Peter Bart: Why Has Female Empowerment Led To So Many Downer Roles For Women?

The #MeToo movement notwithstanding, I’ve been worried about women lately, perhaps because I’ve been seeing too many movies. At a time when women are achieving more muscle in managing their lives and careers, the female characters they portray in movie…

The #MeToo movement notwithstanding, I've been worried about women lately, perhaps because I've been seeing too many movies. At a time when women are achieving more muscle in managing their lives and careers, the female characters they portray in movies lack both muscle and self-esteem. Women need a movement – any sort of movement. They also need help at the box office. Let's start with Melissa McCarthy, Charlize Theron and Amy Schumer. In Spy, McCarthy three years ago…

‘Breaking In’ Signals the Rise of Gabrielle Union as a Box Office Star

While “Avengers: Infinity War” left box office beancounters’ jaws on the floor with its huge Chinese launch last weekend, Gabrielle Union was quietly making her first steps on her path to becoming the next big box office star with her latest film, “Breaking In.”

Made on a thrifty $6 million budget, “Breaking In” stars Union as a mother forced to break out the shotguns after thieves invade her late father’s mansion and hold her children hostage in an attempt to access the house’s vault.

Though critics panned it, the film made $17.5 million from 2,537 screens this past weekend. By comparison, this past weekend’s other new release, Melissa McCarthy’s “Life of the Party,” needed over 1,100 more screens to open to $17.8 million, giving “Breaking In” the higher per screen average at just under $7,000 per screen.

Also Read: How Gabrielle Union Broke Back Into Action Movies on Her Terms

And while the film’s producer, Will Packer, has earned a devoted following thanks to his work on films like “Girls Trip” and TV shows like “Being Mary Jane,” he sees the film as a demonstration of Union’s drawing power with her own massive fanbase on social media. He says that while actors aren’t as big a factor at the box office as they used to be, that’s not because audiences aren’t interested in them anymore.

“The star system has kinda collapsed in a way. Just because a certain name gets put on a movie doesn’t mean that movie’s gonna work, but I think that’s because of the type of names,” Packer told TheWrap. “There’s a lot of interest for new stars who haven’t been given the opportunity to front a major motion picture but have these incredible, engaged, supportive fans waiting to see them in the right roles.”

Enter Union, an actress who has been working in Hollywood for 20 years, but who only now is getting the chance to be front-and-center in a film. Packer and Union have had a long history together, working on “Being Mary Jane” and the ensemble film “Almost Christmas.” Through those films and others like “Bring It On” and “Bad Boys II,” Union has built the sort of devoted, Dwayne Johnson-esque fanbase that includes 4 million Twitter followers and 9.9 million Instagram followers.

Also Read: Jerry Bruckheimer’s ‘Bad Boys’ TV Spinoff Starring Gabrielle Union Gets NBC Pilot Order

So when Packer was presented with the script for “Breaking In” while working on “Being Mary Jane,” he was reminded of the work that Union did in an action role when she starred in “Bad Boys II” back in 2003 and saw “Breaking In” as an opportunity for her to finally get a tough, physical lead role that could put her first on the call sheet.

“Gab keeps herself in amazing shape. She has this physicality about her, and I asked her why she hasn’t used that since ‘Bad Boys II,’” he explained.  “She said she hadn’t gotten a role that gave her the chance to do that, and that she felt she was in better shape now than she was for ‘Bad Boys.’ From that point forward, there was no one else that would have been more fitting for ‘Breaking In.’”

Union herself said that it was a breath of fresh air to take on the role and in the process take control of how she would be viewed as an actor on the big screen.

“I just knew that I was going to be Lara Croft, I was going to be Sigourney Weaver. I was going to be the next ‘Terminator.’ But people decided they’d rather see me kiss boys,” Union told TheWrap last week. 

Also Read: Danai Gurira on All-Female ‘Avengers’ Movie: ‘There’s This Hunger for This Type of Thing’ (Video)

Union’s desire to be in roles that usually belong to white actors is clearly shared by her fans, who overlap with the audience for other recent hit movies like “Black Panther” and “Get Out” that give black stars a chance to kick ass.

