‘The X-Files’ Is Done, and Please Let It Be For Good

Gillian Anderson has said farewell, and it’s time for fans to say goodbye, too.

Of all the times that, as an “X-Files” fan, I’ve had to say goodbye to the show, the first time was probably the best.

When Fox officially canceled the show in 2002, creator Chris Carter crafted a finale that played as a pretty solid series finale, given the show’s legacy. Two-parter “The Truth” brought back David Duchovny (after his season-long absence), attempted to explain the show’s entire mythology through a courtroom trial format, brought back long-deceased guest stars in the form of visions, and let Mulder and Scully make out at least once. Plus, it ended with a scene that served as a beautiful callback to the very first episode of the series: Mulder and Scully talking quietly together about the past and the future in a motel room.

In the pilot, that conversation was all about how Mulder’s quest had driven him into a life of loneliness and isolation, but this new edition ended with Mulder and Scully in each others’ arms, ready to face whatever might be coming down the line.

mulder scully bed

“My Struggle IV” also ended with Mulder and Scully holding each other, but in a much different context: They believe their now-teenage son to be dead, Mulder just shot their longtime nemesis the Cigarette-Smoking Man (fatally, by all evidence provided), and also Scully is pregnant again. But as they hugged on the deserted pier, and the camera pulled away, they looked tired. Almost as tired as I feel.

Which is why, as much as I love the show — have loved the show, for more than half of my life — I’ve embraced the idea that if Season 11 is the last time we see Mulder and Scully on screen together, it’s a good thing.

For one thing, it’s a good idea to embrace the inevitable. Gillian Anderson has been pretty firm on the fact that she’s done playing Scully forever. It’s something that both she and Duchovny have implied to be the case since the show’s original end, but this time it’s something I’ve heard her say enough over the past few months to believe — especially once she tweeted this, two days after the finale aired:

I’ll definitely miss this show, for so many reasons — not the least of which is that, as Anderson demonstrated above, a good Scully GIF can say so very much. But being an “X-Files” fan gives you a real understanding of the nature of unconditional love, in some sense, because this show has frankly struggled for decades to reach its original peaks, and in this latest season those struggles remained.

What could be more unconditional than forgiving a show for actively choosing to retroactively change a massive part of the narrative — specifically, that Mulder and Scully’s son was never biologically Mulder’s, but technically a product of experiments conducted by Cancer Man, making him William’s biological child? To be completely frank, I withheld judgement on this revelation for the entire season because a) it felt like bullshit that would be retconned once again by the finale, and b) I wanted to see exactly how the show handled it.

The answer: badly. It is technically pretty unforgivable, the fact that the show actively took away Scully’s sense of motherhood over her son, and never gave the character a real chance to process the discovery that she was basically raped (not for the first time) as a result of being caught up in the conspiracy. Even the fact that she now is pregnant with a child she feels confident is Mulder’s, as revealed by the final scene, fails to serve as anything less than a consolation prize.

THE X-FILES: L-R: Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny in the "My Struggle IV" season finale episode of THE X-FILES airing Wednesday, March 21 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2018 Fox Broadcasting Co. Cr: Shane Harvey/FOX

And yet, will I still be able to re-watch early episodes and the movies (including “I Want to Believe,” a movie I’m on the record labeling as, essentially, a disaster)? Absolutely. I’ll even be able to re-watch Season 11, and enjoy many of the solid character beats, thanks to the forever great chemistry between Anderson and Duchovny.

In fact, I’ll always be grateful for Season 11. As silly as it was to watch the season premiere actively subvert the Season 10 finale, there’s no denying that Season 11 provided a more satisfying ending, as well as a few standout installments: Both “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat” and “Rm9sbG93ZXJz” (a.k.a. “Followers”) were solid, fun standalone episodes. That said, the fact that the season finale was far better than our expectations says a lot, because it wasn’t a great episode of television. And it’s time to stop applauding this show for not disappointing us to the degree it has in the past.

