford, a former FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran who now assesses security for skyscrapers.

In China, he finds the tallest and safest building on the planet suddenly ablaze — and he’s the only one who can deal with the the threat and save his family from a bunch of terrorists (led by Roland Moller) and unravel whatever conspiracy is going on. “There’s a reason they chose this building,” Chin Han’s wealthy developer tells him.

Further details are pretty scant in this trailer, so we’ll have to wait to find out more about the apparent “Die Hard”-esque plot. So, for now, lots of shots of bad guys shooting guns and The Rock doing crazy stunts will have to suffice.

The new trailer, which debuted during “The Tonight Show” after the Super Bowl, shows Ford struggling to survive as he dangles from a cord thousands of feet above the ground — and then leaping off a very-high-off-the-ground crane into open air.

Rawson M. Thurber wrote and directed the “Die Hard”-like thriller, with Neve Campbell, Chin Han, and Pablo Schreiber also starring.

“Skyscraper” hits theaters July 18. Watch the trailer in the embedded video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle' Is Now Dwayne Johnson's Biggest Domestic Release

Emily Blunt to Star in Dwayne Johnson's 'Jungle Cruise'

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson Says He Has 'No Plans' to Make Another 'Journey' Movie

Dwayne Johnson Won't Run for President… Because of Kevin Hart (Video)

‘Scream’ Star Skeet Ulrich Calls Harvey Weinstein ‘Deplorable’ (Video)

A leading man from “Scream,” the iconic slasher movie from Bob Weinstein’s Dimension Films, spoke out on the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct scandal currently rocking Hollywood.

Skeet Ulrich, who played Billy Loomis in the 1996 Wes Craven project, visited TheWrap Studios on Monday where he discussed the decades-long rape and sexual harassment charges Harvey is facing.

“I think its deplorable, and I think any person with a conscience is relieved that it’s finally come out and he’s facing justice,” Ulrich told host Stuart Brazell.

Also Read: Producers Guild Votes Unanimously to Terminate Harvey Weinstein’s Membership

“If we could push that to our presidency as well, that would be great,” Ulrich added.

“Scream” was a genre sensation that spawned three sequels and went on to gross nearly $540 million total for Dimension at the worldwide box office, according to The Numbers.

Ulrich costarred in the film with Rose McGowan, one Harvey’s accusers and arguably the most vocal among dozens of women who said the mogul assaulted them. Additional “Scream” stars include Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox and David Arquette.

Ulrich is currently guest starring on The CW’s “Riverdale,” as a gang leader on the edge of a small town.

Watch the full interview above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Screenwriter’s Harvey Weinstein Confession: ‘Everybody-F—ing-Knew’

Gretchen Carlson’s Lawyer: Harvey Weinstein Can Be Sued by Employees He Never Targeted

Here’s Who Can Sue Harvey Weinstein – and Who Can’t

A leading man from “Scream,” the iconic slasher movie from Bob Weinstein’s Dimension Films, spoke out on the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct scandal currently rocking Hollywood.

Skeet Ulrich, who played Billy Loomis in the 1996 Wes Craven project, visited TheWrap Studios on Monday where he discussed the decades-long rape and sexual harassment charges Harvey is facing.

“I think its deplorable, and I think any person with a conscience is relieved that it’s finally come out and he’s facing justice,” Ulrich told host Stuart Brazell.

“If we could push that to our presidency as well, that would be great,” Ulrich added.

“Scream” was a genre sensation that spawned three sequels and went on to gross nearly $540 million total for Dimension at the worldwide box office, according to The Numbers.

Ulrich costarred in the film with Rose McGowan, one Harvey’s accusers and arguably the most vocal among dozens of women who said the mogul assaulted them. Additional “Scream” stars include Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox and David Arquette.

Ulrich is currently guest starring on The CW’s “Riverdale,” as a gang leader on the edge of a small town.

Watch the full interview above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Screenwriter's Harvey Weinstein Confession: 'Everybody-F—ing-Knew'

Gretchen Carlson's Lawyer: Harvey Weinstein Can Be Sued by Employees He Never Targeted

Here's Who Can Sue Harvey Weinstein – and Who Can't

‘Ghost In The Shell’ Star Chin Han To Scale ‘Skyscraper’ With Dwayne Johnson

EXCLUSIVE: Legendary’s upcoming 3D action-thriller Skyscraper has added Chin Han to the cast. The Ghost In The Shell actor will join Dwayne Johnson and Neve Campbell in the movie written and directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber.
The movie stars Johnson as Will, a former FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran who now assesses security for skyscrapers. On assignment in Hong Kong, he finds the tallest, safest building in the world suddenly ablaze, and he’s been…

EXCLUSIVE: Legendary’s upcoming 3D action-thriller Skyscraper has added Chin Han to the cast. The Ghost In The Shell actor will join Dwayne Johnson and Neve Campbell in the movie written and directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber. The movie stars Johnson as Will, a former FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran who now assesses security for skyscrapers. On assignment in Hong Kong, he finds the tallest, safest building in the world suddenly ablaze, and he's been…

33 Major ‘House of Cards’ Characters, Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

“House of Cards” is full of bad people, from the corrupt and power-hungry Underwoods, to their many lackeys and opponents. With so many shades of gray, we’ve waded into through the series to rank every single character mired in the show’s Washington D.C. swamp.

Yusuf Al Ahmadi (Farshad Farahat)
The terrorist leader of “House of Cards” ISIS analogue ICO doesn’t get much in the way of screen time. His big moment is refusing to play the Underwoods’ game, which results in the beheading of an innocent man — all in all, a pretty terrible dude.

