Hollywood Has a Favorite for Warner Bros After Kevin Tsujihara’s Exit – Stacey Snider

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

When WarnerMedia dropped the shocking news on Monday that Chairman and CEO Kevin Tsujihara would be stepping down, one name was on everyone’s lips: Stacey Snider.

The timing is almost uncanny. Snider, a well-liked and respected executive, has run Universal Pictures, DreamWorks and is currently Chairman and CEO at 20th Century Fox. Plus, she is about to be out of a job when the merger with Disney is completed this week.

Multiple insiders told TheWrap that Snider is the most obvious candidate outside of Warner Bros to take over the leadership position. In October, it was reported she would not join Disney. And she’s a female executive in the age of #MeToo.

Also Read: Kevin Tsujihara to Step Down as Warner Bros CEO and Chairman Amid Investigation Over Ties to Actress

“[Stacey] makes complete sense. It’s just obvious. It’s too perfect,” said one veteran industry executive, echoing the sentiments of others.

“I do think Stacey would be a good choice, or perhaps someone from the outside who brings a fresh point of view on the big picture and all the new and evolving businesses out there,” said another industry executive.

Snider’s lame duck status has been a topic of board rooms and studio watering holes since late last year, when it was clear that Disney was not offering her a position. At TheWrap’s Grill event in October, industry analyst Roy Salter said Snider could write her own ticket. “Stacey knows how to manage content such as to facilitate positive social impact for the world,” he told TheWrap. “In the upcoming changes within media and entertainment, that type of professional has limitless opportunity.”

But that also requires a rare opening in the leadership positions of Hollywood’s major companies.

Also Read: What’s Next for Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider After Disney Closes Deal?

A spokesperson for WarnerMedia declined to comment past the company’s statement that interim leadership would be announced on Tuesday. Snider declined to comment to TheWrap.

If Snider were interested in the job, she has one powerful executive on her side. Peter Chernin, whose Otter Media was funded and then bought outright by AT&T last year, is a trusted adviser to WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey and has a deal on the Fox lot overseen by Snider.

Said one of the veteran executives, “Peter Chernin is a very powerful guy and he has a lot of sway with the guys over there at AT&T.”

AT&T completed its $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner, making the two companies into WarnerMedia.

When they were at Fox, Snider would bring in Chernin’s company to produce and work on films — he knows that if he gets her into Warner Bros., that Chernin Entertainment will have opportunities, according to the executive.

Also Read: AT&T and Time Warner Close $85 Billion Merger

A spokesperson for Chernin told TheWrap that he was not involved in WarnerMedia plans to replace Tsujihara.

However, another insider told TheWrap that the studio would have to get stabilized before a female executive comes on board. That leaves room for Toby Emmerich, Chairman of Warner Bros. Pictures Group, to ascend — at least temporarily.

The decision for Tsujihara to step down came over the weekend. In a memo on Monday, Stankey told employees that an “interim leadership structure” would be announced on Tuesday.

Two industry insiders said they don’t foresee Emmerich stepping into the role for good.

Also Read: Kevin Tsujihara to Step Down as Warner Bros CEO and Chairman Amid Investigation Over Ties to Actress

“It would be hard to do,” he said. “He is such a creative and he’d have to give a lot of that up to handle home entertainment, the business side and whatever else Kevin was doing. Don’t know if it’s the right move, but I think he could definitely do it.”

Former chairperson of Sony Pictures Entertainment Amy Pascal would also be a candidate to take over the post, although she has formed her own company, Pascal Pictures, and is still serving as a producer on Sony films like “Spider-Man: Far From Home” and Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women.”

Tsujihara, who has worked for two decades at the studio and served as chairman for the last six years, has denied any wrongdoing connected to his past intimate relationship with actress Charlotte Kirk. On March 8, after The Hollywood Reporter published texts between the two that indicated she sought his help in obtaining acting jobs while, he wrote a memo to staff in which he said he deeply regretted “mistakes.”

Also Read: Read Kevin Tsujihara’s Memo to Staff: ‘Became Clear My Leadership Could Be a Distraction’

When Disney announced it would acquire Fox, it became clear that Snider would not be making the move. Last fall TheWrap wrote about potential landing spots  for the executive who has taken successful risks on films such as “Deadpool,” “Hidden Figures” and “The Greatest Showman.” Insiders told TheWrap in October she’d be looking to work at another big studio, but nothing was out there — until now.

“Her first thought is always going to be to work at a studio,” one studio executive told TheWrap at the time. “I’m sure she’ll want to wait for a studio, I just don’t know what’s out there.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Warner Bros CEO Kevin Tsujihara: ‘I Deeply Regret That I Have Made Mistakes’

WarnerMedia to Investigate Ties Between Studio Head Kevin Tsujihara, Actress Charlotte Kirk

Scarlett Johansson’s ‘Black Widow’ Movie Enlists Florence Pugh

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Fighting With my Family” star Florence Pugh is in talks to join Scarlett Johansson in the standalone “Black Widow” movie, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Cate Shortland is directing, while Jac Schaeffer wrote the previous draft of the script, and Ned Benson is rewriting. Kevin Feige is producing. The project is set to begin shooting in June.

