Javier Bardem ‘Shocked’ Over Woody Allen Treatment

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Javier Bardem is “shocked” by the treatment of Woody Allen and said he has “doubts” about the longstanding allegations of sexual misconduct against the filmmaker.

In an interview with French newspaper Paris Match, the actor, who starred in Allen’s 2008 film “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” said he’s “absolutely not” ashamed to have worked with him.

“If there was evidence that Woody Allen was guilty, then yes, I would have stopped working with him, but I have doubts,” Bardem said, according to People. “I am very shocked by this sudden treatment. Judgments in the states of New York and Connecticut found him innocent. The legal situation today is the same as in 2007.”

Also Read: Elle Fanning Says She ‘Regrets’ If Her Decision to Work With Woody Allen ‘Hurt Anyone’

Several stars of Allen’s films have publicly said that they would not work with the director again in the wake of resurfaced allegations of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter, Dylan Farrow, and her mother, Mia Farrow. Among those are “Wonder Wheel” actor David Krumholtz, who said he “deeply” regrets working with the filmmaker on his most recent film, calling it one of his “most heartbreaking mistakes.”

Greta Gerwig also said she will never work for Allen again and wouldn’t have starred in his 2012 movie “To Rome With Love” had she known about the accusations against him. Peter Sarsgaard, who starred in Allen’s 2013 film “Blue Jasmine,” said he would turn down another chance to work with the director.

Also Read: Peter Sarsgaard Says He Won’t Make Another Movie With Woody Allen Film, Jeff Daniels Isn’t So Sure (Video)

Allen has been accused of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow, an allegation for which he was investigated in 1992 but never charged. Allen has denied the allegations, calling it an invention of Farrow’s mother, actress Mia Farrow. They accusations were brought back to the public’s attention when Farrow detailed her experience in an open letter in the New York Times in 2014.

In December, she published a new op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, in which she called out Kate Winslet, Blake Lively and Gerwig for working with Allen amidst the accusations.

A spokesperson for Bardem has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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Diane Keaton: ‘Woody Allen Is My Friend And I Continue to Believe Him’

‘Isle of Dogs’ Film Review: Wes Anderson’s Fetching Animated Tale Features His Pet Obsessions

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In Wes Anderson’s dazzlingly but also puzzlingly realized (more on that in a moment) “Isle of Dogs,” a dystopian fable pitting man’s best friends against its worst fiends in a futuristic Japan, the writer-director proves again that in his hands, a bedtime story is more likely to be an over-stimulant than a narcotic.

When humans first met canines, each fortuitously emboldened a change in the other, and the same could be said for Anderson regarding stop-motion animation: cinema’s premier dioramist could finally go as micro-controlling as needed and still turn out his freest, most lovable work (2009’s “Fantastic Mr. Fox”), while an art form overwhelmed by its digitized brethren showed it could attract hip filmmaking talent and produce eccentric, artisanal masterworks.

“Isle of Dogs” isn’t the sly, maturely immature gem “Mr. Fox” remains — even with that phonic pun of a title — but it’s a mostly enjoyably overstuffed model kit of adventure ingredients: talking dog heroes, an intrepid boy aviator, an outspoken girl reporter, garbage playgrounds, mechanical worlds, robot peril and mischievous humor. It’s even, for this director, tantalizingly political, venturing into dark territory about such utopia-bursting ills as bigotry and authoritarianism.

Watch Video: ‘Isle of Dogs’ First Trailer: Wes Anderson Unleashes Animated Tale of Quirky Dogs in Japan

And yet it’s still nth-degree Anderson in its visuals, wit, and personality, a carefully unfolded pop-up universe of influences (dig that “Seven Samurai” music shoutout), itemizations, tangents, analog textures, communication quirks (English-speaking dogs, non-subtitled Japanese humans), cartographic flourishes, and deadpan comic charm. Its profundity can easily bring out your inner parent, the kind in thrall to an imaginative kid’s attention to storytelling detail, even if the thread occasionally gets lost.

