Geoffrey Rush ‘Virtually Housebound’ and ‘Barely Eats’ Following Allegations of ‘Inappropriate Behavior’

He’s suing the newspaper that first published the accusations.

After being accused of “inappropriate behavior” and stepping down as President of the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts as a result, Geoffrey Rush is said to be “virtually housebound” and barely eating. The Guardian reports that the Academy Award winner’s solicitor has filed a court document stating that Rush has “lost his appetite” due to the “tremendous emotional and social hardship” that resulted from the publication of said accusations in the Daily Telegraph, which stem from a 2015 Sydney Theatre Company production of “King Lear.”

Rush is suing the newspaper for defamation over its publication of several articles. The initial story didn’t go into detail regarding the allegations, nor did it explicitly state that they were sexual in nature; it was eventually deleted. In his statement about stepping down from the AACTA, Rush referred to “the current climate of innuendo and unjustifiable reporting.”

Rush has denied the vague accusations, calling them “spurious.” IndieWire has reached out to the actor’s representatives for comment.

Geoffrey Rush Is “Virtually Housebound” And His Career Is “Irreparably Damaged” Oz Court Told In Defamation Case

Oscar winner Geoffrey Rush is “virtually housebound” and believes his career has been “irreparably damaged” following the publication of an allegation against him, his lawyers claimed in an Australian court today.
The Shine and The King’s Speech star is suing Sydney’s Daily Telegraph and journalist Jonathan Moran for defamation over articles that said he was suspected of inappropriate behavior towards a fellow performer during the production of a Sydney Theatre Company…

Oscar winner Geoffrey Rush is “virtually housebound” and believes his career has been “irreparably damaged” following the publication of an allegation against him, his lawyers claimed in an Australian court today. The Shine and The King’s Speech star is suing Sydney’s Daily Telegraph and journalist Jonathan Moran for defamation over articles that said he was suspected of inappropriate behavior towards a fellow performer during the production of a Sydney Theatre Company…

‘Isle of Dogs’ Leads the Pack at Indie Box Office With Top Screen Average of 2018

Fox Searchlight continues what has been a great 2018 for them with “Isle of Dogs,” the latest from Oscar-nominated director Wes Anderson.

The limited release, stop-motion film opened on 27 screens in six cities this weekend, making $1.57 million. That gives the film a per screen average of just under $60,000, beating the mark set two weeks ago by “The Death of Stalin” for the top PSA of the year so far.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Passes ‘The Avengers’ as Top-Grossing Superhero Movie at US Box Office

“Isle of Dogs” stars Bryan Cranston and a voice cast filled with major Japanese and Western heavyweights in a story about a pack of dogs who struggle to survive on an island of trash after they are banished there thanks to the manipulations of a nefarious mayor (Kunichi Nomura) who scares the populace with warnings of an outbreak of “dog flu.” With the help of the mayor’s ward, Atari (Koyu Rankin), and an outspoken American exchange student (Greta Gerwig), the dogs seek to liberate their species and expose the corruption.

The film premiered to critical acclaim at the Berlin Film Festival, where Anderson won the Silver Bear for his direction. The film expands to roughly 150 locations in 22 cities on Easter Weekend, with a nationwide release on approximately 1,500 screens coming in three weeks.

Also Read: ‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ Dethrones ‘Black Panther,’ Opens With $150 Million Worldwide

Also opening on three screens this weekend is Sony Pictures Classics’ “Final Portrait.” Written and directed by Stanley Tucci, it stars Geoffrey Rush as Alberto Giacometti, a painter in the mid-20th century who develops a bumpy friendship with American critic James Lord (Armie Hammer) after he asks him to model for a portrait. Receiving positive reviews with a 77 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, the film grossed a solid $28,200 for a PSA of $9,400.

In holdovers, IFC’s “The Death of Stalin” expanded to 141 locations this weekend and made just over $1 million for a PSA of $7,519. The film now has a three-weekend total of $2.1 million. The Orchard’s “Flower” suffered a substantial decline as it expanded to 57 locations this weekend, making just $125,767 for a PSA of $2,209 and a 10-day total of $190,679.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Indie Box Office: ‘Journey’s End,’ ‘Flower’ Open to Solid Results

Indie Box Office: ‘Shape of Water’ Adds $2.4 Million After Best Picture Win

Fox Searchlight continues what has been a great 2018 for them with “Isle of Dogs,” the latest from Oscar-nominated director Wes Anderson.

The limited release, stop-motion film opened on 27 screens in six cities this weekend, making $1.57 million. That gives the film a per screen average of just under $60,000, beating the mark set two weeks ago by “The Death of Stalin” for the top PSA of the year so far.

