Noel Clarke Joins Sam Claflin in Crime Thriller ‘The Corrupted’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Noel Clarke has come on board “The Corrupted,” joining lead Sam Claflin and Timothy Spall, Hugh Bonneville, and David Hayman in the British crime thriller. REP Crime, Eclipse Films and Riverstone Pictures said Friday that principal photography is now underway on the film, which will shoot at various locations in the U.K. Clarke recently set […]

Noel Clarke has come on board “The Corrupted,” joining lead Sam Claflin and Timothy Spall, Hugh Bonneville, and David Hayman in the British crime thriller. REP Crime, Eclipse Films and Riverstone Pictures said Friday that principal photography is now underway on the film, which will shoot at various locations in the U.K. Clarke recently set […]

‘Downton Abbey’ Star Hugh Bonneville To Narrate British Wildlife Series

EXCLUSIVE: Downton Abbey star Hugh Bonneville is trying out to become the next Sir David Attenborough after being signed up to narrate a major British wildlife series.
The actor, who most recently starred in Paddington 2, is to voice Wild Britain, an eight-part documentary series for Viacom‘s Channel 5. The show is one of the most ambitious natural history series the commercial broadcaster has ever undertaken as it hopes to find its own take on Planet Earth II.
The series…

EXCLUSIVE: Downton Abbey star Hugh Bonneville is trying out to become the next Sir David Attenborough after being signed up to narrate a major British wildlife series. The actor, who most recently starred in Paddington 2, is to voice Wild Britain, an eight-part documentary series for Viacom's Channel 5. The show is one of the most ambitious natural history series the commercial broadcaster has ever undertaken as it hopes to find its own take on Planet Earth II. The series…

CBS Completes Network Ten Deal; Hugh Bonneville Waltzes To PBS New Year’s Special; Alibaba Exec Shuffle – Global Briefs

CBS has completed its purchase of Australian broadcaster Network Ten, acquiring the main free-to-air channel as well as digital spin-offs One and Eleven and streaming service Tenplay. This comes after an ownership saga that lasted months, which saw a bidding war between CBS and News Corp executive co-chairman Lachlan Murdoch and WIN owner Bruce Gordon. The deal will likely lead to Network Ten launching more original content as well as more multi-platform opportunities for…

CBS has completed its purchase of Australian broadcaster Network Ten, acquiring the main free-to-air channel as well as digital spin-offs One and Eleven and streaming service Tenplay. This comes after an ownership saga that lasted months, which saw a bidding war between CBS and News Corp executive co-chairman Lachlan Murdoch and WIN owner Bruce Gordon. The deal will likely lead to Network Ten launching more original content as well as more multi-platform opportunities for…

Rebecca Ferguson In Talks To Star In Patricia Neal/Roald Dahl Project – AFM

Rebecca Ferguson is in talks to play Oscar winner Patricia Neal alongside Hugh Bonneville as children’s novelist Roald Dahl in John Hay’s Untitled Roald Dahl & Patricia Neal project. Goldcrest Films is financing, co-producing and handling worldwide sales, introducing the pic to buyers at the AFM. Principal photography is scheduled to commence late January 2018.
The film is described as a bittersweet, comedic and heart-warming story of Neal and Dahl’s marriage. The…

Rebecca Ferguson is in talks to play Oscar winner Patricia Neal alongside Hugh Bonneville as children’s novelist Roald Dahl in John Hay’s Untitled Roald Dahl & Patricia Neal project. Goldcrest Films is financing, co-producing and handling worldwide sales, introducing the pic to buyers at the AFM. Principal photography is scheduled to commence late January 2018. The film is described as a bittersweet, comedic and heart-warming story of Neal and Dahl's marriage. The…

‘Paddington 2’ Film Review: Get Ready for More Teddy in This Delightful Romp

Michael Bond’s Paddington Bear stories are endearingly small in scale, so it was quite a gamble when David Heyman, the producer of the “Harry Potter” series, decided that they should be the basis of an action-packed, megabudget franchise. It turned out, though, that he knew what he was doing: “Paddington” was a beloved hit in 2015, and the superior sequel is bound to be even more lucrative.

Once again directed by Paul King, and co-written by King and Simon Farnaby, “Paddington 2” is a sure-footed, sweet-natured family comedy which isn’t set at Christmas, but which glows with so much warmth and fun that it might well be a staple of festive television for years to come. (The film has just opened in the United Kingdom; the North American rights are currently held by The Weinstein Company, but Heyman is looking for another distributor.)

