All Those ‘Us’ Michael Jackson Shout-Outs Explained, From ‘Thriller’ T-Shirt to a Single Glove

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Major spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen Jordan Peele’s “Us.”)

Jordan Peele’s “Us” is chock full of references to Michael Jackson, starting when Lupita Nyongo’s younger self wins a “Thriller” t-shirt at the Santa Cruz boardwalk in the 1980s.

But Peele and his costume designer Kym Barrett threw several more nods to the late King of Pop, who is back in the news given the documentary “Leaving Neverland,” in which two men accuse Jackson of sexual abuse (accusations that his estate has disputed).

The doppelgängers in the film, or The Tethered, wear red jumpsuits and one single glove — just as Jackson wore a red jumpsuit during his famed 1983 music video “Thriller,” and Jackson’s single white glove covered in silver sequins made its TV debut during his performance of “Billy Jean” at Motown’s 25th anniversary in 1983. The single glove would become a signature style throughout the rest of his career.

“There are a lot of references running throughout the movie and there’s a lot of nodding and homages to different directors and different horror movies,” Barrett told TheWrap. “The leader of The Tethered has had access to that T-shirt and she knows who Michael Jackson is. She’s seen imagery and she’s seen like the Hands Across America T-shirt, there’s a lot of imagery which she’s seen.

“When it’s time to have the exodus from the tunnel to the top world, that’s an 8-year-old’s jumbled-up impression of the world and it’s regurgitated out into the choice of the red jumpsuit,” she added. “She sees Hands Across America, the cut-out people reinforced by a guy who looks a bit scary and has a red jacket and glove on — it’s memories from a child that is later turned to the red jumpsuit and the glove.”

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The “Thriller” T-shirt, of course, also correlates to the underground world where the Tethered walk around in a zombie-like fashion — similar to how Jackson and his dancers behaved in director John Landis’ video.

Peele himself weighed in on the Jackson nods in the film, telling Mashable, “Everything in this movie was deliberate, that is one thing I can guarantee you. Unless you didn’t like something and that was a complete accident.”

And deploying the King of Pop — himself a participant in 1986’s Hands Across America, was also intentional. “Michael Jackson is probably the patron saint of duality,” Peele said. “The movie starts in the ’80s — the duality with which I experienced him [Jackson] in that time was both as the guy that presented this outward positivity, but also the ‘Thriller’ video which scared me to death.”

Barrett agreed, adding that Jackson is “an extreme example of how you are seen and how you really are inside,” adding that his first child molestation trial really gave insight into Jackson’s complicated dual legacy. (He was acquitted in 2005 of molesting a 13-year-old boy.)

The idea for the doppelgängers’ jumpsuits originally came from utilitarian wear, “work clothes that people go out to work out every day and things that people who construct the infrastructure of society wear,” Barrett said.

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“It kind of evolved from work wear and utilitarian clothing to also something that they can easily make,” she explained. “Jordan was like, ‘I think they should be red,’ whatever they are. We went down that pathway, and the jumpsuit was tried on a lot of people and was universally accepted. It’s such an easy thing to take on and off, basically. I just shortened the pant leg so you could see their ankles and I wanted there to be a part of them that wasn’t covered, so they were vulnerable. I wanted them to feel like they bled in and out of the light and dark, like a watercolor — they emerge from the darkness.”

She also wanted to set the doppelgängers apart from the above-ground family of Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke’s characters. “They were lights in the darkness because they go through such an extended kind of horrific set of events but they are always coming back together,” she said.

Barrett says she has no idea her homage to Jackson would prove so timely with the release of “Leaving Neverland” just weeks before “Us.”

“I didn’t really think about how it would be good or bad for the movie, it was just an eye-opening thing,” she said. “What really struck me was that in the last trials, the world was seeing him in a different way and you were more likely to say, ‘He could be but what if he’s not?’ or ‘There was some reason,’ whereas this, for me anyway, really shone a light on stuff that had not been out in the open.”

