After A Brutal Stretch, A Movie Market Finally Gets Some Mojo Back – Cannes

After a brutal stretch, a market is finally bringing back the swagger. Despite the Netflix-Cannes snafu which dominated the build-up to the festival, this is the most optimistic mood at the outset of a film mart in years.
The EFM heralded the bounce-ba…

After a brutal stretch, a market is finally bringing back the swagger. Despite the Netflix-Cannes snafu which dominated the build-up to the festival, this is the most optimistic mood at the outset of a film mart in years. The EFM heralded the bounce-back. It was a stabilizing market and the first for some time that indie buyers and sellers re-discovered common ground that had been more of a no-man's land during a multi-year reconfiguration process needed to work out what…

Latest ‘Venom’ Movie Trailer Surpasses ‘Wonder Woman’ Views in First 24 Hours (Exclusive)

Sony Pictures theatrical trailer for the upcoming “Spider-Man” spinoff “Venom” has passed “Wonder Woman” and “Doctor Strange” in the number of views its gotten in its first 24 hours released, TheWrap has exclusively learned.

Tom Hardy stars as Venom, who finally appeared in all his CGI glory in Sony Pictures’ first theatrical trailer during its studio presentation at CinemaCon in Las Vegas on Monday. That day, “Venom” garnered more than 64.3 million views in 24 hours. The current trailer view count is 124.7 million.

“Venom” is one of the biggest second trailers for a superhero film charted by Fizziology, which uses Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, Tumblr, YouTube, Sina Weibo and blogs to provide a complete picture of social media opinions.

The second trailer for “Venom” was rare in that views went up significantly, with the volume increasing 72 percent over the first trailer in the first 24 hours of release. Positive conversation was up 46 percent from the first trailer and negative conversation was down 63 percent. The “Venom” character reveal was extremely well-received. It was exactly what fans on social media were hoping to see, with the design being called “incredible” and “unbelievable.”

Also Read: ‘Venom’: Sony Finally Unveils the Symbiote in New Trailer for Tom Hardy Film (Video)

Organic positive conversation was over 80 percent. The positive audience reaction for the second trailer was most similar to “Spider-Man: Homecoming and “Ant-Man.”

“Venom” follows journalist Eddie Brock (Hardy), who becomes a powerful force for vengeance after he bonds with a symbiotic alien who aesthetically resembles a certain Marvel Comics wall crawling superhero.

Also Read: ‘Venom’ Fans Enraged Over Teaser Trailer That Didn’t, Um, Show Venom

It is the first in a series of “Spider-Man” spinoffs that Sony plans to release in coming years, including the animated Miles Morales film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” due out Dec. 14, and the Silver Sable/Black Cat spinoff “Silver & Black,” which has Gina Prince-Bythewood attached as director and is slated to be released next year.

“Venom” stars Hardy, Michelle Williams and Riz Ahmed, with Ruben Fleischer directing. It will be released in theaters Oct. 5.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Cast Is One Big, Happy Family in ‘Brady Bunch’ Parody (Video)

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Cast Pays Tribute to Their Real-Life Superheroes (Video)

PSA: ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Takes Place Before ‘Avengers: Infinity War’

Sony Pictures theatrical trailer for the upcoming “Spider-Man” spinoff “Venom” has passed “Wonder Woman” and “Doctor Strange” in the number of views its gotten in its first 24 hours released, TheWrap has exclusively learned.

Tom Hardy stars as Venom, who finally appeared in all his CGI glory in Sony Pictures’ first theatrical trailer during its studio presentation at CinemaCon in Las Vegas on Monday. That day, “Venom” garnered more than 64.3 million views in 24 hours. The current trailer view count is 124.7 million.

“Venom” is one of the biggest second trailers for a superhero film charted by Fizziology, which uses Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, Tumblr, YouTube, Sina Weibo and blogs to provide a complete picture of social media opinions.

The second trailer for “Venom” was rare in that views went up significantly, with the volume increasing 72 percent over the first trailer in the first 24 hours of release. Positive conversation was up 46 percent from the first trailer and negative conversation was down 63 percent. The “Venom” character reveal was extremely well-received. It was exactly what fans on social media were hoping to see, with the design being called “incredible” and “unbelievable.”