That said, it’s hard to write a story with a headline like this. As I and IndieWire TV Critic Ben Travers explore during this week’s Very Good Television Podcast, saying goodbye to “The X-Files” isn’t the easiest of things — especially since one of us doesn’t believe it’s really gone for good. (Lord help us all.) Find out why by listening below, and hear the pain in both voices as another revival demands we consider an ending without guaranteeing we’ve been given one.

Don’t forget to subscribe via Soundcloud or iTunes. Make sure to follow IndieWire on Twitter and Facebook for all your TV news. Plus, check out IndieWire’s other podcastsScreen Talk with Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson as well as Michael Schneider’s new podcast, Turn It On, which spotlights the most important TV of each week.

Rachel Weisz Warns Against Female James Bond: Women ‘Should Get Their Own Stories’

Rachel Weisz doesn’t want to see a female James Bond movie, saying she believes women “should get their own stories.”

“[Fleming] devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women,” Weisz told The Telegraph. “Why not create your own story rather than jumping on to the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors? Women are really fascinating and interesting and should get their own stories.”

Of course, Weisz is married to our current James Bond (Daniel Craig), who is set to reprise his role of 007 in “Bond 25,” set for release November 2019. No director has become attached yet.

Also Read: MGM Says James Bond Rights Still Up in the Air, Boasts Strong Q3 After Epix Acquisition

The idea of a Jane Bond film has been circulating for years, with actresses like Priyanka Chopra and Emilia Clarke expressing interest in playing the spy. Elizabeth Banks and Gillian Anderson have also fueled the fire, and while Emily Blunt hasn’t expressed interest in the role, her name has been circulating as a potential star as well.

For now, we can look forward to Blake Lively’s “The Rhythm Section,” the first film in what’s intended to become a franchise with James Bond producers Wilson and Broccoli producing. Jude Law is also attached to the film.

Also Read: Blake Lively’s Hand Injury Halts Production on Spy Thriller ‘The Rhythm Section’

“The Rhythm Section” is based on a series of spy novels by Mark Burnell, which tells the story of woman scorned by the loss of her family in a mysterious plane crash. While it was previously halted due to Lively’s hand injury sustained on set, the film is still aiming for a wide release on Feb. 22, 2019.

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New James Bond Movie Set for 2019 Release, No Word on Daniel Craig

Rachel Weisz doesn’t want to see a female James Bond movie, saying she believes women “should get their own stories.”

“[Fleming] devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women,” Weisz told The Telegraph. “Why not create your own story rather than jumping on to the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors? Women are really fascinating and interesting and should get their own stories.”

Of course, Weisz is married to our current James Bond (Daniel Craig), who is set to reprise his role of 007 in “Bond 25,” set for release November 2019. No director has become attached yet.

The idea of a Jane Bond film has been circulating for years, with actresses like Priyanka Chopra and Emilia Clarke expressing interest in playing the spy. Elizabeth Banks and Gillian Anderson have also fueled the fire, and while Emily Blunt hasn’t expressed interest in the role, her name has been circulating as a potential star as well.

For now, we can look forward to Blake Lively’s “The Rhythm Section,” the first film in what’s intended to become a franchise with James Bond producers Wilson and Broccoli producing. Jude Law is also attached to the film.

“The Rhythm Section” is based on a series of spy novels by Mark Burnell, which tells the story of woman scorned by the loss of her family in a mysterious plane crash. While it was previously halted due to Lively’s hand injury sustained on set, the film is still aiming for a wide release on Feb. 22, 2019.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Steven Seagal Denies Sexual Assault Accusation by Bond Girl

Daniel Craig Confirms He's Returning as James Bond (Video)

New James Bond Movie Set for 2019 Release, No Word on Daniel Craig

‘American Gods’ Picks New Showrunner for Season 2

“Lost” producer Jesse Alexander has been named the new showrunner of Starz series “American Gods.” He’ll helm Season 2 alongside the “Gods” graphic novel author, Neil Gaiman.

Alexander also counts “Alias,” “Heroes” and “Hannibal” among his credits. He recently did some work on CBS All Access series “Star Trek: Discovery.”

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green left the show they adapted from Gaiman’s work after one season. The search for a replacement has been on since then. It’s all taken quite a while.

