All 7 Theatrical ‘Spider-Man’ Movies Ranked, Worst to Best

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

We’ve been through a whole lot of Spider-Man in the past couple decades, from the Tobey Maguire years to Tom Holland in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to, now, a big-screen animated pic focused on Miles Morales and a whole bunch of other Spider-Pe…

Does ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” may not be part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but with a 99 percent Fresh rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes, we’re pretty much all in agreement that it’s worth your time even so.

The question, however, for this particular post is not whether you should go see this crazy thing, but whether you need to stick around after the movie is over for some kind of bonus post-credits scene. Bonus scenes after the credits have been a staple of the MCU since the beginning, but not so for big-screen “Spider-Man” movies — which have often eschewed the practice.

But at this point the post-credits scene concept is so ubiquitous in comic book movies that even DC is doing it after thumbing its nose at Marvel over this for so long. And Sony even got in on the post-credits scene fun with its recent standalone “Venom” movie.

Also Read: ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Film Review: Clever Superhero Saga With Animated Arachnids

So what’s the answer? Does “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” have a post-credits scene?

Yes, there is extra content after the credits start to roll. There is one minor bit, a nod to the late Stan Lee, midway through the credits — and at the very end of the credits we get a bonus scene that serves to introduce us to yet another Spider-Man. A Spider-Man that could very well end up in a future “Spider-Verse” film — and since Sony has already greenlit a sequel, you can start getting your hopes up now.

I’m being intentionally vague here about what’s in the post-credits scene, but if you found this post because you’ve already seen it and want to know what the deal is with it, you can click here for an explainer post that will sum up who exactly that was in the post-credits scene and why you should expect him to play a bigger part next time around.

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‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Post-Credits Scene Explained

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(In case it wasn’t clear from the headline, there are spoilers here for “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”)

The live-action version of Spider-Man may be contained within the Marvel Cinematic Universe for the foreseeable future, but Sony can still do what it wants with animated “Spider-Man” flicks — and thank goodness for that, because “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” totally owns with the way it embraces all corners of the Spider-Canon.

But if you thought the seven Spider-People who participate in the plot in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” — Miles Morales (Shameik Moore), Peter Parker (Chris Pine), Peter B. Parker (Jake Johnson), Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), Peni Parker (Kimiko Glenn), Spider-Man Noir (Nicolas Cage) and Spider-Ham (John Mulaney) —  represented the full breadth of the Spider-Verse, well, you are sorely mistaken.

The post-credits scene for “Into the Spider-Verse” introduces us to another important Spider-Man from the comics, and also visits a past small screen incarnation of Peter Parker. And it feels pretty likely that should “Spider-Verse” get a sequel, that one of these other Spider-Men will be a part of it.

Also Read: ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Film Review: Clever Superhero Saga With Animated Arachnids

That bonus Spider-Man is Miguel O’Hara, better known to fans of his comics as Spider-Man 2099. Miguel is from a version of New York dubbed Nueva York. Miguel, from his lofty perch in the distant future, has been monitoring the whole Spider-Verse situation as it went down, and once it all ends decides to dabble a little bit by traveling back in time.

And he pays a visit to none other than the Spider-Man from the 1967 animated series, where he stumbles into the meme in which two identical Spider-Men are pointing at each other. You know what I’m talking about. This one:

You didn’t think a movie about a bunch of alternate universe Spider-People would avoid that joke, did you? It’s a hilarious bit that initially feels like just a fun throwaway gag until you discover that none other than Oscar Isaac is providing the voice for Miguel O’Hara.

Also Read: Is the Box Office Ready for More Spider-Man With ‘Into the Spider-Verse’

Given that star power, it’s tough not to assume that Spider-Man 2099 will have a part to play in any potential “Spider-Verse” sequels — one has already been greenlit, actually. So for those who, like me, were mildly disappointed that Miguel missed out on the bulk of the shenanigans this time around, that post-credits scene provides an enticing prospect. Though, to be clear, we still don’t know for sure that Spider-Man 2099 be in the next “Spider-Verse” film. But we can’t help but hope, either way.