Organic positive conversation was over 80 percent. The positive audience reaction for the second trailer was most similar to “Spider-Man: Homecoming and “Ant-Man.”

“Venom” follows journalist Eddie Brock (Hardy), who becomes a powerful force for vengeance after he bonds with a symbiotic alien who aesthetically resembles a certain Marvel Comics wall crawling superhero.

It is the first in a series of “Spider-Man” spinoffs that Sony plans to release in coming years, including the animated Miles Morales film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” due out Dec. 14, and the Silver Sable/Black Cat spinoff “Silver & Black,” which has Gina Prince-Bythewood attached as director and is slated to be released next year.

“Venom” stars Hardy, Michelle Williams and Riz Ahmed, with Ruben Fleischer directing. It will be released in theaters Oct. 5.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Avengers: Infinity War' Cast Is One Big, Happy Family in 'Brady Bunch' Parody (Video)

'Avengers: Infinity War' Cast Pays Tribute to Their Real-Life Superheroes (Video)

PSA: 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Takes Place Before 'Avengers: Infinity War'

Tom Hardy Appears in Full Venom Mode in Leaked Trailer Footage (Video)

An eight-second first look at Tom Hardy in full Venom mode leaked online Monday — hours before the full trailer for Sony’s upcoming Marvel movie “Venom” was due to be released.

Fans, who had criticized an earlier teaser of the movie that showed Hardy only as photographer Eddie Brock, welcomed the reveal of the character’s alter ego, the horrifying, sharp-fanged creature known as Venom.

“Well holy s—, Venom looks like Venom,” someone with the Twitter handle MisterBatfleck wrote in a caption attached to the leaked eight-second footage.

A rep for Sony declined to comment.

Also Read: ‘Venom’ Fans Enraged Over Teaser Trailer That Didn’t, Um, Show Venom

The film, which is not considered a spinoff of the Sony-based “Spider-Man” franchise even though the character originated in the Spider-Man universe for which Sony controls film rights, also stars Riz Ahmed, Jenny Slate, Michelle Williams and Woody Harrelson.

Ruben Fleischer is directing the film, based on a script by Scott Rosenberg (“Jumanji”) and Jeff Pinkner (“The Dark Tower”). Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach are producing with Amy Pascal.

Hardy himself took to Instagram on Sunday to tease a new “Venom” trailer screening at CinemaCon in Las Vegas this week.

After the first trailer dropped, “Venom” fans were enraged that the trailer didn’t actually show Venom.

Inbound CinemaCon new trailer Venom ????????????????????????????????

A post shared by Tom Hardy (@tomhardy) on

See Video: ‘Venom’ Teaser Reveals First Look at Tom Hardy as Marvel Antihero

“Ah, now eventually you DO plan to have Venom in your, in your VENOM movie, right? Hello?” wrote one fan, while another said, “How can you tease the movie without showing the character? GG Sony… You deserve to be sold at this point.”

Looks like Sony got the memo.

“Venom” is due in theaters October 5.

See the footage below.

Well holy shit, Venom looks like Venom. pic.twitter.com/rQh5bgmMn4

— MisterBatfleck (@Mister_BatfIeck) April 23, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Jumanji’ Becomes Sony’s Highest-Grossing Film Ever

‘Black Panther’ Composer Set to Score Sony’s Marvel Movie ‘Venom’

An eight-second first look at Tom Hardy in full Venom mode leaked online Monday — hours before the full trailer for Sony’s upcoming Marvel movie “Venom” was due to be released.

Fans, who had criticized an earlier teaser of the movie that showed Hardy only as photographer Eddie Brock, welcomed the reveal of the character’s alter ego, the horrifying, sharp-fanged creature known as Venom.

“Well holy s—, Venom looks like Venom,” someone with the Twitter handle MisterBatfleck wrote in a caption attached to the leaked eight-second footage.

A rep for Sony declined to comment.

The film, which is not considered a spinoff of the Sony-based “Spider-Man” franchise even though the character originated in the Spider-Man universe for which Sony controls film rights, also stars Riz Ahmed, Jenny Slate, Michelle Williams and Woody Harrelson.