Also Read: Every ‘American Gods’ Character, Ranked by How Weirdly Intriguing They Are (Photos)

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Starz chief Chris Albrecht said last month at the Television Critics Association press tour. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

Oh, hey Chris? What happened to Fuller and Green anyway? “They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht answered, when pushed.

Alright. As for the show’s cast, well, that is a whole ‘nother story.

Also Read: ‘American Gods’ Writer Neil Gaiman Will Read Cheesecake Factory Menu to Help Refugees

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said in January, referring to the actress’s announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

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“Lost” producer Jesse Alexander has been named the new showrunner of Starz series “American Gods.” He’ll helm Season 2 alongside the “Gods” graphic novel author, Neil Gaiman.

Alexander also counts “Alias,” “Heroes” and “Hannibal” among his credits. He recently did some work on CBS All Access series “Star Trek: Discovery.”

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green left the show they adapted from Gaiman’s work after one season. The search for a replacement has been on since then. It’s all taken quite a while.

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Starz chief Chris Albrecht said last month at the Television Critics Association press tour. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

Oh, hey Chris? What happened to Fuller and Green anyway? “They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht answered, when pushed.

Alright. As for the show’s cast, well, that is a whole ‘nother story.

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said in January, referring to the actress’s announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'John Wick' TV Spinoff Coming to Starz; Keanu Reeves Expected to Guest

JJ Abrams Sci-Fi Drama 'Demimonde' Grabs Straight-to-Series Order at HBO

Time Warner Q4 Earnings Up as HBO Caps Year of Record Subscriber Growth

Neil Gaiman to Lead ‘American Gods’ Season 2

Neil Gaiman, author of the novel on which “American Gods” is based, will take a central role leading the show in its second season. Other than that, the Starz’ series future isn’t clear.

Starz CEO Chris Albrecht said at the Television Critics Association Friday that the Season 2 cast is largely up in the air at the moment.

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said, referring to her announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

Also Read: 8 Questions We Need Answered in ‘American Gods’ Season 2 (Photos)

Which is one reason Starz turned to its author.

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Albrecht said. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

Also Read: ‘American Gods’: Bilquis’ Origins Revealed in ‘Coming to America’ Vignette (Exclusive Video)

So what actually happened with the old guys, series creators and book-adapters Bryan Fuller and Michael Green?

“They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht said, when pushed.

And apparently, Fuller and Green will still have some involvement going forward, Abrecht said. How much is up to them, Gaiman, and production company Fremantle.

Also Read: ‘American Gods’: Bryan Fuller Teases Longer, ‘Much More Exciting’ Season 2

Whatever. Just get us a Season 2 already, fans are probably thinking right about now.

So is Albrecht.

“We’re hoping for many more American Gods to appear on Starz,” he concluded.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘John Wick’ TV Spinoff Coming to Starz; Keanu Reeves Expected to Guest

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‘American Gods’: What Does the House on the Rock Mean for Season 2?

Neil Gaiman, author of the novel on which “American Gods” is based, will take a central role leading the show in its second season. Other than that, the Starz’ series future isn’t clear.

Starz CEO Chris Albrecht said at the Television Critics Association Friday that the Season 2 cast is largely up in the air at the moment.

“Gillian Anderson seems to be leaving everything, but this was not a surprise,” Albrecht said, referring to her announcement that she is done with “X-Files.” “We knew that she was not necessarily going to be able to come back.”

“But Kristen Chenoweth — as far as we all know — is still committed to the show, obviously pending her availability,” he continued. “As you are seeing, we’re having some trouble getting the second season underway. It’s an incredibly difficult adaptation of a fantastic novel.”

Which is one reason Starz turned to its author.

“Neil Gaiman will be taking more of a central role and moving forward into a more traditional showrunner function,” Albrecht said. “And we’re looking for a partner for him who can ensure that the television part of this gets appropriate attention.”

So what actually happened with the old guys, series creators and book-adapters Bryan Fuller and Michael Green?

“They were not fired nor did they quit,” Albrecht said, when pushed.