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If you’re of the opinion that Spider-Man has been rebooted too many times in the last two decades, hold onto your hats: the animated adventure “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” introduces no less than seven new versions of the character within a single film.

Miraculously, instead of feeling like too much of a good thing, “Into the Spider-Verse” is simply a very good thing. The film, directed by Bob Perischetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman, captures the sprawling interconnectivity of comic-book universes in a way that no other feature film has. Anything can happen, and it usually does. It’s incredibly thrilling to watch, impressively emotional throughout, and easily the best Spider-Man movie since “Spider-Man 2.”

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” stars Shameik Moore (“Dope”) as Miles Morales, a half-black, half-Latino teenager torn between his overbearing yet good-natured police officer father Jefferson (Brian Tyree Henry) and his more relaxed, sketchier uncle Aaron (Mahershala Ali). While Miles practices his graffiti art with his uncle, he’s bitten by a radioactive spider, and we all know what that means.

Watch Video: ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Trailer: Meet All the Spider-People, and One Spider-Pig

The problem isn’t just that Miles starts sticking to his fellow classmates, or that his inner monologue gets louder (one of the film’s most satisfying jokes). The problem is that he stumbles across Spider-Man (Jake Johnson) fighting Kingpin (Liev Schreiber), in the middle of a giant interdimensional rift device. Miles watches helplessly as Spider-Man dies, and he promises to finish what the hero started, namely to prevent the Kingpin from using the machine again, lest it destroy the world.

While he’s wallowing in guilt and self-doubt, Miles stumbles across yet another Peter Parker/Spider-Man (Johnson, again)… and a Spider-Gwen (Hailee Steinfeld) … and a Spider-Noir (Nicolas Cage)… and a Spider-Ham (John Mulaney)… and a SP//dr (Kimiko Glenn, “Orange is the New Black”). Spider-Persons from throughout the multiverse have been sucked into Miles’s reality because of Kingpin’s machine, and they need to stop him and return to their own time periods before they blink out of existence.

Also Read: ‘Spider-Woman’ and Other ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Follow-Ups in the Works at Sony

The plot seems like it should be too much for one film to handle, but “Into the Spider-Verse” wisely stays focused on Miles and his story, and uses all the other characters for support.

Miles Morales is an incredibly captivating new hero, in a story that challenges him in every conceivable way. His powers force upon him an awkward physicality that robs him of his previous confidence. His oath to save the world is such a heavy weight around his shoulders that he always looks ready to collapse. And his loyalties to his family are strained past the breaking point, in a subplot that has the sort of dramatic heft we haven’t seen in a superhero film in a very, very long time.

That heft is shared by several other Spider-heroes, and it’s impressive how organic the presence of such wildly different interpretations of the characters comes across. Miles, Peter and Gwen take up most of the screen time, leaving Spider-Ham, Spider-Noir and SP//dr to add levity and unusual action beats to the film’s second half. It’s also satisfying to see a superhero film offer this much representation across the board (even though the recurring fat jokes are bound to leave some audience members feeling like they’re still not allowed in the club).

Watch Video: ‘Marvel’s Spider-Man’ PS4 Has the Most Heartwarming Stan Lee Cameo Ever

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” understands all too well that the appeal of Spider-Man, in any form, isn’t just the hero’s powers, and it isn’t just the hero’s tragic backstory. It’s the unmistakable sense that the universe has it out for this person, and he or she is going to persevere anyway, through good humor and good intentions. Miles and Peter seem permanently trapped in violent Harold Lloyd routines, getting hit by cars, falling off buildings, dragged by trains, and hiding their identities behind flimsy excuses.

But as hilarious as “Into the Spider-Verse” is (and it’s easily the funniest Spider-Man movie ever), the film also evokes a greater sense of tragedy than any film in the series since Sam Raimi’s original. The heroes are elastic, but life is fragile, and death is very real. If you include flashbacks, the film has a rather impressive body count. What’s more, each of these deaths still motivates the characters left alive, so mortality is always at the forefront of our thoughts, even when the heroes are effortlessly throwing cars around inside a swirling knick-knack vortex of death.