Ruben Fleischer is directing the film, based on a script by Scott Rosenberg (“Jumanji”) and Jeff Pinkner (“The Dark Tower”). Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach are producing with Amy Pascal.

Hardy himself took to Instagram on Sunday to tease a new “Venom” trailer screening at CinemaCon in Las Vegas this week.

After the first trailer dropped, “Venom” fans were enraged that the trailer didn’t actually show Venom.

Inbound CinemaCon new trailer Venom ????????????????????????????????

A post shared by Tom Hardy (@tomhardy) on

“Ah, now eventually you DO plan to have Venom in your, in your VENOM movie, right? Hello?” wrote one fan, while another said, “How can you tease the movie without showing the character? GG Sony… You deserve to be sold at this point.”

Looks like Sony got the memo.

“Venom” is due in theaters October 5.

See the footage below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Dwayne Johnson's 'Jumanji' Becomes Sony's Highest-Grossing Film Ever

'Black Panther' Composer Set to Score Sony's Marvel Movie 'Venom'

‘I Feel Pretty’: How Michelle Williams Turned Her Wacky, Baby-Voiced Boss Into the Comedy’s Breakout Part

Filmmakers Marc Silverstein and Abby Kohn describe the “out-there transformation” the four-time Oscar nominee made for her bonkers supporting role.

To be clear, actress Michelle Williams is not in need of any kind of breakout. The four-time Oscar nominee has spent the last 25 years (yes, her first credited role was back in 1993) carving out an enviable career in Hollywood, and she continues to show an immense capacity and interest for very different roles and movies. Her upcoming slate includes a star-studded superhero feature (“Venom”) and a long-awaited turn as Janis Joplin in Sean Durkin’s biopic, plus a new Luca Guadagnino murder mystery, a two-handed thriller alongside Chris Pine, and a remake of the beloved Susanne Bier film “After the Wedding.” Williams can do it all, but she can also still surprise the hell out of her audience.

Look no further than Marc Silverstein and Abby Kohn’s “I Feel Pretty,” in which Williams steals every single scene she’s in, thanks to her bonkers work as makeup magnate Avery LeClair. While the film is mostly concerned with the journey of regular gal Renee (Amy Schumer), who cracks her head open during a particularly bad SoulCycle class and suddenly believes she’s the most capable and beautiful woman in the world, it’s Williams’ Avery that turns in the film’s most gut-busting performance.

One of Renee’s first acts as a newly-confident woman is to apply for a shiny new receptionist gig at LeClair’s makeup company — picture an industry giant, like Estee Lauder — after slogging it out in as one member of a two-person team dedicated to online sales. Soon, Avery is a huge part of Renee’s life, and the rest of the film itself. Sporting a delightfully off-kilter fashion sense (she wears at least one outfit emblazoned with a giant puppy face) and a disarmingly squeaky baby voice, every choice Williams makes in the film is both totally insane and perfectly calibrated. She disappears into the part, but it’s also entirely her own.

As Silverstein and Kohn told IndieWire, that was entirely by design, but even they can’t quite believe the work Williams turned in (or how audiences are responding to it). “The voice was written and the part is done as written, but the voice was hers,” Silverstein said. “It was just written super high with a vocal fry, and kind of based on someone that she knows and I know. Just someone we know that’s really successful and smart, but when they get up to talk, you’re like, ‘Whoa. Where did that come from?'”

Michelle Williams stars in I FEEL PRETTY

“I Feel Pretty”

STX Entertainment

Williams was able to ruminate on the part and it’s inspiration for nearly two months, and she arrived on set to film her scenes during the tail-end of the 2017 summer shoot. By then, she had nailed the voice, but Silverstein shared that the first few days provided them space to play around with her strange physicality and the not-quite-right she holds herself and interacts with others. (Sample Avery line, said as some form of greeting to Renee: “I thought I smelled animal products!”)