And apparently, Fuller and Green will still have some involvement going forward, Abrecht said. How much is up to them, Gaiman, and production company Fremantle.

Whatever. Just get us a Season 2 already, fans are probably thinking right about now.

So is Albrecht.

“We’re hoping for many more American Gods to appear on Starz,” he concluded.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'John Wick' TV Spinoff Coming to Starz; Keanu Reeves Expected to Guest

Starz Dropped by Altice USA as Negotiations Fail Over New Licensing Deal

'American Gods': What Does the House on the Rock Mean for Season 2?

Did You Catch the ‘All the President’s Men’ Easter Egg in the Latest ‘X-Files’?”

(Note: This post contains light spoilers for the Jan. 10 episode of “The X-Files.”)

“The X-Files” got back to its conspiracy theory roots with the second episode of Season 11, “This,” sending Agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) after a series of elaborate clues to uncover the mystery.

The clues were set in place by series fan-favorite Richard Langly (Dean Haglund), one of the three geeky conspiracy theorists known as the Lone Gunmen who often popped up on the “X-Files” to help out Mulder. And as Mulder and Scully were following the breadcrumbs Langly had left for them from beyond the grave, “The X-Files” managed to slip in an Easter egg homage to “All The President’s Men,” a classic film all about taking down a government conspiracy.

Also Read: ‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?

The Easter egg is an easy one to miss. Early in the episode, Mulder and Scully follow clues left by Langly to help them figure out what’s going on, after they receive a strange electronic transmission from him. Trouble is, Langly and the rest of the Lone Gunmen died heroically back in 2002. They’re buried in Arlington National Cemetery because of their sacrifice, so that’s where Mulder and Scully go to try to find some information to go on.

While there, the pair realize that the dates of birth on the Lone Gunmen’s headstones are actually a message, sending them to another headstone. When they figure out which one it is, they realize it belonged to another “X-Files” character: Deep Throat.

Deep Throat was Mulder’s first informant back in the early days of the show, giving him information about the secret government conspiracy that would go on to consume his life. He shares a code-name with the historically famous informant who leaked information to Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, allowing them to blow open the Watergate scandal that ended in President Richard Nixon’s resignation.

(In real life, Woodward and Bernstein’s Deep Throat was W. Mark Felt, former Associate Director of the FBI who knew Woodward socially.)

Also Read: ‘X-Files’ Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder ‘Did That Make Sense?’

Mulder never knew what Deep Throat’s real name was, but it’s finally revealed when Mulder finds his headstone. During the episode, we see the name Ronald Pakula. That’s the same last name as Alan J. Pakula, the director of the 1976 film “All The President’s Men,” which tells the story of how Woodward and Bernstein broke the Watergate story.

Though “The X-Files” isn’t any more explicit about the Pakula reference, naming the show’s Deep Throat character after the director of a movie about Watergate seems way too on-the-nose to be a coincidence. And after all, “The X-Files” owes a whole lot to media about government conspiracies. It makes sense that creator Chris Carter and the other people working on the show might take the chance to pay homage to a classic.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?

‘X-Files’ Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder ‘Did That Make Sense?’

There’s a Secret Message Hidden at the End of ‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Premiere

‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who the Heck Is Jeffrey Spender?

‘X-Files’: The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

(Note: This post contains light spoilers for the Jan. 10 episode of “The X-Files.”)

“The X-Files” got back to its conspiracy theory roots with the second episode of Season 11, “This,” sending Agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) after a series of elaborate clues to uncover the mystery.

The clues were set in place by series fan-favorite Richard Langly (Dean Haglund), one of the three geeky conspiracy theorists known as the Lone Gunmen who often popped up on the “X-Files” to help out Mulder. And as Mulder and Scully were following the breadcrumbs Langly had left for them from beyond the grave, “The X-Files” managed to slip in an Easter egg homage to “All The President’s Men,” a classic film all about taking down a government conspiracy.

