Jon Hamm, Emily Ratajkowski Get Competitive in Charades

The ‘Beirut’ actor shared a few spars with the late-night host, whereas the model confidently acted out her clues with no hesitation. read more


The 'Beirut' actor shared a few spars with the late-night host, whereas the model confidently acted out her clues with no hesitation.

read more

Jon Hamm’s Impression of Ray Romano Playing Golf Is Simply the Best (Video)

Jon Hamm doing Ray Romano playing golf probably doesn’t sound as funny as it actually is — readers are just going to have to trust us on this one.

The “Mad Men” alum was all over Tuesday’s “Tonight Show,” from his role in the monologue to a game of charades against Emily Ratajkowski. Hamm’s best contribution, however, was this silly little impression of the “Everybody Loves Raymond” star hacking his way around 18 holes.

Watch the video above.

Also Read: Tucker Carlson’s Panda-Sex Bit? ‘Colbert Report’ Did It! (Video)

We told you so.

Need more Hamm to pair with your eggs this morning? Here’s the “Beirut” star and “Legion” narrator crushing it in that aforementioned charades contest:



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Karlie Kloss Kicks Aaron Paul’s A– in Jimmy Fallon’s Charades (Video)

Jon Hamm doing Ray Romano playing golf probably doesn’t sound as funny as it actually is — readers are just going to have to trust us on this one.

The “Mad Men” alum was all over Tuesday’s “Tonight Show,” from his role in the monologue to a game of charades against Emily Ratajkowski. Hamm’s best contribution, however, was this silly little impression of the “Everybody Loves Raymond” star hacking his way around 18 holes.

Watch the video above.

We told you so.

Need more Hamm to pair with your eggs this morning? Here’s the “Beirut” star and “Legion” narrator crushing it in that aforementioned charades contest:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cardi B and Jimmy Fallon Team Up to Mock Trump's 'Spanx' Coat and Facebook (Video)

Jimmy Fallon, Will Smith Perform the 'History of TV Theme Songs' – Yes, Including 'Fresh Prince' (Video)

Karlie Kloss Kicks Aaron Paul's A– in Jimmy Fallon's Charades (Video)

‘Legion’ Fact Check: Were All Those Tick and Dog Facts True?

(This post contains mild spoilers for the April 10 episode of “Legion” on FX)

FX’s “Legion” Season 2 is still messing with viewers’ minds when it comes to what’s real, what isn’t, and what that means for the story of telepathic “X-Men”-adjacent mutants the show features.

In the second episode of Season 2, “Chapter 10,” the show makes a lengthy point about the nature of reality. Midway through the episode, “Legion” introduces what it calls “Chapter 4” of Season 2, titled, “Umwelt.” In ethology, the study of animal behavior, that word refers to how animals perceive the world around them through their senses. Narrator Jon Hamm digs into the concept, starting with a quote.

“A wise man once said, ‘Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away,’” Hamm states. That wise man was science fiction writer and futurist Philip K. Dick.

Also Read: ‘Legion’: Here’s Everything to Remember From Season 1

“Legion” goes on to make a point about the fact that while we think of reality as a solid, unwavering thing, perception of reality can alter it significantly. Along the way, the show lays out some interesting facts about how two animals perceive the world. But are all those animal facts true? Turns out, the writers of “Legion” have done their homework.

The episode starts by talking about how ticks largely interact with the world through their biological need to feed. “For a tick, reality is a product of temperature, and butyric acid,” Hamm explains. He’s right: Ticks seek out prey by detecting temperature and things like sweat and body odors. Butyric acid (as well as lactic acid) secreted from animals’ skin attract ticks to a meal.

As the discussion about ticks continues in the episode, “Legion” overlays a few other interesting tick facts on the screen, and they’re all true. Ticks really are arachnids, like spiders, and not insects. They eat blood and need it to survive, and they really do remain attached for days to eat — as many as seven or more.

Also Read: ‘Legion’: A Complete Chronological Timeline of When Stuff Probably Happened (Photos)

Next, “Legion” moves on to a discussion of interesting things about the Bloodhound, one possible source of food for a tick. “The bloodhound has 200 million scent receptors,” Hamm narrates. “Its perception of the world is based fundamentally on smell.”