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Breaks Original Horror Film Record With $70 Million Opening

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Universal/Monkeypaw’s “Us” has set a new opening weekend record for original horror films, earning a $70.2 million launch from 3,741 screens. This total for Jordan Peele’s latest film blows by the original horror movie opening record of $50.2 million set by “A Quiet Place” last year.

“Us” has also more than doubled the opening weekend earned by Peele’s previous film, “Get Out,” which opened to $33.3 million in February 2017. When ranked among all horror films, including franchise titles and remakes, “Us” sits third on the genre’s opening weekend charts, sitting behind the $123 million opening for 2017’s “It” remake and the $76 million opening for last year’s “Halloween.”

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Peele and “Us” were able to successfully ride the critical acclaim from its SXSW premiere two weeks ago and its 94 percent Rotten Tomatoes score to one of the biggest openings for any horror film, adding $16.7 million from 47 overseas markets to earn an $86.9 million worldwide launch against a $20 million budget.

According to CinemaScore audience data, African-American moviegoers overindexed and comprised of 30 percent of the entire audience. By comparison, Caucasians sat at 36 percent, with Hispanic/Latinos at 21 percent and Asians at 7 percent. While “Get Out” was a hit with audiences with an A- on CinemaScore, “Us” was more consistent with most horror titles with a B.

Taking second is “Captain Marvel,” which dropped 50 percent for a $35 million total in its third weekend. It also grossed $52 million overseas for an $87 million global weekend total. That pushes the latest Marvel film past the domestic total of “Thor: Ragnarok” with $320 million, and past the global total of “Wonder Woman,” “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” and “Batman v Superman” with $910 million after 19 days in theaters around the world.

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Taking third is Paramount’s “Wonder Park” with $8.8 million, a 44 percent drop that brings its 10-day total to $29.2 million and $39.7 million worldwide, with $5 million grossed this weekend from 24 markets overseas.

CBS Films/Lionsgate’s “Five Feet Apart” sits just behind it with $8.5 million for a 35 percent drop and a $26.2 million 10-day domestic total and a $32.8 million total against a $7 million budget. Universal’s “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” completes the top five with $6.5 million for a domestic total of $145 million and a global total of $488 million after five weekends.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ on Pace for $67 Million Opening, Double ‘Get Out’ Debut

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Universal/Monkeypaw’s “Us” is blowing by all analysts’ expectations. On the back of strong pre-release buzz and an opening day total of $29 million, Jordan Peele’s second film is estimated to gross $67 million from 3,741 screens this weekend.

If that estimate holds, not only will “Us” have doubled the opening weekend of Peele’s debut film “Get Out” ($33.3 million), it will set a new opening weekend record for original horror films, beating the $50.2 million of last year’s “A Quiet Place.” It’s also a record for any original film released in March.

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The one somewhat bad note for “Us” is that while critics have been raving about the film with a Rotten Tomatoes score of 95 percent, audiences aren’t quite as enthused as they were for “Get Out.” While that film earned an A on CinemaScore, “Us,” with its more opaque theming and twist ending, has received a B from opening night audiences, which is typical for what horror films tend to receive from the audience poll.

Postrak demographic data shows that Friday night’s audience was 31 percent African-American, compared to 34 percent Caucasians, 22 percent Hispanic/Latino, and 13 percent Asian/Other.

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“Captain Marvel” will settle for the No. 2 spot in its third weekend, though it is still continuing its torrid pace, as it will pass the $315 million domestic total for “Thor: Ragnarok” by Sunday’s end. The Marvel movie is set to make $34.6 million in its third weekend, bringing its domestic total to $321 million and, depending on overseas results, possibly push its global total past the $1 billion mark.

CBS Films/Lionsgate’s “Five Feet Apart” takes third place with an estimated $8.6 million, dropping 34 percent from its $13.1 million opening. Paramount’s “Wonder Park” is fourth, dropping 50 percent for a $7.8 million opening. “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” completes the top five with $6.7 million in its fifth weekend.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’: Yes, Hands Across America Was a Real Thing in the ’80s

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

For those of you who just saw Jordan Peele’s “Us” and wondered where the writer-director got that ingeniously insane idea for Hands Across America in the 1980s-set portion of the film, wonder no more.