“Isle of Dogs” stars Bryan Cranston and a voice cast filled with major Japanese and Western heavyweights in a story about a pack of dogs who struggle to survive on an island of trash after they are banished there thanks to the manipulations of a nefarious mayor (Kunichi Nomura) who scares the populace with warnings of an outbreak of “dog flu.” With the help of the mayor’s ward, Atari (Koyu Rankin), and an outspoken American exchange student (Greta Gerwig), the dogs seek to liberate their species and expose the corruption.

The film premiered to critical acclaim at the Berlin Film Festival, where Anderson won the Silver Bear for his direction. The film expands to roughly 150 locations in 22 cities on Easter Weekend, with a nationwide release on approximately 1,500 screens coming in three weeks.

Also opening on three screens this weekend is Sony Pictures Classics’ “Final Portrait.” Written and directed by Stanley Tucci, it stars Geoffrey Rush as Alberto Giacometti, a painter in the mid-20th century who develops a bumpy friendship with American critic James Lord (Armie Hammer) after he asks him to model for a portrait. Receiving positive reviews with a 77 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, the film grossed a solid $28,200 for a PSA of $9,400.

In holdovers, IFC’s “The Death of Stalin” expanded to 141 locations this weekend and made just over $1 million for a PSA of $7,519. The film now has a three-weekend total of $2.1 million. The Orchard’s “Flower” suffered a substantial decline as it expanded to 57 locations this weekend, making just $125,767 for a PSA of $2,209 and a 10-day total of $190,679.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Indie Box Office: 'Journey's End,' 'Flower' Open to Solid Results

Indie Box Office: 'Shape of Water' Adds $2.4 Million After Best Picture Win

‘Final Portrait’ Film Review: Portrait of the Artist as an Insufferable Old Man

Stanley Tucci has spent the majority of his directing career telling stories about eccentric artists, but it wasn’t until “Final Portrait” that he seemed to find them annoying.

The struggling chefs of “Big Night,” the struggling actors of “The Imposters” and the struggling author of “Joe Gould’s Secret” could be forgiven their obsessions and flaws because they have nothing else to show for their lifetimes of work. If they behaved the exact same way after they were critically acclaimed and financially successful, they would be completely insufferable, just like this film’s version of Alberto Giacometti.

“Final Portrait” stars Geoffrey Rush as Giacometti, a Swiss painter and sculptor who makes so much money he literally doesn’t know what to do with it. So he hides it in wads around his damp, grey studio like he’s the child as well as the bunny in a never-ending Easter egg hunt. He spends most of his days neglecting his wife Annette (Sylvie Testud, “La Vie en Rose”), lavishing affection on his favorite prostitute Caroline (Clémence Poésy, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”) and being routinely dissatisfied with everything he paints and sculpts.

Watch Video: ‘SNL’: Character Actor Sam Rockwell Pays Tribute to Character Actor Stanley Tucci

The year is 1964, the place is Paris, and at the start of the film Giacometti has invited a young art critic and author named James Lord (played by Armie Hammer) to pose for a portrait. Flattered, Lord accepts the offer and walks down to Giacometti’s alleyway apartment which, despite the artist’s enormous success, is so worn down it always looks like it’s in the process of being erased. Lord sits down, Giacometti does very little, and then they break for the day. Would he mind coming back tomorrow? And the day after that? A week at most …

Lord winds up going back to Giacometti’s studio for weeks. Giacometti paints him, erases everything, starts again, shirks work to blow off steam, and generally just wastes this young man’s time. The artist is hypnotically fascinating until he’s a total pain in the rear end, but Lord feels beholden to his sacred artistic process. After all, who is Lord to rush the great Giacometti? Work can wait. Relationships can wait. Life can wait. Forever, if necessary. There’s always more excuses to make in the name of greatness.

Also Read: Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet Dance With Fans in Italy After Empty Screening

The premise of “Final Portrait” is farcical, but writer-director Tucci doesn’t seem to find it very funny. Time drags on, and Lord’s personal and work life fades away, yet the pace never ramps up; the consequences never seem totally dire, and the constant disruptions have no whimsy. Lord can leave any time he wants to — he’s only a prisoner of his own hero worship. Lord thinks great artists need to be indulged, and “Final Portrait” seems to argue that he’s a well-intentioned moron for thinking that.

As Giacometti, Geoffrey Rush gets to wallow in sad-sack self-importance. He rails on and on about how judgmental Pablo Picasso is, never once seeing the irony that he’s being spectacularly judgmental about him. He spends what seems like half the movie staring at a canvas, then barely grazing it with a paintbrush, and then screaming in frustration that he’s ruined everything and needs a break. He argues with his wife, he mopes when his mistress is unavailable, and he only gets away with it because his paintings and sculptures are good, and besides, sometimes he’s … kinda friendly.