Nathan Green (Jeremy Holm)
FBI Agent Nathan Green is Doug Stamper’s Doug Stamper, but with less of the interesting and horrific baggage and terrible relationships.

Elizabeth Hale (Ellen Burstyn)
Claire and her mother Elizabeth have a pretty terrible relationship. She’s pretty terrible to Claire pretty much all the time, until she dies of cancer. Then again, maybe she was right, since Claire uses her mom’s death for political gain.

Janine Skorsky (Constance Zimmer)
Skorsky is a rough reporter just like Barnes, admitting to using sex to get a story as often as dogged reporting. She comes off like a journalist for whom getting to the truth is everything, but when Zoe Barnes is killed, she cuts and runs. In fact, Skorsky winds up selling out Lucas Goodwin to save herself because she’s so scared of Frank Underwood and his goons. It’s hard to blame her for not wanting to get murdered, but she also bears a lot of responsibility for not stopping Underwood several seasons ago.

Edward Meechum (Nathan Darrow)
The Underwoods have a tendency to inspire intense loyalty in their underlings, and Meechum was one of the most loyal. The Secret Service agent might have even fallen in love with the Underwoods. Like a lot of people in “House of Cards,” though, Meechum was ultimately a bit more of a tool than a person.

Hannah Conway (Dominique McElligott)
Will Conway’s wife wants to be the First Lady, but like Conway, starts to bend under the pressure of all the political garbage. Like a lot of people in “House of Cards,” she’s just not equipped to go up against the Underwoods, but she’s at least a pretty good wife.

Donald Blythe (Reed Birney)
Frank has no respect for his eventual vice president, and despite trying to be a good person and a good politician, Blythe winds up as an Underwood collaborator. He’s spends a lot of the series pretty checked out, except for when he proves what a terrible president he’d be.

Gavin Orsay (Jimmi Simpson)
The shifty computer hacker enlisted by Lucas Goodwin did a pretty good job of extorting everyone for a while there. But he was mostly a tool of Doug Stamper and Frank Underwood, and got himself beat up for trying to game the bad guys.

Kate Baldwin (Kim Dickens)
A journalistic thorn in the administration’s side for a bit, Kate Baldwin never quite amounted to a serious check on the Underwoods. Despite her best efforts, though, she can’t stop Frank and Claire with the mere deployment of the truth.

General Brockhart (Colm Feore)
The Republican vice presidential candidate is actually a pretty good guy. He joins the ticket with the intent to do good in the Middle East and protect soldiers, but of course, the politicking ruins his plans. Unfortunately he’s pretty ineffectual against the Underwoods, on account of not being nearly evil enough.

Garrett Walker (Michel Gill)
Other than Peter Russo, nobody got gamed so completely as former President Walker. After slighting Frank and starting him on his ambitious path, he managed to not realize Frank was manipulating everyone everywhere to take over his presidency. He’s the ultimate example of playing checkers while his opponent was playing 4D chess.

Seth Grayson (Derek Cecil)
For a while, it seemed like Seth might be enough of a shark to handle being the Underwood administration’s press secretary. The longer time goes on, though, the more he’s looking like he’s in over his head and unsure how to get out. It seems lucky Seth hasn’t already gotten crushed under the boot heel of Doug Stamper.

Adam Galloway (Ben Daniels)
Claire managed to turn Galloway’s love for her into hatred when Remy and Raymond Tusk threatened to expose her affair with him. After some maneuvering, the Underwoods managed to shut him up, but for a bit Galloway was the good dude Claire could have been with.

LeAnn Harvey (Neve Campbell)
Like everyone in the Underwoods’ circle, LeAnn’s willing to be ruthless and break the law. If she’s ever feeling any remorse about rampantly breaking the law and probably ruining America, she doesn’t show it.

Christina Gallagher (Kristen Connolly)
Peter Russo’s assistant and girlfriend found him self-destructing under Frank’s influence. As one of the rare seemingly actually good people on “House of Cards,” she fights valiantly for Russo for as long as she can manage, but ultimately can’t help him get himself together.

Linda Vasquez (Sakina Jaffrey)
Garrett Walker’s chief of staff talked a big game for a while, but she ultimately had no idea what Frank was doing the entire time he was doing it. Frank at least has a lot of respect for Vasquez, even if he does completely defeat.

Cathy Durant (Jayne Atkinson)
Cathy helped Underwood at plenty of key moments in his bid to oust and replace Walker. It earned her the job of Secretary of State, making her a pretty intense collaborator. She occasionally has misgivings about the awful things the Underwoods are willing to do, but she mostly chooses to look the other way and pretend it’s not happening.

Viktor Petrov (Lars Mikkelsen)
The “House of Cards” version of Russian president Vladimir Putin is a lot like Frank Underwood, but more hilariously rude. The only thing better than being a hyper-intelligent Machiavellian mastermind is being an insulting one.

Will Conway (Joel Kinnaman)
The Republican presidential candidate in the 2016 election isn’t quite as slimy as Frank Underwood, but he’s no saint. Conway would steal an election if he could — and he tried, a bit — and Kinnaman plays him with a simmering rage that makes him seem like he could start beating his wife at any moment.

Rachel Posner (Rachel Brosnahan)
After getting stuck in the weird prisoner-slash-ward relationship with Doug Stamper, Rachel fought pretty hard to escape his grasp. She almost managed it, too, and her cracking of Doug’s skull was pretty powerful moment. But loose ends don’t escape the Underwoods, unfortunately.