Packer has certainly worked to fill this demand, producing thrillers like “Obsessed” and “No Good Deed”  that feature actors like Beyonce, Idris Elba, and Taraji P. Henson in pressure-cooker situations. Packer says he certainly hopes that the turnout from Union’s fanbase for “Breaking In” will give her more opportunities to show her physicality.

What form that next action role might take is still yet to be seen. Union is shopping around a pilot for a “Bad Boys” TV spinoff called “L.A.’s Finest,” which would star her and Jessica Alba. The pilot was made for NBC, but the network announced this week it would not move forward with the show. Union has kept her schedule open in hopes that the show will get the green light and will continue to pitch the pilot to other networks. For his own part, Packer says he hopes to work on another TV project after “Being Mary Jane” concludes with a movie finale on BET later this year.

“Right now, we’ve been talking mostly about television stuff, and while we don’t have the next project lined up yet, I’m sure we’ll find it. We haven’t made a project yet that hasn’t been well received. I will work with Gab on another action film in a heartbeat.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

How Gabrielle Union Broke Back Into Action Movies on Her Terms

‘Breaking In’ Star Gabrielle Union’s Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

Jessica Alba to Star With Gabrielle Union in NBC’s ‘Bad Boys’ Spinoff

While “Avengers: Infinity War” left box office beancounters’ jaws on the floor with its huge Chinese launch last weekend, Gabrielle Union was quietly making her first steps on her path to becoming the next big box office star with her latest film, “Breaking In.”

Made on a thrifty $6 million budget, “Breaking In” stars Union as a mother forced to break out the shotguns after thieves invade her late father’s mansion and hold her children hostage in an attempt to access the house’s vault.

Though critics panned it, the film made $17.5 million from 2,537 screens this past weekend. By comparison, this past weekend’s other new release, Melissa McCarthy’s “Life of the Party,” needed over 1,100 more screens to open to $17.8 million, giving “Breaking In” the higher per screen average at just under $7,000 per screen.

And while the film’s producer, Will Packer, has earned a devoted following thanks to his work on films like “Girls Trip” and TV shows like “Being Mary Jane,” he sees the film as a demonstration of Union’s drawing power with her own massive fanbase on social media. He says that while actors aren’t as big a factor at the box office as they used to be, that’s not because audiences aren’t interested in them anymore.

“The star system has kinda collapsed in a way. Just because a certain name gets put on a movie doesn’t mean that movie’s gonna work, but I think that’s because of the type of names,” Packer told TheWrap. “There’s a lot of interest for new stars who haven’t been given the opportunity to front a major motion picture but have these incredible, engaged, supportive fans waiting to see them in the right roles.”

Enter Union, an actress who has been working in Hollywood for 20 years, but who only now is getting the chance to be front-and-center in a film. Packer and Union have had a long history together, working on “Being Mary Jane” and the ensemble film “Almost Christmas.” Through those films and others like “Bring It On” and “Bad Boys II,” Union has built the sort of devoted, Dwayne Johnson-esque fanbase that includes 4 million Twitter followers and 9.9 million Instagram followers.

So when Packer was presented with the script for “Breaking In” while working on “Being Mary Jane,” he was reminded of the work that Union did in an action role when she starred in “Bad Boys II” back in 2003 and saw “Breaking In” as an opportunity for her to finally get a tough, physical lead role that could put her first on the call sheet.

“Gab keeps herself in amazing shape. She has this physicality about her, and I asked her why she hasn’t used that since ‘Bad Boys II,'” he explained.  “She said she hadn’t gotten a role that gave her the chance to do that, and that she felt she was in better shape now than she was for ‘Bad Boys.’ From that point forward, there was no one else that would have been more fitting for ‘Breaking In.'”

Union herself said that it was a breath of fresh air to take on the role and in the process take control of how she would be viewed as an actor on the big screen.

“I just knew that I was going to be Lara Croft, I was going to be Sigourney Weaver. I was going to be the next ‘Terminator.’ But people decided they’d rather see me kiss boys,” Union told TheWrap last week. 

Union’s desire to be in roles that usually belong to white actors is clearly shared by her fans, who overlap with the audience for other recent hit movies like “Black Panther” and “Get Out” that give black stars a chance to kick ass.

