Timothee Chalamet, Daniel Kaluuya Up for BAFTA’s Rising Star Award

“Get Out” star Daniel Kaluuuya and “Call Me by Your Name” lead Timothee Chalamet are among the nominees for this year’s BAFTA Rising Star award. The pair, who recently talked about their work in Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series, have been short-listed alongside Josh O’Connor, Florence Pugh and Tessa Thompson. O’Connor recently took home the best actor trophy […]

“Get Out” star Daniel Kaluuuya and “Call Me by Your Name” lead Timothee Chalamet are among the nominees for this year’s BAFTA Rising Star award. The pair, who recently talked about their work in Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series, have been short-listed alongside Josh O’Connor, Florence Pugh and Tessa Thompson. O’Connor recently took home the best actor trophy […]

‘God’s Own Country’ Tops British Independent Film Awards

“God’s Own Country” was named the best film of 2017 at the British Independent Film Awards, which took place on Sunday in London.

Acting awards went to Florence Pugh for “Lady Macbeth” and Josh O’Connor for “God’s Own Country.”

Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” won the award for the best international independent film.

Leading nominees going into the show included “Lady Macbeth,” “Three Billboards” and “God’s Own Country.”

The 2017 British Independent Film Awards winners:

Best British Independent Film: “God’s Own Country”

Best International Independent Film: “Get Out”

Best Director: Rungano Nyoni, “I Am Not a Witch”

Best Screenplay: Alice Birch, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Actress: Florence Pugh, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Actor: Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Clarkson, “The Party”

Best Supporting Actor: Simon Russell Beale, “The Death of Stalin”

Most Promising Newcomer: Naomi Ackie, “Lady Macbeth”

The Douglas Hickox Award (Best Debut Director): Rungano Nyoni, “I Am Not a Witch”

Debut Screenwriter: Francis Lee, “God’s Own Country”

Breakthrough Producer: Emily Morgan, “I Am Not a Witch”

The Discovery Award: “In Another Life”

Best Documentary:  “Almost Heaven”

Best British Short Film: “Fish Story”

Best Cinematography:
Ben Davis, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
David Gallego, “I Am Not a Witch”
Tat Radcliffe, “Jawbone”
Thomas Riedelsheimer, “Leaning Into the Wind”
Ari Wegner, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Casting:
“Lady Macbeth”
“God’s Own Country”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Best Costume Design:
“My Cousin Rachel”
“The Death of Stalin”
“How to Talk to Girls at Parties”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Lady Macbeth”

Best Editing:
“Williams”
“Jawbone”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Us And Them”

Best Effects:
“The Ritual”
“Journeyman”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Double Date”
“Their Finest”

Best Make Up & Hair Design:
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Breathe”
“Journeyman”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Lady Macbeth”

Best Music:
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Leaning Into The Wind”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Jawbone”
“The Death of Stalin”

Best Production Design:
“Lady Macbeth”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Final Portrait”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Best Sound:
“God’s Own Country”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Jawbone”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Breathe”

Richard Harris Award: Vanessa Redgrave

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Dina’ Scores Upset Victory at IDA Documentary Awards

Swedish Comedy ‘The Square’ Dominates European Film Awards

Kristen Bell to Host 2018 Screen Actors Guild Awards

“God’s Own Country” was named the best film of 2017 at the British Independent Film Awards, which took place on Sunday in London.

Acting awards went to Florence Pugh for “Lady Macbeth” and Josh O’Connor for “God’s Own Country.”

Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” won the award for the best international independent film.

Leading nominees going into the show included “Lady Macbeth,” “Three Billboards” and “God’s Own Country.”

The 2017 British Independent Film Awards winners:

Best British Independent Film: “God’s Own Country”

Best International Independent Film: “Get Out”

Best Director: Rungano Nyoni, “I Am Not a Witch”

Best Screenplay: Alice Birch, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Actress: Florence Pugh, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Actor: Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Clarkson, “The Party”

Best Supporting Actor: Simon Russell Beale, “The Death of Stalin”

Most Promising Newcomer: Naomi Ackie, “Lady Macbeth”

The Douglas Hickox Award (Best Debut Director): Rungano Nyoni, “I Am Not a Witch”

Debut Screenwriter: Francis Lee, “God’s Own Country”

Breakthrough Producer: Emily Morgan, “I Am Not a Witch”

The Discovery Award: “In Another Life”

Best Documentary:  “Almost Heaven”

Best British Short Film: “Fish Story”

