Netflix’s ‘Lost in Space’ Reboot Borrows Grandeur of Original Score

With every reboot of a classic TV series, the producers face a key question: Reprise the musical theme of the old show or go for an entirely new sound appropriate to a new cast and concept? Zack Estrin, executive producer of Netflix’s “Lost in Space,” available for streaming on April 13, chose the former, with […]

With every reboot of a classic TV series, the producers face a key question: Reprise the musical theme of the old show or go for an entirely new sound appropriate to a new cast and concept? Zack Estrin, executive producer of Netflix’s “Lost in Space,” available for streaming on April 13, chose the former, with […]

‘Star Wars’ Composer John Williams to Quit Franchise After Episode IX

John Williams says that “Star Wars: Episode IX” will be the last movie in the franchise he will score.

“We know J.J. Abrams is preparing one [‘Star Wars’ movie] now that I will hopefully do next year for him,” Williams said on radio station KUSC. “I look forward it. It will round out a series of nine, that will be quite enough for me.”

Williams has scored eight “Star Wars” films to date: “Star Wars,” “The Empire Strikes Back,” “Return of the Jedi,” “Phantom Menace,” “Attack of the Clones,” “Revenge of the Sith,” “The Force Awakens” and “The Last Jedi.”

Also Read: John Williams Earns 51st Oscar Nomination for ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Score

2016’s “Rogue One” score was scored by Michael Giacchino, while John Powell is set to score this year’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Williams’ other credits include “Jaws,” “Indiana Jones, “Catch Me If You Can,” “Munich,” “Minority Report” and “Harry Potter.” He has received 51 Oscar nominations for his music, and he won in 1994 for “Schindler’s List,” in 1983 for “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and in 1978 for “Star Wars.” In 1976, he won the Oscar for “Jaws” and in 1972, he received the award for “Fiddler on the Roof.”

Also Read: Composer John Williams to Write Theme for ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’

“Episode IX” will be directed by Abrams and will serve as the conclusion of the latest “Star Wars” trilogy. Daisy Ridley, Adam Driver, Oscar Isaac and John Boyega are expected to return when the film hits theaters on December 20, 2019.

Listen to Williams’ radio interview here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

11 Things We Learned at AFI Tribute to John Williams

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John Williams, Howard Shore, ‘Man or Muppet’ Nominated for World Soundtrack Awards

John Williams says that “Star Wars: Episode IX” will be the last movie in the franchise he will score.

“We know J.J. Abrams is preparing one [‘Star Wars’ movie] now that I will hopefully do next year for him,” Williams said on radio station KUSC. “I look forward it. It will round out a series of nine, that will be quite enough for me.”

Williams has scored eight “Star Wars” films to date: “Star Wars,” “The Empire Strikes Back,” “Return of the Jedi,” “Phantom Menace,” “Attack of the Clones,” “Revenge of the Sith,” “The Force Awakens” and “The Last Jedi.”

2016’s “Rogue One” score was scored by Michael Giacchino, while John Powell is set to score this year’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Williams’ other credits include “Jaws,” “Indiana Jones, “Catch Me If You Can,” “Munich,” “Minority Report” and “Harry Potter.” He has received 51 Oscar nominations for his music, and he won in 1994 for “Schindler’s List,” in 1983 for “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and in 1978 for “Star Wars.” In 1976, he won the Oscar for “Jaws” and in 1972, he received the award for “Fiddler on the Roof.”

“Episode IX” will be directed by Abrams and will serve as the conclusion of the latest “Star Wars” trilogy. Daisy Ridley, Adam Driver, Oscar Isaac and John Boyega are expected to return when the film hits theaters on December 20, 2019.

Listen to Williams’ radio interview here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

11 Things We Learned at AFI Tribute to John Williams

Composer John Williams to Receive AFI Life Achievement Award

John Williams, Howard Shore, 'Man or Muppet' Nominated for World Soundtrack Awards

‘Star Wars’ Composer John Williams May Stop After ‘Episode IX’: ‘That Will Be Quite Enough for Me’

When the Skywalker saga wraps its third trilogy in 2019, Williams may also be calling it quits.

There’s at least one member of the “Star Wars” galaxy who might not be saddling up for any further adventures after J.J. Abrams’ “Episode IX” wraps the Skywalker saga in 2019. NME reports (from a chat on California radio station KUSC) that longtime composer John Williams might be leaving the franchise after Abrams’ film arrives in 2019.