“What we found on the first couple of days, which was really fun, [is that] she’s had a sort of coddled life and hasn’t had that much difficulty in terms of getting to where she’s gotten, but we kind of found the idea that like, she’s sort of an approximation of human, in terms of the way she moves,” Silverstein said. “The way she’ll lean on things is the way she’s seen someone do it before, but it’s kind of not right. She was so excited by that and just was always finding the weird.”

And just because it’s a comedic role in a comedic film doesn’t damper the fact that Williams is delivering a thoughtful, show-stopping performance at every squeaky-voiced, weirdly-dressed turn. “Looking at the movie, Amy is totally fearless and she’s giving us something that I don’t think we’ve seen her give before, but Michelle also,” Kohn said. “I was impressed with how fearless she is. She made some bold choices that are brilliant.”

Added Silverstein, “She brought the same thought and intensity that she does to any part to this part, which was kind of crazy to see.”

Williams’ work in the film is so out-of-the-box that the filmmakers swear that some people don’t even recognize its her until the very end. “It’s just this other person now that is just like, it’s not Michelle,” Silverstein said. “There’s been people who have watched the movie who didn’t know it was Michelle at all, and at the end they’re like, ‘Wait. That’s who that was?’ Because it is a just out-there transformation.”

Check out the trailer for “I Feel Pretty” below, which offers a teensy glimpse at the wacky brilliance of Williams as Avery LeClair.

“I Feel Pretty” is currently in theaters. 

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‘I Feel Pretty’ and the Long History of ‘Sexy Baby’ Voice on Screen

Michelle Williams is an unexpected scene-stealer in this weekend’s “I Feel Pretty,” but take a closer listen — the Oscar nominee’s vocal performance contributes to an ongoing conversation about gender and voice.

Williams plays cosmetics CEO Avery LeClair in the STX comedy, a model of feminine perfection styled within an inch of her life and suffocating under the pressure it brings. The character serves as an ideal for Amy Schumer’s self-loathing protagonist, but also a lightning rod thanks to her insanely high-pitched voice.

This tone infantilizes her character no matter how serious the conversation she’s conducting as a businesswoman.

Also Read: Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’ Zips to $1 Million at Thursday Box Office

“She is the object of ridicule because of her unfortunate voice,” Williams said during her press tour for “I Feel Pretty” this week.

Williams handles the affectation like a pro, playing up her own saccharine sounds for laughs, but Avery LeClair is the latest in a long line of “sexy baby” types that invite derision and spark debate.

“In the past seven years or so, there’s been so much attention paid to the female voice. From vocal fry to the baby voice. There has always been a cultural anxiousness about gender and voice,” Karen Tongson, an associate professor of gender studies at the University of Southern California, told TheWrap.

The most popular example of the sexy baby voice comes from a 2011 episode of “30 Rock” that centers entirely around the phenomenon. Cristin Milioti plays a guest writer on the fictional sketch series created by Tina Fey’s Liz Lemon — she is scantily clad, pridefully promiscuous and constantly coming on to men in the workplace. And, of course, her voice hits the highest registers possible.

In an NPR interview the same year, Fey recalled the real-life incident that inspired the episode. It was from a college acting class.

“This beautiful, voluptuous little tiny actress had one of these tiny voices. She was doing a monologue, and one of my acting teachers, he very gently said, ‘OK. I want you to do the monologue again, and I would like to use your adult woman voice,’” Fey told Fresh Air host Terry Gross.

Also Read: Jaden Smith’s Adventures in Gender Fluidity: What It Means, Who Profits

The actress dropped her pitch and spoke in her true voice, Fey said, “and all the other women in the class looked at each other like, ‘I knew it!””

Tongson said the “30 Rock” episode “essentially presents those anxieties, particularly for feminist-identified and working professional women — that they are subjugating themselves to certain expectations around femininity and softness. If someone is speaking in a higher tone, it diminishes authority.”

Examples are everywhere. On the highly-bingeable Bravo series “Imposters,” Israeli actress Inbar Lavi offers a masterclass in voice work as she plays a con woman always assuming new identities. One of those is a ditzy, cleavage-baring assistant trying to romance her boss. In his presence, she speaks in the register of a toddler.