The story, dreamed up by Anderson, Jason Schwartzman, Roman Coppola and Konichi Nomura, takes place in the fictional Megasaki, years after a degree by corrupt Mayor Kobayashi (a reference to the frank-scarfing champion?) exiles all dogs to Trash Island over ginned-up fears of conditions called dog-flu, snout-fever, and “canine saturation.” (The mythical history of anti-dog sentiment is narrated in a dryly amusing prologue styled like ancient Japanese woodblock prints, and capped with, of course, a haiku.)

Also Read: Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Triggers Debate Over Cultural Appropriation

Trash Island — flat, monochromatic, and industrial — may be the bleakest setting in all of Anderson-dom, but it is exquisitely littered. When a bickering pack of roving ex-pets (voiced by Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban and Jeff Goldblum) and a battle-hardened stray named Chief (Bryan Cranston) investigate a downed plane on their waste-heap atoll, they discover 12-year-old Atari (Koyu Rankin) — orphan ward to the Mayor (Nomura) — determined at all costs to find the loyal, beloved bodyguard companion named Spots (Liev Schreiber) who was stripped from his side years ago.

The appealingly motley island dogs, spurred by fond memories of their human-serving days, decide to help Atari in his quest, although their motivation rankles Chief, whose grizzled cynicism about obedience sparks the film’s funniest intra-canine banter. The boy’s disappearance back home, however, is just the crisis to push the Mayor (modeled like a composite of every venal Toshiro Mifune tough he ever played for Kurosawa) into an even nastier plan to eradicate all dogs. On his case, though, is an activist foreign exchange student (Greta Gerwig) who smells conspiracy.

To count the number of ways “Isle of Dogs” blares “Wes Anderson!” is pointless, but some of my favorite touches include the cotton-cloud chaos that signals a mutt melee, a breathtaking if graphic sushi-making digression, and the nicely pitched doggy-noir exchanges between Chief and a lushly-furred former show dog named Nutmeg (Scarlett Johansson). If he’s gaining at all as a filmmaker, it’s in his craftier layering of narrative, comedy, and painstaking design so that they keep the whole engine moving instead of lingering, waiting to be regarded.

Also Read: Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton Trolled as ‘Honorary Asians,’ This Time for Animated Characters

But there’s always that nagging sense that Anderson’s fondness for cultural appropriation — the India of “The Darjeeling Limited,” the vanished Europe of “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” and now his Eastern Asia reverie — has more to do with décor-driven pleasures than a resonant inner identity.

It’s one thing to weave a fantasy about saving dogs, and set it in the Japanophilic backdrop of your movie-mad dreams, but there’s a careless insensitivity in evoking issues of internment and annihilation for what amounts to an expensive Japan-set flipbook, particularly if you aren’t even going to provide subtitles for the native characters, who are mostly archetypes anyway. (That aforementioned language gimmick starts out as a head-scratcher, and pretty much stays that.) Then there’s the movie’s A-list vocal talent, a curious case of white-voicing when it comes to its four-legged original characters, who are ostensibly Japanese dogs.

None of it’s done out of any meanness, but it eventually worms its way into your appreciation of Anderson’s otherwise meticulous, wry blend of puppetry, 2D expressionism and dollhouse technique. There is much to admire about how “Isle of Dogs” channels its filmmaker’s design-lab obsessions and neurotic humanity into often beautiful, smile-inducing images, even if you’re not quite ready to pat Anderson on the head after the trick is over and say, “Good boy.”



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FoxNext Brings VR Behind-the-Scenes Look at Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’

‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ May Dethrone ‘Black Panther,’ But It Needs Overseas Boost

Tiffany Haddish to Star in Netflix Animated Series From ‘Bojack Horseman’ Producers

Elle Fanning Says She ‘Regrets’ If Her Decision to Work With Woody Allen ‘Hurt Anyone’ 

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Elle Fanning said Saturday that she “regrets” that starring in Woody Allen’s upcoming “A Rainy Day in New York” may have “hurt anyone in the process.”

