Johnny Cash Poems Set to New Music by Chris Cornell, Willie Nelson, Others on ‘Forever Words’ Album

“Forever Words,” an album setting previously unrecorded lyrics and poems by Johnny Cash to new music written from the late Chris Cornell, Willie Nelson, Alison Krauss and others, will be released on Legacy Recordings on April 6. The album includes contributions from longtime Cash friends like Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, family members such as his […]

“Forever Words,” an album setting previously unrecorded lyrics and poems by Johnny Cash to new music written from the late Chris Cornell, Willie Nelson, Alison Krauss and others, will be released on Legacy Recordings on April 6. The album includes contributions from longtime Cash friends like Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, family members such as his […]

Rosanne Cash ‘Sickened by the Association’ With Charlottesville Neo-Nazi Wearing Johnny Cash Shirt

Rosanne Cash, daughter of music legend Johnny Cash, has a message for white supremacists and other racists who enjoy her father’s music: bug off.

The Country singer posted a messaged to her Facebook page Wednesday afternoon on behalf of her family after becoming aware of a white nationalist who attended the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and was photographed wearing a Johnny Cash t-shirt. “We were sickened by the association,” Cash said.

The August 12 rally, organized by known white supremacists, was marked by multiple instances of violence, most notably the murder of a women when a neo-nazi drove his car through a crowd of anti-racism counter-protestors. The night before the rally, “Unite the Right” attendees held a torchlit march on a local college campus during which they shouted slogans like “Jews will not replace us.”

Also Read: Spotify Purges Violent, Hate-Inspired Music From Its Service Amid Charlottesville Fallout

She continued: “Johnny Cash was a man whose heart beat with the rhythm of love and social justice. He received humanitarian awards from, among others, the Jewish National Fund, B’nai Brith, an the United Nations. He championed the rights of Native Americans, protested the war in Vietnam, was a voice for the poor, the struggling, and the disenfranchised, and an advocate for the rights of prisoners”

“The white supremacists and Neo-Nazis who marched in Charlottesville are poison in our society, and an insult to every American hero who wore a uniform to fight the Nazis in WWII. Several men in the Cash family were mong those who served with Honor,” she added.

In the conclusion of her letter, Cash was adamant that White nationalists aren’t welcome or wanted in fandom for her father’s music. “To any who claim supremacy over other human beings, to any who believe in racial or religious heirarchy: We are not you. Our father, as a person, icon, or symbol, is not you. We ask that the Cash name be kept far away from destructive and hateful ideology.”

Cash’s comments come the day after Donald Trump shocked media members, politicians, and civilians alike when he launched into an unrehearsed, confrontational rant defending “Unite the Right” attendees during a Tuesday press conference. Trump notably downplayed the naked racism on display by nearly every “Unite the Right” attendee, and said that people protesting against racism were equally to blame for the violence that ensued.

Read Cash’s whole letter here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox News’ Shepard Smith Couldn’t Book Any Republicans to Back Trump on Charlottesville (Video)

White Nationalists Seek to ‘Top’ Charlottesville and 7 More Shockers From Vice News Doc (Photos)

Charlottesville Neo-Nazi Leader Cries: ‘I’m Afraid You’re Going to Kill Me’ (Video)

Seth Meyers Calls Trump’s Charlottesville Response ‘Limp D— City’ (Video)

Rosanne Cash, daughter of music legend Johnny Cash, has a message for white supremacists and other racists who enjoy her father’s music: bug off.

The Country singer posted a messaged to her Facebook page Wednesday afternoon on behalf of her family after becoming aware of a white nationalist who attended the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and was photographed wearing a Johnny Cash t-shirt. “We were sickened by the association,” Cash said.

The August 12 rally, organized by known white supremacists, was marked by multiple instances of violence, most notably the murder of a women when a neo-nazi drove his car through a crowd of anti-racism counter-protestors. The night before the rally, “Unite the Right” attendees held a torchlit march on a local college campus during which they shouted slogans like “Jews will not replace us.”

She continued: “Johnny Cash was a man whose heart beat with the rhythm of love and social justice. He received humanitarian awards from, among others, the Jewish National Fund, B’nai Brith, an the United Nations. He championed the rights of Native Americans, protested the war in Vietnam, was a voice for the poor, the struggling, and the disenfranchised, and an advocate for the rights of prisoners”

“The white supremacists and Neo-Nazis who marched in Charlottesville are poison in our society, and an insult to every American hero who wore a uniform to fight the Nazis in WWII. Several men in the Cash family were mong those who served with Honor,” she added.

