Elle Fanning Is a Punk Rock Alien in New ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Trailer (Video)

Elle Fanning plays an alien exploring the punk scene in London in the new trailer for “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Zan (Fanning) has broken off from her group while touring the galaxy to head to earth, where she meets two young inhabitants. In the trailer, Zan and Enn (played by Alex Sharp) engage in a romantic relationship while Zan experiences a lot of things for the first time.

Soon, however, Enn and his friends realize that Zan is different from other girls. And the best part about the trailer? Nicole Kidman is dressed in punk, seemingly leading the punk scene.

Also Read: Elle Fanning Says She ‘Regrets’ If Her Decision to Work With Woody Allen ‘Hurt Anyone’

The film, directed by John Cameron Mitchell, also stars Ruth Wilson and Matt Lucas. Neil Gaiman wrote a short story in 2006 on which this film is now based.

“How to Talk to Girls at Parties” will next play at the San Francisco International Film Festival on Friday. It had its world premiere at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2017.

Watch the trailer above.

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Elle Fanning plays an alien exploring the punk scene in London in the new trailer for “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Zan (Fanning) has broken off from her group while touring the galaxy to head to earth, where she meets two young inhabitants. In the trailer, Zan and Enn (played by Alex Sharp) engage in a romantic relationship while Zan experiences a lot of things for the first time.

Soon, however, Enn and his friends realize that Zan is different from other girls. And the best part about the trailer? Nicole Kidman is dressed in punk, seemingly leading the punk scene.

The film, directed by John Cameron Mitchell, also stars Ruth Wilson and Matt Lucas. Neil Gaiman wrote a short story in 2006 on which this film is now based.

“How to Talk to Girls at Parties” will next play at the San Francisco International Film Festival on Friday. It had its world premiere at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2017.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'3 Generations' Review: Elle Fanning Tries Hard in Timid Trans Tale

Elle Fanning to Play Aspiring Pop Idol In 'Teen Spirit'

Sundance: Elle Fanning, Geena Davis and More Celebs Sip Matching Latte Art (Photos)

Neil Gaiman & ‘A Beautiful Mind’s Akiva Goldsman To Adapt Fantasy Novels ‘Gormenghast’ For FremantleMedia

EXCLUSIVE: FremantleMedia North America is doubling down on the fantastical after securing the rights to sprawling novel series Gormenghast with Neil Gaiman and Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind) lined up to adapt for television.
I understand the company won a hotly contested battle to option the five books in the series, written by British author Mervyn Peake from literary agent Jonathan Sissons at Peters, Fraser and Dunlop.
It marks the first television adaptation of the…

EXCLUSIVE: FremantleMedia North America is doubling down on the fantastical after securing the rights to sprawling novel series Gormenghast with Neil Gaiman and Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind) lined up to adapt for television. I understand the company won a hotly contested battle to option the five books in the series, written by British author Mervyn Peake from literary agent Jonathan Sissons at Peters, Fraser and Dunlop. It marks the first television adaptation of the…

‘Boiled Angels: The Trial of Mike Diana’ Film Review: Neil Gaiman, George Romero and Others Reflect on Free Speech

“Hardcore, psychopathic material.” “Filled with sadism, masochism, and perversion.” “The most offensive zine ever made.” As we learn right up front in Frank Henenlotter’s compelling documentary, “Boiled Angels: The Trial of Mike Diana,” there are a lot of ways to describe Mike Diana’s underground comics. Most people who don’t share his taste — which, to be clear, will be most people — tend to land on something similar to the above. (Actually, the last quote is from Diana himself.)

But the most famous description of his hand-drawn stories? “Obscene.” Is that accurate? Subjectively, sure. But in 1994, the great state of Florida turned opinion into fact, making a shy and unknown 24-year-old the only American artist ever convicted of obscenity.

Given that Diana’s work tends toward subjects like incest, cannibalism, and child torture, the movie opens with the following warning: “If graphic depictions of sex and violence disturb you, STOP watching this film NOW.” Adding to the cult feel, Henenlotter is an exploitation director most famous for a soft-core horror comedy called “Frankenhooker.” Appropriately enough, Diana’s story is narrated by Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra, while the punk soundtrack comes courtesy of bands like Screeching Weasel and Misery Date. Plus, it’s a festival film, premiering this weekend at New York’s What the Fest!?, that was funded through Kickstarter.

