Former YouTuber Suing Over Alleged White-Asian Discrimination

YouTube is being sued by a former employee for alleged discrimination, with the lawsuit saying the streaming media service deliberately limited hiring white and Asian men in an attempt to attain more diversity in its staffing.
The Wall Street Journal reported that former employee Arne Wilberg, a white male, filed the suit in San Mateo County Superior Court. Wilberg worked at Google for nine years, spending four years as a recruiter for YouTube.
The suit alleges the…

YouTube is being sued by a former employee for alleged discrimination, with the lawsuit saying the streaming media service deliberately limited hiring white and Asian men in an attempt to attain more diversity in its staffing. The Wall Street Journal reported that former employee Arne Wilberg, a white male, filed the suit in San Mateo County Superior Court. Wilberg worked at Google for nine years, spending four years as a recruiter for YouTube. The suit alleges the…

The Google anti-diversity guy is suing the company for supposedly discriminating against conservative white dudes

You might remember an incident from a few months back, when Google engineer James Damore transformed himself into “former Google engineer James Damore,” using one of the tech giant’s legendarily intuitive interfaces. That is, Damore decided to send a memo to the entire company complaining about its “prejudices against…

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You might remember an incident from a few months back, when Google engineer James Damore transformed himself into “former Google engineer James Damore,” using one of the tech giant’s legendarily intuitive interfaces. That is, Damore decided to send a memo to the entire company complaining about its “prejudices against…

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Ex-Google Employee James Damore Files Class Action Lawsuit Against Tech Giant

Former Google engineer James Damore — who caused a firestorm in August with a company-wide memo calling the tech giant an “ideological echo chamber”  — has filed a class action lawsuit against the company, claiming discrimination against white male conservatives.

Damore’s lawsuit says the “presence of Caucasians and males was mocked with ‘boos’ during companywide weekly meetings,” while female workers were celebrated “solely due to their gender.” He’s joined in the lawsuit by former Google engineer named David Gudeman, who worked for the company for three years. The lawsuit — filed in Santa Clara County in Northern California — is seeking monetary, non-monetary, and punitive damages.

Damore was fired by the company in August after his internal paper widely circulated. In it, Damore argued the chasm between male and female engineers was due to women being biologically less inclined, on average, to pursue tech jobs than men.

Also Read: Fired Google Engineer Feels ‘Betrayed’ Over Anti-Diversity Memo: ‘They Shamed Me’ (Video)

“Differences in distributions of traits between men and women may in part explain why we don’t have 50 percent representation of women in tech and leadership,” said Damore in his memo.

In August, Google chief executive Sundar Pichai said Damore peddled “harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” and was fired for violating the company’s code of conduct.

The lawsuit, filed by Dhillon Law Group, says it is on behalf of any Google employees who feel they’ve been targeted for their “perceived conservative political views by Google,” as well as “their male gender.” Damore says after his memo went public, he was subjected to “multiple threats and insults from coworkers.” He also says his peers were given bonuses for touting political views in-line with Google’s.

Also Read: IGN Fires Editor-in-Chief After ‘Alleged Misconduct’

Damore adds Google implements “illegal hiring quotas to fill its desired percentages of women and favored minority candidates.” Managers that don’t meet their quotas are shamed, according to the lawsuit. This process, in the end, shows “male and Caucasian employees as less favored than others,” says Damore.

Google did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

You can check out the full 161-page lawsuit here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Eric Schmidt Stepping Down as Chairman of Google Parent Company, Alphabet

Facebook, Google, Twitter Grilled Over 2016 Election: 5 Takeaways From Congressional Hearing

Amazon Irked After Google Abruptly Pulls YouTube From Echo Show

Former Google engineer James Damore — who caused a firestorm in August with a company-wide memo calling the tech giant an “ideological echo chamber”  — has filed a class action lawsuit against the company, claiming discrimination against white male conservatives.