What’s more, the film’s sprawling cast legitimizes every single version of every single superhero, to audiences who may still wonder why we need yet another “Spider-Man.” Or yet another “Fantastic Four.” Or yet another anything. The realization of each hero that they aren’t alone, and that someone understands their pain, can be shared by every audience member recognizing someone just like them on the big screen. They share similar origins, but they connect with different fans, who each have different ideas about the character and what they represent. And each of those versions of Spider-Man, or any other hero, deserves at least a modicum of appreciation, even if they’re not “our” version of the character.

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” represents some of the best superhero storytelling on the market. The frenetic animation and freewheeling story offer audiences a sense of boundless dynamism. It’s not the first time a director has attempted to incorporate comic book iconography into a feature-film adaptation — see also: Ang Lee’s “Hulk” and Edgar Wright’s “Scott Pilgrim vs. The World” — but it’s the most appealing. Watching “Into the Spider-Verse” evokes feelings of sitting cross-legged on the floor of your bedroom, eating cookies and immersing yourself in outrageous, mostly inviting new worlds.



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Jake Johnson to Play ‘Foul-Mouthed’ High School Basketball Coach in Netflix Adult Animated Comedy ‘Hoops’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“New Girl” star Jake Johnson is heading to Netflix to voice the main character in a new adult animated comedy series titled “Hoops,” TheWrap has confirmed.

Johnson will voice the role of Coach Ben Hopkins, who is described as “a hot-headed, foul-mouthed high school basketball coach who thinks turning around his God-awful team will take him to the ‘big leagues.’”

Netflix has ordered 10 episodes of the half-hour comedy, created and written by Ben Hoffman, who will also executive produce. Johnson will executive produce with Hoffman, as will Phil Lord and Chris Miller with the duo’s Lord Miller Productions. Seth Cohen will also executive produce. The series is produced by 20th Century Fox Television, and Bento Box the animation studio.

Also Read: Netflix to Develop Series, Films Based on CS Lewis’ ‘The Chronicles of Narnia’

In addition to “New Girl,” Johnson has recently appeared in “BoJack Horseman” and “Spider Man: Into the Spider-verse.”

Earlier on Wednesday, Netflix announced that it has acquired the rights to C.S. Lewis’ “The Chronicles of Narnia,” and will be developing new series and movies based on the novels.

Netflix and The C.S. Lewis Company signed a multi-year deal, marking the first time one company has held the rights to all seven books. All the projects developed through this deal will be produced by Netflix productions and Mark Gordon of Entertainment One, alongside Douglas Gresham and Vincent Sieber serving as executive producers for the series, as well as producers for the films.

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‘The Incredibles 2’ Soars to Record $18.5 Million at Thursday Box Office

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“The Incredibles 2” earned $18.5 million at the Thursday box office, surpassing “Finding Dory’s” animation preview record of $9.2 million.

“Minions” earned $6.2 million in Thursday previews, while “The Secret Life of Pets” grossed $5.3 million. The preview gross for “Incredibles 2” is higher than those for “Beauty and the Beast” ($16.3 million), “Spider-Man: Homecoming” ($15.4 million) and “Justice League” ($13 million).

The sequel to “The Incredibles” is looking at a weekend opening of $120 million to $145 million.  The first “Incredibles” opened to $70 million in 2004, and “Incredibles 2” will still have a higher opening than its predecessor even after inflation adjustments are made.

Also Read: ‘Incredibles 2’ Film Review: Pixar’s Superhero Family Is Back, Baby – and What a Baby

Taking place right after the end of the first film, “The Incredibles 2” sees the Parr family face a new family dynamic after Elastigirl is recruited for a campaign to help bring superheroes back. While she fights the bad guys, Mr. Incredible is left to take care of his three kids, including the infant Jack-Jack, who begins to develop his own powers.

Brad Bird returns to write and direct, as well as provide the voice for fan favorite Edna Mode. Craig T. Nelson, Helen Hunt, and Samuel L. Jackson also return to the cast, being joined by “Better Call Saul” stars Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks. Critics have nearly unanimously praised the film, giving it a current Rotten Tomatoes score of 94 percent.

Warner Bros./New Line’s “Tag” earned $1.33 million in preshows, compared to “Game Night,” which grossed $1 million in February.

