Pew Research has finally settled the “Who’s a millennial?” question, once and for all

“Millennial” has always been an irritatingly nebulous word, generally defined as “anybody younger than me who has irritating opinions on politics or avocados.” No more, though; the dedicated pollsters at Pew Research have finally hammered down an exact age barrier for the generational group, presumably as a stopgap…

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“Millennial” has always been an irritatingly nebulous word, generally defined as “anybody younger than me who has irritating opinions on politics or avocados.” No more, though; the dedicated pollsters at Pew Research have finally hammered down an exact age barrier for the generational group, presumably as a stopgap…

Read more...

This mesmerizing video proves that all travel Instagrams are the goddamn same

Instagram gets a lot of shit, often because it serves as a handy shorthand for “millennial.” Vacuous self-obsession, a complete inability to keep things to oneself, an unquenchable thirst for likes—all can be found in spades on the photo-sharing service. Another common criticism is the fact that it often feels like a…

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Instagram gets a lot of shit, often because it serves as a handy shorthand for “millennial.” Vacuous self-obsession, a complete inability to keep things to oneself, an unquenchable thirst for likes—all can be found in spades on the photo-sharing service. Another common criticism is the fact that it often feels like a…

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The Wall Street Journal vows to stop making fun of millennials

Well, they’ve done it: Those damned millennials have finally killed the “making fun of millennials” industry. Apparently sick of living in fear that people born between 1977 and 1997 will break into their homes, cover their food in avocado, and then generate a meme about it, The Wall Street Journal has declared that…

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Well, they’ve done it: Those damned millennials have finally killed the “making fun of millennials” industry. Apparently sick of living in fear that people born between 1977 and 1997 will break into their homes, cover their food in avocado, and then generate a meme about it, The Wall Street Journal has declared that…

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Why ‘The Bold Type’ Is the Rare Show That Does Right by Millennials

Freeform’s latest series salutes its characters for their ambition without limiting their achievements to the realm of young people.

Scan the average national news source and millennials are being blamed for the decline in everything from the oil industry to the beer business. (Even IndieWire has placed the demise of the DVR at their feet.) With a murky, nebulous attitude toward an emerging generation, it’s difficult for shows based primarily around millennial characters to not feel like an over-corrective force in shaping how the public sees young professionals.

It’s one of the elements that makes “The Bold Type,” Freeform’s newest series about a trio of employees at a fictional, high-profile women’s magazine, feel like a fresh new direction. The exploits of Scarlet staff writer Jane (Katie Stevens), social media coordinator Kat (Aisha Dee) and newly minted fashion desk assistant Sutton (Meghann Fahy) don’t feel catered to a specific audience. Their stories, as a friend group and as individuals, don’t merely speak to viewers within a New York Cosmo bubble or as a means to convert/educate nonbelievers. These are three young people, three young women who don’t apologize for wanting to contribute to a changing world and find their own places in it.

Rather than condemning Jane, Kat and Sutton for their aspirations, “The Bold Type” champions their specific kind of assertive behavior. These characters aren’t always fully equipped to handle the trickiest aspects of their jobs, but the way the show allows them to fail without passing judgment on them as people is a refreshing change. They are able to have tumultuous times in their friendship, face mistakes and unforced errors in their day-to-day professional lives. There are consequences to those shortcomings, but so far the show has used those mistakes in a way that doesn’t chastise them for trying to find a new approach to telling political, feminist stories.

It allows these relatively new entrants into the workforce a chance to determine their own value in the workplace and a chance to prove that worth to bosses who may need some convincing to give them a chance. They are working in the same internship-to-entry-level position corporate ladder that often undervalues the contributions of its younger members. By showing that this kind of confidence doesn’t come from an abundance of privilege or a series of lucky breaks, it’s helping to show that millennials have a place in the workforce that doesn’t come purely from entitlement.

Sure, the show’s version of life inside the inner workings of an editorial system may be a little idealized at times: “The Bold Type” sometimes skips over some of the more practical, less glamorous parts of reporting stories and filing opinion pieces. But in putting forward what Scarlet does as a magazine on a day-to-day basis, it uses some of those liberties to reconsider the power that these magazines have. Showing the power of young women and young people to champion positive, affirmative ways to change our perception of what’s happening in the world.