Damore’s lawsuit says the “presence of Caucasians and males was mocked with ‘boos’ during companywide weekly meetings,” while female workers were celebrated “solely due to their gender.” He’s joined in the lawsuit by former Google engineer named David Gudeman, who worked for the company for three years. The lawsuit — filed in Santa Clara County in Northern California — is seeking monetary, non-monetary, and punitive damages.

Damore was fired by the company in August after his internal paper widely circulated. In it, Damore argued the chasm between male and female engineers was due to women being biologically less inclined, on average, to pursue tech jobs than men.

“Differences in distributions of traits between men and women may in part explain why we don’t have 50 percent representation of women in tech and leadership,” said Damore in his memo.

In August, Google chief executive Sundar Pichai said Damore peddled “harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” and was fired for violating the company’s code of conduct.

The lawsuit, filed by Dhillon Law Group, says it is on behalf of any Google employees who feel they’ve been targeted for their “perceived conservative political views by Google,” as well as “their male gender.” Damore says after his memo went public, he was subjected to “multiple threats and insults from coworkers.” He also says his peers were given bonuses for touting political views in-line with Google’s.

Damore adds Google implements “illegal hiring quotas to fill its desired percentages of women and favored minority candidates.” Managers that don’t meet their quotas are shamed, according to the lawsuit. This process, in the end, shows “male and Caucasian employees as less favored than others,” says Damore.

Google did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

You can check out the full 161-page lawsuit here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Eric Schmidt Stepping Down as Chairman of Google Parent Company, Alphabet

Facebook, Google, Twitter Grilled Over 2016 Election: 5 Takeaways From Congressional Hearing

Amazon Irked After Google Abruptly Pulls YouTube From Echo Show

Future Colin Kaepernicks, Beware: You Can Get Fired for Political Speech

It doesn’t look like any NFL players will be disciplined for kneeling or locking arms in protest during the playing of the National Anthem. But First Amendment experts say most employees can be fired from many jobs for exercising their freedom of speech.

Federal law does not protect workers in the private sector — only government employees.

“There is no federal law protecting against discrimination or retaliation for political activity” at private companies, Paula Brantner, a senior adviser at Workplace Fairness, told TheWrap. “A lot of people think they have First Amendment rights, but those only apply to government employees.”

Also Read: What’s Colin Kaepernick Doing Now?

The power of employers to dismiss workers was demonstrated in August when Google fired one of its engineers, James Damore, for circulating a memo lashing out at the Silicon Valley giant’s efforts to bring more women into the male-dominated company.

In Berkeley, the Top Dog hot dog chain parted ways with one of its cooks, Cole White, when sleuths on Twitter said he had taken part in the white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Virginia. (He denied he is a white nationalist, and Top Dog said he had resigned, not been fired.)

Californians like Damore and White have some protections many other Americans don’t because California law forbids employers from firing workers for off-duty partisan political activity if it is legal. Colorado, Connecticut, Montana, New York, North Dakota, and Washington, D.C. have also enacted some speech protections for workers, but those protections are not absolute.

Also Read: Megyn Kelly Tackles Trump-NFL Drama Day After Saying She’s ‘Done With Politics’ (Video)

American workers in the private sector who work in states without those laws have no protection for political speech, University of Dayton law professor Jeannette Cox wrote in a recent American Bar Association article.

But government employees are in a different position, Harvard Law professor Mark Tushnet told TheWrap. He said that under the First Amendment, government workers who speak about public policy can’t be fired unless their speech interferes with their jobs — by provoking fights, for example.

“Typically, though, governments aren’t able to make that showing,” he said.

The nation’s 22 million government workers got a boost last year when the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment forbids government bosses from firing workers for supporting a political candidate the boss doesn’t like.

Also Read: Bryant Gumbel Thanks Trump for ‘Racist, Churlish’ NFL Attack (Video)

“The Constitution prohibits a government employer from discharging or demoting an employee because the employee supports a particular political candidate,” Justice Stephen G. Breyer wrote in the decision.

NFL owners, perhaps fearful of a public-relations backlash, have not obeyed President Trump’s Sept. 22 call on them to fire any “son of a bitch” who kneels during the National Anthem. Trump was referring to former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick and other players who started kneeling during the National Anthem last year to protest racism and police brutality.