Best Cinematography:
Ben Davis, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
David Gallego, “I Am Not a Witch”
Tat Radcliffe, “Jawbone”
Thomas Riedelsheimer, “Leaning Into the Wind”
Ari Wegner, “Lady Macbeth”

Best Casting:
“Lady Macbeth”
“God’s Own Country”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Best Costume Design:
“My Cousin Rachel”
“The Death of Stalin”
“How to Talk to Girls at Parties”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Lady Macbeth”

Best Editing:
“Williams”
“Jawbone”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Us And Them”

Best Effects:
“The Ritual”
“Journeyman”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Double Date”
“Their Finest”

Best Make Up & Hair Design:
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Breathe”
“Journeyman”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Lady Macbeth”

Best Music:
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Leaning Into The Wind”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Jawbone”
“The Death of Stalin”

Best Production Design:
“Lady Macbeth”
“The Death of Stalin”
“Final Portrait”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Best Sound:
“God’s Own Country”
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Jawbone”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
“Breathe”

Richard Harris Award: Vanessa Redgrave

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Dina' Scores Upset Victory at IDA Documentary Awards

Swedish Comedy 'The Square' Dominates European Film Awards

Kristen Bell to Host 2018 Screen Actors Guild Awards

‘God’s Own Country’ Review: Period Gay Love Story Falls Apart

Clearly indebted to the memory of “Brokeback Mountain” and its cautious handling of gay male love amidst sheep and lonely landscape, Francis Lee’s debut feature “God’s Own Country” is set on a Yorkshire farm much like the one he himself grew up on, and the camerawork seems in thrall to nature here above all else.

Our young protagonist Johnny (Josh O’Connor, “Florence Foster Jenkins”) is first seen vomiting in the early morning hours, the camera staying on his back as he does so. Johnny’s father Martin (Ian Hart) has suffered a stroke, and so the bulk of the farm work has fallen to Johnny, whose only way of blowing off steam is heavy drinking at local pubs.

Lee’s camera lingers on the lush countryside as Johnny goes about his work, tenderly caring for a heifer and then going to an auction to sell it. We see him urinating and spitting, and Johnny spits again before having rough sex in a restroom with a young blond boy (Harry Lister Smith, “Pan”) who has caught his eye.

Also Read: ‘I Don’t Feel at Home’ Sundance Review: Ruffians Melanie Lynskey and Elijah Wood Kick Butt

The editing and pacing in this first section of “God’s Own Country” is promisingly fast and intuitive, and the sex scene between Johnny and the blond boy has a very erotic furtive feeling. Lee manages to get across that the blond boy isn’t quite sure he wants to go so far with Johnny but gives himself up anyway because he is looking for a date. When they are done and outside, though, Johnny callously rebuffs him.

Johnny meets with a young Romanian boy who has come to help out on the farm named Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu), and right away there is a power struggle between them. Johnny calls this boy “gypsy,” but Gheorghe stares Johnny down and firmly says, “Please don’t call me that.” Gheorghe’s mother taught English in Romania, and Gheorghe is intelligent and proud. And he starts sneaking looks at Johnny.

Also Read: ‘Incredible Jessica James’ Sundance Review: Jessica Williams Reveals New Levels of Charm

The mid-section of “God’s Own Country” is an extended and often silent courtship between Johnny and Gheorghe as they work on the farm together. Portraying this sort of thing on screen is a real tightrope walk — if you put one foot wrong, you can fall down into either silliness or careless voyeurism. There comes a point when Gheorghe takes his pants down to wash himself, and the camera is set back at a distance as Johnny tries not to react to this, but there aren’t enough silent in-between shots of Gheorghe’s face to show us what he is thinking so that the tension between him and Johnny can build and feel real to us.

Finally, Johnny and Gheorghe come together and their clothes come mostly off as they roll around in the mud. This is where “God’s Own Country” runs into a real problem: If you’re filming a sex scene, the best way to do it is to put the camera as close as possible to the two people involved so that we can feel the flush of excitement between them. Lee’s camera stays at a distance from his leads and, far worse, comes in for close shots mainly for glimpses of their bodies.

On the one hand, the sight of their mud-spattered pale white skin is visually striking. On the other, it feels like the camera is gawking at them rather than joining them, and so all semblance of reality and of the necessary awkwardness of getting their clothes off vanishes. And so too does any real eroticism. When Johnny pulled the blond boy’s pants down in back in the restroom, it was from his point of view so that we could share his excitement. When he has sex with Gheorghe, that subjective component is crucially absent.