Also Read: Writers Guild ‘Appalled’ at FCC Investigation of Stephen Colbert: ‘Willful Disregard of First Amendment’

In other words, this is the sort of project that’s likely to have a strongly passionate fan base, while everyone else moves swiftly on. But if you’re among the latter, hold up: this is no mere midnight movie, nor was it made solely for those who see “sadism, masochism, and perversion” as intriguing selling points.

Henenlotter may work at the edges of his industry, but even in his most enthusiastically deranged efforts (1982’s “Basket Case” being a WTF touchstone), he’s proven himself a sophisticated filmmaker. This unexpectedly poignant doc unfolds on multiple tracks, each of which proves consistently captivating.

Also Read: How Donald Trump Merely Reflects Our Potty-Mouth Culture

On one level, we get a well-told history of underground comix, in which filmmaker George Romero and cartoonist Jay Lynch (both of whom have since passed away) recall earlier eras in a burst of anti-establishment nostalgia. “It was like a minor version of, ‘Where do you get your dope?’” Romero happily reminisces about trying to track down censored EC Comics in the 1950s.

At the same time, Henenlotter has something much bigger on his mind. Diana was just starting his own underground comic career in 1990, when five students at the University of Florida were gruesomely murdered. The state was gripped by a frenzied search for the killer, and Diana — whose family had fatefully moved from New York to Florida — was living in the wrong place at the wrong time. A patrolman happened to stumble on a rare copy of his hand-printed ‘zine, “Boiled Angel,” and was horrified by the graphic images inside.

Soon the authorities were at his mother’s doorstep, and though Diana was quickly cleared of murder, authorities seemed to need a high-profile distraction. A well-chosen series of talking heads, including author Neil Gaiman and graphic novelist Peter Kuper, take us through the ensuing trial, with additional commentary from Diana himself.

He wasn’t technically a serial killer, the prosecution admitted, while showing Diana’s macabre drawings to the jury. But his work was deeply disturbing, so couldn’t he become one someday? And sure, art would be protected under the First Amendment. But could you even call his unpleasant subjects art? The jurors — one of whom defined artwork as “needlepoint” — took only 90 minutes to make their conclusions.

Watch Video: First Amendment Coalition Head to Twitter, Facebook: ‘Stop Acting Like You Are Just a Stage’

All of this would be more than enough for a gripping film. But there’s another line running through this story, too: a third rail that the movie tentatively approaches but mostly avoids.

It’s a grave jolt to see Diana’s drawings of gruesomely tortured children and religious desecration, and then hear briefly of his own, appalling early trauma. The references to his abuse and anger are fleeting, and his family members, who make for otherwise engaged observers throughout the film, never grapple with the extensive circumstances of his pain.

It’s easy to understand why a director might shy away from further exploring the distressing facts that seem to inform deliberately extreme fiction. The soft-spoken, immensely likable Diana has been through so much unfairness that no one’s instinct would be to invade his privacy or to hurt him further. And Henenlotter is right to suggest that the nature of his art should be irrelevant to his case.

But “Boiled Angels” winds up expanding well beyond its initial emphasis. Yes, this is a thoughtful and enlightening documentary about artistic censorship and free speech. At its heart, though, is the portrait of an unusually complex artist and his unusually complex career. The biggest shadows in Diana’s life — and in his art — are never fully addressed, but they loom terribly large nonetheless.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Broadcasters Group Blasts Trump Over Threat to NBC’s License as ‘Contrary’ to First Amendment

Texas Congresswoman Takes a Knee ‘in Honor of the First Amendment’

No, Google Did Not Violate Daily Stormer’s First Amendment Rights

First Amendment Under Attack? TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman Weighs in With Panel of Experts (Video)

“Hardcore, psychopathic material.” “Filled with sadism, masochism, and perversion.” “The most offensive zine ever made.” As we learn right up front in Frank Henenlotter’s compelling documentary, “Boiled Angels: The Trial of Mike Diana,” there are a lot of ways to describe Mike Diana’s underground comics. Most people who don’t share his taste — which, to be clear, will be most people — tend to land on something similar to the above. (Actually, the last quote is from Diana himself.)