Packer has certainly worked to fill this demand, producing thrillers like “Obsessed” and “No Good Deed”  that feature actors like Beyonce, Idris Elba, and Taraji P. Henson in pressure-cooker situations. Packer says he certainly hopes that the turnout from Union’s fanbase for “Breaking In” will give her more opportunities to show her physicality.

What form that next action role might take is still yet to be seen. Union is shopping around a pilot for a “Bad Boys” TV spinoff called “L.A.’s Finest,” which would star her and Jessica Alba. The pilot was made for NBC, but the network announced this week it would not move forward with the show. Union has kept her schedule open in hopes that the show will get the green light and will continue to pitch the pilot to other networks. For his own part, Packer says he hopes to work on another TV project after “Being Mary Jane” concludes with a movie finale on BET later this year.

“Right now, we’ve been talking mostly about television stuff, and while we don’t have the next project lined up yet, I’m sure we’ll find it. We haven’t made a project yet that hasn’t been well received. I will work with Gab on another action film in a heartbeat.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

How Gabrielle Union Broke Back Into Action Movies on Her Terms

'Breaking In' Star Gabrielle Union's Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

Jessica Alba to Star With Gabrielle Union in NBC's 'Bad Boys' Spinoff

‘Deadpool 2’ Once Again Tops Studios’ TV Ad Spending

In this week’s edition of the Variety Movie Commercial Tracker, powered by the TV advertising attention analytics company iSpot.tv, Twentieth Century Fox claims the top spot in spending with “Deadpool 2” for the second week in a row.   Ads placed for t…

In this week’s edition of the Variety Movie Commercial Tracker, powered by the TV advertising attention analytics company iSpot.tv, Twentieth Century Fox claims the top spot in spending with “Deadpool 2” for the second week in a row.   Ads placed for the superhero sequel had an estimated media value of $4.65 million through Sunday […]

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Remains the Life of the Box-Office Party, but Melissa McCarthy Disappoints

This weekend also saw Gabrielle Union in a sleeper, with “Breaking In” looking like another low-budget hit from Will Packer.

All Marvel, all the time. At $61.8 million in its third weekend, “Avengers: Infinity War” had a higher gross than any opening weekend this year (other than its own, and “Black Panther”). That will continue with the release of “Deadpool 2” this week — presumably the last Marvel movie from 20th Century Fox, pending the Disney takeover.

“Avengers: Infinity War”

This trio reinforces the sense that Marvel is the biggest force in global cinema, more than even the Star Wars franchise. (“Solo: A Star Wars Story” May 25 will be a chance to counter that belief.)

“Infinity” grossed $547 million in 17 days. That is second best (in adjusted grosses) ever for that brief period, behind only “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” Its third weekend total is just behind the adjusted gross for “The Avengers” and “Black Panther” at the same point.

A $200 million opening in China, the last major country to open, propelled the worldwide gross for “Infinity” to $1.6 billion. That places it ahead of all films since “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” It has a shot of reaching $2 billion, though will likely fall a little short of “Force.” “Deadpool 2,” and then “Solo,” will slow it down — but that’s a blip in its outstanding showing.

Mothers Day is one of those holidays that lead studios to program to the event’s subjects. That meant two releases with female leads: “Life of the Party,” which grossed $18.5 million, and “Breaking In,” which grossed $16.5 million. However, it’s the lesser gross that’s more impressive thanks to a combination of expectations and costs.

“Party” stars Melissa McCarthy, her first film since “Ghostbusters” (which, despite its financial failure, was the biggest-grossing domestic live action comedy of 2016). For the third time, husband Ben Falcone directed.

None of her post-“Bridesmaids” titles found critical support, so the mediocre response here doesn’t seem to be a major factor. However, she’s starred in seven other films, all of which opened between mid-$20 million to upper $40 million. That’s a stark contrast. She also had a number of factors that should have supported the release: It’s her first big comedy in almost two years, it’s a holiday, and there isn’t much comedy competition.