Williams told KUSC: “We know J.J. Abrams is preparing one [‘Star Wars’ movie] now that I will hopefully do next year for him. I look forward it. It will round out a series of nine, that will be quite enough for me.”

The film would be the ninth “Star Wars” feature for the lauded composer, as he’s previously scored the original film “A New Hope,” plus sequels “The Empire Strikes Back” and “Return of the Jedi,” followed by prequels “The Phantom Menace,” “Attack of the Clones,” “Revenge of the Sith,” and the latest installments “The Force Awakens” and “The Last Jedi.”

Michael Giacchino scored the 2016 standalone film “Rogue One,” while John Powell is on deck to score this summer’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Williams just turned 86, but he’s not exactly slowing down. Last year, he scored both “The Last Jedi” and “The Post,” and he’s currently on deck to score frequent collaborator Steven Spielberg’s “The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara” and his long-rumored next Indiana Jones film.

He’s also one of Hollywood’s most highly decorated creators, having one 24 Grammys, five Oscars, and four Golden Globes. He’s also the second most-nominated Oscar nominee ever, clocking in at 51 nods (he’s just behind Walt Disney, with 59).

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John Williams says he’s only got one more of these damn Star Wars movies in him

The Star Wars film franchise will presumably go on for as long as we continue making movies, periodically reviving itself under the watch of its corporate masters, and joining the Super Bowl as the average American’s sole regular exposure to Roman numerals. But while the Star Wars machine will endure indefinitely, its…

Read more…

The Star Wars film franchise will presumably go on for as long as we continue making movies, periodically reviving itself under the watch of its corporate masters, and joining the Super Bowl as the average American’s sole regular exposure to Roman numerals. But while the Star Wars machine will endure indefinitely, its…

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Nominated Composers Take Center Stage at Oscar Concert

With this year’s round of Oscar campaigning finally over and the ballots all in, members of the film scoring community got to take a long, congratulatory breather with a celebratory concert at the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Wednesday night. Presented by the Academy, the Oscar Concert offered a stirring evening of music from the […]

With this year’s round of Oscar campaigning finally over and the ballots all in, members of the film scoring community got to take a long, congratulatory breather with a celebratory concert at the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Wednesday night. Presented by the Academy, the Oscar Concert offered a stirring evening of music from the […]

Academy Takes Over Disney Hall for Spectacular Oscar Concert

Three directors, four songwriters, four composers, a handful of publicists and dozens of Oscar voters were on hand for a gala gathering on Wednesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles – but for the first time in months, that collection of people came together on a night that involved no Oscar campaigning whatsoever.

That’s because voting ended on Tuesday, making Wednesday’s “Oscar Concert” an event that couldn’t be anything but a showcase and celebration of the five Oscar-nominated scores. The show was performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the grand surroundings of Disney Hall, in front of an audience that included last year’s score winner, Justin Hurwitz, and Oscar song nominees Benj Pasek, Justin Paul, Diane Warren and Common.

The concert was part of a three-year alliance between the Academy and the Philharmonic, which began last year with the presentation of “Rebel Without a Cause,” “On the Waterfront” and “Casblanca” with live orchestral accompaniment. At a post-concert reception, L.A Philharmonic CEO Simon Woods and Academy CEO Dawn Hudson let it slip that the partnership will culminate next year with the Philharmonic performing live on the Academy Awards, conducted by its celebrated artistic and musical director, Gustavo Dudamel.

Also Read: Oscar Predictions 2018: Will ‘The Shape of Water’ Rise to the Top in the Wildest Race in Years?

Wednesday’s was the second Oscar-week concert devoted to nominated music, with the first taking place in 2014 at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. But moving to Disney Hall and enlisting the LA Phil, one of world’s greatest and most adventurous orchestras, moved things to a whole new level.

This was also a wildly ambitious program, and one that music-branch governor Laura Karpman said has been in the planning stages since last summer. The first half of the show, curated by Karpman and her fellow governors Michael Giacchino and Charles Bernstein, was dedicated to film scores throughout history, separated by genre and accompanied by film montages: one for “the sound of love,” one for “the sound of fear,” one for “the sound of home,” etc.