But the most famous description of his hand-drawn stories? “Obscene.” Is that accurate? Subjectively, sure. But in 1994, the great state of Florida turned opinion into fact, making a shy and unknown 24-year-old the only American artist ever convicted of obscenity.

Given that Diana’s work tends toward subjects like incest, cannibalism, and child torture, the movie opens with the following warning: “If graphic depictions of sex and violence disturb you, STOP watching this film NOW.” Adding to the cult feel, Henenlotter is an exploitation director most famous for a soft-core horror comedy called “Frankenhooker.” Appropriately enough, Diana’s story is narrated by Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra, while the punk soundtrack comes courtesy of bands like Screeching Weasel and Misery Date. Plus, it’s a festival film, premiering this weekend at New York’s What the Fest!?, that was funded through Kickstarter.

In other words, this is the sort of project that’s likely to have a strongly passionate fan base, while everyone else moves swiftly on. But if you’re among the latter, hold up: this is no mere midnight movie, nor was it made solely for those who see “sadism, masochism, and perversion” as intriguing selling points.

Henenlotter may work at the edges of his industry, but even in his most enthusiastically deranged efforts (1982’s “Basket Case” being a WTF touchstone), he’s proven himself a sophisticated filmmaker. This unexpectedly poignant doc unfolds on multiple tracks, each of which proves consistently captivating.

On one level, we get a well-told history of underground comix, in which filmmaker George Romero and cartoonist Jay Lynch (both of whom have since passed away) recall earlier eras in a burst of anti-establishment nostalgia. “It was like a minor version of, ‘Where do you get your dope?'” Romero happily reminisces about trying to track down censored EC Comics in the 1950s.

At the same time, Henenlotter has something much bigger on his mind. Diana was just starting his own underground comic career in 1990, when five students at the University of Florida were gruesomely murdered. The state was gripped by a frenzied search for the killer, and Diana — whose family had fatefully moved from New York to Florida — was living in the wrong place at the wrong time. A patrolman happened to stumble on a rare copy of his hand-printed ‘zine, “Boiled Angel,” and was horrified by the graphic images inside.

Soon the authorities were at his mother’s doorstep, and though Diana was quickly cleared of murder, authorities seemed to need a high-profile distraction. A well-chosen series of talking heads, including author Neil Gaiman and graphic novelist Peter Kuper, take us through the ensuing trial, with additional commentary from Diana himself.

He wasn’t technically a serial killer, the prosecution admitted, while showing Diana’s macabre drawings to the jury. But his work was deeply disturbing, so couldn’t he become one someday? And sure, art would be protected under the First Amendment. But could you even call his unpleasant subjects art? The jurors — one of whom defined artwork as “needlepoint” — took only 90 minutes to make their conclusions.

All of this would be more than enough for a gripping film. But there’s another line running through this story, too: a third rail that the movie tentatively approaches but mostly avoids.

It’s a grave jolt to see Diana’s drawings of gruesomely tortured children and religious desecration, and then hear briefly of his own, appalling early trauma. The references to his abuse and anger are fleeting, and his family members, who make for otherwise engaged observers throughout the film, never grapple with the extensive circumstances of his pain.

It’s easy to understand why a director might shy away from further exploring the distressing facts that seem to inform deliberately extreme fiction. The soft-spoken, immensely likable Diana has been through so much unfairness that no one’s instinct would be to invade his privacy or to hurt him further. And Henenlotter is right to suggest that the nature of his art should be irrelevant to his case.

But “Boiled Angels” winds up expanding well beyond its initial emphasis. Yes, this is a thoughtful and enlightening documentary about artistic censorship and free speech. At its heart, though, is the portrait of an unusually complex artist and his unusually complex career. The biggest shadows in Diana’s life — and in his art — are never fully addressed, but they loom terribly large nonetheless.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Broadcasters Group Blasts Trump Over Threat to NBC's License as 'Contrary' to First Amendment

Texas Congresswoman Takes a Knee 'in Honor of the First Amendment'

No, Google Did Not Violate Daily Stormer's First Amendment Rights

First Amendment Under Attack? TheWrap's Sharon Waxman Weighs in With Panel of Experts (Video)