One difference is the PG-13 rating; she’s thrived in raunchier, R-rated comedies. In any event, the film’s $30 million budget, likely equal marketing costs, and less-than-guaranteed foreign returns suggest this might struggle to make a profit.

“Breaking In”

That’s not the case for the thriller “Breaking In,” starring Gabrielle Union as a woman defending her family from home invaders. From producer Will Packer, who’s provided a string of low-budget successes to Universal (“Ride Along,” among others), its $6 million budget and more-targeted marketing should lead to a decent profit.

Total box office came to around $135 million, nearly equal to last year. 2018 is up about five percent from last year (mostly due to Marvel), with the rest of this month looking to boost the increase decidedly higher.

The rest of the top 10 is notable for strong holds. The biggest drop came from “Black Panther” (-40 percent), now up to $696 million but also available for streaming. “A Quiet Place” continues its stunning run with only an 18 percent drop in its sixth weekend.

The second weekend of Mexican comic Eugenio Derbez in “Overboard” had a hold with 31 percent down, with nearly $30 million so far. Also impressive is “RBG,” the documentary on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg; it made the no. 10 slot in just 180 theaters.  

The Top Ten

1. Avengers: Infinity War (Disney) Week 3; Last weekend: #1

$61,817,000 (-46%) in 4,474 theaters (no change); PTA (per theater average): $13,817; Cumulative: $547,829,000

2. Life of the Party (Warner Bros.) NEW – Cinemascore: B; Metacritic: 45; Est. budget: $30 million

$18,500,000 in 3,656 theaters; PTA: $5,060; Cumulative: $18,500,000

3. Breaking In (Universal) NEW – Cinemascore: B; Metacritic: 42; Est. budget: $6 million

$16,500,000 in 2,537 theaters; PTA: $6,504; Cumulative: $16,500,000

4. Overboard (Lionsgate) Week 2; Last weekend: #2

$10,100,000 (-31%) in 2,006 theaters (+383); PTA: $5,035; Cumulative: $29,594,000

5. A Quiet Place (Paramount) Week 6; Last weekend: #3

$6,400,000 (-18%) in 3,144 theaters (-269); PTA: $2,036; Cumulative: $169,553,000

6. I Feel Pretty (STX) Week 4; Last weekend: #4

$3,710,000 (-26%) in 2,858 theaters (-374); PTA: $1,298; Cumulative: $43,857,000

7. Rampage (Warner Bros.) Week 5; Last weekend: #5

$3,380,000 (-27%) in 2,548 theaters (-603); PTA: $1,327; Cumulative: $89,745,000

8. Tully (Focus) Week; Last weekend: #6

$2,240,000 (-32%) in 1,356 theaters (+3); PTA: $1,652; Cumulative: $6,890.000

9. Black Panther (Disney) Week 13; Last weekend: #7; also streaming

$1,932,000 (-41%) in 1,370 theaters (-271); PTA: $1,410; Cumulative: $696,187,000

10. RBG (Magnolia) Week 2; Last weekend: #15

$1,165,000 (+102%) in 1,111 theaters (-561); PTA: $6,472; Cumulative: $2,003,000

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‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Hits $1.6 Billion Globally to Become Top-Grossing Superhero Movie in History

After three weekends in theaters, “Avengers: Infinity War” is now the biggest superhero release of all-time after making $61.8 million domestically this weekend and opening to $200 million in China for a global weekend total of $343 million. With a global count of $1.6 billion, the film has passed the $1.51 billion made by the first “Avengers” in 2012, and later this week will pass “Jurassic World” to become the biggest summer release of all-time.

Domestically, “Avengers” performed above analyst expectations, which pegged the film for a $55-60 million result this weekend. But the Marvel movie just keeps on chugging with a higher-than-expected $27 million on Saturday, keeping this weekend’s drop-off to just 48 percent down from last weekend’s $114 million total.

Also Read: ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Crosses $500 Million Domestic

Over in China, “Infinity War” posted the second-biggest opening weekend in that country’s history, blowing past the previous Marvel opening record in China, sitting 28 percent above the $156 million made by “Avengers: Age of Ultron.” We will have a more in-depth look at this huge Chinese launch later today.