One obvious way that it improves on its predecessor is in its choice of villain. The first film introduced an ursine hero who was pretty close to the one in Bond’s books. Endearingly voiced by Ben Whishaw and exquisitely computer-generated, he was a mild-mannered, duffle-coated innocent, who had no superpowers or special abilities except his withering hard stare. And yet he was up against a murderous taxidermist (Nicole Kidman), who was intent on putting his skin on display in a museum. She seemed to have strutted in from a different film altogether. Fortunately, “Paddington 2” is less likely to give young viewers nightmares.

Also Read: Michael Bond, Creator of Paddington Bear, Dies at 91

Its antagonist is a vain, past-it thespian, Phoenix Buchanan, played with delightfully self-parodying foppishness by Hugh Grant. Buchanan dreams of staging a one-man show in the West End, and his complicated fund-raising plans — which would have been at home in an Ealing comedy — involve stealing a vintage pop-up book from the antique shop owned by Paddington’s friend Mr. Gruber (Jim Broadbent).

Alas, thanks to a bad case of mistaken identity, it is Paddington who is led away in handcuffs (or rather, paw-cuffs), and sentenced to 10 years in prison. And while that may sound like cruel and unusual punishment, the screenplay provides a witty reason for the judge’s harshness.

From here on, King’s perfectly paced, joke-filled caper cuts back and forth between two parallel plots. One strand puts Paddington’s adoptive family, the Browns (Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, et al), on the trail of Buchanan, a master of disguise who is spotted around London in a tramp’s rags, a nun’s habit and a suit of armour. Behind bars, meanwhile, Paddington has to win over a fearsome fellow inmate, Knuckles McGinty (Brendan Gleeson), with his marmalade sandwiches and his naive politeness.

Watch Video: ‘Paddington’ Review: A Charming Bear Overcomes the Odds, and So Does His Movie

It’s this unwavering courtesy which gives the film its central theme. Paddington is presented as the furry offspring of Amélie and Forrest Gump, someone so habitually decent that he makes the world a better place simply by being in it. Before he is arrested, the film establishes that his neighbors (played by Sanjeev Bhaskar, Jessica Hynes, Ben Miller and others) would be as lost without his small acts of kindness as the townsfolk in “It’s a Wonderful Life” would be without James Stewart’s George Bailey.

Children will rightly chortle at Paddington’s clumsiness: when he works as a hairdresser and as a window cleaner, his elaborate mishaps are worthy of Laurel and Hardy. But adults may well shed a tear at the film’s sincere celebration of selflessness and community. Only the grumpy Mr. Curry (Peter Capaldi) holds out against Paddington’s benevolence, and he’s quite the explicit caricature of an anti-immigration Brexit voter.

Also Read: Weinstein Co Talking to 22 Buyers, $300 Million Expected Price, Bob Weinstein Must Exit

Not that King sticks with real-world politics for long. Both of his “Paddington” films are proudly artificial in a manner reminiscent of Michel Gondry, Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Wes Anderson, so that even when our hero is in trouble, we’re never far from the transporting comfort of a gorgeous fantasy sequence, an upbeat musical interlude or an array of pastel colors. Production designer Gary Williamson (“Submarine”) and animation director Pablo Grillo (“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”) are crucial to the film’s magical feel.

Purists may quibble that this magical feel doesn’t have much to do with Bond’s original stories. Bond, who died in July at the age of 91, set them in a recognizable contemporary London, with much of the humor arose from the clash between something as exotic as a talking bear and something as ordinary as a department-store security guard. In contrast, King’s big-screen London is a quaint fantasy city, twinkling with fairy lights and dotted with steam trains and ancient printing presses.

Considering that “Paddington 2” is so beguiling, it may seem churlish to object to these embellishments. But it’s a slight shame that King didn’t become a bankable director a decade or so earlier. That way, he could have made a Harry Potter film and adapted a British children’s book that was better suited to his own whimsical, retro sensibilities.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Producers Guild of America Bans Harvey Weinstein for Life

Anthony Bourdain Shames Quentin Tarantino for Harvey Weinstein Silence

Asia Argento Tweets List of Harvey Weinstein Accusers

Jane Fonda: Harvey Weinstein Victims Heeded Because They’re ‘Famous and White’ (Video)

Michael Bond’s Paddington Bear stories are endearingly small in scale, so it was quite a gamble when David Heyman, the producer of the “Harry Potter” series, decided that they should be the basis of an action-packed, megabudget franchise. It turned out, though, that he knew what he was doing: “Paddington” was a beloved hit in 2015, and the superior sequel is bound to be even more lucrative.

Once again directed by Paul King, and co-written by King and Simon Farnaby, “Paddington 2” is a sure-footed, sweet-natured family comedy which isn’t set at Christmas, but which glows with so much warmth and fun that it might well be a staple of festive television for years to come. (The film has just opened in the United Kingdom; the North American rights are currently held by The Weinstein Company, but Heyman is looking for another distributor.)