Also Read: Does ‘Incredibles 2’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“Tag” is based on the true story of a lifelong group of friends who played a game of tag for 23 years. The film stars Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Burress, and Jake Johnson as the crew of friends, with the cast completed by Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Leslie Bibb, Brian Dennehy, and Lil Rel Howrey. Jeff Tomsic directed from a script by Rob McKittrick and Mark Steilen.

Sony/Silver Pictures’ “Superfly” opened on Wednesday and is looking to earn $7 million to $12 million over the five days., with the film sporting a reported budget of $16 million.

“Superfly” stars Trevor Jackson as Youngblood Priest, a career criminal who wants out of the Atlanta drug business, only to get dragged into even deeper trouble after one bad deal. Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis, and Jennifer Morrison also star, with Director X helming the film. “Watchmen” co-writer Alex Tse penned the script, with Joel Silver producing with Atlanta rapper Future.

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‘Tag’ Film Review: Entertaining Action Comedy Chases in Too Many Directions

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

It’s been said that “We don’t stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing.” What a great ethos for a film like “Tag” to have, since it gives every character an excuse to act like an immature child, and it gives the rest of the movie an excuse to run around like a chicken with its head cut off, from one genre and tone to another.

TV director Jeff Tomsic’s new comedy stars Ed Helms, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Buress, Jake Johnson and Jeremy Renner as boyhood friends who still play the game of tag, every year, throughout the month of May. They’re not just messing around either. They’ll infiltrate each other’s businesses, jump out of windows and absolutely annihilate each other’s lives just to slap their hands on one another and say, “You’re it.”

Adults are playing a children’s game, and they’re taking it super-duper mega seriously. It’s a funny premise on which to base a movie. Sometimes “Tag” makes the most of it, treating the innocuous pastime like an action-packed extravaganza, replete with elaborate fight choreography, acrobatic stunts, and twists and turns that would make serial killer Jigsaw nod in approval.

Watch Video: Jon Hamm Explains How ‘Tag’ Co-Star Jeremy Renner Worked With 2 Broken Arms

The plot revolves around Jerry (Renner), the only player in the game who’s still never been tagged, even after all these decades. He’s getting married at the end of the month, and he plans to retire from the game undefeated. So Hoagie (Helms) unites fellow players Callahan (Hamm), Randy (Johnson) and Sable (Buress) for one last game.

Yes, they’ll stop at nothing to tag Jerry once and for all, because… because, basically Hoagie talks a big game about how the pastime keeps them young, and how it keeps them connected after all these years. But there are no tangible stakes in “Tag,” and that just makes everything they do sillier and sillier.

Watch Video: Watch the Hannibal Buress Stand-Up Act That Helped Trigger Bill Cosby’s Downfall

It doesn’t, unfortunately, always make them funnier. “Tag” may not be a broad comedy on the absurd level of “Anchorman,” but the game sure is. Even though these characters are shown to feel real pain, real heartache, and real love for one another, the movie never fully commits to that reality. Many of the scenes in which they try to tag Jerry are dangerously irresponsible, life-threateningly violent and/or ethically repugnant.

Indeed, the only way to find some of the scenes in “Tag” funny is not to take the characters seriously. But half of the movie is dedicated to treating them extremely seriously. The segue between the “Looney Tunes” moments, the Jackie Chan moments, the “Saw” moments and the James L. Brooks moments are sometimes jarring enough to elicit a guffaw, but the overall effect is awkward and chaotic.

It would seem as though we are supposed to filter “Tag” through the perpetually amazed lens of Rebecca, played by Annabelle Wallis (“The Mummy”). She’s a reporter who interviews Callahan at the beginning of the film, and when he is suddenly, unexpectedly tagged, she decides to follow them around and write a story about their game. And yet the only reason she seems to be there is to provide the players with an excuse to explain the rules, out loud and to the audience, and to occasionally marvel at just how seriously they treat the game of tag.

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The film already has a voice-over narration, and the audience should be doing all that marveling on their own, so even though Wallis is obviously an expert at looking baffled, it seems superfluous to include her character at all. It’s not like she’s given anything else to do.

