‘The Simpsons’ Celebrates Historic Episode By Sharing the Best Apple Pie Recipe in History

As the show beats the “Gunsmoke” episode record, “The Simpsons” wants you to make chef and radio host Evan Kleiman’s famous apple pie.

After 636 episodes, “The Simpsons” fans are still learning more about the origins story of Homer J. Simpson. On Sunday night’s episode — historic for beating “Gunsmoke’s” record as the most episodes ever for a primetime scripted series — Homer recalls the happy memory of baking pies with his mother.

Glenn Close returned to once again voice Mona Simpson, who had her first major appearance in 1995’s Season 7 episode “Mother Simpson.” At the time, it was revealed that Mona went into hiding when Homer was young. Mona has appeared several times since then, including a flashback on this Sunday night’s episode, “Forgive and Regret.” In the episode, it was revealed that before Mona disappeared, she and Homer bonded over baking — and she wrote loving notes to her son on the back of every recipe card. When Mona left, Homer’s angry father Abe tossed out those cards — but lied to Homer about what happened.

The disappearance of Mona — and the loss of those treasured recipe cards — set Homer on a path to be, well, the Homer Simpson we all know today. Homer still remembers those pies as the best thing he ever tasted — and eagle-eyed “The Simpsons” viewers (or, quite simply, the ones who hit “pause” at the right time), were given a glimpse of Mona Simpson’s apple pie recipe:

The Simpsons

In the credits, it’s revealed that the recipe is actually from pie aficionado Evan Kleiman, an author, chef, restauranteur and the host of KCRW’s “Good Food.” Kleiman organizes a major pie contest annually, which this year takes place on May 6.

Evan Kleiman

Fox/YouTube/Craftsy

Here’s Kleiman’s recipe:

APPLE PIE

Mix together in bowl:
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Apples
3 Golden Delicious apples
3 Granny Smith or Pippin apples
3 Whatevers except Macintosh

Cut 1 lb of cold butter into 16 pieces. Toss w/flour to coat. Rub butter into the flour mixture with your fingertips or with a pastry cutter. When mixture looks like crumble of different sizes from peas to almonds it is ready for water.

Add 1 tbsp vinegar to 1 cup ice cold water and drizzle over the butter/flour mixture. Toss like a salad. Bring the wet mess together, kneading it twice, into a puck (flat ball) and cut in half. Wrap each half in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight.

Now prepare the apples. Peel the apples and cut the flesh off the cores. Cut the apple into 3/8″ slices. Put in bowl. Add brown sugar to taste, cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Toss to mix. Add 3 tbsp flour to thicken the filling and toss to coat the apple slices.

Roll 1 piece of dough out and line 9″ glass pie pan. Fill it with the apples. Roll out the other piece of dough and top the apples with it. Trim the top and bottom crusts together so you can have 1″ overhang. Roll the overhang under so it sits on the lip of the pie pan. Crimp the edge into a pretty design by pinching the dough. Cut 4 symmetrical slits into the top crust. Brush it with beaten egg with a splash of cream.

Bake in a preheated 425 degree oven for 20 minutes. Turn down heat to 375 degrees and bake another 40 minutes or until the apples are tender when poked with a fork.

Ava DuVernay to Receive GLAAD’s Excellence in Media Award (Exclusive)

Ava DuVernay will be honored with the Excellence in Media Award at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards in New York, TheWrap has learned exclusively.
The Excellence in Media Award is presented to media professionals who have made a difference in promotin…

Ava DuVernay will be honored with the Excellence in Media Award at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards in New York, TheWrap has learned exclusively.

The Excellence in Media Award is presented to media professionals who have made a difference in promoting equality for the LGBTQ community. Previous honorees include Robert de Niro, Kelly Ripa, Debra Messing, Tyra Banks, Julianne Moore, Glenn Close, Barbara Walters and Diane Sawyer.

DuVernay is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning filmmaker who is helping to move the needle towards inclusion in the industry. She has supported careers of LGBTQ talent behind as well as in front of the camera, including on her own drama “Queen Sugar.” She is also the inspiration for the “DuVernay test,” which requires “African Americans and other minorities [to] have fully realized lives rather than serve as scenery in white stories.”

“We’re black. We’re brown. We are native. We are Asian. We are Muslim. We are queer. We are many things that deserve safe spaces and protection,” DuVernay said at a Women in Hollywood event last fall, supporting LGBTQ equality and acceptance. She also supported GLAAD’s Spirit Day by going purple on social media to speak out against bullying.

