Kevin Feige, Samantha Bee Added to 2018 Produced By Lineup

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Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige, TV host Samantha Bee and Paramount chairman Jim Gianopulos have been added to the lineup of the 2018 Produced By Conference, the Producers Guild of America announced Thursday.

Headlining sessions announced today include “Conversation With: Samantha Bee & Jason Jones,” “Conversation With: Kevin Feige,” “Conversation With: Jim Gianopulos” and “Larry Gordon: Uncensored.”

Newly added panelists are Fenton Bailey & Randy Barbato, Dan Bucatinsky, Jack Davis, Andrew Goldberg, Jorge R. Gutiérrez, Dan Harmon, David Lancaster, Jordan Horowitz and Lynette Howell Taylor.

Also Read: Kevin Feige Teases Killing Off Avengers for Good: ‘People Need to Be Careful What They Wish for’

“Conversation With: Samantha Bee & Jason Jones” will let the team share their experiences behind the Emmy-winning series “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” as well as the scripted comedy series “The Detour.” Feige will take part in an in-depth discussion to talk about some of the biggest blockbusters of the last decade, including “Black Panther.”

Gianopulos will discuss overseeing production of Hollywood films, including “Avatar,” “Titanic,” “Deadpool” and “Hidden Figures,” while Gordon will be part of a candid discussion about how he produced films like “Die Hard” and “Hellboy.”

Also Read: Oh, Hi Kevin Feige! Tommy Wiseau Interested in Marvel or DC Film Role

The “Producers Mashup,” which gives attendees the chance to network with veteran producers and development executives, will return this year after its inaugural success last year.

Produced By will take place June 9 and June 10 at Paramount Pictures Studios in Los Angeles. Previously announced speakers are director Errol Morris, Emmy-winning writer Lena Waithe and “Friends” co-creator Marta Kauffman.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Samantha Bee Tackles #MeToo Backlash, Holding Men Like Aziz Ansari to a ‘Higher Standard’ (Video)

‘Full Frontal With Samantha Bee’ Renewed by TBS for 2 More Seasons

Samantha Bee Launches ‘Apology Race’ to Tell World We’re Sorry for President Trump (Video)

Why Director Julia Hart Wanted Gugu Mbatha-Raw For ‘Fast Color’ — SXSW

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Making a splash at South by Southwest two years ago with her directorial debut, Miss Stevens, writer/director Julia Hart is back in 2018 with supernatural drama Fast Color.
The film is co-written and produced by the director’s husband, La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz, who is known for graciously passing Best Picture honors to Moonlight after the envelope scandal that rocked the world. It stars Gugu Mbatha-Raw (A Wrinkle in TimeBlack Mirror: San Junipero) as Ruth, a…

TV Powerhouse Rachel Bloom Joins BE Conference at SXSW 2018!

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Rachel Bloom, the co-creator and star of television hit comedy “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” will join TheWrap’s BE Conference for mentorship in a special one-on-one spotlight interview at SXSW on March 12.

The second annual BE Conference for millennial women takes place on March 11 & 12 during SXSW.

Also newly added to the BE Conference lineup is the talented duo, writer-director Julia Hart and producer Jordan Horowitz (“La La Land”), with their film “Fast Color” which is premiering at SXSW.

They join a stunning lineup of inspiring women and mentors at TheWrap’s conference, including:

  • Award-winning journalist Katie Couric
  • Aurora Browne, Jennifer Whalen, and Meredith MacNeill of the Baroness von Sketch troupe;
  • New York City Public Advocate Letitia James;
  • Activists and Harvey Weinstein accusers Sarah Ann Masse and Jessica Barth;
  • Pussyhat movement cofounder Jayna Zweiman and many others.

Check the full list of mentors and speakers at www.beconferences.com.

Also Read: Katie Couric, Baroness von Sketch Comedians to Headline Power Women, BE Conference at SXSW 2018!

Rachel Bloom is a rare multi-talented star, a performer, writer, director and improv and musical comedienne. She recently wrapped her third season starring in the CW show “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” for which she has won a Golden Globe and has been thrice nominated for the Emmy. The series stars Bloom as Rebecca Bunch, a successful, driven, and arguably crazy young woman who impulsively gives up everything – partnership at a prestigious law firm, an upscale apartment in Manhattan – in a desperate attempt to find love and happiness in suburban West Covina, California.

Bloom’s film “Most Likely to Murder,” written by Dan Gregor (her husband) and Doug Man, will premiere at SXSW. She costars in the dark comedy about a cool kid returning to his hometown 15 years after high school graduation.

Julia Hart is an up and coming female filmmaker with a passion for women’s issues. Hart directed “Fast Color,” which stars Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Lorraine Toussaint & David Strathairn. The film is produced and co-written by Jordan Horowitz.

