Sorry, Sony: ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Is Not Your Studio’s Biggest Hit

Sony says “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is the studio’s biggest domestic film ever. In reality, it doesn’t make the top 10.

With $403.7 million as of April 11, Sony declared “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is its biggest-ever domestic hit, passing the figure “Spider-Man” achieved in its 2002 run. Of course, this is complete nonsense.

Assessing box office without adjustment is like the Labor Dept. calculating the consumer price index without correcting for inflation. Today’s average ticket price bears no resemblance to those of prior decades. And, unlike books and downloads, which track not the price tag but the units sold, North American movies sales are calculated solely by revenue. European cinemas track both admissions and ticket sales, presumably to avoid this problem. The North American system leads to a lot of skewed figures, and announcements like Sony’s.

None of this should diminish the unexpectedly strong response to the “Jumani” sequel. The reboot of the very strong 1995 Robin Williams-starrer doubled the most optimistic expectations with its Christmas release (worldwide, $951 million). The film had a big assist with Dwayne Johnson in the lead, making the case for his status as the biggest draw among movie stars these days (one that will be tested this weekend with “Rampage,” his Warner Bros. action-adventure).

There’s another consideration beyond ticket sales. Sony Pictures is the continuation of Columbia, a studio founded by Harry Cohn 94 years ago and one that encompasses Screen Gems, faith label Affirm Films, the revamped TriStar, and the now-retired Triumph Releasing. Its biggest hits stretch back to 1954, and include some of the most storied titles in film history.

These are the 10 top-grossing domestic titles in Columbia/Sony’s history, adjusted to 2018 ticket prices.

Rank Title and Year Adjusted Gross
1. Ghostbusters (1984) $653.4 million
2. Spider-Man (2002) $637.9 million
3. Spider-Man 2 (2004) $552.3 million
4. Tootsie (1982) $522.4 million
5. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) $513.4 million
6. Lawrence of Arabia (1962) $508.4 million
7. Men in Black (1997) $501.4 million
8. Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) $499.4 million
9. Spider-Man 3 (2007) $449.0 million
10.  The Caine Mutiny (1954) $407.5 million
11. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017) $403.7 million

 

“Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” sold more tickets than “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” “Kramer vs. Kramer,” “Funny Girl,” and more recently, the four Sony-released James Bond titles, which are led by “Skyfall.” That puts it in very rarefied territory, but it’s far from being Sony’s biggest hit.

As context: In adjusted figures, “Black Panther” has now made over $666 million, selling more tickets than any film Sony or Columbia ever released. The massive Marvel smash, one of the most impressive box office achievements ever, now ranks #34 on the all-time ticket sales chart, and will go on to the top 30.

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Ghostbusters Live in Concert Series Set for Fall (EXCLUSIVE)

Sony has announced a Ghostbusters Live in Concert series, complete with screenings of the 1984 comedy with live orchestral accompaniment featuring Elmer Bernstein’s score and Ray Parker, Jr.’s  hit “Ghostbusters.” At each presentation, Peter Bernstein, orchestrator of the original film and son of Elmer Bernstein, will join the local orchestra as guest conductor. “Ghostbusters Live in […]

Sony has announced a Ghostbusters Live in Concert series, complete with screenings of the 1984 comedy with live orchestral accompaniment featuring Elmer Bernstein’s score and Ray Parker, Jr.’s  hit “Ghostbusters.” At each presentation, Peter Bernstein, orchestrator of the original film and son of Elmer Bernstein, will join the local orchestra as guest conductor. “Ghostbusters Live in […]

Here’s Everything Coming to and Leaving Netflix in March

Marvel fans are in for a treat in March — “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” returns for its second season this month, picking up the story of the hard-drinking super private eye in the aftermath of “The Defenders.”

“Jessica Jones” hits the streaming service on March 8, but it isn’t the only Netflix Original series getting a second season this month. The zombie comedy “Santa Clarita Diet,” starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant, comes back on March 23, and the second season of “Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events” kicks off on March 30.

There are plenty of other Netflix Originals on their way this month as well, including “Benji,” a reimagining of the dog-centric kids’ movie of the same name. Also in the movie department, classics like “Ghostbusters” and “Ghostbusters 2” will be on the Netflix slate starting in March.

More than a few things are leaving Netflix this month, too. FX’s animated series “Archer” is dropping off the service, as are all four “Jaws” movies. The animated hit “Zootopia” is on its way out the door, as is director Christopher Nolan’s breakout thriller, “Memento.”

Also Read: Everything You Need to Know About ‘The Punisher’ If You Can’t Remember ‘Daredevil’

Check out the full list of what’s coming and going below.

Available March 1, 2018:

“300”

“21 Thunder” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“2307: Winter’s Dream”

“Adel Karam: Live from Beirut” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Adventureland”

“Algo Muy Gordo”

“Alpha and Omega”

‘Battle Drone”

“Beerfest”

“Casino”

“Cruel Intentions”

“Cruel Intentions 2”

“Cruel Intentions 3”

“Deathgrip”

“Forgetting Sarah Marshall”

“Ghostbusters”

“Ghostbusters 2”

“Gridiron Gang”

“Guess Who”

“Hostage”

“I Am Number Four”

“I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry”

“Jackass: Number Two”

“Land Gold Women”

“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” (The Eighteenth Year)

“Martian Child”

“Moon”

“People Like Us”

“Revolutionary Road”

“Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild”

“The Brothers Grimm”

“The Bucket List”

“The Descent”

“The Descent: Part 2”