‘Parks and Recreation’ Star Nick Offerman Joins Amazon’s ‘Good Omens’

Nick Offerman is the latest star to join “Good Omens,” the Amazon Prime Video adaptation of the Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman book. He will play the U.S. Ambassador and father of the child Warlock in the series, who is mistakenly believed to be the Antichrist. “There may not be anyone alive who can deadpan […]

Nick Offerman is the latest star to join “Good Omens,” the Amazon Prime Video adaptation of the Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman book. He will play the U.S. Ambassador and father of the child Warlock in the series, who is mistakenly believed to be the Antichrist. “There may not be anyone alive who can deadpan […]

Neil Gaiman wrote a lovely tribute to The Breeders for their new album

Even at the height of their mainstream success, The Breeders were always a little bit weirder than was properly recognized. Sure, they wrote “Divine Hammer,” but that record also had “Roi” and “Mad Lucas” on it. So it’s fitting that the group’s new album gets some liner notes from a slightly odd writer.

Read more…

Even at the height of their mainstream success, The Breeders were always a little bit weirder than was properly recognized. Sure, they wrote “Divine Hammer,” but that record also had “Roi” and “Mad Lucas” on it. So it’s fitting that the group’s new album gets some liner notes from a slightly odd writer.

Read more...

‘American Gods’ Picks New Showrunner for Season 2

“Lost” producer Jesse Alexander has been named the new showrunner of Starz series “American Gods.” He’ll helm Season 2 alongside the “Gods” graphic novel author, Neil Gaiman.

Alexander also counts “Alias,” “Heroes” and “Hannibal” among his credits. He recently did some work on CBS All Access series “Star Trek: Discovery.”

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green left the show they adapted from Gaiman’s work after one season. The search for a replacement has been on since then. It’s all taken quite a while.

Also Read: Every ‘American Gods’ Character, Ranked by How Weirdly Intriguing They Are (Photos)

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Starz chief Chris Albrecht said last month at the Television Critics Association press tour. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

Oh, hey Chris? What happened to Fuller and Green anyway? “They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht answered, when pushed.

Alright. As for the show’s cast, well, that is a whole ‘nother story.

Also Read: ‘American Gods’ Writer Neil Gaiman Will Read Cheesecake Factory Menu to Help Refugees

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said in January, referring to the actress’s announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘John Wick’ TV Spinoff Coming to Starz; Keanu Reeves Expected to Guest

JJ Abrams Sci-Fi Drama ‘Demimonde’ Grabs Straight-to-Series Order at HBO

Time Warner Q4 Earnings Up as HBO Caps Year of Record Subscriber Growth

“Lost” producer Jesse Alexander has been named the new showrunner of Starz series “American Gods.” He’ll helm Season 2 alongside the “Gods” graphic novel author, Neil Gaiman.

Alexander also counts “Alias,” “Heroes” and “Hannibal” among his credits. He recently did some work on CBS All Access series “Star Trek: Discovery.”

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green left the show they adapted from Gaiman’s work after one season. The search for a replacement has been on since then. It’s all taken quite a while.

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Starz chief Chris Albrecht said last month at the Television Critics Association press tour. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

Oh, hey Chris? What happened to Fuller and Green anyway? “They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht answered, when pushed.

Alright. As for the show’s cast, well, that is a whole ‘nother story.

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said in January, referring to the actress’s announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'John Wick' TV Spinoff Coming to Starz; Keanu Reeves Expected to Guest

JJ Abrams Sci-Fi Drama 'Demimonde' Grabs Straight-to-Series Order at HBO

Time Warner Q4 Earnings Up as HBO Caps Year of Record Subscriber Growth

The Bryan Fuller-American Gods breakup was apparently even messier than we thought

Back in November, American Gods showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green announced that they’d be leaving the critically well-regarded Starz series after the end of its first season. At the time—and in subsequent discussions—everyone involved seems to have done their best to paint the split as amicable, with Starz…

Read more…

Back in November, American Gods showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green announced that they’d be leaving the critically well-regarded Starz series after the end of its first season. At the time—and in subsequent discussions—everyone involved seems to have done their best to paint the split as amicable, with Starz…

Read more...