The Easter egg is an easy one to miss. Early in the episode, Mulder and Scully follow clues left by Langly to help them figure out what’s going on, after they receive a strange electronic transmission from him. Trouble is, Langly and the rest of the Lone Gunmen died heroically back in 2002. They’re buried in Arlington National Cemetery because of their sacrifice, so that’s where Mulder and Scully go to try to find some information to go on.

While there, the pair realize that the dates of birth on the Lone Gunmen’s headstones are actually a message, sending them to another headstone. When they figure out which one it is, they realize it belonged to another “X-Files” character: Deep Throat.

Deep Throat was Mulder’s first informant back in the early days of the show, giving him information about the secret government conspiracy that would go on to consume his life. He shares a code-name with the historically famous informant who leaked information to Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, allowing them to blow open the Watergate scandal that ended in President Richard Nixon’s resignation.

(In real life, Woodward and Bernstein’s Deep Throat was W. Mark Felt, former Associate Director of the FBI who knew Woodward socially.)

Mulder never knew what Deep Throat’s real name was, but it’s finally revealed when Mulder finds his headstone. During the episode, we see the name Ronald Pakula. That’s the same last name as Alan J. Pakula, the director of the 1976 film “All The President’s Men,” which tells the story of how Woodward and Bernstein broke the Watergate story.

Though “The X-Files” isn’t any more explicit about the Pakula reference, naming the show’s Deep Throat character after the director of a movie about Watergate seems way too on-the-nose to be a coincidence. And after all, “The X-Files” owes a whole lot to media about government conspiracies. It makes sense that creator Chris Carter and the other people working on the show might take the chance to pay homage to a classic.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'X-Files' Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?

'X-Files' Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder 'Did That Make Sense?'

There's a Secret Message Hidden at the End of 'The X-Files' Season 11 Premiere

'X-Files' Refresher: Who the Heck Is Jeffrey Spender?

'X-Files': The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?

(Note: This post contains light spoilers for the Jan. 10 episode of “The X-Files.”)

The second episode of “The X-Files” Season 11 calls back three of the show’s most beloved characters: the Lone Gunmen, Langly, Frohike and Byers.

Richard Langly (Dean Haglund), a character who repeatedly showed up throughout the “X-Files” to help Fox Mulder (David Duchovny), helps kick off the episode “This” by getting in touch with Mulder and Scully (Gillian Anderson). But if you can’t really remember Langly and the rest of the Lone Gunmen, no one would blame you — the characters haven’t been seen on TV for 14 years, and back when they last appeared on the show in 2002, they were killed.

Also Read: Did You Catch the ‘All the President’s Men’ Easter Egg in the Latest ‘X-Files’?”

The Lone Gunmen were three conspiracy theorists who wrote a conspiracy magazine by the same name. Their magazine was a reference to the Kennedy assassination and the conspiracy theories surrounding it — specifically, the idea of a second shooter, contrary to the official story that Lee Harvey Oswald shot Kennedy.

Richard Langly, John Fitzgerald Byers (Bruce Harwood) and Melvin Frohike (Tom Braidwood) often popped up to work with Mulder in X-files cases, usually providing him with technical support and new information. Langly, the Gunman who factors in the episode “This,” was the easygoing punk rocker of the group, and loves the Ramones. But the three men were defined by their friendship and working relationship, with each specializing in different nerdy, but extremely useful, pursuits.

The three characters even had a brief spinoff from “The X-Files” back in 2001, following their own “Mission: Impossible”-like adventures — it was a little lighter than “The X-Files,” much like the episodes in which the Gunmen showed up. “The Lone Gunmen” only lasted one season, although the characters continued to show up in “The X-Files.”

Also Read: ‘X-Files’ Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder ‘Did That Make Sense?’

All three of the Lone Gunmen died in the Season 9 episode “Jump the Shark” in 2002. They sacrificed themselves to stop a bio-terror weapon, and because of the lives they saved, all three were buried in Arlington National Cemetery. But this is “The X-Files,” and characters dying doesn’t always mean much. After all, the Gunmen have already appeared as hallucinations and ghosts, so who knows how else the might appear.

Related stories from TheWrap:

There’s a Secret Message Hidden at the End of ‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Premiere

‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who the Heck Is Jeffrey Spender?