“The Experiment”

“The Fifth Estate”

“The Gift”

“The Lazarus Project”

“True to the Game”

“Untraceable”

“Up in the Air”

“Wet Hot American Summer”

“Women at War 1939-1945”

Also Read: Top 25 Best Netflix Original Series, Ranked From Great to Phenomenal (Photos)

Available March 2, 2018:

“B: The Beginning” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Flint Town” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Girls Incarcerated” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Les Affamés” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Malena Pichot: Estupidez compleja” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Natalia Valdebenito: El Especial” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Voltron: Legendary Defender” Season 5 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 4, 2018:

“Expedition China”

“The Joel McHale Show with Joel McHale” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 5, 2018:

“F The Prom”

“The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 6, 2018:

“Benji”

“Borderliner” Season 1, — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“For the Love of Benji”

“Gad Elmaleh: American Dream” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Also Read: ‘The Defenders’: What’s the Deal With ‘The Substance’ and That Skeleton?

Available March 7, 2018:

“Aftershock”

Available March 8, 2018:

“Bad Guys: Vile City” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Ladies First” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Marvel’s Jessica Jones” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 9, 2018:

“A.I.C.O. Incarnation” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Collateral: Limited Series” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Love” Season 3 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman” Episode: Malala Yousafzai — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Nailed It” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Outsider” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trolls: The Beat Goes On!” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 10, 2018:

“Septiembre, un Llanto en Silencio”

Available March 12, 2018:

“Kygo: Live at the Hollywood Bowl”

“Troy: The Odyssey”

Available March 13, 2018:

“Children of the Whales” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Ricky Gervais: Humanity” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Stretch Armstrong: The Breakout” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Terrace House: Opening New Doors” Part 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 15, 2018: 

“Jackass 3.5: The Unrated Movie”

“Power Rangers Ninja Steel” Season 1

“Tabula Rasa” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Hollywood Masters” Season 2

Available March 16, 2018:

“Benji” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Edha” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“On My Block” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Spirit Riding Free” Season 4 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Take Your Pills” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Legacy of a Whitetail Deer Hunter” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Wild Wild Country” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 19, 2018:

“In Search of Fellini”

Available March 20, 2018:

“100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice”

“The Standups” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 21, 2018:

“Conor McGregor: Notorious”

Available March 23, 2018:

“Alexa & Katie” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Dinotrux Supercharged” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Game Over, Man!” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Layla M.” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Requiem” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Roxanne Roxanne” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Santa Clarita Diet” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“SWORDGAI The Animation” Part 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Mechanism” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 24, 2018:

“Red Trees”

Available March 27, 2018:

“Men on a Mission: 2018”

Available March 28, 2018:

“50 First Dates”

“Little Women”

“Never Back Down 2: The Beatdown”

“The Art of War”

Available March 30, 2018:

“A Series of Unfortunate Events” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“First Match” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Happy Anniversary” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir” Season 2: Part 1

“Rapture” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Reboot: The Guardian Code” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Sofía Niño de Rivera: Selección natural” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Titan” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trailer Park Boys” Season 12 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trump: An American Dream” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 31, 2018:

“Let Me In”

March 1, 2018:

“A Gang Story”

“Anastasia”

“Baby’s Day Out”

“Eyewitness”

“FernGully: The Last Rainforest”

“First Response”

“Forget and Forgive”

“Hitch”

“Jaws”

“Jaws 2”

“Jaws 3”

“Jaws: The Revenge”

“Less Than Zero”

“Memento”

“Slums of Beverly Hills”

“The Chase”

“The Craft”

“The Panic in Needle Park”

“Trigger Point”

“Two Wrongs”

“xXx”

Leaving March 4, 2018:

“Chloe”

“Safe Haven”

Leaving March 6, 2018:

“The Finest Hours”

Leaving March 8, 2018:

“Victoria”

Leaving March 11, 2018:

“Believe”

“Glitch”

Leaving March 12, 2018:

“Standby”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause 2”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause”

Leaving March 13, 2018:

“Breakout Kings” Season 1

“City of God: 10 Years Later”

“London Has Fallen”

“The Killing” Seasons 1-2

Leaving March 14, 2018:

“Archer” Seasons 1-7

Leaving March 19, 2018:

“V/H/S: Viral”

Leaving March 20, 2018:

“Zootopia”

Leaving March 22, 2018:

“Steve Jobs: One Last Thing”

Leaving March 24, 2018:

“Voltron 84” Season 1

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit”

Leaving March 26, 2018:

“The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou”

Leaving March 29, 2018:

“The Gates” Season 1

Leaving March 30, 2018:

“Life in Pieces” Season 1

Leaving March 31, 2018:

“Awake” Season 1

“Bordertown” Season 1

“Breakout Kings” Season 2

“Brickleberry” Seasons 1-3

“Cooper Barrett’s Guide to Surviving Life” Season 1

“Friends with Benefits” Season 1

“In Like Flint”

“Lights Out” Season 1

“Rosewood” Season 1

“Salem” Seasons 2-3

“Small Shots” Season 1

“The Awakening”

“The Carmichael Show” Seasons 1-2

“The Chicago Code” Season 1

“The Crazy Ones” Season 1

“The Finder” Season 1

“The Good Son”

“Traffic Light” Season 1

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Santa Clarita Diet’: Is Drew Barrymore Actually a Zombie? Yes and No

‘A Series of Unfortunate Events:’ How Many Seasons Will There Be?

