Mashable Shuts Down French-Language Version, Ends Partnership with France24

U.S. digital-media company Mashable has folded its French operations and French-language version following the end of its partnership with France24, the French news channel. Mashable and France 24 had launched a local version of the social media site i…

U.S. digital-media company Mashable has folded its French operations and French-language version following the end of its partnership with France24, the French news channel. Mashable and France 24 had launched a local version of the social media site in March 2016 with the support of Google’s innovation fund, as part of its Digital News Initiative. […]

Telemundo’s ‘Un Nuevo Dia’ Debuts Weekly Mashable Tech Segment

Mashable is making its TV debut on Telemundo’s “Un Nuevo Dia” morning show, as the NBCUniversal network looks to boost its reach among younger Hispanic viewers. NBUniversal’s Telemundo and Mashable have worked together since 201…

Mashable is making its TV debut on Telemundo’s “Un Nuevo Dia” morning show, as the NBCUniversal network looks to boost its reach among younger Hispanic viewers. NBUniversal’s Telemundo and Mashable have worked together since 2014, co-producing the “el Pulso” tech-news section of Telemundo’s website. Now Mashable is making the leap to linear TV with a […]

What’s the Cure for Ailing Mashable, BuzzFeed and Other Online News Sites?

The news this week that Mashable would lay off 50 employees in the wake of a fire sale to Ziff Davis for $50 million is a sign of the times in digital news.

Just two years ago the company was valued at $250 million and won $15 million in new funding from Time Warner. Now a plunging valuation has become a painfully common affair across the digital space for both small players and industry titans.

Last week, BuzzFeed axed 100 employees and delayed a planned IPO after missing expected 2017 revenues by as much as 20 percent. A traffic drop prompted Mic.com’s much-maligned “pivot to video” — and dozens of layoffs. Vice also missed earnings, but you may have overlooked that story as the company prepared for what is expected to be a brutal piece in the New York Times about the company’s issues with sexual misconduct.

Also Read: President Trump Just Lost to Barack Obama (on Twitter at Least)

“Digital media publishers are looking for scale,” said Michael J. Wolf, CEO of Active, Inc., a management consulting firm for tech and media companies. “We’re at a point now where there aren’t many of these companies. You could look at Mashable and say it’s just too small. The other reason these companies need to get larger is because they need to be move their businesses into video.”

Scale, however, is far from the only problem. As a growing number of people consume content from Google and social media, companies like Mashable find themselves in an increasingly untenable situation. As distribution algorithms are constantly tweaked, media shops are left constantly scrambling, playing the role of digital soothsayers to a hostile web.

One former Mashable senior staffer told TheWrap that social media changes took a brutal toll on traffic during his tenure and that the company constantly was left floundering with no real strategy for developing other revenue streams.

Also Read: Mashable Lays Off Staff, Top Editor in Shift to TV

A similar story played out at news website Mic.com.

“It provides an opportunity where people think there is a system to play, a game to play. You start designing stories to play into an algorithm,” said a former senior editorial employee at Mic. “Then you start picking stories based on what will do well on Facebook. People start to focus on that and not the news itself.”

To that end, the company often employed what were known internally as framings, creating formulas like “In One Tweet [Sharable Person] Just [Thing Done].” A small cottage industry of “one tweet” posts were produced to document the pronouncements of author J.K. Rowling.

Also Read: Megyn Kelly: I Was Called ‘a Real C-Word’ After Debate Dust-Up With Donald Trump

Some examples include:

“In One tweet, JK Rowling shaded all the men asking why there’s no ‘Men’s Day’”

“In One Tweet, J.K. Rowling Just Sparked the Most Magical Celebration of Equality Eve”
“One Tweet from J.K. Rowling Perfectly Shuts Down Rupert Murdoch’s Anti-Muslim Rhetoric”
“In One Tweet, JK Rowling Tells Mic We’re Wrong”

The dependence on social media has put many outlets in a bind, David Cohn, Senior Director at Advanced Publications, told TheWrap. Media sites can’t ignore Facebook; they need to leverage the social network’s massive platform to funnel readers towards its content. But the money they’re making, in comparison to the gargantuan ad sales Facebook and Google rake in, is negligible. (The duopoly accounts for 85 percent of all internet ad growth, and combined will make more than $100 billion in ad revenue in 2017, according to Mary Meeker’s annual report.)