THE BOLD TYPE - ÒThe Breast IssueÓ - In promoting ScarletÕs breast health awareness campaign, Kat tries to be bold with her message, but is left wondering whether her competitive nature is hurting her cause.ÊJane confronts past issues and current anxieties when she is tasked with writing a controversial piece about BRCA gene testing.ÊSutton is determined to excel at her tasks at hand, but when things fall apart, itÕs Alex who rushes to her rescue. This episode of ÒThe Bold TypeÓ airs Tuesday, August 8 (9:01 - 10:02 p.m. EDT) on Freeform. (Freeform/Phillippe Bosse)AISHA DEE, MELORA HARDIN

“The Bold Type”

Freeform

That care extends to the characters beyond the three at the show’s center. Scarlet boss Jacqueline Carlyle is a marked counterpoint to the usual Miranda Priestly-style magazine editors put on screen in the past. She doesn’t exist merely to help these young women reach actualization, but her occasional nurturing approach to her employees balances a bottom line with making these women better at their jobs.

In turn, though “The Bold Type” occasionally highlights the differing perspectives between women of different ages, it doesn’t set up a generational zero-sum game. There’s a give and take between Jacqueline and Jane, in particular, that doesn’t set up one as the show’s moral conscience over the other.

“The Bold Type” also speaks of the power that young people can have in driving a greater conversation about issues that affect them. Part of that comes through one of the more nuanced representations of social media in the film/TV world. Kat’s job as social coordinator is acknowledged as a valuable part of the magazine’s operations. Jacqueline takes a vested interest in how that side of the business helps a brand present a public face. In the process, it puts the role of messaging on equal footing with a writer and an assistant. The show gives equal weight to the personal and professional issues that these young women face, no matter how traditional their role is.

It’s a common pitfall of emotionally charged dramas to put forward its characters as a sum of their traumas, to define members of an ensemble purely in relation to the hardships of their past. “The Bold Type” isn’t blind to the backstories of the women at the center, but it’s taken care to establish them as their own people before drawing in the full context of their families. For example, Wednesday night’s episode, “The Breast Issue,” revealed some of the ideas behind Jane’s personal connection to a cancer-related piece. Her mother’s battle with breast cancer was revealed only after six episodes of watching Jane come into her own as a writer.

“The Bold Type” doesn’t shy away from consequences. Even when these characters find success, it often comes at a price. Kat gets doxxed, Jane gets sued, Sutton’s job offer hits a snag. But by treating this cyclical process of triumph and setback as a human problem and not merely something of concern for the youths, “The Bold Type” affords valuable voices a platform without a side dish of condescension. As a result, it’s a show that will end up making even more people take notice.

“The Bold Type” airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on Freeform. 

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Millennials Don’t Consider Themselves Adults Until 30, Researcher Says

Turns out, you might be a millennial and not even know it. Even if you’re approaching 40.

According to new research by CBS’ TV ratings guru David Potluck and Nielsen Catalina Solutions, the youngest millennials should be graduating college this year — but that doesn’t mean they all consider themselves adults.

The median age of millennials is 30, Poltrack says — meaning that half are older and half are younger. And 30 happens to be the age at which millennials tend to self-identify as adults, Poltrack said. For these purposes, an “adult” is defined as “someone who has moved out of their parents’ home, has a job, and pays their own bills.”

Also Read: Why YouTube TV Needs Time Warner But Not Viacom

How did millennials start seeming so middle-aged? Poltrack says it because of “lazy” classifications that defined millennials as those 18-to-34. Poltrack, one of the most respected people in studying the demographics of TV viewers, uses designations like “millennial” to simplify who’s watching what.

He and the Center for Generational Kinetics both use the term to describe those born between 1979 and 1995, based on years prescribed by William Strauss and Neil Howe’s book “Generations.” It defines a generation as lasting for 18 years, and works forward from the giant Baby Boomer generation. Their kids, the next largest generation, are millennials. People born after 1995 are actually members of Gen Z.

Also Read: Young Turks Say Cable News Caters to ‘Insiders and Advertisers’

Why are millennials taking so long to grow up and move out? Some of it is their fault, some of it is their parents’ fault, and much of it is everyone’s fault.