Also Read: Armie Hammer’s Gay Drama ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Sells to Sony Pictures Classics

“God’s Own Country” finally becomes a film about saliva and sheep and the very pretty long eyelashes on both Johnny and Gheorghe. There are far too many close-ups of Johnny where he is looking dazed and open-mouthed, and his relationship to his father and grandmother (Gemma Jones) is barely sketched.

“My country is dead,” Gheorghe tells Johnny at one point, and that hints that he is just treading water because his options at this point are so limited. Instead of making us feel that these boys are meant to be together, “God’s Own Country” unintentionally suggests that Gheorghe should get himself to a city where his silky dark hair, bedroom eyes and developed aesthetic sense might be far better appreciated by others.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Icarus’ Sundance Review: Suspenseful Doping Doc Exposes Russian Scandal

So How Did Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

Al Gore Takes Center Stage on Sundance’s Opening Night – and So Does Donald Trump

Sundance 2017 Market Preview: Why Amazon, Netflix Should Dominate Again This Year

Clearly indebted to the memory of “Brokeback Mountain” and its cautious handling of gay male love amidst sheep and lonely landscape, Francis Lee’s debut feature “God’s Own Country” is set on a Yorkshire farm much like the one he himself grew up on, and the camerawork seems in thrall to nature here above all else.

Our young protagonist Johnny (Josh O’Connor, “Florence Foster Jenkins”) is first seen vomiting in the early morning hours, the camera staying on his back as he does so. Johnny’s father Martin (Ian Hart) has suffered a stroke, and so the bulk of the farm work has fallen to Johnny, whose only way of blowing off steam is heavy drinking at local pubs.

Lee’s camera lingers on the lush countryside as Johnny goes about his work, tenderly caring for a heifer and then going to an auction to sell it. We see him urinating and spitting, and Johnny spits again before having rough sex in a restroom with a young blond boy (Harry Lister Smith, “Pan”) who has caught his eye.

The editing and pacing in this first section of “God’s Own Country” is promisingly fast and intuitive, and the sex scene between Johnny and the blond boy has a very erotic furtive feeling. Lee manages to get across that the blond boy isn’t quite sure he wants to go so far with Johnny but gives himself up anyway because he is looking for a date. When they are done and outside, though, Johnny callously rebuffs him.

Johnny meets with a young Romanian boy who has come to help out on the farm named Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu), and right away there is a power struggle between them. Johnny calls this boy “gypsy,” but Gheorghe stares Johnny down and firmly says, “Please don’t call me that.” Gheorghe’s mother taught English in Romania, and Gheorghe is intelligent and proud. And he starts sneaking looks at Johnny.

The mid-section of “God’s Own Country” is an extended and often silent courtship between Johnny and Gheorghe as they work on the farm together. Portraying this sort of thing on screen is a real tightrope walk — if you put one foot wrong, you can fall down into either silliness or careless voyeurism. There comes a point when Gheorghe takes his pants down to wash himself, and the camera is set back at a distance as Johnny tries not to react to this, but there aren’t enough silent in-between shots of Gheorghe’s face to show us what he is thinking so that the tension between him and Johnny can build and feel real to us.

Finally, Johnny and Gheorghe come together and their clothes come mostly off as they roll around in the mud. This is where “God’s Own Country” runs into a real problem: If you’re filming a sex scene, the best way to do it is to put the camera as close as possible to the two people involved so that we can feel the flush of excitement between them. Lee’s camera stays at a distance from his leads and, far worse, comes in for close shots mainly for glimpses of their bodies.

On the one hand, the sight of their mud-spattered pale white skin is visually striking. On the other, it feels like the camera is gawking at them rather than joining them, and so all semblance of reality and of the necessary awkwardness of getting their clothes off vanishes. And so too does any real eroticism. When Johnny pulled the blond boy’s pants down in back in the restroom, it was from his point of view so that we could share his excitement. When he has sex with Gheorghe, that subjective component is crucially absent.

“God’s Own Country” finally becomes a film about saliva and sheep and the very pretty long eyelashes on both Johnny and Gheorghe. There are far too many close-ups of Johnny where he is looking dazed and open-mouthed, and his relationship to his father and grandmother (Gemma Jones) is barely sketched.

