‘Agents of SHIELD’ Renewed for Season 7 by ABC

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

ABC has handed out an early renewal to “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” picking up the series for a seventh season, the network announced on Friday.

The news comes months ahead of the drama’s sixth outing, which was pushed to Summer 2019 earlier this year. At the time, it caused some speculation about the aging show’s future, but the network insisted the move did not reflect a lack of confidence in the show or portend an imminent cancellation.

“By putting it in the summer, we feel like we’re going to be able to super-serve the fanbase that loves that show, and hopefully give it an opportunity to continue on longer than it would if it lived in season,” ABC Entertainment president Channing Dungey told reporters earlier this year when the news was first announced, adding that she believed the most recent season to be the show’s “creatively strongest yet.”

Also Read: ABC Shifts ‘Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD’ to Summer

The renewal keeps “S.H.I.E.L.D.” on as ABC’s last remaining show from Marvel Television following the cancellation of “Inhumans” last season. Elsewhere, Marvel has “The Gifted” at Fox, “Legion” at FX, “Runaways” at Hulu and “Cloak & Dagger” at Freeform.

Netflix, meanwhile, has started to cull its Marvel series offerings in anticipation of Disney’s new streaming efforts, cancelling both “Iron Fist” and “Luke Cage,” leaving just “Jessica Jones,” “Daredevil” and “The Punisher” in its “Defenders” franchise.

Marvel Studios is expected to begin development on a number of “Avengers” spin-off projects for the recently announced Disney+, including standalone limited series centered on Tom Hiddleston’s Loki and Anthony Mackie’s Falcon.

Also Read: Loki, Scarlet Witch, More Marvel Characters to Get Standalone Shows on Disney Streaming Service

“Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” stars Ming-Na Wen, Chloe Bennet, Iain De Caestecker, Elizabeth Henstridge, Henry Simmons, Natalia Cordova-Buckley and Jeff Ward. The series was co-created by Joss Whedon, Jed Whedon & Maurissa Tancharoen, who also serve as executive producers along with Jeffrey Bell and Jeph Loeb. It is produced by ABC Studios and Marvel Television for ABC.

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‘MacGyver’ Ratings Hit Low In Finale; Thanos Teasing ‘S.H.I.E.L.D.’ Steady

Read on: Deadline.

As usual, CBS was the Big 4 viewership victor (6.94 million) on Friday night and matched Fox’s 0.7/3 among adults 18-49 but the House of Moonves certainly felt a sting. Kicked off by the parental themed Season 2 finale of MacGyver (0.6/3) and followed …

‘Hawaii Five-O’ Ratings Top Night, ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ Finale Down From 2017

Read on: Deadline.

With a lot of the country still feeling winter chills, it makes sense that a bit of the warmth from the 50th state would give Hawaii Five-O (1.0/4) some heat last night.
Back from a two-week break and with Sopranos alum Vincent Pastore joining McGarrett and the gang, the island set cop drama was even with its last original of January 19 among adults 18-49. However, Five-O was the highest rated show of the night and, with 8.5 million watching, the second best viewed series…

‘Hell’s Kitchen’ Ratings Top Slow(ish) Friday; Fox & Encore Filled CBS Tied

Read on: Deadline.

CBS was all encores last night, Jane The Virgin (0.2/1) was back from its winter break with a spotlight on boundaries and consent and Gordon Ramsay cooked up a primetime win.
The last Friday of January 2018 saw an even Hell’s Kitchen (0.9/4) take the top spot among adults 18-49. That victory pushed Fox, who played a repeat of  newbie The Resident (0.4/2) at 9 PM, to match the House of Moonves for the overall demo with for the night with a 0.7/3. That’s down a tenth for…

‘Hawaii Five-O’ Ratings Match Season High, ‘Exorcist’ Steady, ‘S.H.I.E.L.D.’ Down

Read on: Deadline.

Maybe it was the lingering remembrance of Pearl Harbor, an escape to the 50th state from the chill of December covering most of America or maybe it was just the love of an old fashioned antidote story, but Hawaii Five-O (1.1/4) had a very good night on Friday.
A somewhat steady primetime on the Big 4 and the CW found the Steve McGarrett led series not only topping the night in the ratings but rising 22% to match its best demo result of its eighth season so far. For you…

‘Marvels Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Starts Season With Predictable Results On Friday

Read on: Deadline.