One obvious way that it improves on its predecessor is in its choice of villain. The first film introduced an ursine hero who was pretty close to the one in Bond’s books. Endearingly voiced by Ben Whishaw and exquisitely computer-generated, he was a mild-mannered, duffle-coated innocent, who had no superpowers or special abilities except his withering hard stare. And yet he was up against a murderous taxidermist (Nicole Kidman), who was intent on putting his skin on display in a museum. She seemed to have strutted in from a different film altogether. Fortunately, “Paddington 2” is less likely to give young viewers nightmares.

Its antagonist is a vain, past-it thespian, Phoenix Buchanan, played with delightfully self-parodying foppishness by Hugh Grant. Buchanan dreams of staging a one-man show in the West End, and his complicated fund-raising plans — which would have been at home in an Ealing comedy — involve stealing a vintage pop-up book from the antique shop owned by Paddington’s friend Mr. Gruber (Jim Broadbent).

Alas, thanks to a bad case of mistaken identity, it is Paddington who is led away in handcuffs (or rather, paw-cuffs), and sentenced to 10 years in prison. And while that may sound like cruel and unusual punishment, the screenplay provides a witty reason for the judge’s harshness.

From here on, King’s perfectly paced, joke-filled caper cuts back and forth between two parallel plots. One strand puts Paddington’s adoptive family, the Browns (Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, et al), on the trail of Buchanan, a master of disguise who is spotted around London in a tramp’s rags, a nun’s habit and a suit of armour. Behind bars, meanwhile, Paddington has to win over a fearsome fellow inmate, Knuckles McGinty (Brendan Gleeson), with his marmalade sandwiches and his naive politeness.

It’s this unwavering courtesy which gives the film its central theme. Paddington is presented as the furry offspring of Amélie and Forrest Gump, someone so habitually decent that he makes the world a better place simply by being in it. Before he is arrested, the film establishes that his neighbors (played by Sanjeev Bhaskar, Jessica Hynes, Ben Miller and others) would be as lost without his small acts of kindness as the townsfolk in “It’s a Wonderful Life” would be without James Stewart’s George Bailey.

Children will rightly chortle at Paddington’s clumsiness: when he works as a hairdresser and as a window cleaner, his elaborate mishaps are worthy of Laurel and Hardy. But adults may well shed a tear at the film’s sincere celebration of selflessness and community. Only the grumpy Mr. Curry (Peter Capaldi) holds out against Paddington’s benevolence, and he’s quite the explicit caricature of an anti-immigration Brexit voter.

Not that King sticks with real-world politics for long. Both of his “Paddington” films are proudly artificial in a manner reminiscent of Michel Gondry, Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Wes Anderson, so that even when our hero is in trouble, we’re never far from the transporting comfort of a gorgeous fantasy sequence, an upbeat musical interlude or an array of pastel colors. Production designer Gary Williamson (“Submarine”) and animation director Pablo Grillo (“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”) are crucial to the film’s magical feel.

Purists may quibble that this magical feel doesn’t have much to do with Bond’s original stories. Bond, who died in July at the age of 91, set them in a recognizable contemporary London, with much of the humor arose from the clash between something as exotic as a talking bear and something as ordinary as a department-store security guard. In contrast, King’s big-screen London is a quaint fantasy city, twinkling with fairy lights and dotted with steam trains and ancient printing presses.

Considering that “Paddington 2” is so beguiling, it may seem churlish to object to these embellishments. But it’s a slight shame that King didn’t become a bankable director a decade or so earlier. That way, he could have made a Harry Potter film and adapted a British children’s book that was better suited to his own whimsical, retro sensibilities.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Producers Guild of America Bans Harvey Weinstein for Life

Anthony Bourdain Shames Quentin Tarantino for Harvey Weinstein Silence

Asia Argento Tweets List of Harvey Weinstein Accusers

Jane Fonda: Harvey Weinstein Victims Heeded Because They're 'Famous and White' (Video)

RTE, ARTE, APT Team on Religious Documentary With Hugh Bonneville

Irish broadcaster RTE, ARTE and American Public Television (APT) are teaming up to co-produce a special one-hour documentary on the final week of Jesus’ life for Easter 2018, to be presented by Hugh Bonneville. “Countdown to Calvary” will see the “Downton Abbey” star travel to Jerusalem to tell the story of the last six days… Read more »

Irish broadcaster RTE, ARTE and American Public Television (APT) are teaming up to co-produce a special one-hour documentary on the final week of Jesus’ life for Easter 2018, to be presented by Hugh Bonneville. “Countdown to Calvary” will see the “Downton Abbey” star travel to Jerusalem to tell the story of the last six days... Read more »

Andrew Garfield, Claire Foy ‘Breathe’ Deeply in First Trailer for Andy Serkis’ Directorial Debut (Video)

“Hacksaw Ridge” actor Andrew Garfield and “The Crown” star Claire Foy take plenty of deep breaths in Andy Serkis’ directorial debut as they play a married couple tackling personal disaster.