Marvel had no comment.

Also Read: Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’ Movie Taps Writer Ned Benson

Black Widow debuted in “Iron Man 2” and since then has appeared in both “Avengers” films, as well as “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and “Captain America: Civil War.” Interest in a standalone outing for the character has been consistently high, with a 2016 Fandago poll  finding “Black Widow” as Avengers fans’ top pick for a solo film.

Pugh most recently starred in “Fighting With My Family” as WWE Superstar Paige alongside Lena Headey, Nick Frost and Jack Lowden. She also most recently starred in “Outlaw King” and “The Commuter” and will next star in Ari Aster’s “Midsommar” and Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women.”

She is represented by WME and Shelter PR.

Umberto Gonzalez contributed to this report.

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Cate Shortland to Direct ‘Black Widow’ Movie for Marvel

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Hollywood Studios Are Releasing 5 Times More Films With Female Directors This Year (Exclusive)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

A record 18 percent of movies slated for release in 2019 from Hollywood’s six major studios have a female director, a substantial jump from just 3 percent in 2018, TheWrap has found.

Sixteen of the 87 studio films slated for release in 2019 have at least one woman credited as director — up from just three last year, when fully half of the majors (Paramount, Sony and Warner Bros.) had zero female directors on their wide-release slates.

Another sign of progress: For the first time in history, all six major studios have at least one film directed by a woman on their slates in 2019.

And perhaps as a reflection of public outcry about gender parity in Hollywood from organizations like Women in Film, the female-directed projects reflect a wide gamut of genres and budgets, from Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck’s big-budget superhero movie “Captain Marvel” for Disney to Greta Gerwig’s starry literary adaptation of “Little Women” for Sony to Gurinder Chadha’s Sundance darling “Blinded by the Light” for Warner Bros.’ New Line division.

It’s a notable change from a 2018 where one would be hard pressed to find any film directed by a woman. Last month, studies conducted by USC and San Diego State found that just four of the top 100 highest-grossing films in 2018 and 15 percent of the top 500 were directed by women, both counts signifying a drop from the year before. But this year’s slate of studio releases may be a sign that diversity efforts in Hollywood are starting to bear fruit.

“It’s what we have known for a long time. Movies about and by women are showing they can be successful at the box office, and the industry is following,” Women in Film Executive Director Kirsten Schaffer told TheWrap. She notes that diversity initiatives like WiF’s Reframe program are finding success because they are challenging studios to look at every stage of how they make their movies.

“When people start the work of examining that unconscious bias, that’s when we see the systemic changes necessary. They start thinking about who makes the decisions, which directors and producers are the first considered for hiring. And it goes down from there for every aspect of a film’s production.”

Also Read: Female Protagonists in Top-Grossing Films Hit All-Time High in 2018 – Yet Men Still Dominated

Indeed, some studios are trying to send the message that they are asking such questions about themselves. Last week, Paramount CEO Jim Gianopulos announced in a company-wide memo that the studio would establish a “Content Creation Council” with the goal of making Paramount’s greenlight and development process more inclusive at all levels of production.

“Special attention will be paid to our storylines, our talent in front of and behind the camera, our vendors and our shooting locations,” Gianopulos wrote.

Reps for all six studios declined to comment for this story, though all confirmed their current release slates.

For this survey, TheWrap did not consider releases from art-house divisions like Fox Searchlight and Sony Pictures Classics, which often rely on acquisitions as opposed to developing projects in-house and hiring the filmmakers involved.

Here is the 2019 outlook at each studio, as well as major projects slated for 2020 or currently in development.

Also Read: Grammy Awards Analysis: Women Seize the Spotlight, But Kendrick Lamar Still Can’t Catch a Break

Marvel Studios

DISNEY

As usual, the current box office kings have the smallest number of 2019 releases, with just 10 films (at least until the studio completes its expected acquisition of Fox’s film and TV assets). Of those 10, two with $100 million-plus budgets have women sharing a director credit. First is next month’s “Captain Marvel” (pictured above), which Anna Boden directed with “Mississippi Grind” partner Ryan Fleck, making her the first woman to direct a Marvel Studios release.

Then, in November, “Frozen” director Jennifer Lee returns with the film’s sequel, “Frozen II,” which is co-directed by Chris Buck. Lee was also named chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation following the departure of John Lasseter amid sexual misconduct accusations.

Disney has announced several female-directed films beyond this year, including Niki Caro’s live-action remake of “Mulan,” set for 2020.