Fans React To That ‘X-Files’ Twist: ‘Are You Kidding Me?’

‘X-Files’: The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

Did You Catch the ‘All the President’s Men’ Easter Egg in the Latest ‘X-Files’?”

‘X-Files’ Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder ‘Did That Make Sense?’

(Note: This post contains light spoilers for the Jan. 10 episode of “The X-Files.”)

The second episode of “The X-Files” Season 11 calls back three of the show’s most beloved characters: the Lone Gunmen, Langly, Frohike and Byers.

Richard Langly (Dean Haglund), a character who repeatedly showed up throughout the “X-Files” to help Fox Mulder (David Duchovny), helps kick off the episode “This” by getting in touch with Mulder and Scully (Gillian Anderson). But if you can’t really remember Langly and the rest of the Lone Gunmen, no one would blame you — the characters haven’t been seen on TV for 14 years, and back when they last appeared on the show in 2002, they were killed.

The Lone Gunmen were three conspiracy theorists who wrote a conspiracy magazine by the same name. Their magazine was a reference to the Kennedy assassination and the conspiracy theories surrounding it — specifically, the idea of a second shooter, contrary to the official story that Lee Harvey Oswald shot Kennedy.

Richard Langly, John Fitzgerald Byers (Bruce Harwood) and Melvin Frohike (Tom Braidwood) often popped up to work with Mulder in X-files cases, usually providing him with technical support and new information. Langly, the Gunman who factors in the episode “This,” was the easygoing punk rocker of the group, and loves the Ramones. But the three men were defined by their friendship and working relationship, with each specializing in different nerdy, but extremely useful, pursuits.

The three characters even had a brief spinoff from “The X-Files” back in 2001, following their own “Mission: Impossible”-like adventures — it was a little lighter than “The X-Files,” much like the episodes in which the Gunmen showed up. “The Lone Gunmen” only lasted one season, although the characters continued to show up in “The X-Files.”

All three of the Lone Gunmen died in the Season 9 episode “Jump the Shark” in 2002. They sacrificed themselves to stop a bio-terror weapon, and because of the lives they saved, all three were buried in Arlington National Cemetery. But this is “The X-Files,” and characters dying doesn’t always mean much. After all, the Gunmen have already appeared as hallucinations and ghosts, so who knows how else the might appear.

Related stories from TheWrap:

There's a Secret Message Hidden at the End of 'The X-Files' Season 11 Premiere

'X-Files' Refresher: Who the Heck Is Jeffrey Spender?

Fans React To That 'X-Files' Twist: 'Are You Kidding Me?'

'X-Files': The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

Did You Catch the 'All the President's Men' Easter Egg in the Latest 'X-Files'?"

'X-Files' Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder 'Did That Make Sense?'

‘X-Files’ Fans Like the Latest Episode, But Wonder ‘Did That Make Sense?’

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the premiere and Jan. 10 episodes of “The X-Files.”)

The premiere of “The X-Files” Season 11 had a lot of fans frustrated.

The first episode of the show’s second revival season pulled a number of twists that bothered a lot of people. Not only did it pull an “It was all a dream” retcon of the Season 10 finale, but it also apparently reworked the parentage of the son of Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) and Fox Mulder (David Duchovny).

The suggestion that the show’s primary antagonist impregnated Scully with “alien science” without her knowledge had many fans taking to social media to voice their annoyance.

Also Read: Did You Catch the ‘All the President’s Men’ Easter Egg in the Latest ‘X-Files’?”

But fans seemed to receive the second episode of the season, dubbed “This,” with more enthusiasm. This episode was more akin to what fans enjoyed in the classic series back in the 1990s — it was mostly a one-off episode about a smaller-scale conspiracy, but it gave hints at the larger arc of the season. It also brought back (a version of) one of the show’s fan-favorite trio of geeks who frequently showed up to help Mulder, the Lone Gunmen.