Season premiere of ABC’s Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (0.7 demo rating,  2.6 million viewers)  predictably dropped by double digits  from its year-ago premiere on a Tuesday at 10  PM in fall of ’16, and came in short of Marvel’s Inhumans that started the season in the slot during Premiere Week of this year. But it matches ABC’s best rating in the slot since then. And the combination of Once Upon a Time on Fridays at 8, and Inhumans at 9 had been stuck at a 0.5 average…

Every Marvel Comics Live-Action TV Show Ranked, from ‘Spider-Man’ to ‘The Punisher’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The recent crop of hit Netflix shows aren’t the first time Marvel has taken its heroes to the small screen. Spider-Man, the Incredible Hulk, Blade and even knock-off-ish X-Men have had a go before the current golden age. Here are all the Marvel shows you’ve seen and a few you might not have, ranked from goofiest pajama costumes to best character-driven dramas.

15. “The Amazing Spider-Man” (1977-79)
A 1977 attempt at a live-action “Spider-Man” is a fun throwback — but in a purely ironic way because Peter Parker’s wall-crawling “special effects” are pretty cringe-worthy. Watching Spider-Man fight guys using extremely hokey choreography gives the whole thing a pretty goofy vibe.

14. “Spidey Super Stories” (1974-1977)
Some days, Spider-Man takes on some super-boring villains. He goes up against The Prankster (a school principal who keeps pranking his students) and The Spoiler (who just likes to everyday things for people) in these goofy sketches in PBS’ “The Electric Company.” Worth a few minutes of watching on YouTube.

13. “Mutant X” (2001-2004)
Delightfully 2001 in every way, “Mutant X” answers the question, “What if you did a knock-off ‘X-Men’ TV show with a low budget.” With obviously pulled punches and early CGI, “Mutant X” scratches an itch for a brand of superhero show that’s completely rooted in the world of 20 years ago.

12. “Iron Fist” (2017)
“Iron Fist” doesn’t hit the heights of the other Netflix Marvel shows. Mostly it’s a bit dull, because Danny Rand isn’t nearly as exciting or distinct as Daredevil, Jessica Jones or Luke Cage. The show also lacks the stylistic punch of the other series, leaving Danny’s story feeling more generic and out of step with the rest of Marvel’s modern offerings.

11. “Blade: The Series” (2006)
Spike TV took the successful “Blade” movies and made a TV show. It’s a decent precursor to the grittier Marvel takes that would later show up on Netflix. Violent, blood-splattered vampire hunting couldn’t hold an audience, though.

10. “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” (2013-current)
For much of its run, “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” has been more or less answering the question, “hey, what are the normal people up to?” That can be pretty engaging, although keeping the show up with the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe continuity on a budget sometimes reigns it in.

9. “The Defenders” (2017)
After four separate, individual series, Netflix and Marvel unite Jessica Jones, Daredevil, Luke Cage and the Iron Fist to save New York in “The Defenders.” The culmination of several series’ stories and the combination of all four different personalities makes “The Defenders” a lot of fun, but the short series winds up confusing and a bit anti-climactic in its final few episodes.

8. “The Incredible Hulk” (1977-1982)
Green Lou Ferrigno helped carry “The Incredible Hulk” through five seasons. The formula of David Banner wandering around America, getting into adventures and helping people, is pretty standard for TV. But there’s plenty of wrong-doers to trigger the Hulk’s rage and get him involved — for justice.

7. “Spider-Man” (1978-79)
A pretty deep departure from the Marvel Comics stories, the Japanese take on “Spider-Man” is worth a look just for the way Spider-man pushes a button on a bracelet that shoots out his suit. This version fully understands to folly of trying to make a serious Spider-Man thing in the ’70s and goes gleefully the other way with plenty of self-awareness.

6. “Marvel’s Agent Carter” (2015-2016)
TV gives Marvel the chance to dig into smaller side stories adjacent to its movies. “Agent Carter” takes that idea to its logical extent, turning out a period show led by a woman and Captain America pal. It gets to explore minor characters pretty intimately, while adding depth to the world when it comes time to turn on an “Avengers” movie.

5. “Marvel’s Daredevil” (2015-current)
The first of Netflix and Marvel’s more down-to-earth superhero TV shows does a great job of making Daredevil seem like a mostly regular dude. It’s also full of great, visceral fight scenes that pack an intensity that CGI can’t really achieve.

4. “Marvel’s Luke Cage” (2016-current)
Giving a different perspective on superheroes than anything that’s come before it, Netflix’s “Luke Cage” adds breadth to the MCU that shows how deep and interesting it can be. It’s also very aware of its time and place in culture and doesn’t shy away from the issues inherent in focusing on a bulletproof Black man.

