Conservative Commentator Kevin Williamson Fired From The Atlantic After Abortion Podcast Surfaces

Conservative commentator Kevin Williamson was fired from The Atlantic, just weeks after being hired, the magazine told TheWrap.

“Kevin is a gifted writer, and he has been nothing but professional in all of our interactions. But I have come to the conclusion that The Atlantic is not the best fit for his talents, and so we are parting ways,” said editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg in an email to staff on Thursday.

In his memo, obtained by TheWrap, Goldberg explained that Williamson was being terminated over his views on abortion, which have come to wide attention in recent days.

Also Read: Tomi Lahren Admits: I Kicked My Dog 5 Times During Live ‘Fox & Friends’ Appearance (Video)

“Late yesterday afternoon, information came to our attention that has caused us to reconsider this relationship. Specifically, the subject of one of Kevin’s most controversial tweets was also a centerpiece of a podcast discussion in which Kevin explained his views on the subject of the death penalty and abortion,” wrote Goldberg.

“The language he used in this podcast–and in my conversations with him in recent days–made it clear that the original tweet did, in fact, represent his carefully considered views,” he added.

While Goldberg himself once trumpeted Williamson’s hire from the National Review, the writer immediately drew outrage — particularly over a tweet in which he argued that women who had had an abortion should face the death penalty. Williamson defenders — and Goldberg himself — had argued that his career should not be judged on an errant tweet.

Also Read: Brian Lancaster, ‘Road Rules’ Alum, Dies at 43

That narrative began to unravel after liberal watchdog group Media Matters for America uncovered audio footage of Williamson articulating his beliefs on abortion in a 2014 National Review podcast.

“And someone challenged me on my views on abortion, saying, ‘If you really thought it was a crime you would support things like life in prison, no parole, for treating it as a homicide.’ And I do support that, in fact, as I wrote, what I had in mind was hanging,” Williamson said.

“My broader point here is, of course, that I am a — as you know I’m kind of squishy on capital punishment in general — but that I’m absolutely willing to see abortion treated like a regular homicide under the criminal code, sure.”

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Conservative commentator Kevin Williamson was fired from The Atlantic, just weeks after being hired, the magazine told TheWrap.

“Kevin is a gifted writer, and he has been nothing but professional in all of our interactions. But I have come to the conclusion that The Atlantic is not the best fit for his talents, and so we are parting ways,” said editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg in an email to staff on Thursday.

In his memo, obtained by TheWrap, Goldberg explained that Williamson was being terminated over his views on abortion, which have come to wide attention in recent days.

“Late yesterday afternoon, information came to our attention that has caused us to reconsider this relationship. Specifically, the subject of one of Kevin’s most controversial tweets was also a centerpiece of a podcast discussion in which Kevin explained his views on the subject of the death penalty and abortion,” wrote Goldberg.

“The language he used in this podcast–and in my conversations with him in recent days–made it clear that the original tweet did, in fact, represent his carefully considered views,” he added.

While Goldberg himself once trumpeted Williamson’s hire from the National Review, the writer immediately drew outrage — particularly over a tweet in which he argued that women who had had an abortion should face the death penalty. Williamson defenders — and Goldberg himself — had argued that his career should not be judged on an errant tweet.

That narrative began to unravel after liberal watchdog group Media Matters for America uncovered audio footage of Williamson articulating his beliefs on abortion in a 2014 National Review podcast.

“And someone challenged me on my views on abortion, saying, ‘If you really thought it was a crime you would support things like life in prison, no parole, for treating it as a homicide.’ And I do support that, in fact, as I wrote, what I had in mind was hanging,” Williamson said.