In the conclusion of her letter, Cash was adamant that White nationalists aren’t welcome or wanted in fandom for her father’s music. “To any who claim supremacy over other human beings, to any who believe in racial or religious heirarchy: We are not you. Our father, as a person, icon, or symbol, is not you. We ask that the Cash name be kept far away from destructive and hateful ideology.”

Cash’s comments come the day after Donald Trump shocked media members, politicians, and civilians alike when he launched into an unrehearsed, confrontational rant defending “Unite the Right” attendees during a Tuesday press conference. Trump notably downplayed the naked racism on display by nearly every “Unite the Right” attendee, and said that people protesting against racism were equally to blame for the violence that ensued.

Read Cash’s whole letter here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox News' Shepard Smith Couldn't Book Any Republicans to Back Trump on Charlottesville (Video)

White Nationalists Seek to 'Top' Charlottesville and 7 More Shockers From Vice News Doc (Photos)

Charlottesville Neo-Nazi Leader Cries: 'I'm Afraid You're Going to Kill Me' (Video)

Seth Meyers Calls Trump's Charlottesville Response 'Limp D— City' (Video)

Leonardo DiCaprio to Star in Sam Phillips Biopic for Paramount

Paramount Pictures has acquired the book “Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ‘N’ Roll” for an adaptation to star Leonardo DiCaprio, TheWrap has learned.

The film will be developed by Appian Way’s DiCaprio and Jennifer Davisson.

The book, written by Peter Guralnick (“Last Train to Memphis”), tells the story of Phillips and the music that he shaped in his tiny Memphis studio with artists as diverse as Elvis Presley, Ike Turner, Howlin’ Wolf, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash, introducing a sound that had never been heard before.

DiCaprio and Davisson will produce along with Guralnick, Mick Jagger, Victoria Pearman, Steve Bing, Ian Montone, Rick Yorn.

The actor’s production company currently has four projects in development with the studio, including “The Devil in the White City,” based on the book by Erik Larson, “Sandcastle Empire,” a yet untitled film and a limited television series.

The Appian deal adds prestige to the Paramount lot — in the form of newly-minted Oscar winner DiCaprio — as Paramount continues to seek a minority shareholder to infuse the studio with cash.

Also Read: Paramount Wins Auction for Cuban Mafia Book ‘The Corporation’ (Exclusive)

Appian Way has produced films like “The Revenant,” “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “The Ides of March,” “Public Enemies” and “The Aviator.”

The company is currently in post-production on Ben Affleck‘s “Live By Night” (2017) and is in pre-production on “Robin Hood: Origins” (2017).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way Signs 3-Year Deal With Paramount

Leonardo DiCaprio Circles ‘Truevine’ Adaptation for Paramount

Paramount Wins Auction for Cuban Mafia Book ‘The Corporation’ (Exclusive)

Paramount Pictures has acquired the book “Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ‘N’ Roll” for an adaptation to star Leonardo DiCaprio, TheWrap has learned.

The film will be developed by Appian Way’s DiCaprio and Jennifer Davisson.

The book, written by Peter Guralnick (“Last Train to Memphis”), tells the story of Phillips and the music that he shaped in his tiny Memphis studio with artists as diverse as Elvis Presley, Ike Turner, Howlin’ Wolf, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash, introducing a sound that had never been heard before.

DiCaprio and Davisson will produce along with Guralnick, Mick Jagger, Victoria Pearman, Steve Bing, Ian Montone, Rick Yorn.

The actor’s production company currently has four projects in development with the studio, including “The Devil in the White City,” based on the book by Erik Larson, “Sandcastle Empire,” a yet untitled film and a limited television series.

The Appian deal adds prestige to the Paramount lot — in the form of newly-minted Oscar winner DiCaprio — as Paramount continues to seek a minority shareholder to infuse the studio with cash.

Appian Way has produced films like “The Revenant,” “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “The Ides of March,” “Public Enemies” and “The Aviator.”

The company is currently in post-production on Ben Affleck‘s “Live By Night” (2017) and is in pre-production on “Robin Hood: Origins” (2017).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Leonardo DiCaprio's Appian Way Signs 3-Year Deal With Paramount

Leonardo DiCaprio Circles 'Truevine' Adaptation for Paramount

Paramount Wins Auction for Cuban Mafia Book 'The Corporation' (Exclusive)

7 Bob Dylan Songs That Other Artists Made Famous (Videos)

In the 75 years he has spent on this Earth, Bob Dylan has left an immeasurable impact on music in many ways, not the least of which is how he has placed greater emphasis on the songwriter. Thanks to songs like “Desolation Row” and “Like A Rolling Stone,” greater value is now placed on artists who write the songs they perform on their own. The irony of this is that much of Dylan’s catalog owes its notoriety to other artists who have taken songs he wrote, some of which were relatively unknown, and turned them into smash hits.