These suites, conducted by Thomas Wilkins, typically took music from three or four classic scores and illustrated it not just with scenes from those movies, but from lots of other movies, too. In the “Sound of Home” segment, for example, Nino Rota’s music for “Amarcord” played over scenes from that movie along with “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring,” “The Last Emperor,” “Dances With Wolves,” “The Sound of Music,” “Parenthood” and several others.

Also Read: Oscar Contenders Elvis Costello, Common on Writing Songs That Leap Off the Screen (Video)

Later, Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Oscar-winning music for 1938 Errol Flynn swashbuckler “The Adventures of Robin Hood” was also used under scenes from “Casablanca” and “An American in Paris,” Luis Enriquez Bacalov’s “Il Postino” score replaced James Horner’s music from “Titanic,” and Mica Levi’s creepy music for “Jackie” was dropped underneath scenes from “The Shining” and even “Jaws.”

It made for entertaining clip packages, even if it was a bit odd to find an evening devoted to film music essentially making the case that music written for one movie is eminently adaptable to another, and that images we association with one composer can work with the music of a different composer.

But really, the idea was to have fun with mood and genre and to let the Philharmonic show off its range and versatility. The clips also posited an alternate view of movie history, with far more foreign films and movies with diverse casts than you’d typically find on a reel of Oscar-recognized films. Make no mistake, an Academy branch that was once known for being extremely heavy on white men of an advanced age is working hard to present a message of diversity.

If the first half of the show was fun, the second half was the real point of the Oscar Concert. The five nominated scores were introduced by the films’ directors – Guillermo del Toro, Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson in person, Martin McDonagh and Christopher Nolan on video – and four of them were on hand to either conduct or perform five-to-10 minute selections from their films. The fifth, “Phantom Thread” composer Jonny Greenwood, was not present, but his music was performed.

Also Read: Oscar Nominee Jonny Greenwood on Jumping From Radiohead to ‘Phantom Thread’ Orchestral Score

For this section, the video screen was not used; we heard the music without seeing the images for which it was written, which marvelously put the focus squarely on five exceptional scores and one exceptional orchestra.

It opened with Carter Burwell’s lovely, evocative and slightly unsettling score to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” Burwell’s suite, which he conducted, ended with soprano Liv Redpath performing a ghostly version of the transcendent early 19th century Irish song “The Last Rose of Summer,” which spotlighted one of the true strength’s of Burwell’s score: the way it is perfectly interwoven with the canny selection of songs that McDonagh uses in the film.

Alexandre Desplat’s “The Shape of Water” score, which followed, was delicate and ravishing; as del Toro pointed out in his introduction, the film’s two main characters don’t speak, so he relied on Desplat to give them a voice.

Introducing the “House of Woodcock” theme from Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” music, Paul Thomas Anderson said he asked the Radiohead guitarist to “write some music like Nelson Riddle would,” figuring that the combination of that 50’s composer’s style and Greenwood’s “British, depressed and atonal” approach would yield something interesting. Which, of course, it did: The “Phantom Thread” music is gentle and elegant, but with an uneasy sense that something’s not quite right.

It was followed by 51-time nominee John Williams, who got the night’s biggest ovation from the audience and from the orchestra simply for walking onstage – and another ovation for the richly dramatic “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” cue “The Rebellion Is Reborn.”

Also Read: John Williams Earns 51st Oscar Nomination for ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Score

“John is a legend, but he doesn’t work like a legend,” said director Johnson. “He works like a little kid sprinting toward a playground because that’s where the toys are.”

And while you might think it’d be tough to follow John Williams, Hans Zimmer did just that with the monumental “Home” from “Dunkirk.” Nolan said he wanted music that was completely integrated with the film’s sound effects and picture, and in fact the composition began with aircraft noises before building to a deep, massive and doomy throb that became bigger and bigger before yielding to a beautiful, yearning and melodic coda.

It brought the house down without detracting from anything that had come before it. Instead, the entire post-intermission section was simply a vivid showcase for the orchestra’s versatility, and a spectacular listening experience that flowed from the acoustic intimacy of “Three Billboards” to the metallic thunder of “Dunkirk.”