Also at the awards show, as previously announced, Alexis Bledel will present Samira Wiley with the Vito Russo Award for her LGBTQ advocacy. Vito Russo was a founder of GLAAD and is also a celebrated ACT UP activist.

Special guests at the awards ceremony will include Halsey, Laverne Cox, Lea Michele, Tituss Burgess, Nyle DiMarco, Wrabel, Blair Imani, and Asia Kate Dillon.

The GLAAD Media Awards honor media for fair and inclusive representation of LGBTQ people and issues, and they also fund GLAAD’s work to accelerate the acceptance of the LGBTQ community.

The GLAAD Media Awards will be held on May 5, 2018.

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‘The Wife’ Trailer: Glenn Close Longs for a More Literary Life in Meg Wolitzer Adaptation — Watch

Jonathan Pryce, Christian Slater, and Elizabeth McGovern co-star in the star-studded take on Wolitzer’s lauded novel of the same name.

Sony Pictures Classics has released the trailer for “The Wife,” Björn Runge’s adaptation of the Meg Wolitzer novel of the same name. Glenn Close stars as the title character, with Jonathan Pryce playing her husband; he’s a revered author, while she’s relegated to simply being, well, the wife. “It was probably one of the trickiest roles I’ve ever confronted,” Close recently told Vanity Fair. “I think it’s a situation that every woman in the audience can relate to, whether they’re of younger generations or not.”

At the beginning of the trailer, Pryce is told he’s been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, an honor both he and Joan have apparently been happily anticipating for some time. In addition to bringing the couple to Sweden, the occasion reminds Close of her early years as a writer whose own aspirations took a backseat to those of her husband. “Tell me about yourself. Do you have an occupation?” she’s asked. Her response: “I do. I am a kingmaker.”

The film also features flashbacks to the early years of the pair’s romance, including hints as to the fractures to come.

“[Joan] was part of my mother’s generation, and I certainly saw her be totally deferential to my dad,” added Close. “In her late 80s she’d say, ‘I feel like I accomplished nothing in my life.’ Looking back, it is so tragic because she was such an amazingly gifted woman. She just didn’t have the toolbox to strike out on her own… Joan’s diminished [in her marriage], and it has become such a habit that she doesn’t really notice anymore. She doesn’t have the vocabulary to give voice to her growing anger—to say, ‘what did you just say to me?’—so she lets it slide. It finally comes to a point where her cup is so full of anger that it overflows.”

Christian Slater, Elizabeth McGovern, Max Irons, Harry Lloyd, and Annie Starke co-star in the film, which premiered in Toronto last fall. SPC will release “The Wife” in theaters on August 3.

Halle Berry At Center Of ‘Jagged Edge’ Remake At Sony Pictures

EXCLUSIVE: Sony Pictures is in the early stages of mounting a remake of the 1985 thriller Jagged Edge, as a star vehicle for Halle Berry. The effort is being led by Steven Bersch, the Sony Worldwide Acquisitions Group head who took over the genre arm Screen Gems. This one could very well be a standard Sony release, but they’re still working that out. The project is a priority and the studio has begun the search for the right writer to draft the new version.
Matti Leshem

EXCLUSIVE: Sony Pictures is in the early stages of mounting a remake of the 1985 thriller Jagged Edge, as a star vehicle for Halle Berry. The effort is being led by Steven Bersch, the Sony Worldwide Acquisitions Group head who took over the genre arm Screen Gems. This one could very well be a standard Sony release, but they’re still working that out. The project is a priority and the studio has begun the search for the right writer to draft the new version. Matti Leshem

‘Father Figures’ Movie Review: Owen Wilson and Ed Helms Find No Laughs in Their Daddy Hunt

Watching “Father Figures” is like finding a piece of food in the back of your fridge that you barely recognize, but know right away it’s not worth eating. Ostensibly a comedy in which Ed Helms and Owen Wilson try to find the dad they never knew, it unfurls its stale scenarios of familial grievance, R-rated gags and white male anxiety with a breathtaking level of laziness.

The weird thing is, a couple of smart, funny dudes this year have done well mining the neurotic Caucasian dad world for prickly, insightful entertainment: Noah Baumbach with “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” and Mike White with “Brad’s Status.” But “Father Figures,” which marks the directorial debut of “Hangover” cinematographer Lawrence Sher, and was written by Justin Malen (“Office Christmas Party”), exhibits the faint aura of a fill-in-the-blanks Hollywood assignment (for example, “plug up a hole in Owen Wilson’s schedule”), after which someone drew dirty pictures in the margins.