That’s accurate as well. In fact, scientists estimate bloodhounds have more than 230 million olfactory cells, or “scent receptors,” in their noses. That’s about 40 times more than humans have. The difference means that the bloodhound’s sense of smells is about 1,000 times better than a person’s.

As the episode continues, “Legion” notes a few other points: First, that the bloodhound breed is over 1,000 years old. They’re believed to be descended from dogs that were kept at the Abbey of Saint-Hubert in Belgium. That’s true: Bloodhounds were first bred around 1,000 A.D. And they really can track a scent trail up to 300 hours after whatever created that scent trail has moved on from the area.

Also Read: ‘Legion’: 11 Questions We Need Answered in Season 2 (Photos)

“Legion” goes on to discuss how human perception of reality can be variable. That might or might not be true, but at the very least, what the show says about how animals perceive reality is the real deal.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, That Was Jon Hamm’s Voice in the ‘Legion’ Season 2 Premiere

‘Legion’: Here’s Everything to Remember From Season 1

Every ‘Legion’ Character Ranked, From Least to Most Likely Imaginary (Photos)

‘Legion’: A Complete Chronological Timeline of When Stuff Probably Happened (Photos)

‘Legion’ Teased Mysteries But Leaves Viewers Hanging In Season 1 (Commentary)

(This post contains mild spoilers for the April 10 episode of “Legion” on FX)

FX’s “Legion” Season 2 is still messing with viewers’ minds when it comes to what’s real, what isn’t, and what that means for the story of telepathic “X-Men”-adjacent mutants the show features.

In the second episode of Season 2, “Chapter 10,” the show makes a lengthy point about the nature of reality. Midway through the episode, “Legion” introduces what it calls “Chapter 4” of Season 2, titled, “Umwelt.” In ethology, the study of animal behavior, that word refers to how animals perceive the world around them through their senses. Narrator Jon Hamm digs into the concept, starting with a quote.

“A wise man once said, ‘Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away,'” Hamm states. That wise man was science fiction writer and futurist Philip K. Dick.

“Legion” goes on to make a point about the fact that while we think of reality as a solid, unwavering thing, perception of reality can alter it significantly. Along the way, the show lays out some interesting facts about how two animals perceive the world. But are all those animal facts true? Turns out, the writers of “Legion” have done their homework.

The episode starts by talking about how ticks largely interact with the world through their biological need to feed. “For a tick, reality is a product of temperature, and butyric acid,” Hamm explains. He’s right: Ticks seek out prey by detecting temperature and things like sweat and body odors. Butyric acid (as well as lactic acid) secreted from animals’ skin attract ticks to a meal.

As the discussion about ticks continues in the episode, “Legion” overlays a few other interesting tick facts on the screen, and they’re all true. Ticks really are arachnids, like spiders, and not insects. They eat blood and need it to survive, and they really do remain attached for days to eat — as many as seven or more.

Next, “Legion” moves on to a discussion of interesting things about the Bloodhound, one possible source of food for a tick. “The bloodhound has 200 million scent receptors,” Hamm narrates. “Its perception of the world is based fundamentally on smell.”

That’s accurate as well. In fact, scientists estimate bloodhounds have more than 230 million olfactory cells, or “scent receptors,” in their noses. That’s about 40 times more than humans have. The difference means that the bloodhound’s sense of smells is about 1,000 times better than a person’s.

As the episode continues, “Legion” notes a few other points: First, that the bloodhound breed is over 1,000 years old. They’re believed to be descended from dogs that were kept at the Abbey of Saint-Hubert in Belgium. That’s true: Bloodhounds were first bred around 1,000 A.D. And they really can track a scent trail up to 300 hours after whatever created that scent trail has moved on from the area.