It came from history. Hands Across America was a real thing that totally actually happened in 1986. Like, for real.

The idea was hatched in 1985 by Ken Kragen, a music manager and film and TV producer. Kragen was a founding member of USA for Africa, of which Hands Across America was a part. It followed the famed charity single “We Are the World” that featured artists such as Michael Jackson, Lionel Ritchie, Stevie Wonder, Tina Turner and a host of other popular musicians during that era.

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USA for Africa, as the name suggests, was established to ease the pain of poverty in Africa and the U.S.. The idea behind Hands Across America was that by gathering roughly 6 million people to join hands across the continental United States — across four time zones through 16 states and Washington, D.C., from Long Beach, Calif., to New York City — they could raise awareness for poverty and homelessness.

Participants donated money to reserve spaces in the line, which stretched 4,124 miles from coast to coast, and the benefit raised $15 million for the cause, after costs, according to the New York Times.

President Ronald Reagan, then-Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton and a host of celebrities from Michael Jackson to Robin Williams to Kathleen Turner all took part.

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Peele’s film begins with a commercial from 1986 promoting Hands Across America — and the idea resurfaces later in the film as well as a brutally poignant metaphor about poverty, homelessness and the discarded.

“Us” isn’t the first film or TV show to mention the event, which has been referenced in movies like the 1989 Shelley Long comedy “Troop Beverly Hills” and on shows like “Cheers,” “The Golden Girls,” “Seinfeld” and “30 Rock.”

The point is, Hands Across America really did happen.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’: Are There Really Thousand of Miles of Hidden Tunnels All Across the Country?

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Jordan Peele’s “Us” opens with an unusual piece of trivia: Across the U.S., there are thousands of miles of underground tunnels that have been long forgotten. The film says they include abandoned subway tunnels, unused sewers or old mine shafts — and many have no clear purpose at all.

If you haven’t seen “Us,” we won’t spoil why exactly that’s significant. But it’ll immediately make you wonder whether there’s a factual basis to the claim. Are there really a whole network of tunnels that people have just forgotten? Peele has had an answer for just about every other seemingly innocuous reference or image in the film, so where did he get this detail?

One person who knows first-hand that Peele isn’t just making something up is Will Hunt, the author of the just-published book “Underground: A Human History of the Worlds Beneath Our Feet.” He’s explored many of the caves, tunnels and underground passageways that do exist across the U.S. along with many urban explorers, and he said the scope of these tunnels would surprise you.

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“There are way more tunnels underground wherever you are in the United States than you would imagine. There are just crazy layers of infrastructure, whether they be active or abandoned transportation tunnels, sewer lines, aqueducts or even military or government infrastructure hidden underground,” Hunt said. “Wherever you go, there’s something under your feet that people don’t think about.”

However, Peele imagines quite a universe in these underground tunnels — no spoilery details here. While Hunt didn’t consult with Peele and hasn’t seen “Us,” he knows the idea of the underground as a metaphor is ripe for a screenplay.

“The underground has always been the unconscious,” Hunt said. “When we’re talking about the unconscious of a culture, of the United States, a good place to explore those forces is beneath the surface.”

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Hunt noted that there’s substantial evidence that hundreds of people live in tunnels, just out view of regular society, in places ranging from Las Vegas to Moscow to Bucharest to New York City.

“In the deeper strata of New York City, you find mole people, you find people who have made homes for themselves in deep hidden nooks and alcoves under the city,” he said. “They’re these marginalized, forgotten people who are living completely out of sight in essentially a separate reality.”

He mentioned a “massive community” that was found underneath the Upper West Side of Manhattan between the ’80s and ’90s where people had “literally built homes out of wares salvaged from the surface.” Hunt said these people had water sources, generators and had siphoned electricity to get by.

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“Basically, any city of any size that has like a stratified society where there are people who are struggling, you’re going to find these communities who have gathered in hidden places,” Hunt said. “And they say something about the society on the surface. They’re a reflection of our darknesses, the injustices of our society on the surface.”