During Kristen Wiig’s time on “Saturday Night Live,” one of her most popular recurring characters was a vampy redhead named Shana. Her shtick was a combination of sexy baby voice and the transatlantic accents of Hollywood’s golden age, who used her exaggerated manners to command the attention of men in any given situation.



“Look earlier in culture at ‘My Fair Lady,’” Tongson said. “We’re talking about how accents mark class. It informs your identity in so many different ways. Whether its a type of accent, tone, the words you choose. It can really mark where you belong in a social order.”

This vocal scrutiny is not just limited to scripted content. Two months ago, Jimmy Kimmel devoted an entire segment on his late-night show to call out a contestant named Krystal on “The Bachelor.” He crowned her as having “the most annoying voice in ‘Bachelor’ history,” and played a supercut of her cooing exaggerated greetings.

Hiiieeeeeeeeeeee.

Reality kingpin Kim Kardashian West’s tendency to drop from sky-high registers to a groggy low — known as “vocal fry” — is also the subject of internet mashups and hot takes.

Consequences get higher outside the safety of philosophical musings and observations in entertainment. Real women often change or mask their voices in everyday situations, sometimes to damaging effects, Tongson said.

“Women in professional situations speak much lower than their actual tambour. I worked with a speech therapist because I was having vocal module issues … I was speaking much lower in the classroom than what my natural vocal box was built for,” Tongson said.

“That has to do with associating with deeper voices and authority.  It’s a common problem. Speech therapists I’ve worked with said it’s a completely common issue for women and it can damage people’s voices and create physiological harm,” she concluded.

We pray no Michelle Williams were harmed during the making of “I Feel Pretty.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’ Zips to $1 Million at Thursday Box Office

‘I Feel Pretty’ Film Review: Amy Schumer Teaches a Despicable Lesson in Self-Love

Evolution of Amy Schumer: From Stand Up Comic to ‘I Feel Pretty’ (Photos)

Michelle Williams is an unexpected scene-stealer in this weekend’s “I Feel Pretty,” but take a closer listen — the Oscar nominee’s vocal performance contributes to an ongoing conversation about gender and voice.

Williams plays cosmetics CEO Avery LeClair in the STX comedy, a model of feminine perfection styled within an inch of her life and suffocating under the pressure it brings. The character serves as an ideal for Amy Schumer’s self-loathing protagonist, but also a lightning rod thanks to her insanely high-pitched voice.

This tone infantilizes her character no matter how serious the conversation she’s conducting as a businesswoman.

“She is the object of ridicule because of her unfortunate voice,” Williams said during her press tour for “I Feel Pretty” this week.

Williams handles the affectation like a pro, playing up her own saccharine sounds for laughs, but Avery LeClair is the latest in a long line of “sexy baby” types that invite derision and spark debate.

“In the past seven years or so, there’s been so much attention paid to the female voice. From vocal fry to the baby voice. There has always been a cultural anxiousness about gender and voice,” Karen Tongson, an associate professor of gender studies at the University of Southern California, told TheWrap.

The most popular example of the sexy baby voice comes from a 2011 episode of “30 Rock” that centers entirely around the phenomenon. Cristin Milioti plays a guest writer on the fictional sketch series created by Tina Fey’s Liz Lemon — she is scantily clad, pridefully promiscuous and constantly coming on to men in the workplace. And, of course, her voice hits the highest registers possible.

In an NPR interview the same year, Fey recalled the real-life incident that inspired the episode. It was from a college acting class.

“This beautiful, voluptuous little tiny actress had one of these tiny voices. She was doing a monologue, and one of my acting teachers, he very gently said, ‘OK. I want you to do the monologue again, and I would like to use your adult woman voice,'” Fey told Fresh Air host Terry Gross.

The actress dropped her pitch and spoke in her true voice, Fey said, “and all the other women in the class looked at each other like, ‘I knew it!””

Tongson said the “30 Rock” episode “essentially presents those anxieties, particularly for feminist-identified and working professional women — that they are subjugating themselves to certain expectations around femininity and softness. If someone is speaking in a higher tone, it diminishes authority.”