Horowitz is an Academy Award nominated producer who most recently produced “La La Land.” At the 2017 Academy Awards, Horowitz entered the history books when he handed the Best Picture Oscar to Barry Jenkins after his film was mistakenly called as the winner. “La La Land” was nominated for a record 14 Oscars and won 6, including Best Director for Damien Chazelle and Best Actress for Emma Stone. Hart & Horowitz, partners in marriage and business co-founded the film and television production company Original Headquarters.

Also Read: Letitia James, Shelley Zalis, Sarah Ann Masse Join BE Conference 2018 as Speakers, Mentors

The BE Conference is a premier conference that connects change makers seeking to make an impact with game changers at the top of their fields who want to inspire and mentor the next generation of leaders. The audience consists of 350 millennials, including entrepreneurs, influencers and rising stars in their respective worlds, along with 50 mentors who are eager to teach and learn from each other.

Launched in 2017 by TheWrap founder and CEO Sharon Waxman, BE Conference offers keynote interviews, panel discussions, workshops, networking and mentoring sessions that build meaningful connections, encourage constructive change, and empower the next generation to BE the best possible version of themselves.

VIP tickets can be purchased for BE Conference 2018 and include exclusive access to mentors and entrance to Power Women Breakfast SXSW in Austin. More information on attending, sponsoring or mentoring at BE is available at Beconferences.com.

‘Counterpart’ Team on Defining Identity Through Two Unique Worlds in the Starz Spy Thriller

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What if you were a grown adult working a seemingly mundane bureaucratic job, caring for your comatose wife, and you learned that there existed not only another version of yourself but of the whole world? Suddenly questions of true self, identity, and nature versus nurture would permeate even the simplest everyday interactions. At least, that […]

‘La La Land’ Producer Hopes He and ‘Moonlight’ Director Showed ‘We Can Be Better… Kinder’

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The 2017 Academy Awards will forever be remembered for one of the biggest screw-ups in Oscars history. In the final moments, due to a series of major errors by accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, ‘La La Land’ was mistakenly named Best Picture, when in fact the winner was acclaimed drama “Moonlight.”

But alongside the “what the hell happened?!” drama emerged another narrative — the comity and community spirit fostered by “Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins and “La La Land” producer Jordan Horowitz. While chaos dominated the Oscars stage and even host Jimmy Kimmel seemed unsure what to do, Horowitz ran to the Mic, told the “Moonlight” team they’d actually won, congratulated them and held the card to the camera to prove it to the world.

Also Read: Academy President Vows ‘Moonlight’ Oscars Snafu Won’t Happen Again in Letter to Members

Afterward and throughout the night, Jenkins and Horowitz were photographed celebrating together and demonstrating there were no hard feelings, and since then they’ve had nothing but nice things to say about one another. The two have been faving each others tweets and complimenting each other all week. While many have expressed concern that the historic nature of the “Moonlight” win has been eclipsed by the way it won, Jenkins and Horowitz have become hollywood’s favorite examples of professional and personal amity.

Jordan is clearly aware that the world is watching, and so it is tonight, while taking questions from followers on Twitter, he expressed his hope that what he and Jenkins went through and how they handled it, set a good example for the industry. “I am hopeful that all of us — teams LLL and Moonlight — demonstrated that we can be better, more generous, and kinder,” he said.

@dedpewlsays I am hopeful that all of us — teams LLL and Moonlight — demonstrated that we can be better, more generous, and kinder.

Jordan Horowitz (@jehorowitz) March 3, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

Oscars Stage Manager Details PwC Accountants’ Incompetence: ‘They Froze’ (Exclusive)

‘Moonlight’ Expands to 1,500-Plus Theaters After Oscars Best Picture Win

Oscars 2017: What’s Next for This Year’s Winners? (Photos)

Oscars Stage Manager Details PwC Accountants’ Incompetence: ‘They Froze’ (Exclusive)

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Gary Natoli, the veteran Oscars stage manager who was in the midst of the chaos on Sunday night when “La La Land” was mistakenly announced as Best Picture, told TheWrap on Wednesday that the two PwC accountants entrusted with the envelopes “froze” when things went wrong.

“I’m sure they’re very lovely people, but they just didn’t have the disposition for this,” Natoli said. “You need somebody who’s going to be confident and unafraid.”

Making matters worse, Natoli said that he and stage manager John Esposito, who stood in the stage-right wings next to PwC partner Brian Cullinan, had a conversation with Cullinan the day before the Oscars about the protocol if an incorrect winner is announced.

Also Read: Watch Every Late-Night Host Skewer Oscars Best Picture Boondoggle (Videos)

“We don’t usually talk about that,” Natoli explained. “But I guess Brian had done an interview where he was asked about it, so he came up to John and me and told us that in the interview, he said, ‘Well, we would tell the stage managers and check with each other and react.’ And then he said to us, ‘Is that what we do?’

“I said, ‘If you know who the winner is, you don’t need to check with each other. You need to immediately go out and rectify the situation, ideally before the wrong winners get to the mic.’ And he said, ‘OK, good, that’s what we thought.’”