“That generation — [sites like] NowThis, Circa — it’s a negotiation, and they’re in a weaker hand. And the reason they’re in this pickle is because they don’t have this strong hand to demand strong tools to monetize. Facebook has that upper hand, so Facebook can monetize,” said Cohn.

Also Read: When Digital Media’s ‘Pivot to Video’ Goes Wrong

He pointed to NowThis as a textbook representation of new school media’s symbiotic relationship with Facebook.

“NowThis is really just a content creator for Facebook, that’s the relationship. Facebook is the distributor and NowThis is the studio — not unlike the movie studio and the movie theater,” added Cohn. “The situation we find here is that the distributors, the Facebooks and social platforms, are in a much better position to monetize, and in a much better position to dictate, because they own the product.”

As companies scramble for answers, outlets have increasingly turned to video to maintain their weakened grasp of the audience. But the pivot to video isn’t a surefire panacea. Mark Bonner, former managing editor at International Business Times, recently told TheWrap the strategy was anything but a silver bullet for the company. By adding autoplay clips, IBT aimed to keep eyeballs on the screen longer and, in turn, boost its ad revenue. That didn’t happen.

Also Read: Ted Cruz Says He’ll Serve With Roy Moore, But Al Franken Charges Are ‘Serious Problem’

“[The pivot to video] was forced on us, and I never got an explanation why, but I can only guess they were looking at the balance sheets and saying ‘this is a fast way for us to make up some gains,’” said Bonner. “It didn’t work, as far as I can tell, because we all got laid off.”

Compounding matters, goals put in place by many of the big money venture capital firms backing these companies has undermined the drive of their editorial teams. An obsession with traffic first, quality journalism second, has stymied the industry. And the impact of VC — and its share of the blame in the media-wide downturn — isn’t lost on those that have seen it firsthand.

“So many of these companies got a lot of VC [venture capital] funding and then at companies, like a BuzzFeed and Mashable, there’s an emphasis on growth. The way to grow is to get hits and the way to get hits is to publish stories that gets hits, not necessarily stories about hard news,” said the former senior Mic employee. “That shifts things away from journalism towards traffic and when you do journalism for traffic rather than for journalism, that takes the sail out of journalists, makes it harder to stay focused, and makes it much more of a business and commodity.”

Also Read: Why Fox Buyout Could Make Disney the ‘Most Powerful Company’ in Hollywood

So what’s the path forward? Cohn sees more companies turning to a “hybrid” business model — somewhere along the spectrum between BuzzFeed’s obsession with scale, and smaller subscription-based outlets like The Information. At the same time, the million dollar question boils down to how tech and media companies find a working relationship moving forward. The hysteria over social media wiping traditional outlets off the map is overstated, but fostering a more beneficial arrangement for quality content will have to be made.

“In truth, they need each other, and when push comes to shove, these tech giants know that and understand that. You can’t surf Google if no one’s producing content, and it means nothing to share content on Facebook if there isn’t good content being made,” said Cohn. “And there’s only so many cat photos people that people can really share. There has to be substantive stuff.” 

(Disclaimer: TheWrap media editor Jon Levine was formerly a staff writer at Mic).

Related stories from TheWrap:

California Wildfire Update: ‘Westworld’ Production Back on, ‘SWAT’ Still Off as Blaze Spreads

‘Jeopardy!’ Champion Slapped With Felony Charges

When Digital Media’s ‘Pivot to Video’ Goes Wrong

Mic Lays Off 25 Employees in Pivot to Video

Break Media Pivots From Sexy Photos and Prank Videos to Sci-Fi Movie With Lorenzo di Bonaventura

The news this week that Mashable would lay off 50 employees in the wake of a fire sale to Ziff Davis for $50 million is a sign of the times in digital news.

Just two years ago the company was valued at $250 million and won $15 million in new funding from Time Warner. Now a plunging valuation has become a painfully common affair across the digital space for both small players and industry titans.

Last week, BuzzFeed axed 100 employees and delayed a planned IPO after missing expected 2017 revenues by as much as 20 percent. A traffic drop prompted Mic.com’s much-maligned “pivot to video” — and dozens of layoffs. Vice also missed earnings, but you may have overlooked that story as the company prepared for what is expected to be a brutal piece in the New York Times about the company’s issues with sexual misconduct.

“Digital media publishers are looking for scale,” said Michael J. Wolf, CEO of Active, Inc., a management consulting firm for tech and media companies. “We’re at a point now where there aren’t many of these companies. You could look at Mashable and say it’s just too small. The other reason these companies need to get larger is because they need to be move their businesses into video.”