“Legion” goes on to discuss how human perception of reality can be variable. That might or might not be true, but at the very least, what the show says about how animals perceive reality is the real deal.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, That Was Jon Hamm's Voice in the 'Legion' Season 2 Premiere

'Legion': Here's Everything to Remember From Season 1

Every 'Legion' Character Ranked, From Least to Most Likely Imaginary (Photos)

'Legion': A Complete Chronological Timeline of When Stuff Probably Happened (Photos)

'Legion' Teased Mysteries But Leaves Viewers Hanging In Season 1 (Commentary)

‘Beirut’ Film Review: Jon Hamm Mired in Muddled Middle-East Tale

“Beirut” is a complicated movie about complicated people in a complicated situation. (Bear with me.) Its narrative complexity is nothing if not constant. If screenwriter Tony Gilroy’s objective was to encourage audiences to pay attention to the details, then he’s probably succeeded.

In short: “Beirut” revolves around former U.S. diplomat Mason Skiles (Jon Hamm), a drunk and wayward “expert negotiator” who was booted out of government work at the tail-end of 1972. During the intervening decade, Cal (Mark Pellegrino, “Supernatural”), an ex-colleague of Mason’s, has been taken hostage in Lebanon. The hostages have requested that Mason be the CIA’s point person to forge a deal. The CIA operatives, namely Sandy Crowder (Rosamund Pike) and Gary Ruzak (Shea Whigham), reluctantly agree to their terms. Back in Lebanon, Mason is forced to confront his sordid past while also attempting to rescue his best friend.

There are more complications. In “Beirut” and Beirut, there always seems to be more complications. Under the direction of Brad Anderson (“The Machinist”), Gilroy’s screenplay takes the antithetical approach to “less is more.” Scene after scene, we’re given more names and organizations (and then acronyms for those organizations) than is probably necessary.

Also Read: Yes, That Was Jon Hamm’s Voice in the ‘Legion’ Season 2 Premiere

To fully map out the inner workings of this movie, you’d need to give each audience member photos, pins, and yarn to connect the dots throughout. You’d also need a flashlight, so that people could make amendments as “Beirut’s” plot breathlessly twists and turns. Anderson’s breakneck delivery of new information will either be thrilling or exhausting for prospective viewers.

Gilroy has a tendency to offer stories that take more than a single viewing to fully process. “Michael Clayton.” “Duplicity” and “State of Play” are all examples of films that can dazzle just as easily as they enervate. Mileage may vary. Although what’s lacking in “Beirut” is a solid through-line to keep people invested — “Clayton” had the cool calmness of George Clooney, “Duplicity” had the sexual chemistry of Clive Owen and Julia Roberts, and “State of Play” had, y’know, Helen Mirren.

At the forefront of “Beirut” is Hamm, who is now entering a new chapter in his career post-“Mad Men.” He’s a curious case: On one hand a tremendous talent, and on the other, a tremendous talent who has routinely appeared in inconsistent fare since putting Don Draper to rest. He does what he can in “Beirut”; Hamm is charming, quick-witted, can turn dramatic on a dime.

Also Read: Jon Hamm Says Social Media Is ‘the Visual Equivalent of Masturbating’

But the film has a tendency to undercut Mason’s livelihood, or lack thereof. He’s a man whose been stripped of both his partner and career, left now to work on middling low-level deals in middle America. Even when Mason is given the opportunity to return to the big leagues of the CIA, there’s a sadness to him.

He can hardly believe he’s been granted a second opportunity. He’s more confounded than grateful, though. The resurgence is a reminder of a former life he messed up; as a result he turns to the bottle. Mason’s drinking is not played for laughs, but it’s also not seriously examined. Gilroy bypasses the psychology of his central character, the how and why of Mason’s internal dilemma. There’s another film in “Beirut” where one could investigate how talented (and good) people make bad decisions, how people like Mason subconsciously self-sabotage themselves, preventing any sort of progress or growth.

Also Read: AMC to Open Saudi Arabia’s First Movie Theater

Instead Anderson leans into the action-thriller of it all There are shootouts and explosions, city-wide chases and impressive stunt work. “Beirut” contains all the elements of a fun, snappy, pre-summer jaunt. And yet the film is actively in competition with itself. The tone is grim and honest when it wants to be, but not necessarily when it needs to be.