Natoli was the lead stage manager on the 2017 Oscars show, and spent most of his time stationed in the stage-left wings with host Jimmy Kimmel. PwC had one of its balloting leaders in each wing: Cullinan stage right, where most of the presenter entrances came from, and Martha Ruiz stage left, which saw less traffic.

Also Read: Oscars: Stars’ Reactions to ‘Moonlight’ Best Picture Win Are The Best (Photos)

Each PwC partner had a complete set of envelopes, and each was supposed to have memorized the winners in each category. Leonardo DiCaprio, who presented the Best Actress award, entered from stage left and received the envelope from Ruiz; when it came time to present Best Picture, Warren Beatty received an envelope from Cullinan — but the PwC partner mistakenly gave him the spare Best Actress envelope that bore the name of Emma Stone and “La La Land,” rather than the Best Picture envelope that bore the name “Moonlight.”

Natoli broke down what happened next: “I was in the wings stage left with Jimmy [Kimmel] when they announced ‘La La Land.’ We watched for about 10 more seconds, and during that entire time Martha was no more than five feet away from us. When ‘La La Land’ was announced, she did not try to get my attention, she did not say anything. And she’s supposed to have memorized the winners.”

Natoli and Kimmel walked directly past Ruiz to get to the hallway that leads into the Dolby Theatre lobby, and then went into the audience where Kimmel had planned to close the show with a quick comedy bit involving Matt Damon. Natoli had to tell Damon’s wife about the bit so that she could give up her seat to the host, so they waited until “La La Land” producer Jordan Horowitz began giving his acceptance speech before making the seating change.

Also Read: ‘Moonlight’ Oscars Flub and 9 More Humiliating Live TV Mistakes (Video)

“As I was taking Matt’s wife to the side of the house, I heard John Esposito on my headset say, ‘Brian says he didn’t think they said the right winner. Can you have Martha check her envelope?’ That was the first time I heard anything about it, and it was probably a minute, or a minute and 15 seconds, from the time Faye announced the wrong winner.”

Because Natoli was no longer in the wings near Ruiz, he radioed another stage manager to find Ruiz and have her open the second Best Picture envelope. “She was standing there with the envelope in her hand, very low-key,” he said of Ruiz. “And John Esposito said that Brian was very low-key too, no urgency. But we had Martha open the envelope, and it said ‘Moonlight.’”

Natoli said he immediately told the stage managers in the wings, “Get the accountants out there!” But he said both Cullinan and Ruiz hesitated. “John was trying to get Brian to go on stage, and he wouldn’t go,” he said. “And Martha wouldn’t go. We had to push them on stage, which was just shocking to me.”

Also Read: Academy Boots Both PwC Accountants From Next Year’s Oscars

Natoli went on stage as well, and immediately looked for the envelope that Faye Dunaway had opened. “At this point I didn’t know that they’d been given the wrong envelope,” he said. “Brian had led us to believe that Faye had just said it incorrectly. So I went looking for the envelope.”

He found that Horowitz had the Best Actress envelope instead of the Best Picture envelope, and then located the correct one, which had finally been given to Beatty. “I said, ‘We have to announce that ‘Moonlight’ is the winner,’” he said. Jordan Horowitz did that more than two minutes after the error had first been made.

“I still do not understand the delay,” Natoli told TheWrap. “Brian should have run out there on his own. Martha should have run out there.

“I didn’t get on the headset and say, ‘Hey, producers, this is what’s happening. What do we do?’ We took our own initiative and got it done — and if we hadn’t done that, we could have been off the air before it was fixed. I’m proud of the way that we handled it, given the lack of response from PwC.”

Natoli calls the fiasco “a confluence of different things. Obviously we know that Brian was taking pictures backstage when he should not have been, and not paying attention. We know they didn’t have the disposition that is necessary for the job. And there was the new design of the envelope, which we had complained about to the Academy a week earlier.”

Also Read: Academy Apologizes for ‘In Memoriam’ Mistake of Showing Still-Living Producer

In fact, he added, the stage crew’s complaints had led to a change in the inserts that went inside the envelopes, which originally had print that was far too small. But they couldn’t do anything about the envelopes themselves, on which the name of the category was not nearly as legible as it had been in previous years.

“I had to look closely to see the category names,” he said. “All they were thinking about was design, not function.”

Looking back, Natoli is glad that PwC has taken full responsibility for the error. In addition, Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs announced on Wednesday that Cullinan and Ruiz would not return for future Oscars. (Cullinan and Ruiz have made no public statements beyond the official PwC apology.)

But Natoli remains bothered that the fiasco has overshadowed an Oscars show that most of the crew thought was good.

“It was very upsetting to us,” he said. “It still is. You work really hard on a show, and then something like that happens. You feel bad about it, even though it’s not your responsibility.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sunday’s Most-Watched Oscars Moment Wasn’t the Best Picture Debacle

James Corden Mocks Oscars Flub: ‘I Bet Hillary Clinton Was Like, Welcome to My World’ (Video)

Oscars Flub: Was the Academy’s New Envelope Design Partly to Blame? (Photos)