The same cannot be said, however, for Isla Fisher, who plays Hoagie’s wife Anna, and takes the game more seriously than even Jerry does. Unfortunately (sigh), she’s not allowed to play, because the game was invented when the boys were nine years old, so “no girls allowed.” Never mind that the movie clearly demonstrates that amendments are made to the rules all the time, so there’s absolutely no good, non-sexist reason to keep her out all these years, even though she epitomizes everything the movie is going for. Intense, funny, willing to go overboard when it’s funny but able to seem genuine in moments of intimacy, Fisher is completely hilarious.

At its best, “Tag” offers the free-spirited thrill of a childhood game with the adrenaline rush of a modern action movie. Jerry is the type of role that Renner was meant to play, absurdly O.P. and totally cocky about it, performing feats of acrobatic insanity using an old lady’s walker, and using Helms’ butt as a punching bag. The chases, the reversals and the clever use of thought bubble choreography (slowing the action down enough to get a full running V.O. color commentary from each player) are simultaneously exciting and whimsical.

Even at its worst, “Tag” is merely scatterbrained. It’s a well-intentioned comedy with funny performances and a handful of great humorous set pieces. If it feels as though it’s three or four different movies fighting each other for dominance, then at least those movies are all, in their own separate ways, relatively entertaining and amusing.

Let them have their fun.



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Tag turns male friendship into a petty, elaborate, sometimes amusing game

Read on: The A.V. Club.

Most comedies about men stubbornly refusing to act their age are actually stealth lectures: Fun is fun, they’ll grant, before going on to insist that sorry, you really do have to grow up eventually. Tag begs to differ. This is a comedy that says you ne…

‘Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse’: Sony Launches New Trailer; Mahershala Ali, Lily Tomlin, More Join Cast

Read on: Deadline.

Sony released the first full trailer for their forthcoming animated feature Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse starring Shameik Moore (Dope, The Get Down) in a different take on your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. The studio also announced an all-sta…

‘New Girl’ Series Finale: That Final Nick-Schmidt Bromance Flashback Was Totally Improvised

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the series finale of “New Girl”)

The love story at the center of Fox’s “New Girl” was a focal point of the series finale on Tuesday. We’re talking, of course, about the bromance between Nick (Jake Johnson) and Schmidt (Max Greenfield).

Oh, come on, you always knew Nick and Jess (Zooey Deschanel) were going to get married. But did you ever imagine Nick would finally admit he truly loves his BFF? Yes, in the last few moments of the episode Nick says those three little words Schmidt has been waiting for so long to hear.

And if Johnson and Greenfield had had it there way, you probably would have seen more of a two-sided relationship long before the finale.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Creator Liz Meriwether Tells Us Where the Idea for Winston’s ‘Greatest Prank’ Came From

“I love all the flashback stuff,” Johnson told TheWrap, while being interviewed along with stars Greenfield and Hannah Simone at an advanced screening of the final two episodes of the Liz Meriwether sitcom. “[Greenfield] in the fat suit was always really funny. Lamorne with those rows was always funny — those cornrows. It was just really fun to do those. And the one that I saw in this one [the finale] — now I’m trying to brag, but I have seen the last two episodes — we do a bit on the couch –,” Johnson said, before being cut off by Simone, who plays Schmidt’s wife Cece.

“I have not seen that like intense sexual chemistry that happens there,” Simone said, laughing.

“Yeah, well, cause it’s been cut out Hannah! For six years!” Johnson said. “Every scene — all you’ll see, cause [Hannah and I] hadn’t worked together for four years — but all you’ll ever see would be ‘Cool it man!’ [from Nick]. And everybody thinks I’m a bad guy. They always cut out. Every bit for him is he’s got a thing for me and I was really glad they finally put it in!”

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Johnson then broke down the scene he was referencing, which is a flashback in the series closer showing Nick and Schmidt moving into the loft right out of college. As he told the story, Greenfield and Simone stood by and tried (unsuccessfully) not to laugh.

“Cause the bit is — it wasn’t scripted that way, he improvised that,” Johnson said. “It was scripted, ‘What’s gonna happen in this loft?’And he goes, ‘I’m gonna hopefully meet a girl and have a kid.’ ‘Maybe I’ll be a writer and fall in love,’ [I say.] That was all that was in there. He improvises — I think I said to him, ‘What does she look like?’ And he improvises exactly what I look like.”