Lucas Goodwin (Sebastian Arcelus)
Good guy Lucas is like a knight trying to slay a dragon. He’s way out of his depth as he tries to go after Frank Underwood for Zoe Barnes’ death, and gets immediately squashed because of it. He gets closer than anyone to taking down Frank, but only with a suicidal assassination attempt.

Tom Hammerschmidt (Boris McGiver)
The journalist who grabbed up the mantle after Lucas Goodwin and Zoe Barnes were both killed took an awful long time to come around on believing in the corruption of the Underwoods, but he’s become the most dogged truth-seeker still operating in “House of Cards.” Hammerschmidt’s has to figure he’s in the crosshairs by now, but his unwillingness to give up on exposing the Underwoods’ actions to the light of day is making him the best hero the show has.

Zoe Barnes (Kata Mara)
Zoe is one of those TV journalists who’s got no ethics and does anything for a story — which makes for good TV but not actually for good journalism. Better journalistic ethics might have saved her from getting tossed in front of a train by Frank Underwood.

Peter Russo (Corey Stoll)
Nobody’s sadder in the world of “House of Cards” than Peter Russo. A politician who came to Washington to try to do some good, he can’t stop self-destructing — with Frank Underwood‘s assistance, of course. It’s a bummer what a schlub he was, considering how much he wants to be a good guy.

Heather Dunbar (Elizabeth Marvel)
For a bit, Heather Dunbar seemed like an actual good guy in the world of “House of Cards,” when she served as special prosecutor on the Walker case, and later as the Democratic candidate against Frank. But politics got the best of her, and when she turned away Lucas Goodwin when he begged her for help taking Frank because it didn’t look great politically, it wound up costing her campaign.

Freddy (Reg E. Cathey)
If Frank ever actually had a real friend, it might have been Freddy. Except Freddy didn’t think so, because as he made clear, Frank only knows how to use people. Though Frank’s battles with Remy wrecked Freddy’s chance at franchising his rib restaurant, he at least got to call the president a motherf—er.

Raymond Tusk (Gerald McRaney)
Billionaire Tusk was a formidable opponent for Underwood, at least for a while. His “general on the battlefield” air and easygoing nature makes him a fun bad guy to watch while he used his money and power to ruin people close to Frank.

Remy Danton (Mahershala Ali)
Remy’s always known what the deal is with Frank, and for a while there, he seemed like he could keep up. But between his affair with Jackie Sharp and his throwing in with Raymond Tusk, Remy eventually couldn’t keep up with the King of Corruption.

Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey)
There’s a reason there are five seasons of “House of Cards.” For some reason, it’s a lot of fun to watch a shockingly evil guy shock us with his evil over and over. He’s pretty much a cartoon supervillain. What’s strange about Frank is that he wants the presidency really badly, but doesn’t really seem to want to do anything with it. He’s always politicking, but never actually accomplishing anything. You’d think endless ambition would get boring. It doesn’t, though.

Tom Yates (Paul Sparks)
Flawed, weird and fascinating, writer Tom Yates gets close to the Underwoods and then can’t seem to pull away from them. His disaffected air of willingness to see how spooky the Underwoods can be, and write about it, matches well with his attachment to Claire, making him one of the most complex non-Underwood characters on the show.

Doug Stamper (Michael Kelly)
Frank’s personal Darth Vader is unfailingly, ridiculously loyal. He’s also an awful intense creeper of a guy who keeps wrecking people with his personal relationships. Stamper is incredibly screwed up, which makes him a compelling, but cringe-worthy watch.

Jackie Sharp (Molly Parker)
Jackie’s struggle with the mess Frank continually pulled her into was one of the key engines that ran the early seasons of “House of Cards.” Her internal battle between ambition and corruption, and not being a completely terrible person, was an interesting counter to the Underwood machinations. Her eventual attempt to strike back at Underwood ultimately failed, but at least she got to give it a shot.

Claire Underwood (Robin Wright)
The only person proven to be Frank’s equal in cunning, ruthlessness and ambition is Claire. She beats him out in guile, though, because where Frank can’t help but gloat, Claire’s more stealthy in her means of destroying people and consolidating power. Probably before the end, she’s going to take down everyone in her way, including her husband.

“House of Cards” is full of bad people, from the corrupt and power-hungry Underwoods, to their many lackeys and opponents. With so many shades of gray, we’ve waded into through the series to rank every single character mired in the show’s Washington D.C. swamp.

Yusuf Al Ahmadi (Farshad Farahat)
The terrorist leader of “House of Cards” ISIS analogue ICO doesn’t get much in the way of screen time. His big moment is refusing to play the Underwoods’ game, which results in the beheading of an innocent man — all in all, a pretty terrible dude.

Nathan Green (Jeremy Holm)
FBI Agent Nathan Green is Doug Stamper’s Doug Stamper, but with less of the interesting and horrific baggage and terrible relationships.

Elizabeth Hale (Ellen Burstyn)
Claire and her mother Elizabeth have a pretty terrible relationship. She’s pretty terrible to Claire pretty much all the time, until she dies of cancer. Then again, maybe she was right, since Claire uses her mom’s death for political gain.

Janine Skorsky (Constance Zimmer)
Skorsky is a rough reporter just like Barnes, admitting to using sex to get a story as often as dogged reporting. She comes off like a journalist for whom getting to the truth is everything, but when Zoe Barnes is killed, she cuts and runs. In fact, Skorsky winds up selling out Lucas Goodwin to save herself because she’s so scared of Frank Underwood and his goons. It’s hard to blame her for not wanting to get murdered, but she also bears a lot of responsibility for not stopping Underwood several seasons ago.