But NFL owners have broad freedom to fire players perceived to violate the NFL’s Personal Conduct Policy. According to the policy, posted on the NFL website, “prohibited conduct” includes “conduct that undermines or puts at risk the integrity of the NFL, NFL clubs, or NFL personnel.”

Discipline can include a fine, suspension or banishment from the league with an opportunity to reapply, the policy states.

In addition to the policy, players may be required to sign contracts with a “morals clause,” which gives team owners another potential justification for firing them if they say or do anything that might potentially make the team look bad.
A copy of former running back Arian Foster’s contract with the Houston Texans, posted online, provides an example of some morals-clause language. (If you’re wondering why his contract is online, here’s an explanation.)
The language requires him “to give his best efforts and loyalty to the Club, and to conduct himself on and off the field with appropriate recognition of the fact that the success of professional football depends largely on public respect for and approval of those associated with the game.”
Of course, teams don’t have to explicitly state that they are cutting a player for making a political statement, or violating any policy. They can simply unofficially blacklist someone they deem difficult or troublesome.
Since Kaepernick opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers to become a free agent in March, no team has signed him. President Trump has taken partial credit for that fact.
“It was reported that NFL owners don’t want to pick him up because they don’t want to get a nasty tweet from Donald Trump,” he said.

It doesn’t look like any NFL players will be disciplined for kneeling or locking arms in protest during the playing of the National Anthem. But First Amendment experts say most employees can be fired from many jobs for exercising their freedom of speech.

Federal law does not protect workers in the private sector — only government employees.

“There is no federal law protecting against discrimination or retaliation for political activity” at private companies, Paula Brantner, a senior adviser at Workplace Fairness, told TheWrap. “A lot of people think they have First Amendment rights, but those only apply to government employees.”

The power of employers to dismiss workers was demonstrated in August when Google fired one of its engineers, James Damore, for circulating a memo lashing out at the Silicon Valley giant’s efforts to bring more women into the male-dominated company.

In Berkeley, the Top Dog hot dog chain parted ways with one of its cooks, Cole White, when sleuths on Twitter said he had taken part in the white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Virginia. (He denied he is a white nationalist, and Top Dog said he had resigned, not been fired.)

Californians like Damore and White have some protections many other Americans don’t because California law forbids employers from firing workers for off-duty partisan political activity if it is legal. Colorado, Connecticut, Montana, New York, North Dakota, and Washington, D.C. have also enacted some speech protections for workers, but those protections are not absolute.

American workers in the private sector who work in states without those laws have no protection for political speech, University of Dayton law professor Jeannette Cox wrote in a recent American Bar Association article.

But government employees are in a different position, Harvard Law professor Mark Tushnet told TheWrap. He said that under the First Amendment, government workers who speak about public policy can’t be fired unless their speech interferes with their jobs — by provoking fights, for example.

“Typically, though, governments aren’t able to make that showing,” he said.

The nation’s 22 million government workers got a boost last year when the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment forbids government bosses from firing workers for supporting a political candidate the boss doesn’t like.

“The Constitution prohibits a government employer from discharging or demoting an employee because the employee supports a particular political candidate,” Justice Stephen G. Breyer wrote in the decision.

NFL owners, perhaps fearful of a public-relations backlash, have not obeyed President Trump’s Sept. 22 call on them to fire any “son of a bitch” who kneels during the National Anthem. Trump was referring to former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick and other players who started kneeling during the National Anthem last year to protest racism and police brutality.

But NFL owners have broad freedom to fire players perceived to violate the NFL’s Personal Conduct Policy. According to the policy, posted on the NFL website, “prohibited conduct” includes “conduct that undermines or puts at risk the integrity of the NFL, NFL clubs, or NFL personnel.”

Discipline can include a fine, suspension or banishment from the league with an opportunity to reapply, the policy states.