Pixar’s Domee Shi, who won the Best Animated Short Oscar on Sunday for “Bao,” is in the early stages of developing her feature debut. Meanwhile, at Marvel Studios, Australian director Cate Shortland is reportedly attached to direct “Black Widow” while “The Rider” director Chloe Zhao is attached to direct “The Eternals,” though neither project has been officially announced by Disney, who declined to comment for this story.

See the full Disney 2019 slate below:

“Captain Marvel” 3/8 (Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck)
“Dumbo” 3/29 (Tim Burton)
“Penguins” 4/17 (Alastair Fothergill and Jeff Wilson)
“Avengers: Endgame” 4/26 (Anthony and Joe Russo)
“Aladdin” 5/24 (Guy Ritchie)
“Toy Story 4” 6/21 (Josh Cooley)
“The Lion King” 7/19 (Jon Favreau)
“Artemis Fowl” 8/9 (Kenneth Branagh)
“Frozen II” 11/22 (Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck)
“Star Wars: Episode IX” 12/20 (J.J. Abrams)

Also Read: Guerrilla Girls Bring Back ‘Senate Is More Progressive Than Hollywood’ Campaign

Universal/Will Packer Productions

UNIVERSAL

Four of the 16 films on Universal’s slate — not counting two still-unspecified placeholders — are directed by women. First up is Tina Gordon Chism’s April comedy “Little,” (above) starring “black-ish” standout Marsai Martin alongside Regina Hall and Issa Rae, followed a month later by Gail Mancuso’s “A Dog’s Journey,” the sequel to the 2017 family film “A Dog’s Purpose.”

Later in the year, the studio will release DreamWorks Animation’s “Abominable,” which is co-directed by Jill Culton, who became the first woman to direct a CGI animated feature with “Open Season” in 2006. And on Thanksgiving, Melina Matsoukas’ thriller “Queen & Slim” will be released, starring Jodie Turner-Smith and Daniel Kaluuya in the titular roles.

One title that was removed from the 2019 slate was “Cowboy Ninja Viking,” which was supposed to be the feature directorial debut of Emmy winner Michelle MacLaren. A Universal spokesman tells TheWrap that the film is still in development. Meanwhile Universal’s 2020 slate includes the Jordan Peele-produced remake of “Candyman,” which Nia DaCosta will direct.

Also Read: Why Hilary Swank Is So Optimistic About Filmmaking’s Diverse Future (Video)

Universal’s indie wing, Focus Features, has three films directed by women coming this year: Laure de Clermont-Tonnerr’s “The Mustang,” due March 15, Kasi Lemmons’ Harriet Tubman biopic “Harriet” and Emerald Fennell’s adaptation of the thriller novel “Promising Young Women.” The latter two films do not have a specific date but are set to release by year’s end.

Here is the full slate:

“Glass” 1/18 (M. Night Shyamalan)
“Happy Death Day 2U” 2/13 (Christopher B. Landon)
“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” 2/22 (Dean DeBlois)
“Us” 3/22 (Jordan Peele)
“Little” 4/12 (Tina Gordon-Chism)
“A Dog’s Journey” 5/17 (Gail Mancuso)
“Ma” 5/31 (Tate Taylor)
“The Secret Life of Pets 2” 6/7 (Chris Renaud)
“Yesterday” 6/28 (Danny Boyle)
“Hobbs & Shaw” 8/2 (David Leitch)
“Good Boys” 8/16 (Lee Eisenberg)
“Abominable” 9/27 (Jill Culton and Todd Wilderman)
“The Hunt” 9/27 (Craig Zobel)
“Last Christmas” 11/15 (Paul Feig)
“Queen & Slim” 11/27 (Melina Matsoukas)
“Cats” 12/20 (Tom Hooper)

Also Read: #OscarsSoMale? Lack of Major Female Nominees Sparks Outcry

SONY

Sony

Sony has already released the first of its four female-directed titles this year, Catherine Hardwicke’s remake of “Miss Bala.” The film has flopped at the box office, grossing $14.7 million after a month in theaters against a $15 million budget.

Later this year, three films directed by women will be a part of Sony’s holiday slate, starting on November 1 with Elizabeth Banks’ revival of “Charlie’s Angels.”

Then, two potential awards contenders will be released on Thanksgiving and Christmas: “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” starring Tom Hanks as Mister Rogers and directed by “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” filmmaker Marielle Heller (pictured above), and Oscar nominee Greta Gerwig’s directorial follow-up to “Lady Bird,” an adaptation of “Little Women” starring Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson and Meryl Streep.

Beyond 2019, Sony has at least two more films by women in development: Clea DuVall’s “Happiest Season” and Paloma Baeza’s “Toymakers Secret.” The studio also has acquired overseas distribution rights for seven films by women through its Stage 6 Films label, including global rights for Heidi Ewing’s “Arrivals” and Camille Stochitch’s “Adventures of Dally and Spanky.”