Now THAT is how you do an #XFiles episode. pic.twitter.com/jWvguDJqjr

— Erin (@mulderist) January 11, 2018

That #XFiles felt like old times

— Claudius (@iamclavdivs) January 11, 2018

Now that is what I call a #XFiles episode. Thank you, Glen Morgan. That was hands down delightful. That is how I like my Mulder and Scully. @GillianA and @davidduchovny killed.

— Sarah Woodbury (@Swoodsie) January 11, 2018

Also Read: ‘X-Files’ Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?

While many fans seemed happy with the return to form of “The X-Files,” a few admitted that this one — which concerned a computer simulation where people’s minds were downloaded without their consent and forced to help the bad guys — didn’t make a ton of sense.

So what basicly happened on the #XFiles? @Fox

— david daub (@Daveisamazing6) January 11, 2018

Who else is confused watching the X-Files this go around? Anyone? Mulder? Scully? #XFiles

— Tina Speechley (@Inkd_Scrivener) January 11, 2018

Can @thexfiles not leave me confused/ concerned/ heartbroken after every episode !! #xfiles

— Rebecca Marie Dalton (@rebecca75797816) January 11, 2018

https://twitter.com/ArthurForward/status/951272977924059136

Also Read: ‘X-Files’: The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

#XFiles [the ending of this episode]

me: pic.twitter.com/gDa0YoYloE

— Charlie-Anomalie (@CoraClavia) January 11, 2018

The episode ended with Mulder and Scully managing to destroy the simulation, only to discover that there were backups, and all their work hadn’t really saved anyone. But fans of the original series will remember that episodes with those downbeat, confusing endings were often par for the course. In fact, those elements might be why so many people liked this one.

At least this #XFiles ended the traditional way. – With the conspirators getting away and the evidence of whatever Mulder & Scully were investigating disappearing. And of course there are backups – it’s a server! #TheXFiles pic.twitter.com/pj2p7uie6S

— Texas Mike ???????????????? (@MikeyDog) January 11, 2018

Also Read: There’s a Secret Message Hidden at the End of ‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Premiere

At least all those evil server backups mean somebody listened to their company’s IT pro, though.

I guess now I feel a little better now that it sounds like they followed IT best practices #XFiles

— Clancy Nacht (@clancynacht) January 11, 2018

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(Note: This post contains spoilers for the premiere and Jan. 10 episodes of “The X-Files.”)

The premiere of “The X-Files” Season 11 had a lot of fans frustrated.

The first episode of the show’s second revival season pulled a number of twists that bothered a lot of people. Not only did it pull an “It was all a dream” retcon of the Season 10 finale, but it also apparently reworked the parentage of the son of Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) and Fox Mulder (David Duchovny).

The suggestion that the show’s primary antagonist impregnated Scully with “alien science” without her knowledge had many fans taking to social media to voice their annoyance.

But fans seemed to receive the second episode of the season, dubbed “This,” with more enthusiasm. This episode was more akin to what fans enjoyed in the classic series back in the 1990s — it was mostly a one-off episode about a smaller-scale conspiracy, but it gave hints at the larger arc of the season. It also brought back (a version of) one of the show’s fan-favorite trio of geeks who frequently showed up to help Mulder, the Lone Gunmen.

While many fans seemed happy with the return to form of “The X-Files,” a few admitted that this one — which concerned a computer simulation where people’s minds were downloaded without their consent and forced to help the bad guys — didn’t make a ton of sense.

https://twitter.com/ArthurForward/status/951272977924059136

The episode ended with Mulder and Scully managing to destroy the simulation, only to discover that there were backups, and all their work hadn’t really saved anyone. But fans of the original series will remember that episodes with those downbeat, confusing endings were often par for the course. In fact, those elements might be why so many people liked this one.

At least all those evil server backups mean somebody listened to their company’s IT pro, though.

Related stories from TheWrap:

There's a Secret Message Hidden at the End of 'The X-Files' Season 11 Premiere

Fans React To That 'X-Files' Twist: 'Are You Kidding Me?'

'X-Files': The Smoking Man Finally Reveals His True Identity

Did You Catch the 'All the President's Men' Easter Egg in the Latest 'X-Files'?"

'X-Files' Refresher: Who Were Langly and the Lone Gunmen?