All 55 Terms Defined on Netflix’s ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events,’ and the Definitions Given

‘The Defenders’ Gives Us the Origin Story for Marvel Superhero Misty Knight

‘The Defenders’: What’s the Deal With ‘The Substance’ and That Skeleton?

Marvel fans are in for a treat in March — “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” returns for its second season this month, picking up the story of the hard-drinking super private eye in the aftermath of “The Defenders.”

“Jessica Jones” hits the streaming service on March 8, but it isn’t the only Netflix Original series getting a second season this month. The zombie comedy “Santa Clarita Diet,” starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant, comes back on March 23, and the second season of “Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events” kicks off on March 30.

There are plenty of other Netflix Originals on their way this month as well, including “Benji,” a reimagining of the dog-centric kids’ movie of the same name. Also in the movie department, classics like “Ghostbusters” and “Ghostbusters 2” will be on the Netflix slate starting in March.

More than a few things are leaving Netflix this month, too. FX’s animated series “Archer” is dropping off the service, as are all four “Jaws” movies. The animated hit “Zootopia” is on its way out the door, as is director Christopher Nolan’s breakout thriller, “Memento.”

Check out the full list of what’s coming and going below.

Available March 1, 2018:

“300”

“21 Thunder” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“2307: Winter’s Dream”

“Adel Karam: Live from Beirut” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Adventureland”

“Algo Muy Gordo”

“Alpha and Omega”

‘Battle Drone”

“Beerfest”

“Casino”

“Cruel Intentions”

“Cruel Intentions 2”

“Cruel Intentions 3”

“Deathgrip”

“Forgetting Sarah Marshall”

“Ghostbusters”

“Ghostbusters 2”

“Gridiron Gang”

“Guess Who”

“Hostage”

“I Am Number Four”

“I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry”

“Jackass: Number Two”

“Land Gold Women”

“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” (The Eighteenth Year)

“Martian Child”

“Moon”

“People Like Us”

“Revolutionary Road”

“Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild”

“The Brothers Grimm”

“The Bucket List”

“The Descent”

“The Descent: Part 2”

“The Experiment”

“The Fifth Estate”

“The Gift”

“The Lazarus Project”

“True to the Game”

“Untraceable”

“Up in the Air”

“Wet Hot American Summer”

“Women at War 1939-1945”

Available March 2, 2018:

“B: The Beginning” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Flint Town” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Girls Incarcerated” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Les Affamés” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Malena Pichot: Estupidez compleja” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Natalia Valdebenito: El Especial” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Voltron: Legendary Defender” Season 5 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 4, 2018:

“Expedition China”

“The Joel McHale Show with Joel McHale” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 5, 2018:

“F The Prom”

“The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 6, 2018:

“Benji”

“Borderliner” Season 1, — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“For the Love of Benji”

“Gad Elmaleh: American Dream” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 7, 2018:

“Aftershock”

Available March 8, 2018:

“Bad Guys: Vile City” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Ladies First” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Marvel’s Jessica Jones” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 9, 2018:

“A.I.C.O. Incarnation” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Collateral: Limited Series” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Love” Season 3 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman” Episode: Malala Yousafzai — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Nailed It” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Outsider” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trolls: The Beat Goes On!” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 10, 2018:

“Septiembre, un Llanto en Silencio”

Available March 12, 2018:

“Kygo: Live at the Hollywood Bowl”

“Troy: The Odyssey”

Available March 13, 2018:

“Children of the Whales” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Ricky Gervais: Humanity” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Stretch Armstrong: The Breakout” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Terrace House: Opening New Doors” Part 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 15, 2018: 

“Jackass 3.5: The Unrated Movie”

“Power Rangers Ninja Steel” Season 1

“Tabula Rasa” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Hollywood Masters” Season 2

Available March 16, 2018:

“Benji” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Edha” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“On My Block” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Spirit Riding Free” Season 4 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Take Your Pills” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Legacy of a Whitetail Deer Hunter” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Wild Wild Country” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 19, 2018:

“In Search of Fellini”

Available March 20, 2018:

“100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice”

“The Standups” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 21, 2018:

“Conor McGregor: Notorious”

Available March 23, 2018:

“Alexa & Katie” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Dinotrux Supercharged” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Game Over, Man!” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Layla M.” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Requiem” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Roxanne Roxanne” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Santa Clarita Diet” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“SWORDGAI The Animation” Part 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Mechanism” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 24, 2018:

“Red Trees”

Available March 27, 2018:

“Men on a Mission: 2018”

Available March 28, 2018:

“50 First Dates”

“Little Women”

“Never Back Down 2: The Beatdown”

“The Art of War”

Available March 30, 2018:

“A Series of Unfortunate Events” Season 2 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“First Match” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Happy Anniversary” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir” Season 2: Part 1

“Rapture” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Reboot: The Guardian Code” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Sofía Niño de Rivera: Selección natural” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“The Titan” — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trailer Park Boys” Season 12 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

“Trump: An American Dream” Season 1 — NETFLIX ORIGINAL

Available March 31, 2018:

“Let Me In”

March 1, 2018:

“A Gang Story”

“Anastasia”

“Baby’s Day Out”

“Eyewitness”

“FernGully: The Last Rainforest”

“First Response”

“Forget and Forgive”

“Hitch”

“Jaws”

“Jaws 2”

“Jaws 3”

“Jaws: The Revenge”

“Less Than Zero”

“Memento”

“Slums of Beverly Hills”

“The Chase”

“The Craft”

“The Panic in Needle Park”

“Trigger Point”