A Sony spokesperson noted that in a recent study conducted by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, the studio had more films with women and/or people of color in lead roles than any other studio in 2018.

Sony’s 2019 slate is as follows:

“Escape Room” 1/4 (Adam Robitel)
“A Dog’s Way Home” 1/11 (Charles Martin Smith)
“Miss Bala” 2/1 (Catherine Hardwicke)
“The Intruder” 5/3 (Deon Taylor)
“Brightburn”5/24 (David Yarovesky)
“Men in Black: International” 6/14 (F. Gary Gray)
“Spider-Man: Far From Home” 7/5 (Jon Watts)
“Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” 7/26 (Quentin Tarantino)
“The Angry Birds Movie 2” 8/16 (Thurop Van Orman)
“Overcomer” 8/23 (Alex Kendrick)
“Black and Blue” 9/20 (Deon Taylor)
“Zombieland: Double Tap” 10/11 (Ruben Fleischer)
“Charlie’s Angels” 11/1 (Elizabeth Banks)
“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” 11/22 (Marielle Heller)
“Jumanji 3” 12/13 (Jake Kasdan)
“Masters of the Universe” 12/18 (Adam and Aaron Nee)
“Little Women” 12/25 (Greta Gerwig)

Also Read: Female Directors Dropped to Just 8 Percent of the Top 250 Films in 2018, Study Finds


WARNER BROS.

Cornerstone Films

Like Sony, Warner Bros. has a larger slate than most of the rest of Hollywood thanks to the presence of New Line and Village Roadshow and partnerships with companies like Legendary Pictures. Warner has four films from women this year — even after Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman 1984” was bumped from November 2019 to June 2020.

The first of WB’s female-led slate is Katt Shea’s adaptation of the classic YA novel “Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase,” due March 15. May will bring another YA adaptation with Ry Russo-Young’s “The Sun Is Also a Star.” August will see the release of Gurinder Chadha’s New Line-produced drama “Blinded by the Light” (above); and in September, Warner will release “The Kitchen,” Andrea Berloff’s tale of a group of widows who take over their husbands’ criminal empire after their death.

Along with “Wonder Woman 1984,” Warner’s 2020 DC movie slate also includes Cathy Yan’s “Birds of Prey,” starring Margot Robbie, Jurnee Smollett-Bell, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, and Rosie Perez. A third DC film, “The New Gods,” has Ava DuVernay attached as director and is in development.

Here is Warner Bros.’ slate:

“The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part” 2/8 (Mike Mitchell)
“Isn’t It Romantic” 2/14 (Todd Strauss-Schulson)
“Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase” 3/15 (Katt Shea)
“Shazam” 4/5 (David F. Sandberg)
“The Curse of La Llorona” 4/19 (Michael Chaves)
“Detective Pikachu” 5/10 (Rob Letterman)
“The Sun is Also a Star” 5/17 (Ry Russo-Young)
“Godzilla: King of the Monsters” 5/31 (Michael Dougherty)
“Shaft” 6/14 (Tim Story)
“Annabelle 3” 7/3 (Gary Dauberman)
“Minecraft” 7/10 (Peter Sollett)
“Blinded by the Light” 8/14 (Gurinder Chadha)
“It: Chapter Two” 9/6 (Andy Muschietti)
“The Kitchen” 9/20 (Andrea Berloff)
“Joker” 10/4 (Todd Phillips)
“The Goldfinch” 10/11 (John Crowley)
“Motherless Brooklyn 11/1 (Edward Norton)
“Doctor Sleep” 11/8 (Mike Flanagan)
“The Good Liar” 11/15 (Bill Condon)
“Superintelligence” 12/25 (Ben Falcone)

Also Read: Female Filmmakers Share War Stories, From Breast Feeding on Set to Male Insubordination

PARAMOUNT

Reed Morano (Photo: Getty Images)

Of the 12 films on Paramount’s slate, only one is directed by a woman: Reed Morano’s “The Rhythm Section,” which had its release date pushed to November 2019 after lead star Blake Lively suffered an on-set injury.

While no films by female directors are currently slated after “The Rhythm Section,” a studio rep said that six woman-led films are in active development — including Ry Russo-Young’s “Nightlife” and Lisa Cholodenko’s remake of the Oscar-nominated German film “Toni Erdmann.”