3. “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” (2016-current)
Another lower-key superhero story, “Jessica Jones” brings heroes and villains down to their very human flaws. The way it taps into and explores feminist themes gives a whole different take on the idea of superpowers in the Marvel universe.

2. “Legion” (2017-current)
Visually gorgeous, this slow-burn look at one of the “X-Men” universe’s most powerful mutants does a phenomenal job of exploring its anti-hero. The focus on the mystery of David’s sanity digs deep into what it’s like, and how to cope, with being a mutant in a way that’s different from other “X-Men” takes.

1. “The Punisher” (2017-current)
The best of the Netflix Marvel shows so far is “The Punisher.” Following the exploits of former soldier Frank Castle, it spends most of its time concerned with a bunch of characters struggling to deal with their own personal tragedies. It also has some of the better action scenes Marvel has yet put in its Netflix series.

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‘Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.’: Jeff Ward Set To Recur In Season 5

Read on: Deadline.

We’ve learned that Jeff Ward (Manson’s Lost Girls) has been tapped for a key recurring role in the upcoming fifth season of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
Details of the mystery character are not known, so stay tuned, but we hear it is a major multi-episode arc.
The series stars Clark Gregg as Director Phil Coulson, Ming-Na Wen as Agent Melinda May, Brett Dalton as Grant Ward, Chloe Bennet as Agent Daisy Johnson, Iain De Caestecker as Agent Leo Fitz, Elizabeth Henstridge…

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Has an Easter Egg Connection to ‘Captain America: The First Avenger’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” brings Peter Parker (Tom Holland) officially into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, adding to the story told in “Captain America: Civil War” and creating more crossovers with the Avengers. The movie’s full of character Easter Eggs too, dropping well-known Spider-Man comics characters into roles throughout Peter’s life.

There’s another Easter Egg character hidden in the life of Peter Parker as well, with a hidden tie to the world of Captain America (Chris Evans). And it’s not the videos Cap appears in to tell kids about exercise or sexual education — it’s Peter’s principal.

Eagle-eyed audience members might have caught a few clues in the office of Principal Morita (Kenneth Choi), who has a scene in which he warns Peter about keeping his academic career on track. In the corner of Morita’s office is a black-and-white photo of a military serviceman. That’s actually another Morita — Private Jim Morita, one of the Captain America’s Howling Commandos from “Captain America: The First Avenger.”

Also Read: Everything You Need to Know Before Seeing ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ (Photos)

The Howling Commandos were a group of World War II soldiers Cap recruited during that movie. Cap helped rescue Morita (also played by Choi) and other prisoners from a HYDRA weapons facility.

Morita later joined up with the Howling Commandos, led by Captain America, to return to the front lines and take on HYDRA. As a communications officer, Morita worked as the radio man for the Howling Commandos.

In addition to being a part of the team during “Captain America: The First Avenger” and helping to capture the Tesseract, an artifact that was also a huge part of the plot in “The Avengers,” Morita was also part of the group with S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) that captured another important Marvel Cinematic Universe artifact. That object was the Obelisk, a deadly item the Howling Commandos took from HYDRA during World War II that HYDRA agents would attempt to steal back on “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

Also Read: A Complete Timeline of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (Photos)

After Cap apparently “died” in the 1940s, Dum Dum Dugan (Neal McDonough) took over the Howling Commandos and continued to fight. Captain America would later find out from S.H.I.E.L.D. files that Morita was killed during the war.

Whether Principal Morita’s role as a descendant of one of Captain America’s crack commandos will factor into later “Spider-Man” movies isn’t clear. But at the least, Morita is another Easter Egg that ties the Marvel Cinematic Universe together.

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‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’: This Future Villain Was Teased in Mid-Credits Scene

‘My Friends Call Me MJ’: The Big ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Easter Egg Explained

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More Superhero Shows Raise the Bar for Television Stuntwork

Read on: Variety.

With a quartet of Marvel series on Netflix and one on ABC (“Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”), and nine series built around characters from the DC Comics universe airing across the broadcast networks, an unprecedented number of comic-book heroes are battling it out on the small screen in increasingly elaborate, Emmy-worthy action sequences. While most of the… Read more »

Madame Hydra to Appear on ‘Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Mallory Jansen will be taking on a third role on ABC’s “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” when the comic book series returns on Tuesday.

The actress will play Madame Hydra in the upcoming episode, following her introduction to the show in the Season 4 premiere as Aida, then as Agnes later in the season. The episode was screened at WonderCon on Saturday, and Entertainment Weekly has a first-look photo of Jansen in character.