“Two Wrongs”

“xXx”

Leaving March 4, 2018:

“Chloe”

“Safe Haven”

Leaving March 6, 2018:

“The Finest Hours”

Leaving March 8, 2018:

“Victoria”

Leaving March 11, 2018:

“Believe”

“Glitch”

Leaving March 12, 2018:

“Standby”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause 2”

“Disney’s The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause”

Leaving March 13, 2018:

“Breakout Kings” Season 1

“City of God: 10 Years Later”

“London Has Fallen”

“The Killing” Seasons 1-2

Leaving March 14, 2018:

“Archer” Seasons 1-7

Leaving March 19, 2018:

“V/H/S: Viral”

Leaving March 20, 2018:

“Zootopia”

Leaving March 22, 2018:

“Steve Jobs: One Last Thing”

Leaving March 24, 2018:

“Voltron 84” Season 1

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit”

Leaving March 26, 2018:

“The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou”

Leaving March 29, 2018:

“The Gates” Season 1

Leaving March 30, 2018:

“Life in Pieces” Season 1

Leaving March 31, 2018:

“Awake” Season 1

“Bordertown” Season 1

“Breakout Kings” Season 2

“Brickleberry” Seasons 1-3

“Cooper Barrett’s Guide to Surviving Life” Season 1

“Friends with Benefits” Season 1

“In Like Flint”

“Lights Out” Season 1

“Rosewood” Season 1

“Salem” Seasons 2-3

“Small Shots” Season 1

“The Awakening”

“The Carmichael Show” Seasons 1-2

“The Chicago Code” Season 1

“The Crazy Ones” Season 1

“The Finder” Season 1

“The Good Son”

“Traffic Light” Season 1

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Santa Clarita Diet': Is Drew Barrymore Actually a Zombie? Yes and No

'A Series of Unfortunate Events:' How Many Seasons Will There Be?

All 55 Terms Defined on Netflix's 'A Series of Unfortunate Events,' and the Definitions Given

'The Defenders' Gives Us the Origin Story for Marvel Superhero Misty Knight

'The Defenders': What's the Deal With 'The Substance' and That Skeleton?

The Evolution of Chris Hemsworth: From ‘Home and Away’ to ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ (Photos)

It didn’t take long for Hollywood to realize it had something with Chris Hemsworth, but Australia held on to this star-in-the-making for years. The Wrap takes a look at the short-yet-productive career of the only man who could rival Hugh Jackman for pure Aussie star power.

Guinevere Jones (2002)

Thor wasn’t the first mythical figure Hemsworth got to play. His first screen appearance came courtesy of the Australian fantasy series “Guinevere Jones,” in which he appeared as the legendary King Arthur for a handful of episodes. Even then, it was clear that long hair was his look.

Home and Away (2004-07)

His breakout role, Hemsworth’s turn as high school dropout Kim Hyde came about after he auditioned for another role, but was turned down. He won a Logie Award for Most Popular New Male Talent and, at the height of his character’s popularity, competed in the fifth season of “Dancing With the Stars Australia.” In May 2015, Hemsworth returned to the show as an extra after catching up with old friends on the set.

Star Trek (2009)

For his first film role, Hemsworth appeared in “Star Trek” in the small but important role of George Kirk, the father of legendary Enterprise captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine).

Thor (2011)

The Aussie finally broke out in America by playing Thor, God of Thunder, in the eponymous film. He won the role over, among others, little brother Liam Hemsworth (“The Hunger Games”) and Tom Hiddleston, who was promptly hired to play Loki.

The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

Filmed in 2009 and kept on the shelf for three years, “Cabin” was acclaimed by critics and audiences alike for its skillful skewering of horror cliches.

The Avengers (2012)

By far the biggest film of the year, “Avengers” vaunted Hemsworth and the rest of the cast to the top of Hollywood’s A-list. Oh, and it just happened to change how studios make movies for the foreseeable future.

Snow White and the Huntsman (2012)

Hemsworth continued his 2012 assault with this fantasy film co-starring Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron. Though the film received mixed reviews, it was a surprise box office success with nearly $400 million worldwide, further establishing Hemsworth as a bona fide star. He and Theron would later return for the 2016 sequel, “The Huntsman: Winter’s War,” with new cast mates Jessica Chastain and Emily Blunt.

Red Dawn (2012)

Yet another 2009 project that was delayed until it could bask in the “Avengers” success, this remake of the 1984 cult classic starred a pre-“Thor” Hemsworth in the role originally played by Patrick Swayze.

Rush (2013)

Hemsworth earned some of the best reviews of his young career for his portrayal of racing great James Hunt in the story of his rivalry with Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl).

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Thanks to the “Avengers” afterglow, “The Dark World” vastly outperformed its predecessor in the box office with nearly $645 million taken in worldwide. Some critics were also quick to point out the growing chemistry between Hemsworth and co-lead Tom Hiddleston as an important factor in the film’s success.

Blackhat (2015)

Credit to Hemsworth for trying new things (like playing an expert hacker who happens to look like Chris Hemsworth), but “Blackhat” became, by far, the actor’s biggest failure yet and was pulled from theaters after only three weeks.

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Another hit with audiences, “Age of Ultron” won Hemsworth a People’s Choice Award for Favorite Action Movie Actor. However, the actor would later admit it was around this time that he had started to get “a bit bored” of playing Thor.

Vacation (2015)

Hemsworth took a try at pure comedy for the first time with the remake to the 1983 Chevy Chase classic. Though the movie itself was panned, Hemsworth earned positive notices for his comedy debut.