Hunt is a journalist who earned the trust of the many urban explorers who document such tunnels and communities, but he said they typically pass along information only through oral tradition, and very few of these tunnels have ever been formally mapped or quantified.

For a real-life account of mole people and the homeless who live in New York City, Hunt recommends the 2000 documentary “Dark Days.” But he said the idea of the underground representing the other and the unconscious of society is something that goes back generations and one that is great for fiction.

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“From a fiction writer’s perspective or a screenwriter’s perspective, to have this dark territory inhabited by these forgotten people directly beneath this neon cityscape is insane,” Hunt said. “When you’re not super-conscious of the world and you’re not thinking hard about reality, you’re in your own space. You’re thinking about what’s in front of you, and you’re not thinking deeper. You can’t talk about this without going into these silly underground puns.”

“But you’re not thinking deep. You’re not looking inside of yourself or not probing or inquiring or investigating,” he continued. “You’re just sort of complacent, and you’re moving through the world comfortable in your own reality. But when you start to question things, and are starting to look beneath the surface of reality, you’re starting to think deeper about the hidden aspects of the world.”

Peele’s “Us” is in theaters now. Hunt’s book “Underground” is available now.

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The Long, Twisted Story Behind ‘I Got 5 on It,’ the Secret Weapon of Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

In most movies, a fight with red-robed doppelgängers to the tune of N.W.A.’s “F— the Police” would be the showstopper. But Jordan Peele’s “Us” has an even better musical trick up its sleeve — its deft dissection of the 1995 Luniz hit “I Got 5 on It.”

“I Got 5 on It” comes from an underrated school of hip-hop that discusses low-stakes and even trivial problems with high-level musicality. The “5” refers to a five-dollar bill kicked in toward the purchase of marijuana. The song basically says, if you want to smoke some of my weed, please kick in some cash. It’s a gripe everyone’s had at some point about weed, gas, or french fries.

But the song remains such an earworm 24 years after its debut because nothing about its music sounds trivial. The music has overtones of hurt and betrayal, and may owe those qualities to its surprising and contentious origin story. Needless to say, the song’s complexity serves “Us” very well.

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We’re introduced to the song as the Wilson family tries to relax on a trip to the beach. (Spoilers follow.) It’s a fraught trip because mom Adelaide Wilson (Lupita Nyong’o) doesn’t really want to go. She has bad memories of the beach from childhood.

(Story continues after the song):

When “I Got 5 On It” comes on the radio, dad Gabe Wilson (Winston Duke) sees it as a fun throwback. (It was the 13th biggest single of 1995). It’s also a bit of a guilty pleasure, since his kids, Zora and Jason, figure out pretty quickly that the song is about drugs. The parents make the requisite denials before the family tries to bond over a ’90s banger.

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But even once they get past the drug issue, there’s still something wrong: Adelaide tries to get Jason to snap along to the beat, but she’s clearly off beat herself. This is foreshadowing how she doesn’t really fit in, to her family or her world.

Later, as it becomes apparent that the family’s apparent happiness came at a terrible price, and is built on a terrible deception, the once-fun song transmogrifies into something grotesque. The movie’s “Tethered Mix” slows things down, and fully indulges the ominous quality hinted at in the original “I Got 5 on It.”

Just listen:

The producer of “I Got 5 on it,” Tone Capone, worked with intense care to create such a layered musical atmosphere. The song contains an almost-ridiculous juxtaposition of complex sound and straightforward subject matter, but it works beautifully because producer Capone, the Luniz (rappers Yukmouth and Numskull), and vocalist Michael Marshall totally commit. It’s striking how passionately Marshall sings the line: “Partner, let’s go half on a sack.”

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Marshall had a good reason to take the song very personally.

There’s a widespread impression that “I Got 5 on It” is built around a sample of the 1987 Club Nouveau song “Why You Treat Me So Bad.” (On one “I Got 5 on it” remix, guest rapper E-40 begins his verse by rapping, “Why ya treat me so bad?/40 makes it happen.”)