“My broader point here is, of course, that I am a — as you know I’m kind of squishy on capital punishment in general — but that I’m absolutely willing to see abortion treated like a regular homicide under the criminal code, sure.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Conservative Commentator Kevin Williamson Fired From The Atlantic After Abortion Podcast Surfaces

Atlantic to Add 100 Staffers in Hiring Spree

Ed Sheeran Toasts Atlantic Records Chair Julie Greenwald (Photos)

'Cash Me Outside' Girl Danielle Bregoli, AKA Rapper Bhad Bhabie, Inks Atlantic Records Deal

‘Dawson’s Creek’ Cast Mulls Reboot During Reunion

“Dawson’s Creek” creator Kevin Williamson is all for a reboot — as long as he isn’t involved. Williamson told Entertainment Weekly he didn’t feel he could provide the show with any new emotional material while commenting on a discussion during a cast reunion, in which the actors pondered the possibility of a return. EW hosted […]

“Dawson’s Creek” creator Kevin Williamson is all for a reboot — as long as he isn’t involved. Williamson told Entertainment Weekly he didn’t feel he could provide the show with any new emotional material while commenting on a discussion during a cast reunion, in which the actors pondered the possibility of a return. EW hosted […]

Sorry, ‘Dawson’s Creek’ Fans, You Probably Won’t Get a Reboot — But You Might Get a ‘Reinvention’

If you were hoping “Dawson’s Creek” would go to the way of “Roseanne,” “Will & Grace” and “Murphy Brown” in the reboot department, we’re sorry to be the ones to tell you your prayers probably will not be answered.

The stars of The WB teen soap — which wrapped in 2003 — said in a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly they aren’t so keen on bringing it back.

“It would have to be a reinvention of sorts,” James Van Der Beek said. Katie Holmes added, “What I love about this show is that it existed at a time pre-social media, pre-internet, and it was nostalgic when we were shooting it. So I really like it where it is, to be honest.”

Also Read: ‘Dawson’s Creek’ 20th Anniversary: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

In the series finale, Jen (Michelle Williams) died after a heart attack, with her young daughter  being taken in by her best friend Jack (Kerr Smith) and his partner Doug (Dylan Neal). Dawson (James Van Der Beek) is a budding director who finally gets to meet his lifelong idol, Steven Spielberg. And Joey (Katie Holmes) and Pacey (Joshua Jackson) proved to be the show’s one true pairing, as they lived happily together in New York City.

“Dawson’s Creek” creator Kevin Williamson says revisiting the series now could be tricky because of where he is in his life.

“‘Dawson’s Creek’ was me expressing myself at that point in time,” Williamson said. “And here I am, at another age, at another point in time. I don’t know what I could emotionally bring to the table. I can’t wait for someone else to do it. I don’t think it’s going to be me. But I’ll be happy to watch it.”

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If you were hoping “Dawson’s Creek” would go to the way of “Roseanne,” “Will & Grace” and “Murphy Brown” in the reboot department, we’re sorry to be the ones to tell you your prayers probably will not be answered.

The stars of The WB teen soap — which wrapped in 2003 — said in a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly they aren’t so keen on bringing it back.

“It would have to be a reinvention of sorts,” James Van Der Beek said. Katie Holmes added, “What I love about this show is that it existed at a time pre-social media, pre-internet, and it was nostalgic when we were shooting it. So I really like it where it is, to be honest.”

In the series finale, Jen (Michelle Williams) died after a heart attack, with her young daughter  being taken in by her best friend Jack (Kerr Smith) and his partner Doug (Dylan Neal). Dawson (James Van Der Beek) is a budding director who finally gets to meet his lifelong idol, Steven Spielberg. And Joey (Katie Holmes) and Pacey (Joshua Jackson) proved to be the show’s one true pairing, as they lived happily together in New York City.

“Dawson’s Creek” creator Kevin Williamson says revisiting the series now could be tricky because of where he is in his life.

“‘Dawson’s Creek’ was me expressing myself at that point in time,” Williamson said. “And here I am, at another age, at another point in time. I don’t know what I could emotionally bring to the table. I can’t wait for someone else to do it. I don’t think it’s going to be me. But I’ll be happy to watch it.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Dawson's Creek' 20th Anniversary: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

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Miramax Makes First Overall Deal: Kevin Williamson To Create Genre Films

EXCLUSIVE: Miramax has signed filmmaker Kevin Williamson to a new first-look pact to develop elevated genre film content. He will set up offices at the studio. It is the first overall deal made since Miramax was relaunched as a production concern under Bill Block’s leadership.
Another lifetime ago, Williamson had some of his breakthrough moments at the old Miramax’s genre label Dimension, where he created the Scream franchise. He established an iconic genre voice as a…

EXCLUSIVE: Miramax has signed filmmaker Kevin Williamson to a new first-look pact to develop elevated genre film content. He will set up offices at the studio. It is the first overall deal made since Miramax was relaunched as a production concern under Bill Block’s leadership. Another lifetime ago, Williamson had some of his breakthrough moments at the old Miramax’s genre label Dimension, where he created the Scream franchise. He established an iconic genre voice as a…

Producer Jill Messick Dead of Suicide at 50; Family Blames Rose McGowan-Harvey Weinstein Fight

Veteran studio executive and producer Jill Messick, the ex-manager of Rose McGowan who found herself caught in the fight between McGowan and Harvey Weinstein, has committed suicide. She was 50.