“My country is dead,” Gheorghe tells Johnny at one point, and that hints that he is just treading water because his options at this point are so limited. Instead of making us feel that these boys are meant to be together, “God’s Own Country” unintentionally suggests that Gheorghe should get himself to a city where his silky dark hair, bedroom eyes and developed aesthetic sense might be far better appreciated by others.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Icarus' Sundance Review: Suspenseful Doping Doc Exposes Russian Scandal

So How Did Kristen Stewart's Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

Al Gore Takes Center Stage on Sundance's Opening Night – and So Does Donald Trump

Sundance 2017 Market Preview: Why Amazon, Netflix Should Dominate Again This Year

‘God’s Own Country’ Sundance Review: Period Gay Love Story Falls Apart

Clearly indebted to the memory of “Brokeback Mountain” and its cautious handling of gay male love amidst sheep and lonely landscape, Francis Lee’s debut feature “God’s Own Country” is set on a Yorkshire farm much like the one he himself grew up on, and the camerawork seems in thrall to nature here above all else.

Our young protagonist Johnny (Josh O’Connor, “Florence Foster Jenkins”) is first seen vomiting in the early morning hours, the camera staying on his back as he does so. Johnny’s father Martin (Ian Hart) has suffered a stroke, and so the bulk of the farm work has fallen to Johnny, whose only way of blowing off steam is heavy drinking at local pubs.

Lee’s camera lingers on the lush countryside as Johnny goes about his work, tenderly caring for a heifer and then going to an auction to sell it. We see him urinating and spitting, and Johnny spits again before having rough sex in a restroom with a young blond boy (Harry Lister Smith, “Pan”) who has caught his eye.

Also Read: ‘I Don’t Feel at Home’ Sundance Review: Ruffians Melanie Lynskey and Elijah Wood Kick Butt

The editing and pacing in this first section of “God’s Own Country” is promisingly fast and intuitive, and the sex scene between Johnny and the blond boy has a very erotic furtive feeling. Lee manages to get across that the blond boy isn’t quite sure he wants to go so far with Johnny but gives himself up anyway because he is looking for a date. When they are done and outside, though, Johnny callously rebuffs him.

Johnny meets with a young Romanian boy who has come to help out on the farm named Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu), and right away there is a power struggle between them. Johnny calls this boy “gypsy,” but Gheorghe stares Johnny down and firmly says, “Please don’t call me that.” Gheorghe’s mother taught English in Romania, and Gheorghe is intelligent and proud. And he starts sneaking looks at Johnny.

Also Read: ‘Incredible Jessica James’ Sundance Review: Jessica Williams Reveals New Levels of Charm

The mid-section of “God’s Own Country” is an extended and often silent courtship between Johnny and Gheorghe as they work on the farm together. Portraying this sort of thing on screen is a real tightrope walk — if you put one foot wrong, you can fall down into either silliness or careless voyeurism. There comes a point when Gheorghe takes his pants down to wash himself, and the camera is set back at a distance as Johnny tries not to react to this, but there aren’t enough silent in-between shots of Gheorghe’s face to show us what he is thinking so that the tension between him and Johnny can build and feel real to us.

Finally, Johnny and Gheorghe come together and their clothes come mostly off as they roll around in the mud. This is where “God’s Own Country” runs into a real problem: If you’re filming a sex scene, the best way to do it is to put the camera as close as possible to the two people involved so that we can feel the flush of excitement between them. Lee’s camera stays at a distance from his leads and, far worse, comes in for close shots mainly for glimpses of their bodies.

On the one hand, the sight of their mud-spattered pale white skin is visually striking. On the other, it feels like the camera is gawking at them rather than joining them, and so all semblance of reality and of the necessary awkwardness of getting their clothes off vanishes. And so too does any real eroticism. When Johnny pulled the blond boy’s pants down in back in the restroom, it was from his point of view so that we could share his excitement. When he has sex with Gheorghe, that subjective component is crucially absent.

Also Read: Armie Hammer’s Gay Drama ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Sells to Sony Pictures Classics

“God’s Own Country” finally becomes a film about saliva and sheep and the very pretty long eyelashes on both Johnny and Gheorghe. There are far too many close-ups of Johnny where he is looking dazed and open-mouthed, and his relationship to his father and grandmother (Gemma Jones) is barely sketched.

“My country is dead,” Gheorghe tells Johnny at one point, and that hints that he is just treading water because his options at this point are so limited. Instead of making us feel that these boys are meant to be together, “God’s Own Country” unintentionally suggests that Gheorghe should get himself to a city where his silky dark hair, bedroom eyes and developed aesthetic sense might be far better appreciated by others.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Icarus’ Sundance Review: Suspenseful Doping Doc Exposes Russian Scandal

So How Did Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

Al Gore Takes Center Stage on Sundance’s Opening Night – and So Does Donald Trump

Sundance 2017 Market Preview: Why Amazon, Netflix Should Dominate Again This Year

Clearly indebted to the memory of “Brokeback Mountain” and its cautious handling of gay male love amidst sheep and lonely landscape, Francis Lee’s debut feature “God’s Own Country” is set on a Yorkshire farm much like the one he himself grew up on, and the camerawork seems in thrall to nature here above all else.