In the Heart of the Sea (2015)

For a man who started a career based on how his body looks, give him credit for having the courage to do away with it for a role. To play Owen Chase, a sea captain who was stranded for months at sea, Hemsworth dropped forty pounds by eating only 500 calories a day.

Ghostbusters (2016)

Hemsworth put his comedy chops back to work by playing opposite some of the best comedians working today: Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones. For playing a dumb-as-a-post secretary in a clever gender trope-reversal, Hemsworth received high marks from several critics.

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Marvel finally realized how to utilize Hemsworth’s comedic abilities for his most famous role: hire a comedy director. Under helmer Taika Waititi, Hemsworth (and the film) soared to new heights in the franchise, delivering what many believe to be the best film in the series and one of the best Marvel films overall.

12 Strong (2018)

Hemsworth is next slated to star in “12 Strong,” the true story about how a team of Special Forces and CIA paramilitary joined with local Afghan soldiers in order to wage war against the Taliban shortly after 9/11.

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Hemsworth follows up on “Ragnarok” with a co-starring role in “Infinity War,” the culmination of the MCU (to this point) and one of the most massive outings by any studio in movie history.

Bad Times at the El Royale (2018)

Hemsworth is signed on to star in Drew Goddard’s thriller with Russell Crowe, Dakota Fanning and Jeff Bridges.

It didn’t take long for Hollywood to realize it had something with Chris Hemsworth, but Australia held on to this star-in-the-making for years. The Wrap takes a look at the short-yet-productive career of the only man who could rival Hugh Jackman for pure Aussie star power.

Guinevere Jones (2002)

Thor wasn’t the first mythical figure Hemsworth got to play. His first screen appearance came courtesy of the Australian fantasy series “Guinevere Jones,” in which he appeared as the legendary King Arthur for a handful of episodes. Even then, it was clear that long hair was his look.

Home and Away (2004-07)

His breakout role, Hemsworth’s turn as high school dropout Kim Hyde came about after he auditioned for another role, but was turned down. He won a Logie Award for Most Popular New Male Talent and, at the height of his character’s popularity, competed in the fifth season of “Dancing With the Stars Australia.” In May 2015, Hemsworth returned to the show as an extra after catching up with old friends on the set.

Star Trek (2009)

For his first film role, Hemsworth appeared in “Star Trek” in the small but important role of George Kirk, the father of legendary Enterprise captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine).

Thor (2011)

The Aussie finally broke out in America by playing Thor, God of Thunder, in the eponymous film. He won the role over, among others, little brother Liam Hemsworth (“The Hunger Games”) and Tom Hiddleston, who was promptly hired to play Loki.

The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

Filmed in 2009 and kept on the shelf for three years, “Cabin” was acclaimed by critics and audiences alike for its skillful skewering of horror cliches.

The Avengers (2012)

By far the biggest film of the year, “Avengers” vaunted Hemsworth and the rest of the cast to the top of Hollywood’s A-list. Oh, and it just happened to change how studios make movies for the foreseeable future.

Snow White and the Huntsman (2012)

Hemsworth continued his 2012 assault with this fantasy film co-starring Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron. Though the film received mixed reviews, it was a surprise box office success with nearly $400 million worldwide, further establishing Hemsworth as a bona fide star. He and Theron would later return for the 2016 sequel, “The Huntsman: Winter’s War,” with new cast mates Jessica Chastain and Emily Blunt.

Red Dawn (2012)

Yet another 2009 project that was delayed until it could bask in the “Avengers” success, this remake of the 1984 cult classic starred a pre-“Thor” Hemsworth in the role originally played by Patrick Swayze.

Rush (2013)

Hemsworth earned some of the best reviews of his young career for his portrayal of racing great James Hunt in the story of his rivalry with Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl).

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Thanks to the “Avengers” afterglow, “The Dark World” vastly outperformed its predecessor in the box office with nearly $645 million taken in worldwide. Some critics were also quick to point out the growing chemistry between Hemsworth and co-lead Tom Hiddleston as an important factor in the film’s success.

Blackhat (2015)

Credit to Hemsworth for trying new things (like playing an expert hacker who happens to look like Chris Hemsworth), but “Blackhat” became, by far, the actor’s biggest failure yet and was pulled from theaters after only three weeks.

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Another hit with audiences, “Age of Ultron” won Hemsworth a People’s Choice Award for Favorite Action Movie Actor. However, the actor would later admit it was around this time that he had started to get “a bit bored” of playing Thor.

Vacation (2015)

Hemsworth took a try at pure comedy for the first time with the remake to the 1983 Chevy Chase classic. Though the movie itself was panned, Hemsworth earned positive notices for his comedy debut.

In the Heart of the Sea (2015)

For a man who started a career based on how his body looks, give him credit for having the courage to do away with it for a role. To play Owen Chase, a sea captain who was stranded for months at sea, Hemsworth dropped forty pounds by eating only 500 calories a day.

Ghostbusters (2016)

Hemsworth put his comedy chops back to work by playing opposite some of the best comedians working today: Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones. For playing a dumb-as-a-post secretary in a clever gender trope-reversal, Hemsworth received high marks from several critics.

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Marvel finally realized how to utilize Hemsworth’s comedic abilities for his most famous role: hire a comedy director. Under helmer Taika Waititi, Hemsworth (and the film) soared to new heights in the franchise, delivering what many believe to be the best film in the series and one of the best Marvel films overall.