Messick’s family said in a statement she was “broken” by seeing her name in the news surrounding McGowan’s accusation that Weinstein raped her. Last month, Weinstein’s team included a quote from her from last year that supported Weinstein’s argument that his involvement with McGowan was consensual.

“Jill Messick was a mother of two children, a loving wife and partner, a dear friend to many and a smart entertainment executive. She was also a survivor, privately battling depression which had been her nemesis for years,” her family said in a statement. “Today she did not survive. Jill took her own life.

Also Read: Harvey Weinstein Breaks Silence, Calls Rose McGowan Accusations a ‘Bold Lie’

“Seeing her name in headlines again and again, as part of one person’s attempt to gain more attention for her personal cause, along with Harvey’s desperate attempt to vindicate himself, was devastating for her,” the statement continued. “It broke Jill, who was just starting to get her life back on track. What makes Rose’s inaccurate accusations and insinuations against Jill ironic was that she was the first person who stood up on Rose’s behalf, and alerted her bosses to the horrific experience which Rose suffered.”

The statement also said she was “victimized by our new culture of unlimited information-sharing and a willingness to accept statement as fact. The speed of disseminating information has carried mistruths about Jill as a person, which she was unable and unwilling to challenge. She became collateral damage in an already horrific story.”

Messick worked as an executive producer on Relativity’s comedy “Masterminds,” Universal’s 2008 film “Baby Mama” and the 2007 comedy “Hot Rod.” She also served as an executive producer on the NBC series “Bad Judge.” Jill also served as an executive at the Paramount-based Lorne Michaels Productions. Her most recent film project is the upcoming Warner Bros. adaptation of “Minecraft” with Steve Carell.

Messick was a production executive at Weinstein’s Miramax from 1997 to 2003, where she also served as a co-executive producer on the 1999 film “She’s All That.” She was also part of the 2002 Oscar-winning film “Frida.” She was McGowan’s manager in 1997, the year McGowan says she was raped by Weinstein.

Last month, Weinstein used quotes attributed to Messick that supported his version of the events at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. McGowan said she was sexually assaulted by Weinstein in his hotel room in Park City, Utah, during 1997’s Sundance Film Festival.

The family’s statement said that in January of 1997, Messick was an entry-level manager at Addis Wechsler, where one of her first clients was Rose McGowan. Her duty was to set up a breakfast with Weinstein at Sundance, and after hearing about Rose’s encounter with the movie mogul, she went to her bosses to insist the situation be addressed, the family said.

Also Read: Jill Messick’s Suicide: Read Her Family’s Devastating Statement

“All Jill knew was that the matter was settled and that Rose continued making films with the Weinsteins. She never knew any details until recently, when Rose elected to make them public,” the statement said.

Messick was born on July 27, 1967. She began her career in the entertainment industry as the director or development for Woods Entertainment, where she was a champion for Kevin Williamson’s spec script, “Scream.” She also championed M. Night Shyamalan’s script “Wide Awake,” which was his U.S. feature directorial debut.

She is survived by two children, Jackson and Ava, and their father, Kevin Messick, as well as her brother and her partner Dan Schuck.

A representative for Weinstein didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. TheWrap reached out to McGowan for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Veteran studio executive and producer Jill Messick, the ex-manager of Rose McGowan who found herself caught in the fight between McGowan and Harvey Weinstein, has committed suicide. She was 50.

Messick’s family said in a statement she was “broken” by seeing her name in the news surrounding McGowan’s accusation that Weinstein raped her. Last month, Weinstein’s team included a quote from her from last year that supported Weinstein’s argument that his involvement with McGowan was consensual.