Well below “Avengers” are two new releases, Warner Bros/New Line’s “Life of the Party” and Universal’s “Breaking In,” which had very different outings at the box office this weekend. “Life of the Party” made an estimated $18.5 million from 3,656 screens, scoring the lowest opening for its lead star, Melissa McCarthy. By comparison, McCarthy’s previous low, 2016’s “The Boss,” scored $23.5 million. Audiences and critics have been lukewarm to the film, giving it a 42 percent Rotten Tomatoes score and a B on CinemaScore.

Also Read: Will ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Become the First $2 Billion Summer Hit?

While McCarthy has had success as a lead star with action comedies like “The Heat” and “Spy,” the more traditional adult comedies she has made with her husband and director Ben Falcone have had diminishing returns. “Life of the Party” is the third collaboration between McCarthy and Falcone following “The Boss” and the 2014 film “Tammy,” which looks like it will remain the highest grossing release by the couple with a $33.3 million five-day start and a $100 million global total. “Tammy” was also made on a cheaper budget with $20 million compared to $32 million for “Life of the Party.

In third place is “Breaking In,” which may be a much darker film than “Life of the Party” but has a much sunnier box office outlook. Produced by Will Packer and starring Gabrielle Union as a mom who takes up arms to protect her kids from a band of home invaders, the thriller cost only $6 million to make and has hit the upper end of tracker expectations with $16.5 million from 2,537 screens.

Also Read: The 6 Most Plausible ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Fan Theories We’ve Seen (Spoilers)

As with many of Packer’s films, women made up the majority of moviegoers, with CinemaScore reporting 65 percent of opening crowds being female. They were much kinder to the film than critics, giving it a B on CinemaScore compared to a 27 percent Rotten Tomatoes score from reviews.

In fourth is Pantelion/MGM’s “Overboard,” which is holding on strong with Latino audiences with $10.1 million in its second weekend, just 31 percent down from the Pantelion-record $14.7 million opening that the Eugenio Derbez romcom earned last weekend. The film now has a ten-day total of $29.6 million. Completing the top five is Paramount’s “A Quiet Place,” which added $6.3 million in its sixth weekend to push its domestic total to just under $170 million.

Next week will see the reign of “Avengers” atop the box office charts come to an end at the hands of another, far more naughtier Marvel film: Fox’s “Deadpool 2.” The sequel, which stars Ryan Reynolds as the titular mercenary and sees “Infinity War” star Josh Brolin join as the mercenary Cable, is expected to at least match the $132 million made by the first “Deadpool” in 2016, which was a then-record for February releases.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Crosses $500 Million Domestic

Will ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Become the First $2 Billion Summer Hit?

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ – Joe Russo’s Comments Could Blow Out Fan Theories About That Ending

After three weekends in theaters, “Avengers: Infinity War” is now the biggest superhero release of all-time after making $61.8 million domestically this weekend and opening to $200 million in China for a global weekend total of $343 million. With a global count of $1.6 billion, the film has passed the $1.51 billion made by the first “Avengers” in 2012, and later this week will pass “Jurassic World” to become the biggest summer release of all-time.

Domestically, “Avengers” performed above analyst expectations, which pegged the film for a $55-60 million result this weekend. But the Marvel movie just keeps on chugging with a higher-than-expected $27 million on Saturday, keeping this weekend’s drop-off to just 48 percent down from last weekend’s $114 million total.

Over in China, “Infinity War” posted the second-biggest opening weekend in that country’s history, blowing past the previous Marvel opening record in China, sitting 28 percent above the $156 million made by “Avengers: Age of Ultron.” We will have a more in-depth look at this huge Chinese launch later today.

Well below “Avengers” are two new releases, Warner Bros/New Line’s “Life of the Party” and Universal’s “Breaking In,” which had very different outings at the box office this weekend. “Life of the Party” made an estimated $18.5 million from 3,656 screens, scoring the lowest opening for its lead star, Melissa McCarthy. By comparison, McCarthy’s previous low, 2016’s “The Boss,” scored $23.5 million. Audiences and critics have been lukewarm to the film, giving it a 42 percent Rotten Tomatoes score and a B on CinemaScore.