12 Strong (2018)

Hemsworth is next slated to star in “12 Strong,” the true story about how a team of Special Forces and CIA paramilitary joined with local Afghan soldiers in order to wage war against the Taliban shortly after 9/11.

Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Hemsworth follows up on “Ragnarok” with a co-starring role in “Infinity War,” the culmination of the MCU (to this point) and one of the most massive outings by any studio in movie history.

Bad Times at the El Royale (2018)

Hemsworth is signed on to star in Drew Goddard’s thriller with Russell Crowe, Dakota Fanning and Jeff Bridges.

All the Movie References and Homages in ‘Stranger Things 2’ (Photos)

“Stranger Things 2” is packed with everything from small nods to full-on homage scenes to classic films, from the 1980s when the show is set, and beyond. Here’s a comprehensive list of all the movie homages in the show’s second season.

“MadMax” (“Mad Max,” 1980)

Max borrows the name of Mel Gibson’s iconic character, and later Keith (Matty Cardarople) calls her “Road Warrior,” a reference to the second “Mad Max” movie. The kids are still a year away from the most ridiculous film in the series, Tina Turner’s “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome,” though.

“The Terminator” at the movies (“The Terminator,” 1984)

Passing through Hawkins, it’s possible to catch a glimpse of a movie marquis showing James Cameron’s killer robot action-horror title. The show picks up on the real-world opening weekend of “The Terminator.”

Also Read: 32 ‘Stranger Things 2’ Characters, Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

Millennium Falcon toy (“Star Wars,” 1977)

Mike (Finn Wolfhard) spends some time in his basement in Season 1, reminiscing about Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), who’s been missing for almost a year. As he goes through his toys, he picks up his Kenner Millennium Falcon toy from 1979. It’s the one that Eleven moved with her mind back in Season 1.

Reese’s Pieces (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

During his first interview with Dr. Owens (Paul Reiser) that audiences see, Will (Noah Schnapp) mentions that his favorite Halloween candy is Reese’s Pieces. While not the most direct of “E.T.” references, the popularity of the film also caused a spike in the popularity of the candy. Later, we’ll see an E.T. toy in the bedroom of Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin), as well.

Eleven’s ghost costume (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

Cutting holes in a sheet to create a ghost costume is hardly a new idea, but Eleven appearing as a pint-sized ghost is a visual gag that’s hard to separate from the same idea that appeared in “E.T.” In the movie, the kids use the ghost costume to disguise their alien friend, and Eleven wants to use it to hide her identity in the same way.

Also Read: ‘Stranger Things 2’ Repeats the Mistake Season 1 Made with Barb (Commentary)

Marty McFly’s camera (“Back to the Future,” 1985)

Bob (Sean Astin) hands over his JVC video camera to Jonathan (Charlie Heaton) to use when he takes Will and the other kids trick-or-treating. It’s the same model camera that Doc Brown gives to Marty McFly to record Doc’s first Delorean time travel experiment in “Back to the Future.”

“Ghostbusters” costumes (“Ghostbusters,” 1984)

The kids’ coordinated “Ghostbusters” outfits are pretty on-point, and have some fun do-it-yourself nods built in since the movie would have only been out a few months in 1984. For instance, it’s possible to see the spray paint and foam that went into the construction of the proton packs, which is a great nod.

Max’s Michael Myers costume (“Halloween,” 1978)

The guys aren’t the only ones with movie reference costumes. Max goes trick-or-treating dressed as villain Michael Myers from John Carpenter’s 1978 slasher movie “Halloween.” By 1984, when “Stranger Things 2” is set, there had been three movies in the “Halloween” franchise.

Also Read: ‘Stranger Things 2’: Everything You Need to Know About D&D’s Mind Flayer

Jason Voorhees costume (“Friday the 13th: Part III,” 1982)

Speaking of slashers on Halloween, one of the bigger kids who torments Will is dressed as “Friday the 13th” killer Jason Voorhees. The hockey mask look wasn’t Jason’s first, but he’d gotten his iconic look together by “Friday the 13th: Part III.”

Seeing in the static (“Poltergeist,” 1982)

It’s impossible to see a creepy, static-covered TV with a kid’s silhouette in front of it and not think of 1982’s “Poltergeist.” Eleven doesn’t see ghosts in the static the way Carol Anne does in the movie, but she does use it to help her see people with her psychic remote viewing abilities.

Dustin’s baloney trail (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

A child leading a strange creature using a long trail of food? It’s hard not to see more shades of “E.T.” in Dustin’s attempt to get D’art in the storm cellar using baloney slices. They’re not Reese’s Pieces, but the whole situation is visually and thematically similar.

Also Read: ‘Stranger Things 2’: How to Get Steve Harrington Hair, According to Steve Harrington

Dustin’s gremlin (“Gremlins,” 1984)

Dustin discovered a weird, (somewhat) cute slug tadpole in his garbage can, and turns it into a pet. But it’s not long before D’art stops being cute and starts being trouble as eats more and more — a lot like what happens to Gizmo and the other Mogwai in “Gremlins.”

Gross alien skin (“Alien,” 1979)

While Dustin’s problem with D’art mirrors “Gremlins,” D’art itself is a lot more like the creature in Ridley Scott’s 1979 horror masterpiece “Alien.” Steve Harrington even finds D’art’s skin after he sheds to grow even bigger, recalling Brett’s discovery right before’s carried off in the 1979 film.