Oh, he does. Down to the gray beanie.

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“We laughed, the crew laughed. I thought, ‘Another garbage, throwaway moment.’ But finally what I appreciate is they did put that in. Cause that is what it was seven years! Every opportunity to make it a sexual bit between us, he would do, I would fight. We would do for three minutes, somebody would finally yell, ‘Guys stop! We’re never using it.’ But it was fun to do.”

Greenfield expanded on his dynamic with Johnson a bit more, talking about how so much of their on-screen banter was improvised over the years. And how his favorite came about in just the last few episodes.

“There is a moment that really had me crying laughing,” Greenfield said of a scene in Episode 2 in the final season. “Jake walks into the scene and he has some line about like, ‘That’s like a porcupine putting on a tie’ [laughs]. And I remember very vividly — and I don’t remember a lot of things cause my brain dies sometimes [laughs] — and improvising on every take, ‘Wow, wonder what that would look like.’ And I remember Jake saying for the first three takes, ‘Please ,stop improvising that, cause they’re gonna put it in the show.’”

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And of course, they did. “I saw it at home when it was on later. Done. One of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. That happened and just — tears.

OK, go back and watch that one now, cause you’re gonna need some happy tears after all the feels in the series finale.

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‘New Girl’ Creator Liz Meriwether Tells Us Where the Idea for Winston’s ‘Greatest Prank’ Came From

‘New Girl’ Creator Liz Meriwether Tells Us Where the Idea for Winston’s ‘Greatest Prank’ Came From

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the series finale of “New Girl”)

They didn’t have to move?!?

The series finale of “New Girl” aired Tuesday night, ending the whole show with one of the most elaborate pranks Winston (Lamorne Morris) has ever pulled off on the Fox sitcom. Sorry, “Prank Sinatra.”

See, Winston, Cece (Hannah Simone) and Schmidt (Max Greenfield) had spent the entire final episode packing up Jess (Zooey Deschanel) and Nick’s (Jake Johnson) belongings, as the newly-married couple were being evicted from the loft that every member of the core group had lived in at one time or another, by a company called Engram Pattersky (which also happened to be the episode’s title). The night was full of laughter and tears and one last game of True American.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Series Finale: Jess Has ‘Truly Terrible’ – and Underwhelming – News (Exclusive Video)

Only just as they were done loading the truck, Winston revealed he had planned the entire ruse, and they didn’t have to move. What, you didn’t realize if you rearrange the letters in Engram Pattersky you get “My Greatest Prank”? Oh, snap.

Now, who would have thought Liz Meriwether’s goofy ensemble comedy would end with a twist that required “The Usual Suspects” like flashbacks to break it down? Oh, the creator said it was the only way to could have closed it once the writers thought of it.

“It was our writer — who’s been with the show since the beginning — Berkley Johnson, who came up with the idea,” Meriwether told TheWrap in an interview last week. “And as soon as he said it in the room, we were all just dying laughing. and it felt really right. And he loves word puzzles, so he came up with the Engram Pattersky; that, that spelled ‘my greatest prank.’”

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Showrunner Pitches Us the Show’s Most Sellable Spinoff

“But I think the idea of, we knew that we wanted Winston to have one big final prank,” Meriwether continued. “And he always goes too big or too small. So we were pitching around different ideas. And when Berkeley pitched that, it kind of made sense. I think we all felt like them getting evicted or having to leave the apartment was going to feel a little expected. So there was something great about the prank idea to give it a little bit of a final twist as opposed to, ‘Oh, they have to leave and it’s sad.’ It was great.”

It was the greatest, Liz.

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Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The last-ever episode of “New Girl” airs tonight, Tuesday, on Fox, and no one is ready for it. Least of all, Jessica Day (Zooey Deschanel) who is going to be the “bearer of truly terrible news” for the gang in the series closer. News that not everyone finds all that bad, actually.