Scale, however, is far from the only problem. As a growing number of people consume content from Google and social media, companies like Mashable find themselves in an increasingly untenable situation. As distribution algorithms are constantly tweaked, media shops are left constantly scrambling, playing the role of digital soothsayers to a hostile web.

One former Mashable senior staffer told TheWrap that social media changes took a brutal toll on traffic during his tenure and that the company constantly was left floundering with no real strategy for developing other revenue streams.

A similar story played out at news website Mic.com.

“It provides an opportunity where people think there is a system to play, a game to play. You start designing stories to play into an algorithm,” said a former senior editorial employee at Mic. “Then you start picking stories based on what will do well on Facebook. People start to focus on that and not the news itself.”

To that end, the company often employed what were known internally as framings, creating formulas like “In One Tweet [Sharable Person] Just [Thing Done].” A small cottage industry of “one tweet” posts were produced to document the pronouncements of author J.K. Rowling.

Some examples include:

“In One tweet, JK Rowling shaded all the men asking why there’s no ‘Men’s Day'”

“In One Tweet, J.K. Rowling Just Sparked the Most Magical Celebration of Equality Eve”
“One Tweet from J.K. Rowling Perfectly Shuts Down Rupert Murdoch’s Anti-Muslim Rhetoric”
“In One Tweet, JK Rowling Tells Mic We’re Wrong”

The dependence on social media has put many outlets in a bind, David Cohn, Senior Director at Advanced Publications, told TheWrap. Media sites can’t ignore Facebook; they need to leverage the social network’s massive platform to funnel readers towards its content. But the money they’re making, in comparison to the gargantuan ad sales Facebook and Google rake in, is negligible. (The duopoly accounts for 85 percent of all internet ad growth, and combined will make more than $100 billion in ad revenue in 2017, according to Mary Meeker’s annual report.)

“That generation — [sites like] NowThis, Circa — it’s a negotiation, and they’re in a weaker hand. And the reason they’re in this pickle is because they don’t have this strong hand to demand strong tools to monetize. Facebook has that upper hand, so Facebook can monetize,” said Cohn.

He pointed to NowThis as a textbook representation of new school media’s symbiotic relationship with Facebook.

“NowThis is really just a content creator for Facebook, that’s the relationship. Facebook is the distributor and NowThis is the studio — not unlike the movie studio and the movie theater,” added Cohn. “The situation we find here is that the distributors, the Facebooks and social platforms, are in a much better position to monetize, and in a much better position to dictate, because they own the product.”

As companies scramble for answers, outlets have increasingly turned to video to maintain their weakened grasp of the audience. But the pivot to video isn’t a surefire panacea. Mark Bonner, former managing editor at International Business Times, recently told TheWrap the strategy was anything but a silver bullet for the company. By adding autoplay clips, IBT aimed to keep eyeballs on the screen longer and, in turn, boost its ad revenue. That didn’t happen.

“[The pivot to video] was forced on us, and I never got an explanation why, but I can only guess they were looking at the balance sheets and saying ‘this is a fast way for us to make up some gains,'” said Bonner. “It didn’t work, as far as I can tell, because we all got laid off.”

Compounding matters, goals put in place by many of the big money venture capital firms backing these companies has undermined the drive of their editorial teams. An obsession with traffic first, quality journalism second, has stymied the industry. And the impact of VC — and its share of the blame in the media-wide downturn — isn’t lost on those that have seen it firsthand.

“So many of these companies got a lot of VC [venture capital] funding and then at companies, like a BuzzFeed and Mashable, there’s an emphasis on growth. The way to grow is to get hits and the way to get hits is to publish stories that gets hits, not necessarily stories about hard news,” said the former senior Mic employee. “That shifts things away from journalism towards traffic and when you do journalism for traffic rather than for journalism, that takes the sail out of journalists, makes it harder to stay focused, and makes it much more of a business and commodity.”

So what’s the path forward? Cohn sees more companies turning to a “hybrid” business model — somewhere along the spectrum between BuzzFeed’s obsession with scale, and smaller subscription-based outlets like The Information. At the same time, the million dollar question boils down to how tech and media companies find a working relationship moving forward. The hysteria over social media wiping traditional outlets off the map is overstated, but fostering a more beneficial arrangement for quality content will have to be made.