“Since we’re bringing back Hydra in the Framework, we thought we’d bring it back with a force to be reckoned with,” executive producers Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancharoen said in a statement to EW. “Madame Hydra is a villain with the perfect combo of strength, sexy, and scary. We’ve thrown many challenges Mallory’s way and she’s always up for the task. We’re excited for fans to see how she makes Madame Hydra come to life.”

See the first-look photo from Entertainment Weekly below.

“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” returns Tuesday, April 4 at 10 p.m. on ABC.

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Every Marvel Comics Live-Action TV Show Ranked, from ‘The Incredible Hulk’ to ‘Legion’ (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The recent crop of hit Netflix shows aren’t the first time Marvel has taken its heroes to the small screen. Spider-Man, the Incredible Hulk, Blade and even knock-off-ish X-Men have had a go before the current golden age. Here are all the Marvel shows you’ve seen and a few you might not have, ranked from goofiest pajama costumes to best character-driven dramas.

12. “The Amazing Spider-Man” (1977-79)
A 1977 attempt at a live-action “Spider-Man” is a fun throwback — but in a purely ironic way because Peter Parker’s wall-crawling “special effects” are pretty cringe-worthy. Watching Spider-Man fight guys using extremely hokey choreography gives the whole thing a pretty goofy vibe.

11. “Spidey Super Stories” (1974-1977)
Some days, Spider-Man takes on some super-boring villains. He goes up against The Prankster (a school principal who keeps pranking his students) and The Spoiler (who just likes to everyday things for people) in these goofy sketches in PBS’ “The Electric Company.” Worth a few minutes of watching on YouTube.

10. “Mutant X” (2001-2004)
Delightfully 2001 in every way, “Mutant X” answers the question, “What if you did a knock-off ‘X-Men’ TV show with a low budget.” With obviously pulled punches and early CGI, “Mutant X” scratches an itch for a brand of superhero show that’s completely rooted in the world of 20 years ago.

9. “Blade: The Series” (2006)
Spike TV took the successful “Blade” movies and made a TV show. It’s a decent precursor to the grittier Marvel takes that would later show up on Netflix. Violent, blood-splattered vampire hunting couldn’t hold an audience, though.

8. “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” (2013-current)
For much of its run, “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” has been more or less answering the question, “hey, what are the normal people up to?” That can be pretty engaging, although keeping the show up with the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe continuity on a budget sometimes reigns it in.

7. “The Incredible Hulk” (1977-1982)
Green Lou Ferrigno helped carry “The Incredible Hulk” through five seasons. The formula of David Banner wandering around America, getting into adventures and helping people, is pretty standard for TV. But there’s plenty of wrong-doers to trigger the Hulk’s rage and get him involved — for justice.

6. “Spider-Man” (1978-79)
A pretty deep departure from the Marvel Comics stories, the Japanese take on “Spider-Man” is worth a look just for the way Spider-man pushes a button on a bracelet that shoots out his suit. This version fully understands to folly of trying to make a serious Spider-Man thing in the ’70s and goes gleefully the other way with plenty of self-awareness.

5. “Marvel’s Agent Carter” (2015-2016)
TV gives Marvel the chance to dig into smaller side stories adjacent to its movies. “Agent Carter” takes that idea to its logical extent, turning out a period show led by a woman and Captain America pal. It gets to explore minor characters pretty intimately, while adding depth to the world when it comes time to turn on an “Avengers” movie.

4. “Marvel’s Daredevil” (2015-current)
The first of Netflix and Marvel’s more down-to-earth superhero TV shows does a great job of making Daredevil seem like a mostly regular dude. It’s also full of great, visceral fight scenes that pack an intensity that CGI can’t really achieve.

3. “Marvel’s Luke Cage” (2016-current)
Giving a different perspective on superheroes than anything that’s come before it, Netflix’s “Luke Cage” adds breadth to the MCU that shows how deep and interesting it can be. It’s also very aware of its time and place in culture and doesn’t shy away from the issues inherent in focusing on a bulletproof Black man.

2. “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” (2016-current)
Another lower-key superhero story, “Jessica Jones” brings heroes and villains down to their very human flaws. The way it taps into and explores feminist themes gives a whole different take on the idea of superpowers in the Marvel universe.

1. “Legion” (2017-current)
Visually gorgeous, this slow-burn look at one of the “X-Men” universe’s most powerful mutants does a phenomenal job of exploring its anti-hero. The focus on the mystery of David’s sanity digs deep into what it’s like, and how to cope, with being a mutant in a way that’s different from other “X-Men” takes.

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Top 20 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)