During an interview for another upcoming movie, “Galveston,” at TheWrap’s studio at SXSW, Fanning was seemingly caught off guard when asked about her “Rainy Day” director, Woody Allen. Several stars of Allen’s films have publicly said that they would not work with the director again in the wake of resurfaced allegations of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter, Dylan Farrow, and her mother, Mia Farrow.

“I regret if my decision to work with anyone hurt anyone in the process, because it’s never your intent to do [so],” Fanning said, adding that she supported the Time’s Up movement. “I’m a huge supporter of women and working with women and [“Galveston” director] Mélanie [Laurent].”

See Video: Peter Sarsgaard Says He Won’t Make Another Movie With Woody Allen Film, Jeff Daniels Isn’t So Sure

Among the many actors that have worked with Allen in the past who said they would not work with him again is “Wonder Wheel” actor David Krumholtz, who said he “deeply” regrets working with the filmmaker on his most recent film, calling it one of his “most heartbreaking mistakes.”

Greta Gerwig also said she will never work for Allen again and wouldn’t have starred in his 2012 movie “To Rome With Love” had she known about the accusations against him. Peter Sarsgaard, who starred in Allen’s 2013 film “Blue Jasmine,” said he would turn down another chance to work with the director.

Fanning’s “Rainy Day in New York” costars Timothee Chalamet and Rebecca Hall said they donated their salaries from the film to charities, with Chalamet saying he gave money to Time’s UP, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN, an anti-sexual violence organization.

“It’s a small gesture and not one intended as close to compensation, but I’ve donated my wage to @timesup,” Hall wrote in an Instagram post in January.

Also Read: Kate Winslet Has ‘Bitter Regrets’ About Working With ‘Men of Power’ (Video)

Fanning said she also made a donation to Time’s Up. “This conversation that we’re having needs to be had for sure and it needs to be continued. I’m a huge supporter of all of that.”

Allen has been accused of sexual assault by his adoptive daughter Dylan Farrow, an allegation for which he was investigated in 1992 but never charged. Allen has denied the allegations, calling it an invention of Farrow’s mother, actress Mia Farrow. They accusations were brought back to the public’s attention when Farrow detailed her experience in an open letter in the New York Times in 2014.

In December, she published a new op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, in which she called out Kate Winslet, Blake Lively and Gerwig for working with Allen amidst the accusations.

Fanning attended SXSW to discuss “Galveston,” which was directed by Mélanie Laurent and also stars Ben Foster and Lili Reinhart.

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Biggest Oscar Snubs and Surprises Include ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘This Is Me’

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It was primarily business as expected at the 90th Annual Academy Awards, with most frontrunners from the guild awards taking home prizes. Still, there managed to be a few surprises over the course of the evening. SNUBS: “Lady Bird” and “Mudbound” In an evening where the love was spread around pretty evenly, Greta Gerwig’s acclaimed […]

Jordan Peele and Get Out triumph at the Film Independent Spirit Awards

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It’s the day before the Oscars, which means it’s time for Hollywood to take its traditionally smaller, cooler trial run for the big night, in the form of the annual Film Independent Spirit Awards. Presented by non-profit Film Independent, and voted on by independent filmmakers, the show was broadcast today on IFC,…

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Independent Spirit Awards: The Complete Winners List (Updating Live)

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“Get Out” emerged as the big winner of the 2018 Independent Spirit Awards, held Saturday on the beach in Santa Monica, Ca.

Jordan Peele’s racially charged thriller — which captivated the country and became an unlikely indie blockbuster — took Best Feature at the annual show put up by Film Independent. Peele also took Best Director.

Top acting prizes went to Frances McDormand for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and Timothee Chalamet for “Call Me by Your Name.” Best Supporting Male went to Sam Rockwell for “Three Billboards,” and Best Supporting Female went to Allison Janney of “I, Tonya.” That makes it a virtual clean sweep for the latter two actors on the eve of the Academy Awards.

Also Read: Kroll and Mulaney Roast Harvey Weinstein, Louis CK, Kevin Spacey in Spirit Awards Monologue

Greta Gerwig won Best Screenplay for her coming-of-age darling “Lady Bird,” while Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani took Best First Screenplay for their autobiographical comedy “The Big Sick.”