Bob checks for pirate treasure (“Goonies,” 1985)

Midway through “Stranger Things 2,” Joyce (Winona Ryder) enlists Bob to help her decipher Will’s drawings. When Mike explains that the goal is to “Find the X,” Bob asks, “What’s at the X, pirate treasure?” As a kid, Sean Astin hunted pirate treasure with his friends in the 1985 Richard Donner-directed movie “The Goonies.”

Also Read: Here’s All the ’80s References in ‘Stranger Things 2’ (Photos)

Jonathan and Nancy as Indy and Willy (“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,” 1984)

After Nancy (Natalia Dyer) and Jonathan bring their information to Murray (Brett Gelman), they stay the night in separate rooms. The scene in which they talk to themselves about their relationship plays almost exactly like a similar scene with Harrison Ford and Kate Capshaw in the 1984 movie “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.”

Hopper goes back for his Indy hat (“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,” 1984)

Pop culture is full of references of Indiana Jones going back for his iconic hat mid-escape in “Temple of Doom,” reaching under a closing stone doorway to snag it at the last second (the gag is a repeat from “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” when Indy grabbed his whip). It’s Hopper who goes back for his hat in “Stranger Things 2,” after Hawkins Labs folks show up to help in the tunnels beneath Hawkins.

Soldiers get the “Aliens” treatment (“Aliens,” 1986)

Toward the end of “Stranger Things 2,” Dr. Owens sends a group of soldiers down into the tunnels the vines leaking from the Upside Down are creating under Hawkins. They don’t know the danger they’re walking into or how useless their weapons will be, just like the Colonial Marines in James Cameron’s 1986 movie “Aliens.”

Also Read: ‘Stranger Things 2’ Refresher: What Happened to Eleven’s Mom?

“(Luke) It’s a trap!” (“The Empire Strikes Back,” 1980)

At the same time the soldiers are in the tunnels, Mike realizes he needs to warn Dr. Owens about the danger the soldiers are in. He’s subsequently held back by Marines while screaming about a trap — a moment that looks and sounds a lot like Princess Leia’s attempt to warn Luke Skywalker that he’s walking into Darth Vader’s trap in “The Empire Strikes Back” (1980).

Will gets exorcised (“The Exorcist,” 1973)

Father Merrin’s procedure might not have involved space heaters, but tying Will to the bed in order to expel a dark spirit from within him draws a pretty bring line to “The Exorcist.” Lucky for the Byers and Nancy, nobody has to fling themselves out a window to defeat the Shadow Monster.

“Sometimes I amaze even myself.” (“Star Wars,” 1977)

At the end of “Stranger Things 2,” Dr. Owens sneaks in another “Star Wars” reference, although this one wasn’t from the 1980s. Owens uses Han Solo’s iconic line from 1977’s “Star Wars.” Here’s Harrison Ford delivering it in the movie.

“Stranger Things 2” is packed with everything from small nods to full-on homage scenes to classic films, from the 1980s when the show is set, and beyond. Here’s a comprehensive list of all the movie homages in the show’s second season.

“MadMax” (“Mad Max,” 1980)

Max borrows the name of Mel Gibson’s iconic character, and later Keith (Matty Cardarople) calls her “Road Warrior,” a reference to the second “Mad Max” movie. The kids are still a year away from the most ridiculous film in the series, Tina Turner’s “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome,” though.

“The Terminator” at the movies (“The Terminator,” 1984)

Passing through Hawkins, it’s possible to catch a glimpse of a movie marquis showing James Cameron’s killer robot action-horror title. The show picks up on the real-world opening weekend of “The Terminator.”

Millennium Falcon toy (“Star Wars,” 1977)

Mike (Finn Wolfhard) spends some time in his basement in Season 1, reminiscing about Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), who’s been missing for almost a year. As he goes through his toys, he picks up his Kenner Millennium Falcon toy from 1979. It’s the one that Eleven moved with her mind back in Season 1.

Reese’s Pieces (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

During his first interview with Dr. Owens (Paul Reiser) that audiences see, Will (Noah Schnapp) mentions that his favorite Halloween candy is Reese’s Pieces. While not the most direct of “E.T.” references, the popularity of the film also caused a spike in the popularity of the candy. Later, we’ll see an E.T. toy in the bedroom of Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin), as well.

Eleven’s ghost costume (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

Cutting holes in a sheet to create a ghost costume is hardly a new idea, but Eleven appearing as a pint-sized ghost is a visual gag that’s hard to separate from the same idea that appeared in “E.T.” In the movie, the kids use the ghost costume to disguise their alien friend, and Eleven wants to use it to hide her identity in the same way.

Marty McFly’s camera (“Back to the Future,” 1985)

Bob (Sean Astin) hands over his JVC video camera to Jonathan (Charlie Heaton) to use when he takes Will and the other kids trick-or-treating. It’s the same model camera that Doc Brown gives to Marty McFly to record Doc’s first Delorean time travel experiment in “Back to the Future.”

“Ghostbusters” costumes (“Ghostbusters,” 1984)

The kids’ coordinated “Ghostbusters” outfits are pretty on-point, and have some fun do-it-yourself nods built in since the movie would have only been out a few months in 1984. For instance, it’s possible to see the spray paint and foam that went into the construction of the proton packs, which is a great nod.

Max’s Michael Myers costume (“Halloween,” 1978)

The guys aren’t the only ones with movie reference costumes. Max goes trick-or-treating dressed as villain Michael Myers from John Carpenter’s 1978 slasher movie “Halloween.” By 1984, when “Stranger Things 2” is set, there had been three movies in the “Halloween” franchise.