In addition to the policy, players may be required to sign contracts with a “morals clause,” which gives team owners another potential justification for firing them if they say or do anything that might potentially make the team look bad.
A copy of former running back Arian Foster’s contract with the Houston Texans, posted online, provides an example of some morals-clause language. (If you’re wondering why his contract is online, here’s an explanation.)
The language requires him “to give his best efforts and loyalty to the Club, and to conduct himself on and off the field with appropriate recognition of the fact that the success of professional football depends largely on public respect for and approval of those associated with the game.”
Of course, teams don’t have to explicitly state that they are cutting a player for making a political statement, or violating any policy. They can simply unofficially blacklist someone they deem difficult or troublesome.
Since Kaepernick opted out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers to become a free agent in March, no team has signed him. President Trump has taken partial credit for that fact.
“It was reported that NFL owners don’t want to pick him up because they don’t want to get a nasty tweet from Donald Trump,” he said.

Milo Yiannopoulos’ Free Speech Event in Berkeley Unravels as Speakers Cancel

The four-day Free Speech Week organized by Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California at Berkeley is in chaos just days before it is scheduled to begin, as headliner Ann Coulter canceled and student organizers dropped their reservations for campus buildings.

Coulter told the Associated Press on Friday that she decided to back out of the Sept. 24-27 conservative speakers forum because she heard “the administration was dead set on blocking this event” — an assertion university administrators flatly denied. “I also don’t think Berkeley deserves to hear a brilliant and entertaining Ann Coulter speech,” Coulter told the AP via email.

Yiannopoulos has touted former White House adviser Steve Bannon as a speaker, but the Breitbart News boss has not confirmed his appearance with the university or reached out to plan his security, UC Berkeley spokesman Dan Mogulof told TheWrap on Friday.

Yiannopoulos and Bannon have not responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Also Read: Milo Yiannopoulos Sues Simon & Schuster for $10 Million Over Abandoned ‘Dangerous’ Deal

Eleven of the 17 speakers listed by organizers have not confirmed that they will attend, UC Chancellor Carol Christ said in a statement.

At least four of people listed by organizers as speakers at the event, which is scheduled to begin on Sunday, have said they were never contacted by Yiannopoulos or student organizers. They include Charles Murray, Heather MacDonald, Michael Malice, and James Damore, the former Google engineer who was fired for his anti-diversity memo, Vanity Fair reported.

Another speaker, Lucian Wintrich, has said Yiannopoulos secretly decided to cancel the event earlier this week. “When I was first invited to Free Speech Week I saw it as an incredible opportunity,” Wintrich told Mediaite. “But then it was made clear to me this week that this event definitely wasn’t happening, and I had to drop out — I saw no reason to lie to the public and mislead people into thinking it was happening.”

Also Read: Milo Yiannopoulos Says Self-Published Book ‘Dangerous’ Sold Out 100k Copies on First Day

The student group organizing the event, the Berkeley Patriot, has not spoken to the University since Sept. 12 and dropped its reservations for two campus buildings, Mogulof said. “They’ve gone dark,” he said of the group, adding that speakers are still free to talk in any open space on campus.

“We continue to prepare for these events next week,” Mogulof said. “We’re in the process of spending close to $1 million in security arrangements.” The university has incurred at least $1.4 million in security costs for previous speaking engagements by conservative speakers this year.

On Thursday, Yiannopoulos insisted to Mediaite that the event “will proceed exactly as planned.” But he also told the Los Angeles Times via text message that he would hold a news conference in San Francisco on Saturday after arriving in a speedboat wearing a $15,000 fur coat.

Also Read: Anthony Scaramucci Rips Steve Bannon’s ‘Messianic Complex,’ White Nationalist ‘Tendencies’

Mike Wright, a leader with the student group and co-organizer Berkeley Patriot, told the San Francisco Chronicle the group was “concerned about threats and our safety” and undecided on whether to cancel cancel Free Speech Week. But a lawyer for the group said late Friday the event would go forward.

Michael Cernovich, a conservative radio commentator and unconfirmed speaker, tweeted on Friday, “I will be joining Milo at a press conference tomorrow where he will announce developments and future plans regarding Free Speech Week.”