Examples are everywhere. On the highly-bingeable Bravo series “Imposters,” Israeli actress Inbar Lavi offers a masterclass in voice work as she plays a con woman always assuming new identities. One of those is a ditzy, cleavage-baring assistant trying to romance her boss. In his presence, she speaks in the register of a toddler.

During Kristen Wiig’s time on “Saturday Night Live,” one of her most popular recurring characters was a vampy redhead named Shana. Her shtick was a combination of sexy baby voice and the transatlantic accents of Hollywood’s golden age, who used her exaggerated manners to command the attention of men in any given situation.

“Look earlier in culture at ‘My Fair Lady,'” Tongson said. “We’re talking about how accents mark class. It informs your identity in so many different ways. Whether its a type of accent, tone, the words you choose. It can really mark where you belong in a social order.”

This vocal scrutiny is not just limited to scripted content. Two months ago, Jimmy Kimmel devoted an entire segment on his late-night show to call out a contestant named Krystal on “The Bachelor.” He crowned her as having “the most annoying voice in ‘Bachelor’ history,” and played a supercut of her cooing exaggerated greetings.

Hiiieeeeeeeeeeee.

Reality kingpin Kim Kardashian West’s tendency to drop from sky-high registers to a groggy low — known as “vocal fry” — is also the subject of internet mashups and hot takes.

Consequences get higher outside the safety of philosophical musings and observations in entertainment. Real women often change or mask their voices in everyday situations, sometimes to damaging effects, Tongson said.

“Women in professional situations speak much lower than their actual tambour. I worked with a speech therapist because I was having vocal module issues … I was speaking much lower in the classroom than what my natural vocal box was built for,” Tongson said.

“That has to do with associating with deeper voices and authority.  It’s a common problem. Speech therapists I’ve worked with said it’s a completely common issue for women and it can damage people’s voices and create physiological harm,” she concluded.

We pray no Michelle Williams were harmed during the making of “I Feel Pretty.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer's 'I Feel Pretty' Zips to $1 Million at Thursday Box Office

'I Feel Pretty' Film Review: Amy Schumer Teaches a Despicable Lesson in Self-Love

Evolution of Amy Schumer: From Stand Up Comic to 'I Feel Pretty' (Photos)

Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’ Zips to $1 Million at Thursday Box Office

Amy Schumer’s “I Feel Pretty” earned $1 million at the Thursday box office.

In comparison, Schumer’s “Trainwreck” earned $1.8 million in previews in 2015 before it grossed $30 million in its opening weekend, whereas last year’s “Snatched” grossed $650,000 on Thursday night before opening to $19.5 million. “I Feel Pretty” is aiming for a $13 million to $15 million opening weekend, based on a production budget of $32 million.

“I Feel Pretty” stars Schumer as Renee, who after a head injury during a workout class sees her body in a completely new perspective and has a newfound confidence to live life fearlessly. The film, written and directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, also stars Michelle Williams, Emily Ratajkowski, Aidy Bryant, Busy Philipps and Tom Hopper.

Also Read: ‘I Feel Pretty’ Film Review: Amy Schumer Teaches a Despicable Lesson in Self-Love

“Super Troopers 2” earned $1.35 million from 1,850 locations on Thursday night, with showings starting at 4:20 p.m. To compare, Universal’s “Blockers” earned $1.5 million in previews a couple weeks ago, and had an opening weekend of $20.5 million.

It is the sequel to the cult comedy by Jay Chandrasekhar, which was released in February 2002 and opened to $6.2 million — $9.8 million in today’s dollar.

The sequel is written by and stars the Broken Lizard comedy team, which includes Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan, Steve Lemme, Paul Soter and Erik Stolhanske as a group of bumbling Vermont State Troopers. When a border dispute arises between the U.S. and Canada, the group sets up an outpost in the disputed land, and their arrival isn’t welcomed by the Canadians. Brian Cox, Seann William Scott, Lynda Carter, and Rob Lowe also star.