But the notion that Club Nouveau originated the music is bitterly disputed.

Tone Capone, aka Anthony Gilmour, said in an interview with WhoSampled writer Chris Read that the Luniz brought “the idea and the hook to me.” Capone was working at the time with Marshall, a high school friend.

As Marshall explained in a 2014 interview with Trayze TV, “the Luniz wanted to sample the song ‘Why You Treat Me So Bad.’”

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As it happened, he knew the song well. Very well.

He told Trayze TV: “‘Why You Treat Me So Bad’ is a melody that was stolen from me from a song called ‘Thinking About You,’ so I had an opportunity to be able to create over the beat that I had first.”

Yes, that’s right: As Marshall described it, at the time the Luniz brought the “Why You Treat Me So Bad” hook to Capone, he just happened to be working with Marshall, who just happened to the real author of the hook.

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A Medium post by Gino Sorcinelli concluded that “Thinking About You” did indeed precede “Why You Treat Me So Bad.” Sorcinelli wrote last year that Jay King, the former executive producer of Timex Social Club’s hit song “Rumors,” created Club Nouveau after a falling out with Marshall. Sorcinelli said that when King exited, he had several demos from Timex Social Club, including “Thinking About You.”

King, who is now a respected on-air personality on Sacramento radio station KDEE 97.5, did not immediately respond to requests for comment through the station.

Sorcinelli’s entire post is highly recommended. It gives the date of “Thinking About You” as 1986, the year before the release of “Why You Treat Me So Bad.” (Interestingly, 1986 is also the year when “Us” begins. It’s fun to wonder if Gabe became fixated on the music the same year that Adelaide fixated on a Michael Jackson shirt that may or may not have inspired the entire look of the red-garbed, gloved doppelgängers who pervade the film.)

Here’s “Thinking About You”:

So which version did Tone Capone sample? Neither.

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As he explained to WhoSampled, Capone played the song himself in order to get the perfect sound we hear on “I Got 5 On It.”

“I looped the Club Nouveau record first and it was too fast,” he explained. “I slowed it down and it sounded good but after I analyzed it more I felt like I could replay it and control the breaks of the song better.”

As Capone further told WhoSampled, that started him down a prolific and lucrative path of replaying hooks instead of sampling them, so he could squeeze out exactly what he needed from each hook without the extra percussive sounds, vocals, or whatever else that he didn’t need.

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Of course, “I Got 5 on It” isn’t built on just one hook: Tone Capone also borrows from Audio Two’s frequently sampled “Top Billin’” and Kool and the Gang’s “Jungle Boogie,” which got a popularity boost in 1994, the year before “I Got 5 on It,” from its inclusion in Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction.”

But no one disputes those samples the way they do the main hook.

So yes, “I Got 5 on It” is about drugs. But it’s also about duality, and second chances, and perhaps betrayal.

Just like “Us.”

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With the release of “Us,” Jordan Peele has cemented his status as the next can’t-miss horror filmmaker. He’s also proven himself to be quite the horror expert, as he’s sprinkled in the most references to fright flicks we&#…

Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’: What Does the Bible Passage ‘Jeremiah 11:11’ Say?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

If you’ve just stepped out of Jordan Peele’s “Us,” your head is probably spinning with questions.

While we can’t explain the existential meaning of its themes like identity, free will and the fear of The Other that Peele poses throughout, we can help with one detail left unanswered by the film: What does the Bible passage “Jeremiah 11:11” say?

If you haven’t seen “Us,” yet, some SPOILERS!!!! follow.

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In the opening scene of “Us,” we see Lupita Nyong’o’s character Adelaide as a young girl in 1986. While walking through a carnival on a boardwalk by the beach, she sees a homeless man with a piece of cardboard that reads “Jeremiah 11:11.” When she returns to the beach as an adult, she sees the same homeless man with the same cardboard sign, only now he’s being carted into an ambulance as a bloody corpse.

Here’s “Jeremiah 11:11,” as translated into English in the King James Bible:

Therefore thus saith the LORD, Behold, I will bring evil upon them, which they shall not be able to escape; and though they shall cry unto me, I will not hearken unto them.