While McCarthy has had success as a lead star with action comedies like “The Heat” and “Spy,” the more traditional adult comedies she has made with her husband and director Ben Falcone have had diminishing returns. “Life of the Party” is the third collaboration between McCarthy and Falcone following “The Boss” and the 2014 film “Tammy,” which looks like it will remain the highest grossing release by the couple with a $33.3 million five-day start and a $100 million global total. “Tammy” was also made on a cheaper budget with $20 million compared to $32 million for “Life of the Party.

In third place is “Breaking In,” which may be a much darker film than “Life of the Party” but has a much sunnier box office outlook. Produced by Will Packer and starring Gabrielle Union as a mom who takes up arms to protect her kids from a band of home invaders, the thriller cost only $6 million to make and has hit the upper end of tracker expectations with $16.5 million from 2,537 screens.

As with many of Packer’s films, women made up the majority of moviegoers, with CinemaScore reporting 65 percent of opening crowds being female. They were much kinder to the film than critics, giving it a B on CinemaScore compared to a 27 percent Rotten Tomatoes score from reviews.

In fourth is Pantelion/MGM’s “Overboard,” which is holding on strong with Latino audiences with $10.1 million in its second weekend, just 31 percent down from the Pantelion-record $14.7 million opening that the Eugenio Derbez romcom earned last weekend. The film now has a ten-day total of $29.6 million. Completing the top five is Paramount’s “A Quiet Place,” which added $6.3 million in its sixth weekend to push its domestic total to just under $170 million.

Next week will see the reign of “Avengers” atop the box office charts come to an end at the hands of another, far more naughtier Marvel film: Fox’s “Deadpool 2.” The sequel, which stars Ryan Reynolds as the titular mercenary and sees “Infinity War” star Josh Brolin join as the mercenary Cable, is expected to at least match the $132 million made by the first “Deadpool” in 2016, which was a then-record for February releases.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Avengers: Infinity War' Crosses $500 Million Domestic

Will 'Avengers: Infinity War' Become the First $2 Billion Summer Hit?

'Avengers: Infinity War' – Joe Russo's Comments Could Blow Out Fan Theories About That Ending

Box Office: ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Stays Strong With $61 Million Third Weekend

“Avengers: Infinity War” has maintained its staying power at the domestic box office. The Disney and Marvel blockbuster earned a huge $61.8 million in its third weekend. Combined with its $200 million launch in China, “Infinity War&#8…

“Avengers: Infinity War” has maintained its staying power at the domestic box office. The Disney and Marvel blockbuster earned a huge $61.8 million in its third weekend. Combined with its $200 million launch in China, “Infinity War” earned $343.1 million worldwide this weekend, for a global cume of $1.6 billion. On Saturday, it became the […]

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Crosses $500 Million Domestic

“Avengers: Infinity War” became the second-fastest film in box office history to make $500 million domestically after its third Friday in theaters, when it grossed $16 million, bringing its U.S. total to $502 million and its worldwide total to over $1.3 billion.

“Infinity War” hit the half-billion domestic mark after 15 days in theaters, one day faster than “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and five days slower than “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” “Avengers” also passed the global run of “The Last Jedi” on Friday thanks to a robust opening day in China, where strong pre-sales pushed the film to a $76 million start. “Infinity War” will look to break the Marvel opening weekend record in China, which is held by “Avengers: Age of Ultron” with $156 million.

Also Read: Don’t Rule Out More ‘Avengers’ Movies After ‘Avengers 4,’ Says Disney CEO Bob Iger

Back in the U.S., industry estimates currently project the Marvel film to finish its third weekend with $60 million, a 48 percent drop from its $114 million haul last weekend. That would bring the domestic total by Sunday’s end to $548 million.

Behind “Infinity War” is Warner Bros./New Line’s “Life of the Party,” which, after making $4.9 million on opening night, is in danger of becoming the worst opening weekend for lead star Melissa McCarthy with an estimated $18 million from 3,656 screens against a $32 million budget. That’s down 24 percent from her previous career low, “The Boss,” which opened to $23.6 million in 2016 and, like “Life of the Party,” was directed by McCarthy’s husband, Ben Falcone.