Here is Paramount’s slate this year:

“What Men Want” 2/11 (Adam Shankman)
“Wonder Park” 3/15 (No credited director)
“Pet Sematary” 4/5 (Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer)
“Rocketman” 5/31 (Dexter Fletcher)
“Limited Partners” 6/28 (Miguel Arteta)
“Dora the Explorer” 8/2 (James Bobin)
“Crawl” 8/23 (Alexandre Aja)
“Gemini Man” 10/4 (Ang Lee)
“Are You Afraid of the Dark?” 10/11 (D.J. Caruso)
“Terminator: Dark Fate” 11/1 (Tim Miller)
“Sonic the Hedgehog” 11/8 (Jeff Fowler)
“The Rhythm Section” 11/22 (Reed Morano)

Also Read: Why We Created the Power Women Summit – The Road to 50/50 by 2020


20th CENTURY FOX

20th Century Fox

Finally, there’s Fox, whose 2019 slate is complicated by its impending acquisition by Disney. It’s difficult to say how many of Fox’s films and developing projects will see release after the merge is finalized later this year. But for now, Fox does have one film with a female director on this year’s slate: Roxann Dawson’s faith-based film “Breakthrough,” which is set for release in April (pictured above).

Fox’s indie wing, Fox Searchlight, only has two films currently slated for 2019, neither directed by women. This month, however, the studio acquired rights to “Nomadland,” Chloe Zhao’s follow-up to “The Rider” and starring Frances McDormand in her first leading role after winning an Oscar for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Fox’s current slate is as follows:

“The Kid Who Would Be King” 1/25 (Joe Cornish)
“Alita: Battle Angel” 2/14 (Robert Rodriguez)
“Ad Astra” 3/15 (James Gray)
“Breakthrough” 4/17 (Roxann Dawson)
“Dark Phoenix” 6/7 (Simon Kinberg)
“Ford v. Ferrari” 6/28 (James Mangold)
“Stuber” 7/12 (Michael Dowse)
“The New Mutants” 8/2 (Josh Boone)
“Spies in Disguise” 9/13 (Nick Bruno and Troy Quane)
“The Art of Racing in the Rain” 9/27 (Simon Curtis)
“Kingsman: The Great Game” 11/8 (Matthew Vaughn)
“Call of the Wild” 12/25 (Chris Sanders)

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#OscarsSoMale? Lack of Major Female Nominees Sparks Outcry

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The Oscar nomination list is here, and Film Twitter isn’t happy about the lack of female nominees for Best Director and several other major below-the-line categories.

A year after Greta Gerwig earned a Best Director nomination for “Lady Bird,” the category was back to being an all-male affair as Adam McKay (“Vice”), Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”) Pawel Pawlikowski (“Cold War”), Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman) and Yorgos Lanthimos (“The Favourite”) were nominated.

Meanwhile, in the Best Picture category, which lists producers as nominees, only five women were listed among the 25 producers credited for this year’s field of eight contending films. Overall, of the 225 nominations handed out on Tuesday, 62 went to women. While that is the highest number in Oscar history, that still means that women only account for 28 percent of the nomination field.

Also Read: Oscar Nominee Alfonso Cuarón: ‘Audiences Are Hungry for Diversity in Cinema’

“Remember this is not about whether a film is good,” said Women and Hollywood founder Melissa Silverstein in a Twitter thread posted Tuesday morning. “It’s about access and opportunity.”

Silverstein pointed to several female directors that did not get the serious consideration that their male peers did, namely Debra Granik for “Leave No Trace” and Chloe Zhao for “The Rider.” She also noted that while Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant earned nominations for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” the film’s director, Marielle Heller, did not.

“Debra Granik hasn’t been nominated for best director and that is just as tragic as Spike Lee not getting nominated which has been rectified this year. She makes extraordinary films. There would be no Jennifer Lawrence without Debra,” Silverstein wrote.

Also Read: Hollywood Agents, Producers on Industry Misogyny: ‘We Have to Be the First People’ to Make Change

“Bradley Cooper got about $40 million for his 1st movie ‘”A Star Is Born”‘] – and it’s great- but let’s remember that his film gets to the finish line ahead of some others because of the investment that is made in the campaign,” Silverstein added. “I know it’s hard for people who are not living in the weeds and don’t see women’s names as directors all the time to believe that women make movies that should be nominated year in and year out. But they do.”

There were some positives for women in film, though. Hannah Beachler, the production designer for “Black Panther,” became the first African-American woman to be nominated for Best Production Design. Also, while the nomination list was disappointing for women behind the camera, there’s a sign of hope for women in narrative.

That’s because the two films that led the pack in nominations, “Roma” and “The Favourite,” were films that featured women in all the core roles. “Roma” stars Yalitza Aparicio and Marina De Tavira each earned nominations on Tuesday, as did “Favourite” stars Olivia Coleman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz. In the 90-year history of the Oscars, only three Best Picture winners feature women in the lead and main supporting roles: “Chicago” in 2003, “Terms of Endearment” in 1984, and “All About Eve” in 1951.