“In truth, they need each other, and when push comes to shove, these tech giants know that and understand that. You can’t surf Google if no one’s producing content, and it means nothing to share content on Facebook if there isn’t good content being made,” said Cohn. “And there’s only so many cat photos people that people can really share. There has to be substantive stuff.” 

(Disclaimer: TheWrap media editor Jon Levine was formerly a staff writer at Mic).

Related stories from TheWrap:

California Wildfire Update: 'Westworld' Production Back on, 'SWAT' Still Off as Blaze Spreads

'Jeopardy!' Champion Slapped With Felony Charges

When Digital Media's 'Pivot to Video' Goes Wrong

Mic Lays Off 25 Employees in Pivot to Video

Break Media Pivots From Sexy Photos and Prank Videos to Sci-Fi Movie With Lorenzo di Bonaventura

Mashable Hit With Layoffs After Selling to Ziff Davis

Mashable has made what appears to be a significant round of layoffs, following the struggling digital-media company’s fire sale to Ziff Davis. Mashable’s deal to sell to publisher Ziff Davis for $50 million — one-fifth of its prior valuation of $250 million — was reported last month by the Wall Street Journal. The exit for […]

Mashable has made what appears to be a significant round of layoffs, following the struggling digital-media company’s fire sale to Ziff Davis. Mashable’s deal to sell to publisher Ziff Davis for $50 million — one-fifth of its prior valuation of $250 million — was reported last month by the Wall Street Journal. The exit for […]

BuzzFeed Sheds 100 Jobs, Moves President Greg Coleman Into Unspecified Role

BuzzFeed, long the poster child for pure-digital growth, is shedding 100 jobs in a significant restructuring, and president Greg Coleman is transitioning into a new, unspecified role.
The layoffs, confirmed in a staff memo from CEO Jonah Peretti, will affect mainly the company’s “business” unit. The group “was built to support direct sold advertising but will need to bring in different, more diverse expertise,” Peretti wrote. “As our strategy evolves, we need to evolve…

BuzzFeed, long the poster child for pure-digital growth, is shedding 100 jobs in a significant restructuring, and president Greg Coleman is transitioning into a new, unspecified role. The layoffs, confirmed in a staff memo from CEO Jonah Peretti, will affect mainly the company's "business" unit. The group "was built to support direct sold advertising but will need to bring in different, more diverse expertise,” Peretti wrote. "As our strategy evolves, we need to evolve…

Mashable Sold at Fire-Sale Price of $50 Million to Ziff Davis (Report)

Digital-media firm Mashable has clinched a sale for the company — and it’s not for a price that founder Pete Cashmore or investors including Turner were looking for. Ziff Davis, a tech, gaming and healthcare publisher, is buying the New York-based company for about $50 million, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing anonymous sources. That’s […]

Digital-media firm Mashable has clinched a sale for the company — and it’s not for a price that founder Pete Cashmore or investors including Turner were looking for. Ziff Davis, a tech, gaming and healthcare publisher, is buying the New York-based company for about $50 million, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing anonymous sources. That’s […]

Mashable Managing Editor Blasts ‘A-holes’ on Forbes 30 Under 30 List

Forbes Magazine announced its annual 30 Under 30 list on Tuesday highlighting the achievements of the up-and-coming generation of figures in media, politics, business, culture and more.

For media, the list was a Benetton-worthy lineup that included familiar faces, like CNN political reporter Andrew Kaczynski, and some less famous figures, like cinematographer Khaled Khatib.

But Mashable Managing Editor Foster Kamer wasn’t having any of it, launching an extended Twitter rant on Tuesday blasting the list and everyone on it. (It goes without saying that Kamer himself was not on the list.)

Also Read: Mashable Lays Off Staff, Top Editor in Shift to TV

“Most of these people, you will not hear about again. And that will become deeply crippling for them — to be validated once early in your career, and then, never again. That is worse than never making them in the first place,” he wrote.

“These people have sacrificed normal lives, normal friends, and normal relationships with people. Many of them view all personal relationships as deeply transactional,” Kamer continued in apparent stream of advice directed at twentysomething media workers. “Do you want to be that? No! You don’t! We call those people ‘a–holes.’”

While Kamer lauded some who made the Forbes media list, like Freedom of the Press Foundation reporter Peter Sterne, he was critical of others, calling out author and Instagram poet Rupi Kaur by name.

“Shout out to Rupi Kaur for her hustle,” he wrote. “But if my a– could clench a pen independent of the brain in my head it could write better poetry on the bottom of a slurpee cup than anything she’s ever inked.”