Helms plays Peter, an embittered, divorced father of a teenage boy (Zachary Haven) who hates him, and twin brother to a chill layabout named Kyle (Wilson) whose moneyed life in Hawaii with a sexy young bride (Jessica Gomes) is the exact opposite of Pete’s: charmed and carefree. Reunited at the wedding of their mother Helen (Glenn Close), the brothers learn that their dad wasn’t a husband who died when they were young, but an unknown out of many possible sexual assignations their mother had in the swinging ’70s.

Also Read: Sony Pictures Classics Acquires North American Rights to Glenn Close’s ‘The Wife’

The revelation is enough to send Peter and Kyle on a road trip together to find their father, and because they don’t get along — well, it’s really Pete’s churlish negativity versus Kyle’s untroubled positivity — the movie practically guarantees a certain amount of bickering and infantilized behavior. As Yoda might say to the screen, “The jinks are high with this one.”

In Miami, the pair scope out Terry Bradshaw (playing himself, which he’s good at) as a potential parent, and then must endure highly graphic depictions of their mother’s sexual prowess from the ex-Steeler and a fellow NFL retiree (Ving Rhames) before the brothers’ quest is known to the footballers. (That this requires you to imagine Glenn Close in these pornographic reveries is more like a joke played on a great actress than an actual joke.)

Tipped off that their dad might have been a Wall Street wunderkind who once partied at Studio 54 with their mom, the brothers then head off to find Roland Hunt (an expectedly committed J.K. Simmons), who turns out to be a dragon-tattooed, gun-wielding hermit whose antics nearly get them killed.

Also Read: Comedy Central Sets ‘Fake News With Ted Nelms’ Special Starring Ed Helms

Certain scenes are simply headscratchers: a rest area stop that leads to Kyle urinating on a boy, and the picking up of a hitchhiker (Katt Williams, valiantly playing along) that involves tying him up because the brothers think he’s a serial killer. (Um, Peter’s the one with serial killer eyes, no?) On their way to Wooster, Massachusetts, to explore the possibility that their dad was a decorated cop, Peter successfully flirts with a woman at a hotel bar, and when I jotted down, guessing, a certain sexual taboo in my notes, I was right.

A movie that makes Peter a proctologist partly for the rectum humor, that is race-queasy and glibly sexist, isn’t too hard to figure out in other ways. Sher shows no special affinity for comic pacing or enlivening dialogue scenes, either, so the movie just plods from scene to scene, building no momentum.

Also Read: TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted ‘Joker’s Wild’ Reboot

The autopilot vibe extends to the stars, too. Helms is running on fumes here with his humiliated-dweeb shtick, the movies he’s making a far cry from the sad sack promise he showed in “Cedar Rapids” and “The Office.” Wilson is Wilson — he always at least tries to have chemistry with his buddy vehicles — and it’s safe to wonder if he’ll still be trying to pull off the same beach-kissed, holistic groove when the movies are about retirees pulling off heists. (Grandpa Owen has a free autumn: sign him up!)

At the end, after Christopher Walken and a terribly used Ali Wong share scene time with a cat’s enlarged testicles in a veterinarian’s office, “Father Figures” makes a hard swerve into emotionality for the big reveal about the brothers’ origins. What you’re left with isn’t a warm feeling about mothers and sacrifice; you’ll just wonder why this had to be a big secret in the first place.

Neither committed to forging new comic ground with its wackiness, or savvy enough to make us care about a family journey, “Father Figures” is its own dad stereotype: it’s never there for you.



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Watching “Father Figures” is like finding a piece of food in the back of your fridge that you barely recognize, but know right away it’s not worth eating. Ostensibly a comedy in which Ed Helms and Owen Wilson try to find the dad they never knew, it unfurls its stale scenarios of familial grievance, R-rated gags and white male anxiety with a breathtaking level of laziness.

The weird thing is, a couple of smart, funny dudes this year have done well mining the neurotic Caucasian dad world for prickly, insightful entertainment: Noah Baumbach with “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” and Mike White with “Brad’s Status.” But “Father Figures,” which marks the directorial debut of “Hangover” cinematographer Lawrence Sher, and was written by Justin Malen (“Office Christmas Party”), exhibits the faint aura of a fill-in-the-blanks Hollywood assignment (for example, “plug up a hole in Owen Wilson’s schedule”), after which someone drew dirty pictures in the margins.

Helms plays Peter, an embittered, divorced father of a teenage boy (Zachary Haven) who hates him, and twin brother to a chill layabout named Kyle (Wilson) whose moneyed life in Hawaii with a sexy young bride (Jessica Gomes) is the exact opposite of Pete’s: charmed and carefree. Reunited at the wedding of their mother Helen (Glenn Close), the brothers learn that their dad wasn’t a husband who died when they were young, but an unknown out of many possible sexual assignations their mother had in the swinging ’70s.