Edward Meechum (Nathan Darrow)
The Underwoods have a tendency to inspire intense loyalty in their underlings, and Meechum was one of the most loyal. The Secret Service agent might have even fallen in love with the Underwoods. Like a lot of people in “House of Cards,” though, Meechum was ultimately a bit more of a tool than a person.

Hannah Conway (Dominique McElligott)
Will Conway’s wife wants to be the First Lady, but like Conway, starts to bend under the pressure of all the political garbage. Like a lot of people in “House of Cards,” she’s just not equipped to go up against the Underwoods, but she’s at least a pretty good wife.

Donald Blythe (Reed Birney)
Frank has no respect for his eventual vice president, and despite trying to be a good person and a good politician, Blythe winds up as an Underwood collaborator. He’s spends a lot of the series pretty checked out, except for when he proves what a terrible president he’d be.

Gavin Orsay (Jimmi Simpson)
The shifty computer hacker enlisted by Lucas Goodwin did a pretty good job of extorting everyone for a while there. But he was mostly a tool of Doug Stamper and Frank Underwood, and got himself beat up for trying to game the bad guys.

Kate Baldwin (Kim Dickens)
A journalistic thorn in the administration’s side for a bit, Kate Baldwin never quite amounted to a serious check on the Underwoods. Despite her best efforts, though, she can’t stop Frank and Claire with the mere deployment of the truth.

General Brockhart (Colm Feore)
The Republican vice presidential candidate is actually a pretty good guy. He joins the ticket with the intent to do good in the Middle East and protect soldiers, but of course, the politicking ruins his plans. Unfortunately he’s pretty ineffectual against the Underwoods, on account of not being nearly evil enough.

Garrett Walker (Michel Gill)
Other than Peter Russo, nobody got gamed so completely as former President Walker. After slighting Frank and starting him on his ambitious path, he managed to not realize Frank was manipulating everyone everywhere to take over his presidency. He’s the ultimate example of playing checkers while his opponent was playing 4D chess.

Seth Grayson (Derek Cecil)
For a while, it seemed like Seth might be enough of a shark to handle being the Underwood administration’s press secretary. The longer time goes on, though, the more he’s looking like he’s in over his head and unsure how to get out. It seems lucky Seth hasn’t already gotten crushed under the boot heel of Doug Stamper.

Adam Galloway (Ben Daniels)
Claire managed to turn Galloway’s love for her into hatred when Remy and Raymond Tusk threatened to expose her affair with him. After some maneuvering, the Underwoods managed to shut him up, but for a bit Galloway was the good dude Claire could have been with.

LeAnn Harvey (Neve Campbell)
Like everyone in the Underwoods’ circle, LeAnn’s willing to be ruthless and break the law. If she’s ever feeling any remorse about rampantly breaking the law and probably ruining America, she doesn’t show it.

Christina Gallagher (Kristen Connolly)
Peter Russo’s assistant and girlfriend found him self-destructing under Frank’s influence. As one of the rare seemingly actually good people on “House of Cards,” she fights valiantly for Russo for as long as she can manage, but ultimately can’t help him get himself together.

Linda Vasquez (Sakina Jaffrey)
Garrett Walker’s chief of staff talked a big game for a while, but she ultimately had no idea what Frank was doing the entire time he was doing it. Frank at least has a lot of respect for Vasquez, even if he does completely defeat.

Cathy Durant (Jayne Atkinson)
Cathy helped Underwood at plenty of key moments in his bid to oust and replace Walker. It earned her the job of Secretary of State, making her a pretty intense collaborator. She occasionally has misgivings about the awful things the Underwoods are willing to do, but she mostly chooses to look the other way and pretend it’s not happening.

Viktor Petrov (Lars Mikkelsen)
The “House of Cards” version of Russian president Vladimir Putin is a lot like Frank Underwood, but more hilariously rude. The only thing better than being a hyper-intelligent Machiavellian mastermind is being an insulting one.

Will Conway (Joel Kinnaman)
The Republican presidential candidate in the 2016 election isn’t quite as slimy as Frank Underwood, but he’s no saint. Conway would steal an election if he could — and he tried, a bit — and Kinnaman plays him with a simmering rage that makes him seem like he could start beating his wife at any moment.

Rachel Posner (Rachel Brosnahan)
After getting stuck in the weird prisoner-slash-ward relationship with Doug Stamper, Rachel fought pretty hard to escape his grasp. She almost managed it, too, and her cracking of Doug’s skull was pretty powerful moment. But loose ends don’t escape the Underwoods, unfortunately.

Lucas Goodwin (Sebastian Arcelus)
Good guy Lucas is like a knight trying to slay a dragon. He’s way out of his depth as he tries to go after Frank Underwood for Zoe Barnes’ death, and gets immediately squashed because of it. He gets closer than anyone to taking down Frank, but only with a suicidal assassination attempt.

Tom Hammerschmidt (Boris McGiver)
The journalist who grabbed up the mantle after Lucas Goodwin and Zoe Barnes were both killed took an awful long time to come around on believing in the corruption of the Underwoods, but he’s become the most dogged truth-seeker still operating in “House of Cards.” Hammerschmidt’s has to figure he’s in the crosshairs by now, but his unwillingness to give up on exposing the Underwoods’ actions to the light of day is making him the best hero the show has.

Zoe Barnes (Kata Mara)
Zoe is one of those TV journalists who’s got no ethics and does anything for a story — which makes for good TV but not actually for good journalism. Better journalistic ethics might have saved her from getting tossed in front of a train by Frank Underwood.

Peter Russo (Corey Stoll)
Nobody’s sadder in the world of “House of Cards” than Peter Russo. A politician who came to Washington to try to do some good, he can’t stop self-destructing — with Frank Underwood‘s assistance, of course. It’s a bummer what a schlub he was, considering how much he wants to be a good guy.