Also Read: Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’ Braces for Ugly Box Office Debut

Finally, there’s Codeblack/Lionsgate’s “Traffik,” a thriller written and directed by Deon Taylor that stars Paula Patton as a journalist whose romantic getaway with her boyfriend is shattered after they accidentally come into possession of a phone belonging to a group of sex traffickers. Lionsgate is giving the film a targeted release of around 1,000 screens with a projected opening of $4 million after grossing $225,000 in previews on Thursday.

“A Quiet Place” is looking at a third weekend total in the low $20 million range, with “Rampage” expected to take a 45-50 percent drop and make a second weekend total in the high teens — the film starring Dwayne Johnson earned another 1.9 million on Thursday night for a domestic cumulative of $45.6 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer’s 12 Best Moments: From a ‘Slutty’ Tattoo Joke to That Startling Cheer Dance (Photos)

Amy Schumer Claps Back at ‘I Feel Pretty’ Critics: ‘We All Struggle With Self-Esteem’

Justin Bieber to Amy Schumer: Stars Throw Their Support Behind #MarchForOurLives

Amy Schumer’s “I Feel Pretty” earned $1 million at the Thursday box office.

In comparison, Schumer’s “Trainwreck” earned $1.8 million in previews in 2015 before it grossed $30 million in its opening weekend, whereas last year’s “Snatched” grossed $650,000 on Thursday night before opening to $19.5 million. “I Feel Pretty” is aiming for a $13 million to $15 million opening weekend, based on a production budget of $32 million.

“I Feel Pretty” stars Schumer as Renee, who after a head injury during a workout class sees her body in a completely new perspective and has a newfound confidence to live life fearlessly. The film, written and directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, also stars Michelle Williams, Emily Ratajkowski, Aidy Bryant, Busy Philipps and Tom Hopper.

“Super Troopers 2” earned $1.35 million from 1,850 locations on Thursday night, with showings starting at 4:20 p.m. To compare, Universal’s “Blockers” earned $1.5 million in previews a couple weeks ago, and had an opening weekend of $20.5 million.

It is the sequel to the cult comedy by Jay Chandrasekhar, which was released in February 2002 and opened to $6.2 million — $9.8 million in today’s dollar.

The sequel is written by and stars the Broken Lizard comedy team, which includes Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan, Steve Lemme, Paul Soter and Erik Stolhanske as a group of bumbling Vermont State Troopers. When a border dispute arises between the U.S. and Canada, the group sets up an outpost in the disputed land, and their arrival isn’t welcomed by the Canadians. Brian Cox, Seann William Scott, Lynda Carter, and Rob Lowe also star.

Finally, there’s Codeblack/Lionsgate’s “Traffik,” a thriller written and directed by Deon Taylor that stars Paula Patton as a journalist whose romantic getaway with her boyfriend is shattered after they accidentally come into possession of a phone belonging to a group of sex traffickers. Lionsgate is giving the film a targeted release of around 1,000 screens with a projected opening of $4 million after grossing $225,000 in previews on Thursday.

“A Quiet Place” is looking at a third weekend total in the low $20 million range, with “Rampage” expected to take a 45-50 percent drop and make a second weekend total in the high teens — the film starring Dwayne Johnson earned another 1.9 million on Thursday night for a domestic cumulative of $45.6 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer's 12 Best Moments: From a 'Slutty' Tattoo Joke to That Startling Cheer Dance (Photos)

Amy Schumer Claps Back at 'I Feel Pretty' Critics: 'We All Struggle With Self-Esteem'

Justin Bieber to Amy Schumer: Stars Throw Their Support Behind #MarchForOurLives

Michelle Williams To Co-Star With Julianne Moore In ‘After The Wedding’

Michelle Williams, last seen in critically acclaimed films The Greatest Showman and All the Money in the World, is set to join Julianne Moore in the U.S. remake of After The Wedding, which is written and directed by Moore’s spouse Bart Freundlich…

Michelle Williams, last seen in critically acclaimed films The Greatest Showman and All the Money in the World, is set to join Julianne Moore in the U.S. remake of After The Wedding, which is written and directed by Moore’s spouse Bart Freundlich. This version takes on a different spin to Susanne Bier’s original Danish drama by casting the two lead roles as women in the story of Isabel, who runs a dilapidated orphanage outside of Calcutta, and who travels to New York to…