And while seeing Dudamel and the Philharmonic on the Oscar stage next year will no doubt be a treat, the real lesson of Wednesday’s Oscar Concert was that the Academy shouldn’t wait another four years to do this again. Instead, they should immediately book that hall and sign up that orchestra for an encore next February.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Three Billboards’ Call Out Hollywood Sex Abuse on Eve of Oscars

Oscar Season Surprise: ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Get Out’ Have Won More Best Picture Awards Than ‘The Shape of Water’

What Should Sufjan Stevens Wear to the Oscars? We Have Ideas (Photos)

Three directors, four songwriters, four composers, a handful of publicists and dozens of Oscar voters were on hand for a gala gathering on Wednesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles – but for the first time in months, that collection of people came together on a night that involved no Oscar campaigning whatsoever.

That’s because voting ended on Tuesday, making Wednesday’s “Oscar Concert” an event that couldn’t be anything but a showcase and celebration of the five Oscar-nominated scores. The show was performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the grand surroundings of Disney Hall, in front of an audience that included last year’s score winner, Justin Hurwitz, and Oscar song nominees Benj Pasek, Justin Paul, Diane Warren and Common.

The concert was part of a three-year alliance between the Academy and the Philharmonic, which began last year with the presentation of “Rebel Without a Cause,” “On the Waterfront” and “Casblanca” with live orchestral accompaniment. At a post-concert reception, L.A Philharmonic CEO Simon Woods and Academy CEO Dawn Hudson let it slip that the partnership will culminate next year with the Philharmonic performing live on the Academy Awards, conducted by its celebrated artistic and musical director, Gustavo Dudamel.

Wednesday’s was the second Oscar-week concert devoted to nominated music, with the first taking place in 2014 at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. But moving to Disney Hall and enlisting the LA Phil, one of world’s greatest and most adventurous orchestras, moved things to a whole new level.

This was also a wildly ambitious program, and one that music-branch governor Laura Karpman said has been in the planning stages since last summer. The first half of the show, curated by Karpman and her fellow governors Michael Giacchino and Charles Bernstein, was dedicated to film scores throughout history, separated by genre and accompanied by film montages: one for “the sound of love,” one for “the sound of fear,” one for “the sound of home,” etc.

These suites, conducted by Thomas Wilkins, typically took music from three or four classic scores and illustrated it not just with scenes from those movies, but from lots of other movies, too. In the “Sound of Home” segment, for example, Nino Rota’s music for “Amarcord” played over scenes from that movie along with “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring,” “The Last Emperor,” “Dances With Wolves,” “The Sound of Music,” “Parenthood” and several others.

Later, Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Oscar-winning music for 1938 Errol Flynn swashbuckler “The Adventures of Robin Hood” was also used under scenes from “Casablanca” and “An American in Paris,” Luis Enriquez Bacalov’s “Il Postino” score replaced James Horner’s music from “Titanic,” and Mica Levi’s creepy music for “Jackie” was dropped underneath scenes from “The Shining” and even “Jaws.”

It made for entertaining clip packages, even if it was a bit odd to find an evening devoted to film music essentially making the case that music written for one movie is eminently adaptable to another, and that images we association with one composer can work with the music of a different composer.

But really, the idea was to have fun with mood and genre and to let the Philharmonic show off its range and versatility. The clips also posited an alternate view of movie history, with far more foreign films and movies with diverse casts than you’d typically find on a reel of Oscar-recognized films. Make no mistake, an Academy branch that was once known for being extremely heavy on white men of an advanced age is working hard to present a message of diversity.

If the first half of the show was fun, the second half was the real point of the Oscar Concert. The five nominated scores were introduced by the films’ directors – Guillermo del Toro, Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson in person, Martin McDonagh and Christopher Nolan on video – and four of them were on hand to either conduct or perform five-to-10 minute selections from their films. The fifth, “Phantom Thread” composer Jonny Greenwood, was not present, but his music was performed.

For this section, the video screen was not used; we heard the music without seeing the images for which it was written, which marvelously put the focus squarely on five exceptional scores and one exceptional orchestra.

It opened with Carter Burwell’s lovely, evocative and slightly unsettling score to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” Burwell’s suite, which he conducted, ended with soprano Liv Redpath performing a ghostly version of the transcendent early 19th century Irish song “The Last Rose of Summer,” which spotlighted one of the true strength’s of Burwell’s score: the way it is perfectly interwoven with the canny selection of songs that McDonagh uses in the film.

Alexandre Desplat’s “The Shape of Water” score, which followed, was delicate and ravishing; as del Toro pointed out in his introduction, the film’s two main characters don’t speak, so he relied on Desplat to give them a voice.