Also Read: Female Directors Dropped to Just 8 Percent of the Top 250 Films in 2018, Study Finds

Read more reactions about women and the Oscar nominations below:

They should just have Natalie repeat this every year until it changes. https://t.co/7rftJAGoBY

— Franklin Leonard (@franklinleonard) January 22, 2019

me @ the best director oscar nominations pic.twitter.com/LUlhIg3Av6

— karen han (@karenyhan) January 22, 2019

Anyway shout out to queens Lynne Ramsay, Chloe Zhao, Marielle Heller, and Debra Granik for making some of the best films of the year. pic.twitter.com/oVxgX1A7Nh

— Michelle Buchman (@michelledeidre) January 22, 2019

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Oscar Nominee Alfonso Cuarón: ‘Audiences Are Hungry for Diversity in Cinema’

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Bob Odenkirk is in Greta Gerwig’s Little Women 

Read on: The A.V. Club.

At this point, the cast of Greta Gerwig’s Little Women adaptation is looking so good that it actually makes her look a little greedy. The Ladybird writer/director has already landed Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Meryl Streep, Laura Dern, Florence P…

‘Better Call Saul’s Bob Odenkirk Joins Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’ Remake

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EXCLUSIVE: Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Better Call Saul star Bob Odenkirk is set for Sony Pictures’ Little Women, the remake which is being written and directed by Greta Gerwig. The previously announced cast includes Meryl Streep, Timothee Ch…

Emma Watson Squeezes Into Cast of Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’ Adaptation

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Greta Gerwig’s adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott classic “Little Woman” has found a different Emma.

Emma Watson is joining the Sony project in a role that was initial intended for Emma Stone, after Stone was unable to board the project due to scheduling conflicts.

Watson, who starred in Disney’s 2017 live-action adaptation of “Beauty and the Beast,” one of the year’s highest-grossing films, joins a loaded cast that includes “Lady Bird” stars Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet, as well as Meryl Streep, Laura Dern, Florence Pugh and James Norton.

Also Read: Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet in Talks to Reteam for Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’

“Little Women” follows teenage sisters Amy, Jo, Beth and Meg and their mother Marmee during Civil War-era Massachusetts and details the sisters’ passage from childhood to womanhood as they navigate their new town, true love, and their first holiday without their pastor father.

It’s not clear who will be playing what role yet.

Gerwig, who was nominated for best director and best original screenplay for last year’s “Lady Bird,” was initially brought on board to rewrite the script for the project, which has been in development a while at the studio. She will now also direct the film.

“Little Women” was last adapted to the screen in 1994 in an Oscar-nominated Gillian Armstrong film starring Winona Ryder, Claire Danes, Susan Sarandon and Christian Bale.

Also Read: Emma Watson Sports ‘Time’s Up’ Tattoo After the Oscars (Photo)

Amy Pascal is producing, along with Denise Di Novi and Robin Swicord. Andrea Giannetti will oversee the production for Columbia Pictures.

Watson is managed by Untitled Entertainment and repped by CAA.

Variety first reported the news.

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Greta Gerwig and Saoirse Ronan reunite for a new movie version of Little Women

Read on: The A.V. Club.

According to reports, Greta Gerwig has set the seventh Hollywood adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic coming-of-age novel Little Women as her next directorial project. In case you’ve never read it, the novel—which was previously made into films in…

Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet in Talks to Reteam for Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Greta Gerwig’s next project, an adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott classic “Little Women” for Sony’s Columbia Pictures is attracting big names.

“Lady Bird” stars Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet along with Meryl Streep, Emma Stone, Florence Pugh are in talks to join the project, a person close to the film told TheWrap.

“Little Women” follows teenage sisters Amy, Jo, Beth and Meg and their mother Marmee during Civil War-era Massachusetts and details the sisters’ passage from childhood to womanhood as they navigate their new town, true love, and their first holiday without their pastor father.

Also Read: ‘Lady Bird’ Director Greta Gerwig on Focusing on a Female Protagonist Who Doesn’t Need a Guy

The studio is still casting the project, so it’s not clear who will be playing what role yet.

Gerwig, who was nominated for best director and best original screenplay for last year’s “Lady Bird,” was initially brought on board to rewrite the script for the project, which has been in development a while at the studio.

Gerwig is in talks to take on directing duties as well on the project, which was last adapted to the screen in 1994 in an Oscar-nominated Gillian Armstrong film starring Winona Ryder, Claire Danes, Susan Sarandon and Christian Bale.

This would be Gerwig’s first project since the success of her successful directorial debut last year.

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Greta Gerwig To Helm ‘Little Women’ At Sony; Meryl Streep, Emma Stone, Timothee Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan In Talks

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Javier Bardem ‘Shocked’ Over Woody Allen Treatment

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Javier Bardem is “shocked” by the treatment of Woody Allen and said he has “doubts” about the longstanding allegations of sexual misconduct against the filmmaker.

In an interview with French newspaper Paris Match, the actor, who starred in Allen’s 2008 film “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” said he’s “absolutely not” ashamed to have worked with him.