In the clip above, which is exclusive to TheWrap, Jess and Nick (Jake Johnson) gather Cece (Hannah Simone), Schmidt (Max Greenfield) and Winston (Lamorne Morris) together at the loft to announce that — wait for it — they are being evicted within 24 hours and need to say goodbye to the home they have all (at one time or another) shared.

“Brace yourselves! Nick and I are moving out of the loft,” Jess says.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Showrunner Pitches Us the Show’s Most Sellable Spinoff

*silence*

“That’s it?” Winston says, and it appears Cece and Schmidt are just as underwhelmed. “That’s what you called us here for? Why do you always think like a character in ‘The Baby-Sitters Club’?” Schmidt questions.

OK, it sounds like this is going to be a rough finale — both for those who are and are not upset about the upcoming move.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Series Finale: Jess Rocks an Eyepatch on Her Wedding Day (Exclusive Video)

Here is Fox’s official logline for the series finale, titled “Engram Pattersky” (we have no idea why): As Nick and Jess find out they are evicted from the loft, the gang takes a tour down memory lane, which includes a final round of “True American.” Story by Dave Finkel & Brett Baer; teleplay by Elizabeth Meriwether; directed by Erin O’Malley.

Watch the clip above.

The series finale of “New Girl” will air with an hour of back-to-back episodes tonight, Tuesday, at 9/8c on Fox.

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Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Jessica Day (Zooey Deschanel) is getting compliment after compliment on the day of her wedding to Nick Miller (Jake Johnson) in Tuesday’s penultimate episode of “New Girl” — too bad everyone is straight up lying to her face. A face partially covered by an eyepatch.

In a clip from the second to last installment of the Fox comedy, which is exclusive to TheWrap, we see Jess’ mother, Joan, (Jamie Lee Curtis) her best friend Cece (Hannah Simone) and Winston’s very pregnant wife Aly (Nasim Pedrad) all complimenting her.

“You’re as beautiful as the day you slid out of me,” Joan tells her. “No one is going to be able to take their eyes off you,” Cece adds.”You’re a vision,” Aly coos. They all deny she looks like a “pirate bride,” before 3-year-old Ruth speaks the truth.

Also Read: One ‘New Girl’ Writer Has Been Lobbying to Do That Furguson Episode for 4 Years

“Why are we lying to her?” Cece and Schmidt’s daughter questions. From the mouths of babes, right?

Here is Fox’s official logline for the seventh and final season episode, accurately titled “The Curse of the Pirate Bride” (see, Ruth was right!): Jess (Deschanel) & Nick’s (Johnson) wedding day is full of surprises and Winston (Lamorne Morris) & Aly’s (guest star Pedrad) big day arrives. Greenfield and Simone also star. Curtis, Dermot Mulroney, Rob Reiner, June Diane Raphael and Zoe Lister-Jones guest star. It was written by Ann Kim and directed by Josh Greenbaum.

Learn why Jess is wearing the eyepatch — and how they plan to work around it — in the clip above.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’: Damon Wayans Jr Makes His Series Return – and Owes Someone $71,000 (Exclusive Video)

The series finale of “New Girl” will air with an hour of back-to-back episodes tonight, Tuesday, at 9/8c on Fox.

Related stories from TheWrap:

One ‘New Girl’ Writer Has Been Lobbying to Do That Furguson Episode for 4 Years

‘New Girl’: Damon Wayans Jr Makes His Series Return – and Owes Someone $71,000 (Exclusive Video)

‘New Girl’: Schmidt and Cece’s Life Has Become ‘the 3rd Act of a Darren Aronofsky Film’ (Exclusive Video)

‘New Girl’: Here’s Why Schmidt and Cece Named Their Daughter After Ruth Bader Ginsburg

‘New Girl’: Damon Wayans Jr Makes His Series Return – and Owes Someone $71,000 (Exclusive Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

We’re four episodes into the final season of “New Girl” and that means it’s time for some Coach. Yes, on Tuesday’s episode of the Zooey Deschanel-led Fox comedy, Damon Wayans Jr. will return as the fan-favorite roommate who moved to New York at the end of Season 4.

But it doesn’t look like everyone is thrilled to see their old pal.