On Monday, Yiannopoulos released a statement blaming the university for using “bureaucratic maneuvers and strategic media leaks to disrupt the event and dissuade headline speakers from attending.”

Also Read: Steve Bannon Slams George W Bush, Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice as ‘Idiots’ on National Security (Video)

Mogulof told TheWrap that conservative pundit Ben Shapiro had spoken on the campus earlier this month without incident.

Salon writer Amanda Marcotte suggested in her story that the Free Speech Week “smells like a massive troll.” When she asked Yiannopoulos for information on the event, he replied in an email, “F— off you ginger c—.”

Yiannopoulos was forced to resign as writer for Breitbart News over comments that appeared to endorse pedophilia, and Simon & Schuster backed out of its book deal with him. He wound up self-published the book.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milo Yiannopoulos Sues Simon & Schuster for $10 Million Over Abandoned ‘Dangerous’ Deal

Milo Yiannopoulos Supporter Sues Berkeley for $23 Million

Milo Yiannopoulos Set to Self-Publish His Book After Being Dumped by Publisher

The four-day Free Speech Week organized by Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California at Berkeley is in chaos just days before it is scheduled to begin, as headliner Ann Coulter canceled and student organizers dropped their reservations for campus buildings.

Coulter told the Associated Press on Friday that she decided to back out of the Sept. 24-27 conservative speakers forum because she heard “the administration was dead set on blocking this event” — an assertion university administrators flatly denied. “I also don’t think Berkeley deserves to hear a brilliant and entertaining Ann Coulter speech,” Coulter told the AP via email.

Yiannopoulos has touted former White House adviser Steve Bannon as a speaker, but the Breitbart News boss has not confirmed his appearance with the university or reached out to plan his security, UC Berkeley spokesman Dan Mogulof told TheWrap on Friday.

Yiannopoulos and Bannon have not responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Eleven of the 17 speakers listed by organizers have not confirmed that they will attend, UC Chancellor Carol Christ said in a statement.

At least four of people listed by organizers as speakers at the event, which is scheduled to begin on Sunday, have said they were never contacted by Yiannopoulos or student organizers. They include Charles Murray, Heather MacDonald, Michael Malice, and James Damore, the former Google engineer who was fired for his anti-diversity memo, Vanity Fair reported.

Another speaker, Lucian Wintrich, has said Yiannopoulos secretly decided to cancel the event earlier this week. “When I was first invited to Free Speech Week I saw it as an incredible opportunity,” Wintrich told Mediaite. “But then it was made clear to me this week that this event definitely wasn’t happening, and I had to drop out — I saw no reason to lie to the public and mislead people into thinking it was happening.”

The student group organizing the event, the Berkeley Patriot, has not spoken to the University since Sept. 12 and dropped its reservations for two campus buildings, Mogulof said. “They’ve gone dark,” he said of the group, adding that speakers are still free to talk in any open space on campus.

“We continue to prepare for these events next week,” Mogulof said. “We’re in the process of spending close to $1 million in security arrangements.” The university has incurred at least $1.4 million in security costs for previous speaking engagements by conservative speakers this year.

On Thursday, Yiannopoulos insisted to Mediaite that the event “will proceed exactly as planned.” But he also told the Los Angeles Times via text message that he would hold a news conference in San Francisco on Saturday after arriving in a speedboat wearing a $15,000 fur coat.

Mike Wright, a leader with the student group and co-organizer Berkeley Patriot, told the San Francisco Chronicle the group was “concerned about threats and our safety” and undecided on whether to cancel cancel Free Speech Week. But a lawyer for the group said late Friday the event would go forward.

Michael Cernovich, a conservative radio commentator and unconfirmed speaker, tweeted on Friday, “I will be joining Milo at a press conference tomorrow where he will announce developments and future plans regarding Free Speech Week.”

On Monday, Yiannopoulos released a statement blaming the university for using “bureaucratic maneuvers and strategic media leaks to disrupt the event and dissuade headline speakers from attending.”

Mogulof told TheWrap that conservative pundit Ben Shapiro had spoken on the campus earlier this month without incident.