Heather Dunbar (Elizabeth Marvel)
For a bit, Heather Dunbar seemed like an actual good guy in the world of “House of Cards,” when she served as special prosecutor on the Walker case, and later as the Democratic candidate against Frank. But politics got the best of her, and when she turned away Lucas Goodwin when he begged her for help taking Frank because it didn’t look great politically, it wound up costing her campaign.

Freddy (Reg E. Cathey)
If Frank ever actually had a real friend, it might have been Freddy. Except Freddy didn’t think so, because as he made clear, Frank only knows how to use people. Though Frank’s battles with Remy wrecked Freddy’s chance at franchising his rib restaurant, he at least got to call the president a motherf—er.

Raymond Tusk (Gerald McRaney)
Billionaire Tusk was a formidable opponent for Underwood, at least for a while. His “general on the battlefield” air and easygoing nature makes him a fun bad guy to watch while he used his money and power to ruin people close to Frank.

Remy Danton (Mahershala Ali)
Remy’s always known what the deal is with Frank, and for a while there, he seemed like he could keep up. But between his affair with Jackie Sharp and his throwing in with Raymond Tusk, Remy eventually couldn’t keep up with the King of Corruption.

Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey)
There’s a reason there are five seasons of “House of Cards.” For some reason, it’s a lot of fun to watch a shockingly evil guy shock us with his evil over and over. He’s pretty much a cartoon supervillain. What’s strange about Frank is that he wants the presidency really badly, but doesn’t really seem to want to do anything with it. He’s always politicking, but never actually accomplishing anything. You’d think endless ambition would get boring. It doesn’t, though.

Tom Yates (Paul Sparks)
Flawed, weird and fascinating, writer Tom Yates gets close to the Underwoods and then can’t seem to pull away from them. His disaffected air of willingness to see how spooky the Underwoods can be, and write about it, matches well with his attachment to Claire, making him one of the most complex non-Underwood characters on the show.

Doug Stamper (Michael Kelly)
Frank’s personal Darth Vader is unfailingly, ridiculously loyal. He’s also an awful intense creeper of a guy who keeps wrecking people with his personal relationships. Stamper is incredibly screwed up, which makes him a compelling, but cringe-worthy watch.

Jackie Sharp (Molly Parker)
Jackie’s struggle with the mess Frank continually pulled her into was one of the key engines that ran the early seasons of “House of Cards.” Her internal battle between ambition and corruption, and not being a completely terrible person, was an interesting counter to the Underwood machinations. Her eventual attempt to strike back at Underwood ultimately failed, but at least she got to give it a shot.

Claire Underwood (Robin Wright)
The only person proven to be Frank’s equal in cunning, ruthlessness and ambition is Claire. She beats him out in guile, though, because where Frank can’t help but gloat, Claire’s more stealthy in her means of destroying people and consolidating power. Probably before the end, she’s going to take down everyone in her way, including her husband.

‘House of Cards’: All the Characters You Need To Remember Before Season 5 (Photos)

Sure, you remember Frank and Claire Underwood, and their trusted advisor Doug Stamper — and probably Will Conway, their Republican challenger in the presidential election. But there are a whole lot of other “House of Cards” characters who are easy to forget in a show with this many moving pieces.

Peter Russo (Corey Stoll)

Frank Underwood’s first major victim is Peter Russo, a Pennsylvania congressman who Underwood covers for, gaining leverage over him. Then when Underwood needed Russo to cave, he orchestrated a situation to cause him to slip back into alcoholism. Frank finished his total destruction of Russo by murdering him and making it look like a suicide.

President Garrett Walker (Michael Gill)

The former Democratic president, Walker made the major error of not giving Frank the Secretary of State position he’d been promised. So Frank made it his mission to get revenge, destroy Walker and steal his presidency. It took a long time and tons of political moves, but Frank eventually managed to get Walker to make him Vice President, then got Walker impeached.

Remy Danton (Mahershala Ali)

A former employee of Frank Underwood’s from way back, Remy became a lobbyist, and then worked for Raymond Tusk. For a while, Remy was Frank’s chief of staff, but eventually Remy flips on Frank, confirming details to journalist Tom Hammerschmidt about Frank’s involvement in impeaching former President Garrett Walker before making his exit from the political stage.

Jackie Sharp (Molly Parker)

A former ally of Frank’s, Jackie was manipulated so much into betraying people for his benefit, she started to see his true colors. She briefly ran for president against Heather Dunbar, but Frank backstabbed her and she dropped out and endorsed Dunbar against Frank instead. She also corroborated her role in helping Frank against Walker in Hammerschmidt’s story.

Tom Yates (Paul Sparks)

Frank originally commissioned Tom to write about his pet legislation, “America Works,” which morphed into a book about Underwood himself. But Frank fired Tom when he didn’t like the candid portrait of the Underwoods the author was writing. But he helped convince Claire to leave Frank in Season 3, then came on as Claire’s speechwriter when she became Frank’s running mate. Oh, and Tom and Claire are having an affair.

Leann Harvey (Neve Campbell)

The Underwoods’ campaign manager is as ruthless as they are. One of her biggest contributions was helping connect Frank with Aiden McCallen, the data scientist who discovered Republican presidential nominee Will Conway was manipulating search engine traffic to get a leg-up in the election.

Aidan MacAllan (Damian Young)
A data scientist for the NSA, Aidan has been the Underwoods’ ace in the hole for the entire 2016 election. He’s using domestic surveillance to aid their campaign in a completely illegal manner, but he’s unsure and twitchy about the whole idea.