The revelation is enough to send Peter and Kyle on a road trip together to find their father, and because they don’t get along — well, it’s really Pete’s churlish negativity versus Kyle’s untroubled positivity — the movie practically guarantees a certain amount of bickering and infantilized behavior. As Yoda might say to the screen, “The jinks are high with this one.”

In Miami, the pair scope out Terry Bradshaw (playing himself, which he’s good at) as a potential parent, and then must endure highly graphic depictions of their mother’s sexual prowess from the ex-Steeler and a fellow NFL retiree (Ving Rhames) before the brothers’ quest is known to the footballers. (That this requires you to imagine Glenn Close in these pornographic reveries is more like a joke played on a great actress than an actual joke.)

Tipped off that their dad might have been a Wall Street wunderkind who once partied at Studio 54 with their mom, the brothers then head off to find Roland Hunt (an expectedly committed J.K. Simmons), who turns out to be a dragon-tattooed, gun-wielding hermit whose antics nearly get them killed.

Certain scenes are simply headscratchers: a rest area stop that leads to Kyle urinating on a boy, and the picking up of a hitchhiker (Katt Williams, valiantly playing along) that involves tying him up because the brothers think he’s a serial killer. (Um, Peter’s the one with serial killer eyes, no?) On their way to Wooster, Massachusetts, to explore the possibility that their dad was a decorated cop, Peter successfully flirts with a woman at a hotel bar, and when I jotted down, guessing, a certain sexual taboo in my notes, I was right.

A movie that makes Peter a proctologist partly for the rectum humor, that is race-queasy and glibly sexist, isn’t too hard to figure out in other ways. Sher shows no special affinity for comic pacing or enlivening dialogue scenes, either, so the movie just plods from scene to scene, building no momentum.

The autopilot vibe extends to the stars, too. Helms is running on fumes here with his humiliated-dweeb shtick, the movies he’s making a far cry from the sad sack promise he showed in “Cedar Rapids” and “The Office.” Wilson is Wilson — he always at least tries to have chemistry with his buddy vehicles — and it’s safe to wonder if he’ll still be trying to pull off the same beach-kissed, holistic groove when the movies are about retirees pulling off heists. (Grandpa Owen has a free autumn: sign him up!)

At the end, after Christopher Walken and a terribly used Ali Wong share scene time with a cat’s enlarged testicles in a veterinarian’s office, “Father Figures” makes a hard swerve into emotionality for the big reveal about the brothers’ origins. What you’re left with isn’t a warm feeling about mothers and sacrifice; you’ll just wonder why this had to be a big secret in the first place.

Neither committed to forging new comic ground with its wackiness, or savvy enough to make us care about a family journey, “Father Figures” is its own dad stereotype: it’s never there for you.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Christmas Box Office Preview: Can New Movies Survive in 'Star Wars' Shadow?

Billy Joel, J.K. Simmons, Jimmy Fallon Belt Out Doo-Wop Version of 'The Longest Time' (Video)

Tina Fey, Robert Carlock to Receive Honorary Comedy Prize From WGA East

Beer and Boasting in Las Vegas: the Story of a Fox Comedy Premiere at 30,000 Feet

Film Review: ‘Father Figures’

Twins don’t have to look alike, but in the dithering and maladroit road comedy “Father Figures,” Ed Helms and Owen Wilson play bickering brothers who are fraternal twins, and the casting doesn’t sit right; the two actors never convince us that they were baptized in the same physical or spiritual DNA. Helms is Peter Reynolds, […]

Twins don’t have to look alike, but in the dithering and maladroit road comedy “Father Figures,” Ed Helms and Owen Wilson play bickering brothers who are fraternal twins, and the casting doesn’t sit right; the two actors never convince us that they were baptized in the same physical or spiritual DNA. Helms is Peter Reynolds, […]

Father Figures is an Owen Wilson/Ed Helms comedy that’s barely there at all

It doesn’t speak highly of a comedy when one of its lead actors declining to do much actual comic shtick counts as a respite. Father Figures may be largely unfunny, in that few of its jokes work and they are given a vast, 113-minute expanse in which to not work, but at least Ed Helms isn’t playing another…

Read more…

It doesn’t speak highly of a comedy when one of its lead actors declining to do much actual comic shtick counts as a respite. Father Figures may be largely unfunny, in that few of its jokes work and they are given a vast, 113-minute expanse in which to not work, but at least Ed Helms isn’t playing another…

Read more...