Pretty doom and gloom! Although it’s certainly appropriate for a horror movie like “Us,” it’s not among the more common verses used in the movies.

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The book of Jeremiah is part of the Bible’s Old Testament, and Jeremiah is the second of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the second of the prophets in the Christian Bible. The passage in particular is part of a covenant between God and the people of Israel. God says through Jeremiah that he would protect the people of Israel in exchange for worshipping Him exclusively. But he warns of a “conspiracy” among the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem.

“They are turned back to the iniquities of their forefathers, which refused to hear my words; and they went after other gods to serve them,” the passage reads. “The house of Israel and the house of Judah have broken my covenant which I made with their fathers.”

You could make the connection that, with this passage, Peele is referring to the bond between men and the other “tethered,” or the clones that reside in tunnels underneath the surface. And it also teases how Adelaide’s clone Red is so driven to revenge with no chance for redemption or salvation for those living above ground.

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Even if the passage itself doesn’t have the strongest narrative tie, “11:11” pops up again in the film. The numbers are a mirrored image, which fits perfectly with the doppelgänger themes of “Us.” And it’s also the time that’s stuck on the clock when the power in the family’s home goes out and when the copycat families in red first appear.

Didn’t expect Jordan Peele to get all Biblical on you, huh? Hope that clears up at least one question. As to whether you have a clone controlling your every move and slowly awaiting to murder you, you’re on your own with that one.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Scares Up $7.4 Million at Thursday Box Office

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Us,” the horror follow-up to “Get Out” from director Jordan Peele and released by Universal, earned a massive $7.4 million in its Thursday box office previews from 3,150 screens. It opens on 3,741 screens this weekend.

Independent trackers have “Us” expected to earn between $45-50 million, though Universal is saying that the opening would be considered a success if it was within the range of “Get Out.” Peele’s previous film earned $33.3 million in its first weekend in 2017 following a Thursday preview total of just $1.8 million.

A $50 million opening for “Us” would also put it within the range of the opening for John Krasinski’s horror film “A Quiet Place,” which earned $4.3 million during its Thursday previews. It also eclipsed the total of last year’s horror prequel “The Nun,” which made an impressive $5.4 million on Thursday ahead of a $53.8 million opening.

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“Get Out” was made on a trim $4.5 million budget, while “Us” cost a still modest $20 million. But behind killer word of mouth and a Rotten Tomatoes score that currently sits at 94 percent with 183 reviews counted, “Us” is expected to leg out well beyond its opening and could reach a domestic run of over $200 million.

“Us” stars Lupita Nyong’o as Adelaide Wilson, a woman returning to her beachside childhood home with her husband, Gabe (Winston Duke), and their two children (Shahadi Wright Joseph, Evan Alex) for an idyllic summer getaway. After spending a tense day at the beach with their friends (Elisabeth Moss, Tim Heidecker), Adelaide and her family return to their vacation home to discover the silhouettes of four figures standing in their driveway. “Us” pits an ordinary American family against a terrifying and uncanny opponent: doppelgängers of themselves.

Peele wrote and directed “Us,” his second feature, for his Monkeypaw Productions alongside Ian Cooper. The film is the company’s first solo production venture. Sean McKittrick and Jason Blum also produced.

“Us” could top what would be the third weekend for Marvel’s “Captain Marvel.” It also opens opposite the true-story thriller “Hotel Mumbai” and the foreign film “Sunset,” and Julianne Moore’s “Gloria Bell” going wider.

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Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Our box office intel says that Jordan Peele’s Us from Universal/Monkeypaw Productions is on track for a $4M-plus Thursday night, possibly even $5M off showtimes that began at 7PM.
These numbers could always fluctuate, and even if Us dr…

Does Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Writer/director/producer Jordan Peele made one hell of a splash with his debut “Get Out” back in 2017, and he’s showing off his filmmaking chops once again right now with “Us,” another heady horror flick with a lot to say.