Secretary of State Catherine Durant (Jayne Atkinson)

Former Democratic Senator Cathy Durant has been a key ally of Frank’s all through his machinations to become president. She helped him way back in Season 1, and got the Secretary of State nomination for her trouble. She’s been having second thoughts about the way Frank runs the country for a while though.

Zoe Barnes (Kate Mara)

Zoe started as a journalist with questionable ethics who had an affair with Frank as a mutually beneficial relationship. He’d provide her with leaks, she’d write the stories he wanted. But she started to uncover more and more about Frank, including his murder of Peter Russo. Before she could do much with the information, Frank threw her in front of a train.

Lucas Goodwin (Sebastian Arcelus)

Zoe’s former editor took up the case after her death, enlisting hacker Gavin Orsay to help him break into AT&T to discover if Frank and Zoe really were having an affair. It was actually an FBI sting orchestrated by Doug Stamper, though, and Gavin was run up on cyberterrorism charges. Knowing that Frank had killed Zoe and Russo but unable to prove it, Gavin shot the president, and was killed during the assassination attempt.

Tom Hammerschmidt (Boris McGiver)

The latest journalist to try to take down Frank Underwood. Hammerschmidt started looking into what Lucas found out about Zoe and started trying to track it down. As editor-in-chief of the Washington Herald, he’s had some success, and he’s slowly tracking down more and more about the Underwoods. He hasn’t quite convinced anyone they’re actually supervillains yet, though.

Nathan Green (Jeremy Holm)

FBI guy Nathan Green is a friend of Doug Stamper’s, and when Lucas Goodwin put out a post on the Deep Web looking for someone to help him get information by hacking AT&T, Green spotted it. That allowed Stamper to frame Goodwin for cyberterrorism, with the help of hacker Gavin Orsay, who Green worked with. Green’s been elevated in the FBI for helping cover Frank’s back.

Rachel Posner (Rachel Brosnahan)

Rachel was a prostitute that got mixed up with Russo in 2013. Stamper paid her to keep quiet about being with the politician, and then he started paying her to sleep with him as well. Eventually, Stamper used Rachel to help get Russo drinking again, crushing his governor aspirations as part of Frank’s master plan. But Stamper got way too clingy with Rachel and she tries to escape his grasp, making her a potentially damaging loose end. With Orsay’s help, he eventually tracks her down and kills her. That leaves only Lisa Williams, Rachel’s girlfriend, actively looking for her.

Tim Corbet (David Andrews)

Tim is Frank’s good friend from college, but in fact their relationship was actually romantic. Frank feels very strongly for Tim, even though the two have moved on with their separate lives.

Vice President Donald Blythe (Reed Birney)

Frank basically hates Donald Blythe. He’s been using him since Season 1, carefully manipulating the congressman to get bills passed, ingratiate himself with other people, and execute his master plans. Frank made Blythe his vice president because he was an easy nomination and it was more politically useful to get Blythe out of Congress. Now Blythe is a vice president who doesn’t do a whole lot, and when he was left to take over the presidency when Frank was in a coma after being shot, pretty much found he wasn’t interested in the job.

Viktor Petrov (Lars Mikkelsen)

The Russian president, pretty obviously based on real-life leader Vladimir Putin, might be the smuggest person on “House of Cards,” and that’s definitely saying something. Petrov is as shrewd and ruthless as the Underwoods, but he’s a lot less polite about it most of the time. He’s continually locked horns with Frank and messed up his plans as president.

Augustus Underwood (Malcolm Madera)

Though his real name is Eric, the Civil War reenactor who portrayed Frank’s ancestor, Confederate soldier Augustus Underwood, endeared himself to the then-vice president during his visit to his home state. Eric told Frank a great deal about his great-great-great grandfather, including the details of his death during the Battle of Spotsylvania.

Gavin Orsay (Jimmi Simpson)

A hacker bagged by the FBI, Doug Stamper used Orsay to set up Lucas Goodwin as he was trying to find evidence about Zoe Barnes’ death. Instead, Orsay and the FBI got Goodwin arrested. Later Stamper sued Orsay to find the missing Rachel Posner, and Orsay tried to use the information to extort Stamper and get a pardon. Stamper, in turn, beat the hell out of him.

Sure, you remember Frank and Claire Underwood, and their trusted advisor Doug Stamper — and probably Will Conway, their Republican challenger in the presidential election. But there are a whole lot of other “House of Cards” characters who are easy to forget in a show with this many moving pieces.

Peter Russo (Corey Stoll)

Frank Underwood’s first major victim is Peter Russo, a Pennsylvania congressman who Underwood covers for, gaining leverage over him. Then when Underwood needed Russo to cave, he orchestrated a situation to cause him to slip back into alcoholism. Frank finished his total destruction of Russo by murdering him and making it look like a suicide.

President Garrett Walker (Michael Gill)

The former Democratic president, Walker made the major error of not giving Frank the Secretary of State position he’d been promised. So Frank made it his mission to get revenge, destroy Walker and steal his presidency. It took a long time and tons of political moves, but Frank eventually managed to get Walker to make him Vice President, then got Walker impeached.

Remy Danton (Mahershala Ali)

A former employee of Frank Underwood’s from way back, Remy became a lobbyist, and then worked for Raymond Tusk. For a while, Remy was Frank’s chief of staff, but eventually Remy flips on Frank, confirming details to journalist Tom Hammerschmidt about Frank’s involvement in impeaching former President Garrett Walker before making his exit from the political stage.