“If there was evidence that Woody Allen was guilty, then yes, I would have stopped working with him, but I have doubts,” Bardem said, according to People. “I am very shocked by this sudden treatment. Judgments in the states of New York and Connecticut found him innocent. The legal situation today is the same as in 2007.”

Also Read: Elle Fanning Says She ‘Regrets’ If Her Decision to Work With Woody Allen ‘Hurt Anyone’

Several stars of Allen’s films have publicly said that they would not work with the director again in the wake of resurfaced allegations of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter, Dylan Farrow, and her mother, Mia Farrow. Among those are “Wonder Wheel” actor David Krumholtz, who said he “deeply” regrets working with the filmmaker on his most recent film, calling it one of his “most heartbreaking mistakes.”

Greta Gerwig also said she will never work for Allen again and wouldn’t have starred in his 2012 movie “To Rome With Love” had she known about the accusations against him. Peter Sarsgaard, who starred in Allen’s 2013 film “Blue Jasmine,” said he would turn down another chance to work with the director.

Also Read: Peter Sarsgaard Says He Won’t Make Another Movie With Woody Allen Film, Jeff Daniels Isn’t So Sure (Video)

Allen has been accused of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow, an allegation for which he was investigated in 1992 but never charged. Allen has denied the allegations, calling it an invention of Farrow’s mother, actress Mia Farrow. They accusations were brought back to the public’s attention when Farrow detailed her experience in an open letter in the New York Times in 2014.

In December, she published a new op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, in which she called out Kate Winslet, Blake Lively and Gerwig for working with Allen amidst the accusations.

A spokesperson for Bardem has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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‘Isle of Dogs’ Film Review: Wes Anderson’s Fetching Animated Tale Features His Pet Obsessions

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

In Wes Anderson’s dazzlingly but also puzzlingly realized (more on that in a moment) “Isle of Dogs,” a dystopian fable pitting man’s best friends against its worst fiends in a futuristic Japan, the writer-director proves again that in his hands, a bedtime story is more likely to be an over-stimulant than a narcotic.

When humans first met canines, each fortuitously emboldened a change in the other, and the same could be said for Anderson regarding stop-motion animation: cinema’s premier dioramist could finally go as micro-controlling as needed and still turn out his freest, most lovable work (2009’s “Fantastic Mr. Fox”), while an art form overwhelmed by its digitized brethren showed it could attract hip filmmaking talent and produce eccentric, artisanal masterworks.

“Isle of Dogs” isn’t the sly, maturely immature gem “Mr. Fox” remains — even with that phonic pun of a title — but it’s a mostly enjoyably overstuffed model kit of adventure ingredients: talking dog heroes, an intrepid boy aviator, an outspoken girl reporter, garbage playgrounds, mechanical worlds, robot peril and mischievous humor. It’s even, for this director, tantalizingly political, venturing into dark territory about such utopia-bursting ills as bigotry and authoritarianism.

Watch Video: ‘Isle of Dogs’ First Trailer: Wes Anderson Unleashes Animated Tale of Quirky Dogs in Japan

And yet it’s still nth-degree Anderson in its visuals, wit, and personality, a carefully unfolded pop-up universe of influences (dig that “Seven Samurai” music shoutout), itemizations, tangents, analog textures, communication quirks (English-speaking dogs, non-subtitled Japanese humans), cartographic flourishes, and deadpan comic charm. Its profundity can easily bring out your inner parent, the kind in thrall to an imaginative kid’s attention to storytelling detail, even if the thread occasionally gets lost.

The story, dreamed up by Anderson, Jason Schwartzman, Roman Coppola and Konichi Nomura, takes place in the fictional Megasaki, years after a degree by corrupt Mayor Kobayashi (a reference to the frank-scarfing champion?) exiles all dogs to Trash Island over ginned-up fears of conditions called dog-flu, snout-fever, and “canine saturation.” (The mythical history of anti-dog sentiment is narrated in a dryly amusing prologue styled like ancient Japanese woodblock prints, and capped with, of course, a haiku.)

Also Read: Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Triggers Debate Over Cultural Appropriation

Trash Island — flat, monochromatic, and industrial — may be the bleakest setting in all of Anderson-dom, but it is exquisitely littered. When a bickering pack of roving ex-pets (voiced by Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban and Jeff Goldblum) and a battle-hardened stray named Chief (Bryan Cranston) investigate a downed plane on their waste-heap atoll, they discover 12-year-old Atari (Koyu Rankin) — orphan ward to the Mayor (Nomura) — determined at all costs to find the loyal, beloved bodyguard companion named Spots (Liev Schreiber) who was stripped from his side years ago.