Probably the most famous Dylan cover of all time is Jimi Hendrix’s “All Along The Watchtower,” which the legendary guitarist included in 1968 on “Electric Ladyland” but which Dylan had released a year earlier. Dylan has said that he considers Hendrix’s version to be the definitive one.

“It Ain’t Me Babe” was the closing song on the 1964 album “Another Side of Bob Dylan,” but The Turtles’ cover a year later was the version that climbed into the Billboard Top 10. It has also been covered by Johnny Cash, Nancy Sinatra, and most recently, Kesha and Ben Folds at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards.

Some music fans may be surprised to know that for all of Dylan’s accomplishments, he has never released a single that hit the top of the Billboard charts. He did write a #1 single, though. The Byrds’ cover of “Mr. Tambourine Man” topped the charts in both the U.S. and U.K. and effectively gave birth to the folk rock movement of the 60s. Both the original and The Byrds’ cover have been honored by the Grammys.

“Love Is Just A Four Letter Word” is a song that Dylan never recorded, but became famous when Joan Baez released it in 1968. Baez covered several other Dylan songs and helped introduce him to the masses when he was getting his career started.

Another song Dylan wrote but never recorded was “Coming From The Heart,”

One of Manfred Mann’s most famous singles was “Mighty Quinn,” which hit the top of the UK charts and cracked the Billboard Top 10 in 1968. Dylan had first written and recorded the song a year earlier during his famous Basement Tapes sessions, but did not officially release it until 1970.

In 1972, Dylan was tasked with recording the soundtrack for the film “Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid.” While doing that, he wrote a chorus for a song called “Wagon Wheel” that he ultimately decided to scrap. Recordings of Dylan’s chorus lived on through bootlegs, and in 1995, the Americana group Old Crow Medicine Show fleshed it out into a single that has gone platinum. In 2013, Darius Rucker did a country cover of “Wagon Wheel” that won him a Grammy.

In the 75 years he has spent on this Earth, Bob Dylan has left an immeasurable impact on music in many ways, not the least of which is how he has placed greater emphasis on the songwriter. Thanks to songs like “Desolation Row” and “Like A Rolling Stone,” greater value is now placed on artists who write the songs they perform on their own. The irony of this is that much of Dylan’s catalog owes its notoriety to other artists who have taken songs he wrote, some of which were relatively unknown, and turned them into smash hits.

Probably the most famous Dylan cover of all time is Jimi Hendrix’s “All Along The Watchtower,” which the legendary guitarist included in 1968 on “Electric Ladyland” but which Dylan had released a year earlier. Dylan has said that he considers Hendrix’s version to be the definitive one.

“It Ain’t Me Babe” was the closing song on the 1964 album “Another Side of Bob Dylan,” but The Turtles’ cover a year later was the version that climbed into the Billboard Top 10. It has also been covered by Johnny Cash, Nancy Sinatra, and most recently, Kesha and Ben Folds at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards.

Some music fans may be surprised to know that for all of Dylan’s accomplishments, he has never released a single that hit the top of the Billboard charts. He did write a #1 single, though. The Byrds’ cover of “Mr. Tambourine Man” topped the charts in both the U.S. and U.K. and effectively gave birth to the folk rock movement of the 60s. Both the original and The Byrds’ cover have been honored by the Grammys.

“Love Is Just A Four Letter Word” is a song that Dylan never recorded, but became famous when Joan Baez released it in 1968. Baez covered several other Dylan songs and helped introduce him to the masses when he was getting his career started.

Another song Dylan wrote but never recorded was “Coming From The Heart,”

One of Manfred Mann’s most famous singles was “Mighty Quinn,” which hit the top of the UK charts and cracked the Billboard Top 10 in 1968. Dylan had first written and recorded the song a year earlier during his famous Basement Tapes sessions, but did not officially release it until 1970.

In 1972, Dylan was tasked with recording the soundtrack for the film “Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid.” While doing that, he wrote a chorus for a song called “Wagon Wheel” that he ultimately decided to scrap. Recordings of Dylan’s chorus lived on through bootlegs, and in 1995, the Americana group Old Crow Medicine Show fleshed it out into a single that has gone platinum. In 2013, Darius Rucker did a country cover of “Wagon Wheel” that won him a Grammy.