Jackie Sharp (Molly Parker)

A former ally of Frank’s, Jackie was manipulated so much into betraying people for his benefit, she started to see his true colors. She briefly ran for president against Heather Dunbar, but Frank backstabbed her and she dropped out and endorsed Dunbar against Frank instead. She also corroborated her role in helping Frank against Walker in Hammerschmidt’s story.

Tom Yates (Paul Sparks)

Frank originally commissioned Tom to write about his pet legislation, “America Works,” which morphed into a book about Underwood himself. But Frank fired Tom when he didn’t like the candid portrait of the Underwoods the author was writing. But he helped convince Claire to leave Frank in Season 3, then came on as Claire’s speechwriter when she became Frank’s running mate. Oh, and Tom and Claire are having an affair.

Leann Harvey (Neve Campbell)

The Underwoods’ campaign manager is as ruthless as they are. One of her biggest contributions was helping connect Frank with Aiden McCallen, the data scientist who discovered Republican presidential nominee Will Conway was manipulating search engine traffic to get a leg-up in the election.

Aidan MacAllan (Damian Young)
A data scientist for the NSA, Aidan has been the Underwoods’ ace in the hole for the entire 2016 election. He’s using domestic surveillance to aid their campaign in a completely illegal manner, but he’s unsure and twitchy about the whole idea.

Secretary of State Catherine Durant (Jayne Atkinson)

Former Democratic Senator Cathy Durant has been a key ally of Frank’s all through his machinations to become president. She helped him way back in Season 1, and got the Secretary of State nomination for her trouble. She’s been having second thoughts about the way Frank runs the country for a while though.

Zoe Barnes (Kate Mara)

Zoe started as a journalist with questionable ethics who had an affair with Frank as a mutually beneficial relationship. He’d provide her with leaks, she’d write the stories he wanted. But she started to uncover more and more about Frank, including his murder of Peter Russo. Before she could do much with the information, Frank threw her in front of a train.

Lucas Goodwin (Sebastian Arcelus)

Zoe’s former editor took up the case after her death, enlisting hacker Gavin Orsay to help him break into AT&T to discover if Frank and Zoe really were having an affair. It was actually an FBI sting orchestrated by Doug Stamper, though, and Gavin was run up on cyberterrorism charges. Knowing that Frank had killed Zoe and Russo but unable to prove it, Gavin shot the president, and was killed during the assassination attempt.

Tom Hammerschmidt (Boris McGiver)

The latest journalist to try to take down Frank Underwood. Hammerschmidt started looking into what Lucas found out about Zoe and started trying to track it down. As editor-in-chief of the Washington Herald, he’s had some success, and he’s slowly tracking down more and more about the Underwoods. He hasn’t quite convinced anyone they’re actually supervillains yet, though.

Nathan Green (Jeremy Holm)

FBI guy Nathan Green is a friend of Doug Stamper’s, and when Lucas Goodwin put out a post on the Deep Web looking for someone to help him get information by hacking AT&T, Green spotted it. That allowed Stamper to frame Goodwin for cyberterrorism, with the help of hacker Gavin Orsay, who Green worked with. Green’s been elevated in the FBI for helping cover Frank’s back.

Rachel Posner (Rachel Brosnahan)

Rachel was a prostitute that got mixed up with Russo in 2013. Stamper paid her to keep quiet about being with the politician, and then he started paying her to sleep with him as well. Eventually, Stamper used Rachel to help get Russo drinking again, crushing his governor aspirations as part of Frank’s master plan. But Stamper got way too clingy with Rachel and she tries to escape his grasp, making her a potentially damaging loose end. With Orsay’s help, he eventually tracks her down and kills her. That leaves only Lisa Williams, Rachel’s girlfriend, actively looking for her.

Tim Corbet (David Andrews)

Tim is Frank’s good friend from college, but in fact their relationship was actually romantic. Frank feels very strongly for Tim, even though the two have moved on with their separate lives.

Vice President Donald Blythe (Reed Birney)

Frank basically hates Donald Blythe. He’s been using him since Season 1, carefully manipulating the congressman to get bills passed, ingratiate himself with other people, and execute his master plans. Frank made Blythe his vice president because he was an easy nomination and it was more politically useful to get Blythe out of Congress. Now Blythe is a vice president who doesn’t do a whole lot, and when he was left to take over the presidency when Frank was in a coma after being shot, pretty much found he wasn’t interested in the job.

Viktor Petrov (Lars Mikkelsen)

The Russian president, pretty obviously based on real-life leader Vladimir Putin, might be the smuggest person on “House of Cards,” and that’s definitely saying something. Petrov is as shrewd and ruthless as the Underwoods, but he’s a lot less polite about it most of the time. He’s continually locked horns with Frank and messed up his plans as president.

Augustus Underwood (Malcolm Madera)

Though his real name is Eric, the Civil War reenactor who portrayed Frank’s ancestor, Confederate soldier Augustus Underwood, endeared himself to the then-vice president during his visit to his home state. Eric told Frank a great deal about his great-great-great grandfather, including the details of his death during the Battle of Spotsylvania.

Gavin Orsay (Jimmi Simpson)

A hacker bagged by the FBI, Doug Stamper used Orsay to set up Lucas Goodwin as he was trying to find evidence about Zoe Barnes’ death. Instead, Orsay and the FBI got Goodwin arrested. Later Stamper sued Orsay to find the missing Rachel Posner, and Orsay tried to use the information to extort Stamper and get a pardon. Stamper, in turn, beat the hell out of him.

‘Scream’ Turns 20: 10 Reasons It’s Still a Meta-Horror Masterpiece (Photos)

After years of bad slasher-movie sequels virtually ruined the genre, director Wes Craven and screenwriter Kevin Williamson revitalized it in 1996 with “Scream,” which turns 20 this week. But its tongue-in-cheek subject matter about killers and victims who know every movie trope inspired a generation of meta stories across genres. As we mark the 20th anniversary of “Scream,” let’s look at 10 reasons its a meta-horror classic.