Also like “The Boss,” “Life of the Party” has been tepidly received by audiences, earning a 42 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes and a B on CinemaScore. 63 percent of opening night crowds were over the age of 35, with the 18-35 demo giving the film a B+ on CinemaScore while viewers under 18 gave the PG-13 comedy an A-. Warner Bros.’ will hope to raise opening weekend figures on Sunday, as their marketing campaign for the film has targeted mothers and daughters in the hope that they will spend Mother’s Day going to see the film together.

Also Read: ‘Life of the Party’ Film Review: Melissa McCarthy Goes to College, But This Class Is Easily Dismissed

In third is Universal’s Will Packer thriller “Breaking In,” which made $4.5 million on opening night from 2,537 screens and is estimated to hit tracker expectations with $14.9 million. While less than “Life of the Party,” this Gabrielle Union- fronted film is in a better financial position, holding a production budget of just $6 million. Critics, as they have with many past films produced by Packer, gave the film negative reviews with a 29 percent Rotten Tomatoes score. But Packer and Union’s fans were more positive, giving the film a B on CinemaScore.

Pantelion/MGM’s “Overboard” will take fourth in its second weekend, dropping 44 percent from its $14.7 million opening for an $8.3 million weekend total. Paramount’s “A Quiet Place” completes the top five with an estimated $6.1 million in its sixth weekend.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Just Might Obliterate China’s Superhero Box Office Record

Can ‘Life of the Party’ and ‘Breaking In’ Carve Out Box Office Success During ‘Avengers’ Reign?

Don’t Rule Out More ‘Avengers’ Movies After ‘Avengers 4,’ Says Disney CEO Bob Iger

“Avengers: Infinity War” became the second-fastest film in box office history to make $500 million domestically after its third Friday in theaters, when it grossed $16 million, bringing its U.S. total to $502 million and its worldwide total to over $1.3 billion.

“Infinity War” hit the half-billion domestic mark after 15 days in theaters, one day faster than “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and five days slower than “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” “Avengers” also passed the global run of “The Last Jedi” on Friday thanks to a robust opening day in China, where strong pre-sales pushed the film to a $76 million start. “Infinity War” will look to break the Marvel opening weekend record in China, which is held by “Avengers: Age of Ultron” with $156 million.

Back in the U.S., industry estimates currently project the Marvel film to finish its third weekend with $60 million, a 48 percent drop from its $114 million haul last weekend. That would bring the domestic total by Sunday’s end to $548 million.

Behind “Infinity War” is Warner Bros./New Line’s “Life of the Party,” which, after making $4.9 million on opening night, is in danger of becoming the worst opening weekend for lead star Melissa McCarthy with an estimated $18 million from 3,656 screens against a $32 million budget. That’s down 24 percent from her previous career low, “The Boss,” which opened to $23.6 million in 2016 and, like “Life of the Party,” was directed by McCarthy’s husband, Ben Falcone.

Also like “The Boss,” “Life of the Party” has been tepidly received by audiences, earning a 42 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes and a B on CinemaScore. 63 percent of opening night crowds were over the age of 35, with the 18-35 demo giving the film a B+ on CinemaScore while viewers under 18 gave the PG-13 comedy an A-. Warner Bros.’ will hope to raise opening weekend figures on Sunday, as their marketing campaign for the film has targeted mothers and daughters in the hope that they will spend Mother’s Day going to see the film together.

In third is Universal’s Will Packer thriller “Breaking In,” which made $4.5 million on opening night from 2,537 screens and is estimated to hit tracker expectations with $14.9 million. While less than “Life of the Party,” this Gabrielle Union- fronted film is in a better financial position, holding a production budget of just $6 million. Critics, as they have with many past films produced by Packer, gave the film negative reviews with a 29 percent Rotten Tomatoes score. But Packer and Union’s fans were more positive, giving the film a B on CinemaScore.

Pantelion/MGM’s “Overboard” will take fourth in its second weekend, dropping 44 percent from its $14.7 million opening for an $8.3 million weekend total. Paramount’s “A Quiet Place” completes the top five with an estimated $6.1 million in its sixth weekend.

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