Notable below-the-line prizes went to Tatiana S. Riegel, who took Best Editing for
“I, Tonya.”  Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, director of photography on “Call Me by Your Name,” won Best Cinematography.

Comedians Nick Kroll and John Mulaney (“Big Mouth,” “Oh, Hello”) returned to host the ceremony, an annual splashy gathering of Hollywood stars and indie film luminaries willing to brave the natural lighting of  a rare daytime awards show.

Also Read: Independent Spirit Awards: In a Stormy Year, It’s Up to Jordan Peele to Keep the Streak Alive

The complete winners list:

BEST FEATURE
“Call Me by Your Name”
“The Florida Project”
“Get Out” *WINNER
“Lady Bird”
“The Rider”

BEST FIRST FEATURE
“Columbus”
“Ingrid Goes West,” Director Matt Spicer *WINNER 
“Menashe”
“Oh Lucy!”
“Patti Cake$”

JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD – Given to the best feature made for under $500,000. (Award given to the writer, director and producer. Executive Producers are not awarded.)
“Dayveon”
“A Ghost Story”
“Life and nothing more” *WINNER
“Most Beautiful Island”
“The Transfiguration”

BEST DIRECTOR
Sean Baker, “The Florida Project”
Jonas Carpignano, “A Ciambra”
Luca Guadagnino, “Call Me by Your Name”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out” *WINNER
Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie, “Good Time”
Chloé Zhao, “The Rider”

BEST SCREENPLAY
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird” *WINNER
Azazel Jacobs, “The Lovers”
Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out”
Mike White, “Beatriz at Dinner”

BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY
Kris Avedisian, Kyle Espeleta, Jesse Wakeman, “Donald Cried”
Emily V. Gordon, Kumail Nanjiani, “The Big Sick” *WINNER
Ingrid Jungermann, “Women Who Kill”
Kogonada, “Columbus”
David Branson Smith, Matt Spicer, “Ingrid Goes West”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Thimios Bakatakis, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”
Elisha Christian, “Columbus”
Hélène Louvart, “Beach Rats”
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, “Call Me by Your Name” *WINNER
Joshua James Richards, “The Rider”

BEST EDITING
Ronald Bronstein, Benny Safdie, “Good Time”
Walter Fasano, “Call Me by Your Name”
Alex O’Flinn, “The Rider”
Gregory Plotkin, “Get Out”
Tatiana S. Riegel, “I, Tonya” *WINNER

BEST FEMALE LEAD
Salma Hayek, “Beatriz at Dinner”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Shinobu Terajima, “Oh Lucy!”
Regina Williams, “Life and nothing more”

BEST MALE LEAD
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name” *WINNER
Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”
James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Robert Pattinson, “Good Time”

BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE
Holly Hunter, “The Big Sick”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya” *WINNER
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Lois Smith, “Marjorie Prime”
Taliah Lennice Webster, “Good Time”

BEST SUPPORTING MALE
Nnamdi Asomugha, “Crown Heights”
Armie Hammer, “Call Me by Your Name”
Barry Keoghan, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER
Benny Safdie, “Good Time”

ROBERT ALTMAN AWARD – Given to one film’s director, casting director and ensemble cast

“Mudbound”
Director: Dee Rees
Casting Directors: Billy Hopkins, Ashley Ingram
Ensemble Cast: Jonathan Banks, Mary J. Blige, Jason Clarke, Garrett Hedlund, Jason Mitchell, Rob Morgan, Carey Mulligan

BEST DOCUMENTARY
“The Departure”
“Faces Places” *WINNER
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Motherland”
“Quest”

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM
“BPM (Beats Per Minute)”
“A Fantastic Woman” *WINNER
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Lady Macbeth”
“Loveless”

BONNIE AWARD
Chloé Zhao *WINNER

 

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Spirit Awards 2018: Blue Carpet Arrivals (Photos)

Independent Spirit Awards: In a Stormy Year, It’s Up to Jordan Peele to Keep the Streak Alive

Film Independent Spirit Awards Gives Out $150,000 in 2018 Filmmaker Grants