“Jill Messick was a mother of two children, a loving wife and partner, a dear friend to many and a smart entertainment executive. She was also a survivor, privately battling depression which had been her nemesis for years,” her family said in a statement. “Today she did not survive. Jill took her own life.

“Seeing her name in headlines again and again, as part of one person’s attempt to gain more attention for her personal cause, along with Harvey’s desperate attempt to vindicate himself, was devastating for her,” the statement continued. “It broke Jill, who was just starting to get her life back on track. What makes Rose’s inaccurate accusations and insinuations against Jill ironic was that she was the first person who stood up on Rose’s behalf, and alerted her bosses to the horrific experience which Rose suffered.”

The statement also said she was “victimized by our new culture of unlimited information-sharing and a willingness to accept statement as fact. The speed of disseminating information has carried mistruths about Jill as a person, which she was unable and unwilling to challenge. She became collateral damage in an already horrific story.”

Messick worked as an executive producer on Relativity’s comedy “Masterminds,” Universal’s 2008 film “Baby Mama” and the 2007 comedy “Hot Rod.” She also served as an executive producer on the NBC series “Bad Judge.” Jill also served as an executive at the Paramount-based Lorne Michaels Productions. Her most recent film project is the upcoming Warner Bros. adaptation of “Minecraft” with Steve Carell.

Messick was a production executive at Weinstein’s Miramax from 1997 to 2003, where she also served as a co-executive producer on the 1999 film “She’s All That.” She was also part of the 2002 Oscar-winning film “Frida.” She was McGowan’s manager in 1997, the year McGowan says she was raped by Weinstein.

Last month, Weinstein used quotes attributed to Messick that supported his version of the events at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. McGowan said she was sexually assaulted by Weinstein in his hotel room in Park City, Utah, during 1997’s Sundance Film Festival.

The family’s statement said that in January of 1997, Messick was an entry-level manager at Addis Wechsler, where one of her first clients was Rose McGowan. Her duty was to set up a breakfast with Weinstein at Sundance, and after hearing about Rose’s encounter with the movie mogul, she went to her bosses to insist the situation be addressed, the family said.

“All Jill knew was that the matter was settled and that Rose continued making films with the Weinsteins. She never knew any details until recently, when Rose elected to make them public,” the statement said.

Messick was born on July 27, 1967. She began her career in the entertainment industry as the director or development for Woods Entertainment, where she was a champion for Kevin Williamson’s spec script, “Scream.” She also championed M. Night Shyamalan’s script “Wide Awake,” which was his U.S. feature directorial debut.

She is survived by two children, Jackson and Ava, and their father, Kevin Messick, as well as her brother and her partner Dan Schuck.

A representative for Weinstein didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. TheWrap reached out to McGowan for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Cancels Book Tour After Spat With Transgender Woman: 'I Have Given Enough'

Rose McGowan: Harvey Weinstein Denial Is a 'Sad, Pathetic' Attempt to 'Slut Shame'

Rose McGowan Hurls F-Bombs at Harvey Weinstein After He Calls Her Accusations a 'Bold Lie'

Dawson’s Creek creator stands by the whole Pacey-dating-a-teacher thing

Teen-weep staple Dawson’s Creek premiered 20 years ago, and to commemorate the anniversary The Hollywood Reporter sat down with series creator Kevin Williamson for an in-depth chat. Fans of Dawson, Joey, Pacey, and Jen will find plenty to savor here, as Williamson dishes on everything from the show’s origins and…

Read more…

Teen-weep staple Dawson’s Creek premiered 20 years ago, and to commemorate the anniversary The Hollywood Reporter sat down with series creator Kevin Williamson for an in-depth chat. Fans of Dawson, Joey, Pacey, and Jen will find plenty to savor here, as Williamson dishes on everything from the show’s origins and…

Read more...

‘Dawson’s Creek’ Turns 20: Kevin Williamson Reveals the Teen Drama’s Deepest Secrets

Josh Jackson as Dawson, Katie Holmes’ moving pre-audition request and a deeply personal coming out story: The creator of the series that made stars of its cast and launched a genre opens up on the 20th anniversary of its premiere.read more


Josh Jackson as Dawson, Katie Holmes' moving pre-audition request and a deeply personal coming out story: The creator of the series that made stars of its cast and launched a genre opens up on the 20th anniversary of its premiere.

read more