Jason Voorhees costume (“Friday the 13th: Part III,” 1982)

Speaking of slashers on Halloween, one of the bigger kids who torments Will is dressed as “Friday the 13th” killer Jason Voorhees. The hockey mask look wasn’t Jason’s first, but he’d gotten his iconic look together by “Friday the 13th: Part III.”

Seeing in the static (“Poltergeist,” 1982)

It’s impossible to see a creepy, static-covered TV with a kid’s silhouette in front of it and not think of 1982’s “Poltergeist.” Eleven doesn’t see ghosts in the static the way Carol Anne does in the movie, but she does use it to help her see people with her psychic remote viewing abilities.

Dustin’s baloney trail (“E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial,” 1982)

A child leading a strange creature using a long trail of food? It’s hard not to see more shades of “E.T.” in Dustin’s attempt to get D’art in the storm cellar using baloney slices. They’re not Reese’s Pieces, but the whole situation is visually and thematically similar.

Dustin’s gremlin (“Gremlins,” 1984)

Dustin discovered a weird, (somewhat) cute slug tadpole in his garbage can, and turns it into a pet. But it’s not long before D’art stops being cute and starts being trouble as eats more and more — a lot like what happens to Gizmo and the other Mogwai in “Gremlins.”

Gross alien skin (“Alien,” 1979)

While Dustin’s problem with D’art mirrors “Gremlins,” D’art itself is a lot more like the creature in Ridley Scott’s 1979 horror masterpiece “Alien.” Steve Harrington even finds D’art’s skin after he sheds to grow even bigger, recalling Brett’s discovery right before’s carried off in the 1979 film.

Bob checks for pirate treasure (“Goonies,” 1985)

Midway through “Stranger Things 2,” Joyce (Winona Ryder) enlists Bob to help her decipher Will’s drawings. When Mike explains that the goal is to “Find the X,” Bob asks, “What’s at the X, pirate treasure?” As a kid, Sean Astin hunted pirate treasure with his friends in the 1985 Richard Donner-directed movie “The Goonies.”

Jonathan and Nancy as Indy and Willy (“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,” 1984)

After Nancy (Natalia Dyer) and Jonathan bring their information to Murray (Brett Gelman), they stay the night in separate rooms. The scene in which they talk to themselves about their relationship plays almost exactly like a similar scene with Harrison Ford and Kate Capshaw in the 1984 movie “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.”

Hopper goes back for his Indy hat (“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,” 1984)

Pop culture is full of references of Indiana Jones going back for his iconic hat mid-escape in “Temple of Doom,” reaching under a closing stone doorway to snag it at the last second (the gag is a repeat from “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” when Indy grabbed his whip). It’s Hopper who goes back for his hat in “Stranger Things 2,” after Hawkins Labs folks show up to help in the tunnels beneath Hawkins.

Soldiers get the “Aliens” treatment (“Aliens,” 1986)

Toward the end of “Stranger Things 2,” Dr. Owens sends a group of soldiers down into the tunnels the vines leaking from the Upside Down are creating under Hawkins. They don’t know the danger they’re walking into or how useless their weapons will be, just like the Colonial Marines in James Cameron’s 1986 movie “Aliens.”

“(Luke) It’s a trap!” (“The Empire Strikes Back,” 1980)

At the same time the soldiers are in the tunnels, Mike realizes he needs to warn Dr. Owens about the danger the soldiers are in. He’s subsequently held back by Marines while screaming about a trap — a moment that looks and sounds a lot like Princess Leia’s attempt to warn Luke Skywalker that he’s walking into Darth Vader’s trap in “The Empire Strikes Back” (1980).

Will gets exorcised (“The Exorcist,” 1973)

Father Merrin’s procedure might not have involved space heaters, but tying Will to the bed in order to expel a dark spirit from within him draws a pretty bring line to “The Exorcist.” Lucky for the Byers and Nancy, nobody has to fling themselves out a window to defeat the Shadow Monster.

“Sometimes I amaze even myself.” (“Star Wars,” 1977)

At the end of “Stranger Things 2,” Dr. Owens sneaks in another “Star Wars” reference, although this one wasn’t from the 1980s. Owens uses Han Solo’s iconic line from 1977’s “Star Wars.” Here’s Harrison Ford delivering it in the movie.

Your daily reminder that Dan Aykroyd will say yes to any Ghostbusters pitch you give him

In a brief interview with Cinema Blend, Dan Aykroyd was asked whether he might be interested in a live-action Ghostbusters TV series—maybe one on Netflix, where Stranger Things is currently keeping the franchise alive through its characters’ period-accurate obsession with the 1984 film. Carefully weighing the myriad…

Read more…

In a brief interview with Cinema Blend, Dan Aykroyd was asked whether he might be interested in a live-action Ghostbusters TV series—maybe one on Netflix, where Stranger Things is currently keeping the franchise alive through its characters’ period-accurate obsession with the 1984 film. Carefully weighing the myriad…

Read more...

The Ghostbusters animated movie will finally tell things from the ghosts’ point of view

After decades of depicting the human soul as little more than floating target practice for cocky physicists with nuclear accelerators strapped to their backs, it sounds like the Ghostbusters franchise is finally going to let the ghosts tell their side of the story. This is per geek news site ThatHashtagShow.com, which…

Read more…

After decades of depicting the human soul as little more than floating target practice for cocky physicists with nuclear accelerators strapped to their backs, it sounds like the Ghostbusters franchise is finally going to let the ghosts tell their side of the story. This is per geek news site ThatHashtagShow.com, which…

Read more...