Salon writer Amanda Marcotte suggested in her story that the Free Speech Week “smells like a massive troll.” When she asked Yiannopoulos for information on the event, he replied in an email, “F— off you ginger c—.”

Yiannopoulos was forced to resign as writer for Breitbart News over comments that appeared to endorse pedophilia, and Simon & Schuster backed out of its book deal with him. He wound up self-published the book.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milo Yiannopoulos Sues Simon & Schuster for $10 Million Over Abandoned 'Dangerous' Deal

Milo Yiannopoulos Supporter Sues Berkeley for $23 Million

Milo Yiannopoulos Set to Self-Publish His Book After Being Dumped by Publisher

Ads Posted Near Google’s LA Office Blast Firing of Memo-Sending Employee

Fake advertisements bashing Google appeared near its Venice, California offices Friday in response to the company’s decision to fire an employee who emailed a memo criticizing the company’s efforts to increase diversity.

Billboards posted on bus stops and bench ads in the neighborhood include using the company’s signature rainbow font to spell out “Goolag,” a play on a name for Soviet-era labor camps — where dissent was crushed. Another advertisement juxtaposes Google CEO Sundar Pichai with late Apple boss Steve Jobs. It includes Apple’s “Think different” slogan, with a fake Google motto responding to that, saying “Not So Much.”

Google fired engineer James Damore Monday after he circulated a memo to employees that said the company is an “echo chamber,” and chalked up the underrepresentation of women in technology to biological traits.

Also Read: Google Fires Employee Who Wrote ‘Anti-Diversity Manifesto’

“We strongly support the right of Googlers to express themselves, and much of what was in that memo is fair to debate, regardless of whether a vast majority of Googlers disagree with it,” Pichai said in an email to staffers explaining his decision to fire Damore. “However, portions of the memo violate our Code of Conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” he continued.

Since he was let go by the search giant, Damore appears to be basking in his newfound notoriety, giving interviews to YouTube personalities and penning a Wall Street Journal op-ed. He also started a Twitter account, @Fired4Truth — which features a profile picture of Damore wearing a “Goolag” t-shirt.

Related stories from TheWrap:

NY Times Columnist David Brooks Urges Google CEO to Resign

Fired Google Engineer Feels ‘Betrayed’ Over Anti-Diversity Memo: ‘They Shamed Me’ (Video)

Google Fires Employee Who Wrote ‘Anti-Diversity Manifesto’

Fake advertisements bashing Google appeared near its Venice, California offices Friday in response to the company’s decision to fire an employee who emailed a memo criticizing the company’s efforts to increase diversity.

Billboards posted on bus stops and bench ads in the neighborhood include using the company’s signature rainbow font to spell out “Goolag,” a play on a name for Soviet-era labor camps — where dissent was crushed. Another advertisement juxtaposes Google CEO Sundar Pichai with late Apple boss Steve Jobs. It includes Apple’s “Think different” slogan, with a fake Google motto responding to that, saying “Not So Much.”

Google fired engineer James Damore Monday after he circulated a memo to employees that said the company is an “echo chamber,” and chalked up the underrepresentation of women in technology to biological traits.

“We strongly support the right of Googlers to express themselves, and much of what was in that memo is fair to debate, regardless of whether a vast majority of Googlers disagree with it,” Pichai said in an email to staffers explaining his decision to fire Damore. “However, portions of the memo violate our Code of Conduct and cross the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace,” he continued.

Since he was let go by the search giant, Damore appears to be basking in his newfound notoriety, giving interviews to YouTube personalities and penning a Wall Street Journal op-ed. He also started a Twitter account, @Fired4Truth — which features a profile picture of Damore wearing a “Goolag” t-shirt.

Related stories from TheWrap:

NY Times Columnist David Brooks Urges Google CEO to Resign

Fired Google Engineer Feels 'Betrayed' Over Anti-Diversity Memo: 'They Shamed Me' (Video)

Google Fires Employee Who Wrote 'Anti-Diversity Manifesto'