For starters, the December 2007-June 2009 recession made finding employment harder — especially for recent college grads, many of whom happened to saddled with a ton student loan debt. High housing costs, meanwhile, reduced any stigma connected to living at home.

“More controversial is the whole idea that their baby boomer parents have really coddled them,” Poltrack told TheWrap. “They’ve made it too good for them. Why would you leave?”

Also Read: Dwayne Johnson, Lin-Manuel Miranda Unleash ‘Millennials: The Musical’ (Video)

Well, at some point it’s pretty much to get married and have kids — to be an “adult,” in other words. That’s when people truly become valuable to someone like Poltrack, who wants them to buy a house and a few TVs — and tune in to CBS.

“Only now are they really coming into their own in terms of being major consumers of goods and services, and therefore a major economic component as well as a population component,” he explained.

The older people get, the more television they watch. And for CBS, the older TV viewers get, the more they watch “Blue Bloods.”

So, millennials, go do some apartment hunting already — David Poltrack will help you pack.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Survivor: Millennials vs Gen X’ Crowns Season 33 Winner

Kellyanne Conway Is Tired of Anti-Trump Millennials Being Treated as ‘Precious Snowflakes’ (Video)

CNN Dominates Election Cycle Among Millennials

Did Hillary Clinton Really Call Millennials ‘Basement Dwellers’?

Is TV Doomed? Two-Thirds of Young Millennials Use an Ad Blocker to Watch, Study Says

Turns out, you might be a millennial and not even know it. Even if you’re approaching 40.

According to new research by CBS’ TV ratings guru David Potluck and Nielsen Catalina Solutions, the youngest millennials should be graduating college this year — but that doesn’t mean they all consider themselves adults.

The median age of millennials is 30, Poltrack says — meaning that half are older and half are younger. And 30 happens to be the age at which millennials tend to self-identify as adults, Poltrack said. For these purposes, an “adult” is defined as “someone who has moved out of their parents’ home, has a job, and pays their own bills.”

How did millennials start seeming so middle-aged? Poltrack says it because of “lazy” classifications that defined millennials as those 18-to-34. Poltrack, one of the most respected people in studying the demographics of TV viewers, uses designations like “millennial” to simplify who’s watching what.

He and the Center for Generational Kinetics both use the term to describe those born between 1979 and 1995, based on years prescribed by William Strauss and Neil Howe’s book “Generations.” It defines a generation as lasting for 18 years, and works forward from the giant Baby Boomer generation. Their kids, the next largest generation, are millennials. People born after 1995 are actually members of Gen Z.

Why are millennials taking so long to grow up and move out? Some of it is their fault, some of it is their parents’ fault, and much of it is everyone’s fault.

For starters, the December 2007-June 2009 recession made finding employment harder — especially for recent college grads, many of whom happened to saddled with a ton student loan debt. High housing costs, meanwhile, reduced any stigma connected to living at home.

“More controversial is the whole idea that their baby boomer parents have really coddled them,” Poltrack told TheWrap. “They’ve made it too good for them. Why would you leave?”

Well, at some point it’s pretty much to get married and have kids — to be an “adult,” in other words. That’s when people truly become valuable to someone like Poltrack, who wants them to buy a house and a few TVs — and tune in to CBS.

“Only now are they really coming into their own in terms of being major consumers of goods and services, and therefore a major economic component as well as a population component,” he explained.

The older people get, the more television they watch. And for CBS, the older TV viewers get, the more they watch “Blue Bloods.”

So, millennials, go do some apartment hunting already — David Poltrack will help you pack.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Survivor: Millennials vs Gen X' Crowns Season 33 Winner

Kellyanne Conway Is Tired of Anti-Trump Millennials Being Treated as 'Precious Snowflakes' (Video)

CNN Dominates Election Cycle Among Millennials

Did Hillary Clinton Really Call Millennials 'Basement Dwellers'?

Is TV Doomed? Two-Thirds of Young Millennials Use an Ad Blocker to Watch, Study Says

CNN Dominates Election Cycle Among Millennials

Millennials might not watch as much cable news as their parents, but when they do, the majority of adults age 18-34 prefer CNN over rivals Fox News and MSNBC.