Also Read: Mashable Scores $15 Million Investment From Turner

Ouch.

Kamer, who did land on a 2010 New York Times list of “Rising Stars of Gossip Blogs,” told TheWrap that he originally wanted to offer encouragement.

“I have a lot of love for a lot of people who were wondering in public or private why they weren’t on these lists. And the truth/message is: ‘It’s a semi-arbitrary, deeply human process. Don’t worry about it. You’re great, and you’ll be even better if you ignore some arbitrary ranking, and forge forward with confidence,’” he said via Twitter, adding that his bit about “a–holes” had been in jest.

“I know a few people on the list, and I’m genuinely super happy for them, and they’re not at all a–holes,” he said. “When I called them all a–holes, I was being facetious.”

Here’s a portion of his Twitter tirade.

Dear People Young and Old, Having a Bad Day, Because of the 30 Under 30 list –

1. These lists are made ostensibly so we can learn about these people. But who actually needs to learn about Rupi Kaur or Logic’s agent?

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

2. These lists are actually editorial features compiled almost explicitly for you to project your insecurities on. I would know! I used to make them. So: Do not do that.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

3. Most of these people, you will not hear about again. And that will become deeply crippling for them–to be validated once early in your career, and then, never again. That is worse than never making them in the first place.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

4. These people have sacrificed normal lives, normal friends, and normal relationships with people. Many of them view all personal relationships as deeply transactional. Do you want to be that? No! You don’t! We call those people “assholes.”

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

5. You know what’s better than being a flash in the pan? Longevity. You know this, but again, these lists were made to make you forget about that and click to indulge your most anxious, self-conscious impulses. Bleh. Fuck that noise. Again: That ain’t you.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

6. You’re gonna make the list of TK YOUR NAME’S 7 UNDER 36.7 WHO ARE DOPE AF PEOPLE. Everyone who doesn’t make that list can eat your azz, including everyone on the Forbes 30 Under 30 who want to make you self-conscious and anxious about your future.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

6B. Especially @petersterne, who is the white devil NO JUST KIDDING Peter’s actually a nice guy. I’m sure many of these people are.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

7. But fuck ‘em anyway, today, because they are not on YOUR LIST. All of which is to say: Do not give into your existential career anxiety and click on Forbes stories. Spend your time doing something useful, like reading my Tweets NO JUST KIDDING actually get some work done.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

7. (I think it’s 7?) Whatever: Ultimately, remember, these lists were created for you to project/freak out on and all these people are deeply unhappy and have weird hangups as bad or worse than yours, and they won’t be successful or making lists of under 30 forever. FIN.

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

9. (and by the way shout out to rupi kaur for her hustle but if my ass could clench a pen independent of the brain in my head it could write better poetry on the bottom of a slurpee cup than anything she’s ever inked, DEUCES)

– Foster Kamer (@weareyourfek) November 14, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

Mashable’s New Chief Content Officer Defends New Video-Focused Strategy

Mashable Lays Off Staff, Top Editor in Shift to TV

Mashable Scores $15 Million Investment From Turner

Mashable Could Sell for $300-$350 Million (Report)

Forbes Magazine announced its annual 30 Under 30 list on Tuesday highlighting the achievements of the up-and-coming generation of figures in media, politics, business, culture and more.

For media, the list was a Benetton-worthy lineup that included familiar faces, like CNN political reporter Andrew Kaczynski, and some less famous figures, like cinematographer Khaled Khatib.

But Mashable Managing Editor Foster Kamer wasn’t having any of it, launching an extended Twitter rant on Tuesday blasting the list and everyone on it. (It goes without saying that Kamer himself was not on the list.)

“Most of these people, you will not hear about again. And that will become deeply crippling for them — to be validated once early in your career, and then, never again. That is worse than never making them in the first place,” he wrote.

“These people have sacrificed normal lives, normal friends, and normal relationships with people. Many of them view all personal relationships as deeply transactional,” Kamer continued in apparent stream of advice directed at twentysomething media workers. “Do you want to be that? No! You don’t! We call those people ‘a–holes.'”

While Kamer lauded some who made the Forbes media list, like Freedom of the Press Foundation reporter Peter Sterne, he was critical of others, calling out author and Instagram poet Rupi Kaur by name.