But “Us” is a little bit less straightforward than “Get Out” was, offering up what appears on the surface to be a fairly simple but ingenious twist on the home invasion formula — our protagonist family of four, led by Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, is forced to face off against their own evil doppelgangers. But the further you get into the film, the clearer it becomes that there is so much more going on here than you could have imagined.

So as the credits begin to roll and you’re trying to figure out what it was you just saw, you’re gonna want help from any place you can get it because “Us” really is quite a doozy.

Also Read: ‘Us’ Film Review: Jordan Peele Terrifies Again With a Chilling Examination of Duality

So you’re probably going to wonder — or hope, as I did — that Peele would bestow “Us” with a stinger or extra scene during or  after the credits that might shed some light on the revelations that the film dropped as it reached its climax. So does “Us” have a mid-credits scene or post-credits scene or anything like that?

While we here at TheWrap would always encourage any and all moviegoers to stick around through the end credits of a film to show some small amount of appreciation for the many, many people that were responsible for bringing whatever you just watched to life, you can rest assured that “Us” does not feature any extra scenes during or after the credits. So if you’ve got to get out of the theater quickly or are in dire need of a visit to the restroom, you can head out knowing that you won’t be missing any extra content or clues to help decipher the film by leaving when the credits start.

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Jordan Peele doubles the horror and doubles the fun in the expertly crafted Us

Read on: The A.V. Club.

You know you’re in the hands of a natural born filmmaker when you can feel yourself being tugged, as if by invisible forces, from one shot to the next, into a movie’s diabolical design. That’s the sensation provoked by Jordan Peele’s Us, which begins w…

Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Headed Toward an Even Bigger Opening Than ‘Get Out’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Two years ago, Jordan Peele became the box office’s biggest surprise as “Get Out” became one of the year’s biggest cultural and financial hits. Now, with an Oscar and multiple producer attachments to his name, Peele is ready to make a big splash at the box office again as Universal releases his second film, “Us,” nationwide this weekend.

While there were 14 other films that had a higher domestic gross than in 2017, “Get Out” had by far the biggest return on investment. Produced by Blumhouse with its usual thrifty approach, the film grossed $176 million domestic and $255 million worldwide against a mere $4.5 million production budget. The film also legged out far better than most horror or R-rated movies, as it opened to $33.3 million in February 2017 and more than quintupled that amount by the end of its domestic theatrical run.

Also Read: ‘Us’ Film Review: Jordan Peele Terrifies Again With a Chilling Examination of Duality

Universal says that any opening higher than what “Get Out” made would be considered a success, but trackers are very optimistic as they project a $45-50 million opening. An opening on the higher end of that range would match the $50.2 million opening of last year’s horror hit “A Quiet Place,” which “Us” is currently outperforming in advance ticket sales on Fandango. The film is also expected to leg out as well as “Get Out,” which could mean a domestic run of more than $200 million against a $20 million production budget.

Even compared to other upcoming horror films like “Pet Sematary,” “Us” is a fiercely unique film that is enjoying immense social buzz and critical acclaim. Since its premiere on the opening night of SXSW, “Us” has earned a 98 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, with 68 reviews logged. And along with lead stars Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, both of whom are still riding high off of their “Black Panther” fame, “Us” also has something that was once common decades ago but which is now rare: a director with box office draw.

Also Read: Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Wins Over Critics: ‘A Masterpiece’ Despite Some ‘Messiness’

“In horror, there is a brand recognition with Blumhouse, but there isn’t a single director that has become so popular with audiences as Jordan Peele has,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock. “The closest person I can think of is Eli Roth, but even he didn’t get nearly as big off of just one film the way Peele has with ‘Get Out.’”

Written, directed, and co-produced by Peele, “Us” stars Nyong’o and Duke as an upper-middle class African-American couple on vacation with their two kids. But their vacation is interrupted when they are attacked by clones of themselves known as The Tethered, who have come to claim the family’s lives for themselves. Tim Heidecker and Elisabeth Moss also star in the film, which was produced by Blumhouse’s Jason Blum, QC Productions’ Sean McKittrick and Ian Cooper, who is producing alongside Peele through Monkeypaw Productions

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