Among that group, CNN has dominated the election cycle, averaging 50,000 millennial-aged viewers compared to 39,000 for Fox News and 28,000 for MSNBC from July 2015 through Oct. 4, 2016. CNN’s millennial audience grew 52 percent over that time period, with Fox News’ growth at 22 percent and MSNBC’s at 17 percent.

Only 64 percent of millennials actually pay for cable, while 26 percent have never had pay TV, according to a USA Today study from last December. It should be noted that USA Today considered millennials adults age 18-29 as opposed to 18-34, but the bottom line is that young people watch less TV than their parents.

Also Read: Anthony Bourdain Says No to Dining with Donald Trump: ‘Absolutely F–ing Not’ (Exclusive)

It appears the youngsters who actually spring for cable flock to CNN. During primetime, the network averaged 109,000 millennial-aged viewers, outpacing Fox News’ 89,000 and more than doubling MSNBC’s 49,000. CNN grew 106 percent among millennials during primetime, while Fox News and MSNBC’s growth was at less than 50 percent.

CNN and its cable news rivals have additional competition to deal with nowadays. Voters can receive information on their phones, and various streaming services provide extensive election coverage. The Young Turks’ YouTube page has over three million subscribers, while CNN’s YouTube page has 1.6 million.

The Pew Research Center recently noted that baby boomers and previous generations dominated every presidential election since 1980, but Generation X eligible voters and millennials will be more important than ever when it comes to deciding the next president and could “mark the beginning of a new era for U.S. presidential elections.”

Also Read: Why HLN’s Robin Meade Isn’t Celebrating Her Work Anniversary

Pew also noted that Millennials’ views of national news media have grown more negative, with only 27 percent of the youngest demographic of voters claiming the news has a positive impact — but at least they’re watching.

Millennials aren’t the only people watching CNN. The network finished the week of Oct. 10-16 as the third most-watched network in all of cable, behind only Fox News and Nickelodeon.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cable Ratings: Only ESPN Tops Fox News, CNN in Primetime

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Millennials might not watch as much cable news as their parents, but when they do, the majority of adults age 18-34 prefer CNN over rivals Fox News and MSNBC.

Among that group, CNN has dominated the election cycle, averaging 50,000 millennial-aged viewers compared to 39,000 for Fox News and 28,000 for MSNBC from July 2015 through Oct. 4, 2016. CNN’s millennial audience grew 52 percent over that time period, with Fox News’ growth at 22 percent and MSNBC’s at 17 percent.

Only 64 percent of millennials actually pay for cable, while 26 percent have never had pay TV, according to a USA Today study from last December. It should be noted that USA Today considered millennials adults age 18-29 as opposed to 18-34, but the bottom line is that young people watch less TV than their parents.

It appears the youngsters who actually spring for cable flock to CNN. During primetime, the network averaged 109,000 millennial-aged viewers, outpacing Fox News’ 89,000 and more than doubling MSNBC’s 49,000. CNN grew 106 percent among millennials during primetime, while Fox News and MSNBC’s growth was at less than 50 percent.

CNN and its cable news rivals have additional competition to deal with nowadays. Voters can receive information on their phones, and various streaming services provide extensive election coverage. The Young Turks’ YouTube page has over three million subscribers, while CNN’s YouTube page has 1.6 million.

The Pew Research Center recently noted that baby boomers and previous generations dominated every presidential election since 1980, but Generation X eligible voters and millennials will be more important than ever when it comes to deciding the next president and could “mark the beginning of a new era for U.S. presidential elections.”

Pew also noted that Millennials’ views of national news media have grown more negative, with only 27 percent of the youngest demographic of voters claiming the news has a positive impact — but at least they’re watching.

Millennials aren’t the only people watching CNN. The network finished the week of Oct. 10-16 as the third most-watched network in all of cable, behind only Fox News and Nickelodeon.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cable Ratings: Only ESPN Tops Fox News, CNN in Primetime

Debate Ratings: CNN Dominates Fox News, MSNBC With 11.2 Million Viewers

Anderson Cooper's New CNN Deal Takes Him Out of Running for 'Live with Kelly'