In the famous opening sequence of “Scream,” Casey (Drew Barrymore) says she thinks the sequels to “A Nightmare on Elm Street” “sucked” after the killer tells her his favorite horror movie. Craven directed the original “Nightmare on Elm Street,” but was uninvolved in its sequels. The line serves as a clever wink to fans of the genre and sets the tone for the film.

In another reference to “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” Craven briefly makes a cameo as a school janitor dressed in villain Freddy Krueger’s original costume.

Barrymore, the most famous cast member at the time, was originally offered the role of protagonist Sidney (eventually played by Neve Campbell), but was drawn to the 12-minute opening scene because it established that anything could happen in the movie. Her quick death recalls Janet Leigh’s death midway through Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho.”

Jamie Kennedy’s character Randy lists four rules of horror movies: (1) You will not survive if you have sex, (2) if you drink or do drugs, or (3) if you say “I’ll be right back,” and (4) everyone is a suspect. Williamson’s script both adheres to these rules and subverts them, with characters deliberately pressing their luck and Craven toying with audience expectations.

Randy at one point watches Jamie Lee Curtis in “Halloween.” He pleads with her, “Turn around Jamie! He’s right behind you,” just as Ghostface creeps up on his own character. The joke works on two levels, because Kennedy and Lee Curtis share first names.

Near the end of the film, Skeet Ulrich’s character Billy licks fake blood off his fingers, telling Sidney it’s just corn syrup. Of course, the movie actually used fake blood made from dyed red corn syrup, over 50 gallons in all during production.

As explained in “Scream: The Inside Story,” “Scream” was sent to the MPAA for review nine times in order to secure an R-rating over an NC-17. Producer Bob Weinstein personally had to lobby the MPAA in order to get the film the lower rating. He convinced the MPAA that the film was effectively a comedy.

Similarly, Dimension Films initially offered the project to a number of other directors before Craven stepped in. Weinstein had to ask Williamson whether the script he just bought was a “funny movie with scares” or a “scary movie with humor.”

Williamson was inspired by some real-life murder cases in his hometown to write the screenplay, but the story itself borrows heavily from an earlier slasher film, “When a Stranger Calls” from 1979. Carol Kane plays a babysitter stalked by a killer who turns out to be in the house after calling her on the phone.

“Scream” was the subject of much debate after real murders occurred in which the killers said they were inspired by Craven’s film. In fact, Williamson’s script appears to preemptively address the discussion. “Movies don’t create psychos,” Uhlrich’s character says. “Movies make psychos more creative.”

 

 

After years of bad slasher-movie sequels virtually ruined the genre, director Wes Craven and screenwriter Kevin Williamson revitalized it in 1996 with “Scream,” which turns 20 this week. But its tongue-in-cheek subject matter about killers and victims who know every movie trope inspired a generation of meta stories across genres. As we mark the 20th anniversary of “Scream,” let’s look at 10 reasons its a meta-horror classic.

In the famous opening sequence of “Scream,” Casey (Drew Barrymore) says she thinks the sequels to “A Nightmare on Elm Street” “sucked” after the killer tells her his favorite horror movie. Craven directed the original “Nightmare on Elm Street,” but was uninvolved in its sequels. The line serves as a clever wink to fans of the genre and sets the tone for the film.

In another reference to “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” Craven briefly makes a cameo as a school janitor dressed in villain Freddy Krueger’s original costume.

Barrymore, the most famous cast member at the time, was originally offered the role of protagonist Sidney (eventually played by Neve Campbell), but was drawn to the 12-minute opening scene because it established that anything could happen in the movie. Her quick death recalls Janet Leigh’s death midway through Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho.”

Jamie Kennedy’s character Randy lists four rules of horror movies: (1) You will not survive if you have sex, (2) if you drink or do drugs, or (3) if you say “I’ll be right back,” and (4) everyone is a suspect. Williamson’s script both adheres to these rules and subverts them, with characters deliberately pressing their luck and Craven toying with audience expectations.

Randy at one point watches Jamie Lee Curtis in “Halloween.” He pleads with her, “Turn around Jamie! He’s right behind you,” just as Ghostface creeps up on his own character. The joke works on two levels, because Kennedy and Lee Curtis share first names.

Near the end of the film, Skeet Ulrich’s character Billy licks fake blood off his fingers, telling Sidney it’s just corn syrup. Of course, the movie actually used fake blood made from dyed red corn syrup, over 50 gallons in all during production.

As explained in “Scream: The Inside Story,” “Scream” was sent to the MPAA for review nine times in order to secure an R-rating over an NC-17. Producer Bob Weinstein personally had to lobby the MPAA in order to get the film the lower rating. He convinced the MPAA that the film was effectively a comedy.

Similarly, Dimension Films initially offered the project to a number of other directors before Craven stepped in. Weinstein had to ask Williamson whether the script he just bought was a “funny movie with scares” or a “scary movie with humor.”

Williamson was inspired by some real-life murder cases in his hometown to write the screenplay, but the story itself borrows heavily from an earlier slasher film, “When a Stranger Calls” from 1979. Carol Kane plays a babysitter stalked by a killer who turns out to be in the house after calling her on the phone.

“Scream” was the subject of much debate after real murders occurred in which the killers said they were inspired by Craven’s film. In fact, Williamson’s script appears to preemptively address the discussion. “Movies don’t create psychos,” Uhlrich’s character says. “Movies make psychos more creative.”