Introducing the “House of Woodcock” theme from Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” music, Paul Thomas Anderson said he asked the Radiohead guitarist to “write some music like Nelson Riddle would,” figuring that the combination of that 50’s composer’s style and Greenwood’s “British, depressed and atonal” approach would yield something interesting. Which, of course, it did: The “Phantom Thread” music is gentle and elegant, but with an uneasy sense that something’s not quite right.

It was followed by 51-time nominee John Williams, who got the night’s biggest ovation from the audience and from the orchestra simply for walking onstage – and another ovation for the richly dramatic “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” cue “The Rebellion Is Reborn.”

“John is a legend, but he doesn’t work like a legend,” said director Johnson. “He works like a little kid sprinting toward a playground because that’s where the toys are.”

And while you might think it’d be tough to follow John Williams, Hans Zimmer did just that with the monumental “Home” from “Dunkirk.” Nolan said he wanted music that was completely integrated with the film’s sound effects and picture, and in fact the composition began with aircraft noises before building to a deep, massive and doomy throb that became bigger and bigger before yielding to a beautiful, yearning and melodic coda.

It brought the house down without detracting from anything that had come before it. Instead, the entire post-intermission section was simply a vivid showcase for the orchestra’s versatility, and a spectacular listening experience that flowed from the acoustic intimacy of “Three Billboards” to the metallic thunder of “Dunkirk.”

And while seeing Dudamel and the Philharmonic on the Oscar stage next year will no doubt be a treat, the real lesson of Wednesday’s Oscar Concert was that the Academy shouldn’t wait another four years to do this again. Instead, they should immediately book that hall and sign up that orchestra for an encore next February.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Three Billboards' Call Out Hollywood Sex Abuse on Eve of Oscars

Oscar Season Surprise: 'Lady Bird,' 'Get Out' Have Won More Best Picture Awards Than 'The Shape of Water'

What Should Sufjan Stevens Wear to the Oscars? We Have Ideas (Photos)

German Olympic Figure Skater Dancing to ‘Schindler’s List’ Score ‘Is a Bad Music Choice’

(Spoiler alert: This post includes details of the Winter Olympics from PyeongChang not yet aired in the U.S.)

German figure skater Nicole Schott’s decision to dance to the score from Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning Holocaust drama “Schindler’s List” overshadowed her actual performance early Friday morning local time in PyeongChang in South Korea.

While the film’s main theme music composed by John Williams and performed by violinist Itzhak Perlman is hauntingly beautiful, many thought it was inappropriate considering Germany’s history with the Nazis and Jewish concentration camps.

Schott’s use of the score was described as “a bad music choice” by one Twitter user Thursday night, while another said it “feels real f—ed up.”

Also Read: Serena Williams Narrates New Doc on Cultural, Racial Impact of 1968 Olympic Games (Video)

“Nicole Schott, German figure skater, chooses to do her free skate to the Schindlers List theme song,” was a subsequent social media user’s opinion. “You just cannot draw it up any worse. Face planting on your first move and laying there for the reminder of your time would’ve been better.”

However, one person logically pointed out that Schott is only 21, and “was born in the post-Nazi era.”

Many speculated on her family origins and if she was a “Dreamer.” Born in Essen, Germany, Schott’s father is originally from Poland, where he was a professional hockey player, according to her Olympics.org bio.

Also Read: French Skater’s Breast Pops Out During Mid-Routine Olympic Wardrobe Malfunction (Video)

However, despite the uproar, USA Today reported that Schott is not the first figure skater to use the “Schindler’s List” score. The violin-based soundtrack has been in the regular rotation since the movie’s 1993 release. Months after its U.S. debut, German figure skater and two-time Olympic gold medalist Katarina Witt performed to it.

“Schindler’s List” tells the story of Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), a Sudeten German businessman, during which he saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by employing them in his factories during World War II.

It won seven Academy Awards (out of twelve nominations), including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Original Score.

Also Read: Ratings: Lindsey Vonn Is No Shaun White, But Olympics Still Ice Out Competition

See the Twitter reactions below.

Nicole Schott is a lovely & talented woman who was born more than 50 yrs post-Nazi era (original German Nazis, not present day US wannabes.) That said, if you are representing Germany in ladies figure skating, “Schindler’s List” is a bad music choice.