In the clip above, which is exclusive to TheWrap, Nick (Jake Johnson) and Coach are at each other’s throats and Jess (Deschanel) has no idea why. The gang is all gathered at the bar “to celebrate the life of a cat” that loved Nick and Coach like sons — We’re assuming Furguson? But let’s not even go there right now — and these two can’t stop arguing.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’: Schmidt and Cece’s Life Has Become ‘the 3rd Act of a Darren Aronofsky Film’ (Exclusive Video)

Jess finally gets involved to see if this has to do with the fact Nick thinks the movie “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” should actually be called “Paul Blop: Mall Cop” (the rhyme is RIGHT there) or something equally ridiculous. Only it seems like the beef has a little more meat to it, once Nick confesses that Coach actually owes him $71,000.

Wow.

While we have no idea why Coach needed that kind of dough and why Nick (now a successful author) lent it to him, we know that is probably a much bigger reason to bicker than the title of some movie. (Though, as Nick puts it, they did just “give up” there.)

Also Read: ‘New Girl’: Here’s Why Schmidt and Cece Named Their Daughter After Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Watch the clip above.

The final season of “New Girl” airs Tuesdays at 9:30/8:30 c on Fox.

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(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Tuesday’s season seven premiere of “New Girl.”)

“New Girl” returned for its seventh and final season tonight with more than a few new elements, including a new character. A teeny, tiny one who the series’ co-showrunner Brett Baer told TheWrap is going to play a big part in the Zooey Deschanel-led comedy’s final few episodes: Ruth Bader Parekh Schmidt.

When the show picked up Tuesday after about a three-year time jump, fans were introduced to Schmidt (Max Greenfield) and Cece’s (Hannah Simone) three-year-old daughter (played by twins Rhiannon and Danielle Rockoff), who they named after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Also Read: ‘New Girl’s Lamorne Morris Digs up Fox Comedy’s Best Easter Eggs for Superfans (Exclusive Video)

TheWrap asked Baer about this hilarious decision in a recent interview and found out it had a lot to do with character growth on Schmidt’s part — a guy who was always very conservative and often objectified women at the beginning of the Elizabeth Meriwether-created series.

“I think that that came from wanting for Cece to have had some impact on that and Cece’s relationship with Jess (Deschanel) and their political leanings,” Baer said. “I think she probably went out with Schmidt on that,” Baer said. “And I think Schmidt always — you know, he’s a strict conservative. There was a time where I think he was hoping Paul Ryan would run in 2020?” (Oh, yes, there was.)

“But I think down in his soul though, he is a progressive when it comes to his daughter being a successful woman and wanting to support her being, as I think we talked about in one of the episodes, becoming President of the United States herself,” Baer added. “And I think he respects strong women, and he was always able to get along with Jess, who obviously had a different political leaning than he did.”

Also Read: ‘New Girl’ Showrunner Pitches Us the Show’s Most Sellable Spinoff as the Final Season Begins

While fans may immediately find Ruth to be adorable and a great addition to the cast (and the series’ stars and writers did too!) Baer said they were apprehensive about their risky decision to bring a kid into the mix with just eight episodes left to wrap up the beloved show.

“We were terrified,” Baer said, laughing. “You’re introducing this really important element and you’ve got a dynamic and chemistry that this cast has and we knew this was a major contribution and change that could shift everything. You needed to have exactly the right person, or I should say people, in that part. And a lot of it came down to getting Max and Hannah to audition with our final prospects for the role. And Max is a father, and Hannah a new mother, and they have this incredible relationship with the actors who played Ruth. And they were really, really lovely together on set. Very, very welcoming.”

“And those kids were really funny,” Baer added. “There were many times we’d see a cut of the episodes and some of the scenes that they’re in we’d say, ‘Can we cut back to Ruth for a thing here? We need a laugh here.’ And we’d scrub through the footage and find an incredible, hilarious take or beat or reaction that would just give us an extra laugh.”

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“They actually became a really important part of the show for us this season and not only from a storytelling standpoint, but just from a production standpoint looking for that great bit to get us out of a scene,” Baer said. “More often than not, we were able to find what we were looking for in their outtakes. And they had a great dynamic with Jake Johnson (who plays Nick) too, who was hilarious with them.”

The final season of “New Girl” airs Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m. ET on Fox.

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