From Bleecker Street and Participant Media, “Breathe” tells the story of a real-life adventurous couple — British Robin and Diana Cavendish — who must cope with adult-onset polio.

After being struck by the disease at the age of 28, Robin is paralyzed from the neck down and able to breathe only with the use of a mechanical ventilator.

Also Read: Claire Foy Is the Frontrunner to Play Lisbeth Salander in ‘Girl in the Spider’s Web’

With the support of Diana, he goes on to become a tireless advocate for the disabled and is instrumental in helping countless people regain their independence — and becomes a medical phenomenon himself.

The Cavendish’s son, producer Jonathan Cavendish, now runs The Imaginarium Studios with Serkis, who is best known for his motion capture roles in “The Lord of the Rings,” “The Hobbit” and “King Kong.”

“Breathe” is penned by “Gladiator” writer William Nicholson and also stars Tom Hollander and “Downton Abbey” alum Hugh Bonneville.

Also Read: Andrew Garfield’s ‘Breathe’ Bought by Participant Media, Bleecker Street

It opens in select theaters on Oct.13.

See the studio’s official description of the film below.

For his directorial debut, Andy Serkis brings to life the inspiring true love story between Robin and Diana Cavendish (Andrew Garfield, Claire Foy), an adventurous couple who refuse to give up in the face of a devastating disease. When Robin is struck down by polio at the age of 28, he is confined to a hospital bed and given only a few months to live. With the help of Diana’s twin brothers (Tom Hollander) and the groundbreaking ideas of inventor Teddy Hall (Hugh Bonneville), Robin and Diana dare to escape the hospital ward to seek out a full and passionate life together — raising their young son, traveling and devoting their lives to helping other polio patients. Written by two-time Academy Award nominated writer William Nicholson, and shot by three-time Academy Award winner Robert Richardson, “Breath” is a heartwarming celebration of love and human possibility.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Andrew Garfield Busts Out a Wig and a Backflip While Lip Syncing to Whitney Houston (Videos)

Andrew Garfield to Star as Afghanistan War Reporter in Indie ‘Black Lion’

Oscar Nominee Andrew Garfield Says ‘Hacksaw Ridge’ Character Is ‘Antidote’ to Donald Trump Values

“Hacksaw Ridge” actor Andrew Garfield and “The Crown” star Claire Foy take plenty of deep breaths in Andy Serkis’ directorial debut as they play a married couple tackling personal disaster.

From Bleecker Street and Participant Media, “Breathe” tells the story of a real-life adventurous couple — British Robin and Diana Cavendish — who must cope with adult-onset polio.

After being struck by the disease at the age of 28, Robin is paralyzed from the neck down and able to breathe only with the use of a mechanical ventilator.

With the support of Diana, he goes on to become a tireless advocate for the disabled and is instrumental in helping countless people regain their independence — and becomes a medical phenomenon himself.

The Cavendish’s son, producer Jonathan Cavendish, now runs The Imaginarium Studios with Serkis, who is best known for his motion capture roles in “The Lord of the Rings,” “The Hobbit” and “King Kong.”

“Breathe” is penned by “Gladiator” writer William Nicholson and also stars Tom Hollander and “Downton Abbey” alum Hugh Bonneville.

It opens in select theaters on Oct.13.

See the studio’s official description of the film below.

For his directorial debut, Andy Serkis brings to life the inspiring true love story between Robin and Diana Cavendish (Andrew Garfield, Claire Foy), an adventurous couple who refuse to give up in the face of a devastating disease. When Robin is struck down by polio at the age of 28, he is confined to a hospital bed and given only a few months to live. With the help of Diana’s twin brothers (Tom Hollander) and the groundbreaking ideas of inventor Teddy Hall (Hugh Bonneville), Robin and Diana dare to escape the hospital ward to seek out a full and passionate life together — raising their young son, traveling and devoting their lives to helping other polio patients. Written by two-time Academy Award nominated writer William Nicholson, and shot by three-time Academy Award winner Robert Richardson, “Breath” is a heartwarming celebration of love and human possibility.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Andrew Garfield Busts Out a Wig and a Backflip While Lip Syncing to Whitney Houston (Videos)

Andrew Garfield to Star as Afghanistan War Reporter in Indie 'Black Lion'

Oscar Nominee Andrew Garfield Says 'Hacksaw Ridge' Character Is 'Antidote' to Donald Trump Values