There’s a level of specificity to some aspects (the archival footage that bookends the film), and laziness in others (Mason’s familial ties to Lebanon). Mason may very well be saving his best friend, but we’re given nothing more than sunset flashbacks of a joyous dinner to inform that friendship. The characters’ consequences are more spoken than felt.

And the consequences of this movie are similarly sparse. Brad Anderson has three upcoming films in the next couple of years, and Gilroy (who originally penned this script in 1991) has rarely been without employment. Jon Hamm is Jon Hamm, and eventually a film will better utilize his abilities. All will be well for everyone involved. Sometimes gifted people make not-so gifted art.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Women Filmmakers From the Middle East and North Africa Unite to Champion Female Artists

Director Mike Burstyn’s ‘Azimuth’ Distills a Lifetime of Wisdom About the Middle East (Guest Blog)

‘Nostalgia’ Film Review: Jon Hamm Leads All-Star Cast in One-Note Examination of Grief

Would You Have a Threesome With Jon Hamm and Billy Eichner? (Video)

“Beirut” is a complicated movie about complicated people in a complicated situation. (Bear with me.) Its narrative complexity is nothing if not constant. If screenwriter Tony Gilroy’s objective was to encourage audiences to pay attention to the details, then he’s probably succeeded.

In short: “Beirut” revolves around former U.S. diplomat Mason Skiles (Jon Hamm), a drunk and wayward “expert negotiator” who was booted out of government work at the tail-end of 1972. During the intervening decade, Cal (Mark Pellegrino, “Supernatural”), an ex-colleague of Mason’s, has been taken hostage in Lebanon. The hostages have requested that Mason be the CIA’s point person to forge a deal. The CIA operatives, namely Sandy Crowder (Rosamund Pike) and Gary Ruzak (Shea Whigham), reluctantly agree to their terms. Back in Lebanon, Mason is forced to confront his sordid past while also attempting to rescue his best friend.

There are more complications. In “Beirut” and Beirut, there always seems to be more complications. Under the direction of Brad Anderson (“The Machinist”), Gilroy’s screenplay takes the antithetical approach to “less is more.” Scene after scene, we’re given more names and organizations (and then acronyms for those organizations) than is probably necessary.

To fully map out the inner workings of this movie, you’d need to give each audience member photos, pins, and yarn to connect the dots throughout. You’d also need a flashlight, so that people could make amendments as “Beirut’s” plot breathlessly twists and turns. Anderson’s breakneck delivery of new information will either be thrilling or exhausting for prospective viewers.

Gilroy has a tendency to offer stories that take more than a single viewing to fully process. “Michael Clayton.” “Duplicity” and “State of Play” are all examples of films that can dazzle just as easily as they enervate. Mileage may vary. Although what’s lacking in “Beirut” is a solid through-line to keep people invested — “Clayton” had the cool calmness of George Clooney, “Duplicity” had the sexual chemistry of Clive Owen and Julia Roberts, and “State of Play” had, y’know, Helen Mirren.

At the forefront of “Beirut” is Hamm, who is now entering a new chapter in his career post-“Mad Men.” He’s a curious case: On one hand a tremendous talent, and on the other, a tremendous talent who has routinely appeared in inconsistent fare since putting Don Draper to rest. He does what he can in “Beirut”; Hamm is charming, quick-witted, can turn dramatic on a dime.

But the film has a tendency to undercut Mason’s livelihood, or lack thereof. He’s a man whose been stripped of both his partner and career, left now to work on middling low-level deals in middle America. Even when Mason is given the opportunity to return to the big leagues of the CIA, there’s a sadness to him.

He can hardly believe he’s been granted a second opportunity. He’s more confounded than grateful, though. The resurgence is a reminder of a former life he messed up; as a result he turns to the bottle. Mason’s drinking is not played for laughs, but it’s also not seriously examined. Gilroy bypasses the psychology of his central character, the how and why of Mason’s internal dilemma. There’s another film in “Beirut” where one could investigate how talented (and good) people make bad decisions, how people like Mason subconsciously self-sabotage themselves, preventing any sort of progress or growth.