– (((Tim Horrigan))) (@TimothyHorrigan) February 23, 2018

Nicole Schott is a German woman skating to Schindler’s List. that feels real fucked up #Olympics

– ashley osterer (@ayoalo) February 23, 2018

Maybe don’t skate to the theme from Schindler’s List if you’re from Germany. It’s just a little bit #Awkward. #Olympics https://t.co/VgVlBfgfY6

– Ann Dystopian Fan (@AnnDystopianFan) February 23, 2018

The music score of Schindler’s List is beautiful. I’d like to know why Nicole Schott of Germany chose to skate to it. I seriously doubt that she intended any offense.

– Eric Hanke (@Eric_Hanke) February 23, 2018

God I love the pace of closed captioning. Just now, watching a German figure skater:

NICOLE SCHOTT IS SKATING TO…

…SCHINDLER’S LIST ????

– T.J. Chambers (@tjchambersLA) February 23, 2018

Germany’s Nicole Schott skating to Schindler’s List is an interesting choice.

– Bryan Armen Graham (@BryanAGraham) February 23, 2018

Nicole Schott of Germany is being slammed for figure skating to music from Schindler’s List, but Schott is an Ashkenazic name so is anyone asking whether she’s Jewish? Seems like the obvious question but can’t find any answers online.

– David Volodzko (@davidvolodzko) February 23, 2018

Nicole Schott is actually a Dreamer, so her parents are from Poland.

– Juergen Klinger (@JuergenKlinge) February 23, 2018

I’m glad I’m not the only one who raised an eyebrow at the skater from Germany using music from Schindler’s List. #Olympics2018

– omgshiny (@omgshinythings) February 23, 2018

(Next on the ice is Germany)

You think the worst they can do is fall then you hear Schindler’s List playing! pic.twitter.com/Mdr9HM00bt

– SAM6 (@travelong6) February 23, 2018

In defense of the German skater who chose the theme from “Schindler’s List” for her routine… yeah, I got nothing. #SchindlersList

– Adam Sank (@AdamSank) February 23, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

No One Is Having a Better Olympics Than Adam Rippon, Except ‘Maybe Somebody Who Actually Won Them?’

Leslie Jones, Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski Are ‘Crazy in Love’ With the Olympics (Video)

Serena Williams Narrates New Doc on Cultural, Racial Impact of 1968 Olympic Games (Video)

(Spoiler alert: This post includes details of the Winter Olympics from PyeongChang not yet aired in the U.S.)

German figure skater Nicole Schott’s decision to dance to the score from Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning Holocaust drama “Schindler’s List” overshadowed her actual performance early Friday morning local time in PyeongChang in South Korea.

While the film’s main theme music composed by John Williams and performed by violinist Itzhak Perlman is hauntingly beautiful, many thought it was inappropriate considering Germany’s history with the Nazis and Jewish concentration camps.

Schott’s use of the score was described as “a bad music choice” by one Twitter user Thursday night, while another said it “feels real f—ed up.”

“Nicole Schott, German figure skater, chooses to do her free skate to the Schindlers List theme song,” was a subsequent social media user’s opinion. “You just cannot draw it up any worse. Face planting on your first move and laying there for the reminder of your time would’ve been better.”

However, one person logically pointed out that Schott is only 21, and “was born in the post-Nazi era.”

Many speculated on her family origins and if she was a “Dreamer.” Born in Essen, Germany, Schott’s father is originally from Poland, where he was a professional hockey player, according to her Olympics.org bio.

However, despite the uproar, USA Today reported that Schott is not the first figure skater to use the “Schindler’s List” score. The violin-based soundtrack has been in the regular rotation since the movie’s 1993 release. Months after its U.S. debut, German figure skater and two-time Olympic gold medalist Katarina Witt performed to it.

“Schindler’s List” tells the story of Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), a Sudeten German businessman, during which he saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by employing them in his factories during World War II.

It won seven Academy Awards (out of twelve nominations), including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Original Score.

See the Twitter reactions below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

No One Is Having a Better Olympics Than Adam Rippon, Except 'Maybe Somebody Who Actually Won Them?'

Leslie Jones, Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski Are 'Crazy in Love' With the Olympics (Video)

Serena Williams Narrates New Doc on Cultural, Racial Impact of 1968 Olympic Games (Video)