“Shout out to Rupi Kaur for her hustle,” he wrote. “But if my a– could clench a pen independent of the brain in my head it could write better poetry on the bottom of a slurpee cup than anything she’s ever inked.”

Ouch.

Kamer, who did land on a 2010 New York Times list of “Rising Stars of Gossip Blogs,” told TheWrap that he originally wanted to offer encouragement.

“I have a lot of love for a lot of people who were wondering in public or private why they weren’t on these lists. And the truth/message is: ‘It’s a semi-arbitrary, deeply human process. Don’t worry about it. You’re great, and you’ll be even better if you ignore some arbitrary ranking, and forge forward with confidence,'” he said via Twitter, adding that his bit about “a–holes” had been in jest.

“I know a few people on the list, and I’m genuinely super happy for them, and they’re not at all a–holes,” he said. “When I called them all a–holes, I was being facetious.”

Here’s a portion of his Twitter tirade.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Mashable's New Chief Content Officer Defends New Video-Focused Strategy

Mashable Lays Off Staff, Top Editor in Shift to TV

Mashable Scores $15 Million Investment From Turner

Mashable Could Sell for $300-$350 Million (Report)

Mashable Looks for Exit in Sale Talks With Germany’s ProSieben (Report)

Mashable, the digital-media player that like many of its peers has refocused on growing its video biz, has engaged in “extensive” discussions with ProSiebenSat.1 about a sale, the Wall Street Journal reported. The unprofitable New York-based company had been trying to raised additional investment from a strategic investor but is “now leaning toward an all-out… Read more »

Mashable, the digital-media player that like many of its peers has refocused on growing its video biz, has engaged in “extensive” discussions with ProSiebenSat.1 about a sale, the Wall Street Journal reported. The unprofitable New York-based company had been trying to raised additional investment from a strategic investor but is “now leaning toward an all-out... Read more »

Bumble Opens NYC Pop-Up for Users to Mingle in Real Life

Bumble, the dating app, opened a pop-up location in New York this month called “The Hive,” where app users can meet and mingle in real life.

The company made the announcement on its blog earlier this week, stating that “#BumbleHiveNYC is a safe space where guests can expect complimentary entertainment, drinks and snacks, and interactive sessions with thought leaders and entrepreneurs.”

It will be open from June 1 to June 25 at 148 Mercer Street in New York. “The Hive” seeks to attract entrepreneurs, artists and thinkers from all over and establish a community for them to connect — not just single people looking to meet their one true love.

Also Read: Tinder CEO Chris Payne Out After Just 5 Months

The space also has events scheduled for the month. For example, on Saturday, Bumble is offering a free brunch and cocktails in the afternoon. On Sunday, a DJ will spin your favorite tracks and guests can sip on Rose all day long.

While “The Hive” is only open this month, for now, Whitney Wolfe, Bumble’s founder and CEO told Mashable that they plan to find permanent fixtures in select cities. The company wants to create a space for “users to convene is a safe place where only positive interaction is welcome.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Married By Mom and Dad’: Devin Reveals His Secret Tinder Past (Exclusive Video)

‘Pokemon Go’ Is More Popular Among Android Users Than Tinder, Gaining on Twitter

LA Billboard Targets Tinder, Grindr Users for ‘Free STD Checks’

Bumble, the dating app, opened a pop-up location in New York this month called “The Hive,” where app users can meet and mingle in real life.

The company made the announcement on its blog earlier this week, stating that “#BumbleHiveNYC is a safe space where guests can expect complimentary entertainment, drinks and snacks, and interactive sessions with thought leaders and entrepreneurs.”

It will be open from June 1 to June 25 at 148 Mercer Street in New York. “The Hive” seeks to attract entrepreneurs, artists and thinkers from all over and establish a community for them to connect — not just single people looking to meet their one true love.

The space also has events scheduled for the month. For example, on Saturday, Bumble is offering a free brunch and cocktails in the afternoon. On Sunday, a DJ will spin your favorite tracks and guests can sip on Rose all day long.

While “The Hive” is only open this month, for now, Whitney Wolfe, Bumble’s founder and CEO told Mashable that they plan to find permanent fixtures in select cities. The company wants to create a space for “users to convene is a safe place where only positive interaction is welcome.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Married By Mom and Dad': Devin Reveals His Secret Tinder Past (Exclusive Video)

'Pokemon Go' Is More Popular Among Android Users Than Tinder, Gaining on Twitter

LA Billboard Targets Tinder, Grindr Users for 'Free STD Checks'