Instead Anderson leans into the action-thriller of it all There are shootouts and explosions, city-wide chases and impressive stunt work. “Beirut” contains all the elements of a fun, snappy, pre-summer jaunt. And yet the film is actively in competition with itself. The tone is grim and honest when it wants to be, but not necessarily when it needs to be.

There’s a level of specificity to some aspects (the archival footage that bookends the film), and laziness in others (Mason’s familial ties to Lebanon). Mason may very well be saving his best friend, but we’re given nothing more than sunset flashbacks of a joyous dinner to inform that friendship. The characters’ consequences are more spoken than felt.

And the consequences of this movie are similarly sparse. Brad Anderson has three upcoming films in the next couple of years, and Gilroy (who originally penned this script in 1991) has rarely been without employment. Jon Hamm is Jon Hamm, and eventually a film will better utilize his abilities. All will be well for everyone involved. Sometimes gifted people make not-so gifted art.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Women Filmmakers From the Middle East and North Africa Unite to Champion Female Artists

Director Mike Burstyn's 'Azimuth' Distills a Lifetime of Wisdom About the Middle East (Guest Blog)

'Nostalgia' Film Review: Jon Hamm Leads All-Star Cast in One-Note Examination of Grief

Would You Have a Threesome With Jon Hamm and Billy Eichner? (Video)

‘Beirut’ Review: Jon Hamm Delivers Best Work Yet In Compelling International Thriller

Well, better late than never. It has taken screenwriter Tony Gilroy’s script of Beirut only 27 years to reach the screen, but it was well worth the wait especially in that it gives its leading man Jon Hamm a movie role worthy of his talents. So why did it take so long for the script Gilroy wrote near the beginning of his career in 1991 to get made? Chalk it up to the mysteries of the movie industry, or perhaps just bad timing. Whatever the reasons, Beirut, which details a…

Well, better late than never. It has taken screenwriter Tony Gilroy’s script of Beirut only 27 years to reach the screen, but it was well worth the wait especially in that it gives its leading man Jon Hamm a movie role worthy of his talents. So why did it take so long for the script Gilroy wrote near the beginning of his career in 1991 to get made? Chalk it up to the mysteries of the movie industry, or perhaps just bad timing. Whatever the reasons, Beirut, which details a…

Film Review: ‘Aardvark’

Like the unreliable-narrator novel, the unreliable-perspective movie is a tricky proposition that can be fascinating, but requires considerable finesse. The auspicious central conceit of “Aardvark,” Brian Shoaf’s first feature as writer-director, features Zachary Quinto as a mentally ill man whose difficulty separating reality from delusion is shared with the viewer. But the film can never quite decide […]

Like the unreliable-narrator novel, the unreliable-perspective movie is a tricky proposition that can be fascinating, but requires considerable finesse. The auspicious central conceit of “Aardvark,” Brian Shoaf’s first feature as writer-director, features Zachary Quinto as a mentally ill man whose difficulty separating reality from delusion is shared with the viewer. But the film can never quite decide […]

Signature Strikes UK Distribution Deals For Movie Trio Including Jon Hamm-Rosamund Pike Thriller ‘Beirut’

UK distributor Signature Entertainment has finalized deals for three movies, including Jon Hamm and Rosamund Pike thriller Beirut and Steve Coogan and Paul Rudd comedy Ideal Home, I can reveal.
In Beirut, which Signature picked up from Trumbo and Captain Fantastic production outfit ShivHans Pictures, a U.S. diplomat flees Lebanon in 1972 after a tragic incident at his home. Ten years later, he is called back to war-torn Beirut by a CIA operative to negotiate for the life…

UK distributor Signature Entertainment has finalized deals for three movies, including Jon Hamm and Rosamund Pike thriller Beirut and Steve Coogan and Paul Rudd comedy Ideal Home, I can reveal. In Beirut, which Signature picked up from Trumbo and Captain Fantastic production outfit ShivHans Pictures, a U.S. diplomat flees Lebanon in 1972 after a tragic incident at his home. Ten years later, he is called back to war-torn Beirut by a CIA operative to negotiate for the life…