The appealingly motley island dogs, spurred by fond memories of their human-serving days, decide to help Atari in his quest, although their motivation rankles Chief, whose grizzled cynicism about obedience sparks the film’s funniest intra-canine banter. The boy’s disappearance back home, however, is just the crisis to push the Mayor (modeled like a composite of every venal Toshiro Mifune tough he ever played for Kurosawa) into an even nastier plan to eradicate all dogs. On his case, though, is an activist foreign exchange student (Greta Gerwig) who smells conspiracy.

To count the number of ways “Isle of Dogs” blares “Wes Anderson!” is pointless, but some of my favorite touches include the cotton-cloud chaos that signals a mutt melee, a breathtaking if graphic sushi-making digression, and the nicely pitched doggy-noir exchanges between Chief and a lushly-furred former show dog named Nutmeg (Scarlett Johansson). If he’s gaining at all as a filmmaker, it’s in his craftier layering of narrative, comedy, and painstaking design so that they keep the whole engine moving instead of lingering, waiting to be regarded.

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But there’s always that nagging sense that Anderson’s fondness for cultural appropriation — the India of “The Darjeeling Limited,” the vanished Europe of “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” and now his Eastern Asia reverie — has more to do with décor-driven pleasures than a resonant inner identity.

It’s one thing to weave a fantasy about saving dogs, and set it in the Japanophilic backdrop of your movie-mad dreams, but there’s a careless insensitivity in evoking issues of internment and annihilation for what amounts to an expensive Japan-set flipbook, particularly if you aren’t even going to provide subtitles for the native characters, who are mostly archetypes anyway. (That aforementioned language gimmick starts out as a head-scratcher, and pretty much stays that.) Then there’s the movie’s A-list vocal talent, a curious case of white-voicing when it comes to its four-legged original characters, who are ostensibly Japanese dogs.

None of it’s done out of any meanness, but it eventually worms its way into your appreciation of Anderson’s otherwise meticulous, wry blend of puppetry, 2D expressionism and dollhouse technique. There is much to admire about how “Isle of Dogs” channels its filmmaker’s design-lab obsessions and neurotic humanity into often beautiful, smile-inducing images, even if you’re not quite ready to pat Anderson on the head after the trick is over and say, “Good boy.”



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Elle Fanning Says She ‘Regrets’ If Her Decision to Work With Woody Allen ‘Hurt Anyone’ 

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Elle Fanning said Saturday that she “regrets” that starring in Woody Allen’s upcoming “A Rainy Day in New York” may have “hurt anyone in the process.”

During an interview for another upcoming movie, “Galveston,” at TheWrap’s studio at SXSW, Fanning was seemingly caught off guard when asked about her “Rainy Day” director, Woody Allen. Several stars of Allen’s films have publicly said that they would not work with the director again in the wake of resurfaced allegations of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter, Dylan Farrow, and her mother, Mia Farrow.

“I regret if my decision to work with anyone hurt anyone in the process, because it’s never your intent to do [so],” Fanning said, adding that she supported the Time’s Up movement. “I’m a huge supporter of women and working with women and [“Galveston” director] Mélanie [Laurent].”

See Video: Peter Sarsgaard Says He Won’t Make Another Movie With Woody Allen Film, Jeff Daniels Isn’t So Sure

Among the many actors that have worked with Allen in the past who said they would not work with him again is “Wonder Wheel” actor David Krumholtz, who said he “deeply” regrets working with the filmmaker on his most recent film, calling it one of his “most heartbreaking mistakes.”

Greta Gerwig also said she will never work for Allen again and wouldn’t have starred in his 2012 movie “To Rome With Love” had she known about the accusations against him. Peter Sarsgaard, who starred in Allen’s 2013 film “Blue Jasmine,” said he would turn down another chance to work with the director.

Fanning’s “Rainy Day in New York” costars Timothee Chalamet and Rebecca Hall said they donated their salaries from the film to charities, with Chalamet saying he gave money to Time’s UP, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN, an anti-sexual violence organization.

“It’s a small gesture and not one intended as close to compensation, but I’ve donated my wage to @timesup,” Hall wrote in an Instagram post in January.

Also Read: Kate Winslet Has ‘Bitter Regrets’ About Working With ‘Men of Power’ (Video)

Fanning said she also made a donation to Time’s Up. “This conversation that we’re having needs to be had for sure and it needs to be continued. I’m a huge supporter of all of that.”

Allen has been accused of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow, an allegation for which he was investigated in 1992 but never charged. Allen has denied the allegations, calling it an invention of Farrow’s mother, actress Mia Farrow. They accusations were brought back to the public’s attention when Farrow detailed her experience in an open letter in the New York Times in 2014.

In December, she published a new op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, in which she called out Kate Winslet, Blake Lively and Gerwig for working with Allen amidst the accusations.

Fanning attended SXSW to discuss “Galveston,” which was directed by Mélanie Laurent and also stars Ben Foster and Lili Reinhart.

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