Our young protagonist Johnny (Josh O’Connor, “Florence Foster Jenkins”) is first seen vomiting in the early morning hours, the camera staying on his back as he does so. Johnny’s father Martin (Ian Hart) has suffered a stroke, and so the bulk of the farm work has fallen to Johnny, whose only way of blowing off steam is heavy drinking at local pubs.

Lee’s camera lingers on the lush countryside as Johnny goes about his work, tenderly caring for a heifer and then going to an auction to sell it. We see him urinating and spitting, and Johnny spits again before having rough sex in a restroom with a young blond boy (Harry Lister Smith, “Pan”) who has caught his eye.

The editing and pacing in this first section of “God’s Own Country” is promisingly fast and intuitive, and the sex scene between Johnny and the blond boy has a very erotic furtive feeling. Lee manages to get across that the blond boy isn’t quite sure he wants to go so far with Johnny but gives himself up anyway because he is looking for a date. When they are done and outside, though, Johnny callously rebuffs him.

Johnny meets with a young Romanian boy who has come to help out on the farm named Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu), and right away there is a power struggle between them. Johnny calls this boy “gypsy,” but Gheorghe stares Johnny down and firmly says, “Please don’t call me that.” Gheorghe’s mother taught English in Romania, and Gheorghe is intelligent and proud. And he starts sneaking looks at Johnny.

The mid-section of “God’s Own Country” is an extended and often silent courtship between Johnny and Gheorghe as they work on the farm together. Portraying this sort of thing on screen is a real tightrope walk — if you put one foot wrong, you can fall down into either silliness or careless voyeurism. There comes a point when Gheorghe takes his pants down to wash himself, and the camera is set back at a distance as Johnny tries not to react to this, but there aren’t enough silent in-between shots of Gheorghe’s face to show us what he is thinking so that the tension between him and Johnny can build and feel real to us.

Finally, Johnny and Gheorghe come together and their clothes come mostly off as they roll around in the mud. This is where “God’s Own Country” runs into a real problem: If you’re filming a sex scene, the best way to do it is to put the camera as close as possible to the two people involved so that we can feel the flush of excitement between them. Lee’s camera stays at a distance from his leads and, far worse, comes in for close shots mainly for glimpses of their bodies.

On the one hand, the sight of their mud-spattered pale white skin is visually striking. On the other, it feels like the camera is gawking at them rather than joining them, and so all semblance of reality and of the necessary awkwardness of getting their clothes off vanishes. And so too does any real eroticism. When Johnny pulled the blond boy’s pants down in back in the restroom, it was from his point of view so that we could share his excitement. When he has sex with Gheorghe, that subjective component is crucially absent.

“God’s Own Country” finally becomes a film about saliva and sheep and the very pretty long eyelashes on both Johnny and Gheorghe. There are far too many close-ups of Johnny where he is looking dazed and open-mouthed, and his relationship to his father and grandmother (Gemma Jones) is barely sketched.

“My country is dead,” Gheorghe tells Johnny at one point, and that hints that he is just treading water because his options at this point are so limited. Instead of making us feel that these boys are meant to be together, “God’s Own Country” unintentionally suggests that Gheorghe should get himself to a city where his silky dark hair, bedroom eyes and developed aesthetic sense might be far better appreciated by others.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Icarus' Sundance Review: Suspenseful Doping Doc Exposes Russian Scandal

So How Did Kristen Stewart's Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

Al Gore Takes Center Stage on Sundance's Opening Night – and So Does Donald Trump

Sundance 2017 Market Preview: Why Amazon, Netflix Should Dominate Again This Year

Verge List for Sundance 2017 Features Michelle Morgan, Lakeith Stanfield (Exclusive Photos)

Photographer and magazine founder Jeff Vespa unveils eight artists to watch at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Actress Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actress Danielle Macdonald, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Haley Lu Richardson,”Columbus”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actor Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

 

Photographer and magazine founder Jeff Vespa unveils eight artists to watch at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Actress Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actress Danielle Macdonald, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Haley Lu Richardson,”Columbus”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actor Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.