Also Read: Golden Globe Voters Brush Off Geoffrey Rush Accusation, Nominate Him Anyway

Rush is talented enough to make Giacometti intriguing for a couple of scenes, but over the course of the movie Tucci practically dares us not to turn on him. By the time Giacometti reveals, offhanded, like it wasn’t anything, that he used to fantasize about raping and murdering women just before bedtime in order to help him sleep, it’s pretty clear we’re supposed to have lost all sympathy. He’s an a-hole who happens to have talent, and no portrait is worth spending this much time in the same room as someone like that.

Though finely acted, “Final Portrait” is a frustrating contradiction. Like James Lord, we are invited into the world of a great artist, but once we get there we’re forced to wonder whether it was worth the trip. Lots of biopics reveal their subjects to be flawed, miserable, or even despicable human beings, but they don’t always reserve a healthy portion of judgment for the rest of us, who just wanted to know what it was like to hang out with them. It’s a clever subversion of the whole biopic genre; it just never really sells its point in an impactful way.

Stanley Tucci takes our collective urge to excuse bad behavior in the name of art, a topic we desperately need to consider right now, but he doesn’t really put it under a microscope to see why that happens or how that relationship works. His characters are subtle, but his tone is muddled, as though it would be rude to come out and damn any of them. Without a strong guiding hand we’re left with a finely acted, but only adequate biopic, which brushes against greatness and then paints over it.



Related stories from TheWrap:

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Armie Hammer Fires Back (Again) at Culture Writer: ‘Your Glass Seems Chronically Half Empty’

TheWrap Screening Series 2017 Portraits, From Gary Oldman to Armie Hammer (Photos)

Armie Hammer to Make Broadway Debut in ‘Straight White Men’

Stanley Tucci has spent the majority of his directing career telling stories about eccentric artists, but it wasn’t until “Final Portrait” that he seemed to find them annoying.

The struggling chefs of “Big Night,” the struggling actors of “The Imposters” and the struggling author of “Joe Gould’s Secret” could be forgiven their obsessions and flaws because they have nothing else to show for their lifetimes of work. If they behaved the exact same way after they were critically acclaimed and financially successful, they would be completely insufferable, just like this film’s version of Alberto Giacometti.

“Final Portrait” stars Geoffrey Rush as Giacometti, a Swiss painter and sculptor who makes so much money he literally doesn’t know what to do with it. So he hides it in wads around his damp, grey studio like he’s the child as well as the bunny in a never-ending Easter egg hunt. He spends most of his days neglecting his wife Annette (Sylvie Testud, “La Vie en Rose”), lavishing affection on his favorite prostitute Caroline (Clémence Poésy, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”) and being routinely dissatisfied with everything he paints and sculpts.

The year is 1964, the place is Paris, and at the start of the film Giacometti has invited a young art critic and author named James Lord (played by Armie Hammer) to pose for a portrait. Flattered, Lord accepts the offer and walks down to Giacometti’s alleyway apartment which, despite the artist’s enormous success, is so worn down it always looks like it’s in the process of being erased. Lord sits down, Giacometti does very little, and then they break for the day. Would he mind coming back tomorrow? And the day after that? A week at most …

Lord winds up going back to Giacometti’s studio for weeks. Giacometti paints him, erases everything, starts again, shirks work to blow off steam, and generally just wastes this young man’s time. The artist is hypnotically fascinating until he’s a total pain in the rear end, but Lord feels beholden to his sacred artistic process. After all, who is Lord to rush the great Giacometti? Work can wait. Relationships can wait. Life can wait. Forever, if necessary. There’s always more excuses to make in the name of greatness.

The premise of “Final Portrait” is farcical, but writer-director Tucci doesn’t seem to find it very funny. Time drags on, and Lord’s personal and work life fades away, yet the pace never ramps up; the consequences never seem totally dire, and the constant disruptions have no whimsy. Lord can leave any time he wants to — he’s only a prisoner of his own hero worship. Lord thinks great artists need to be indulged, and “Final Portrait” seems to argue that he’s a well-intentioned moron for thinking that.

As Giacometti, Geoffrey Rush gets to wallow in sad-sack self-importance. He rails on and on about how judgmental Pablo Picasso is, never once seeing the irony that he’s being spectacularly judgmental about him. He spends what seems like half the movie staring at a canvas, then barely grazing it with a paintbrush, and then screaming in frustration that he’s ruined everything and needs a break. He argues with his wife, he mopes when his mistress is unavailable, and he only gets away with it because his paintings and sculptures are good, and besides, sometimes he’s … kinda friendly.

Rush is talented enough to make Giacometti intriguing for a couple of scenes, but over the course of the movie Tucci practically dares us not to turn on him. By the time Giacometti reveals, offhanded, like it wasn’t anything, that he used to fantasize about raping and murdering women just before bedtime in order to help him sleep, it’s pretty clear we’re supposed to have lost all sympathy. He’s an a-hole who happens to have talent, and no portrait is worth spending this much time in the same room as someone like that.

Though finely acted, “Final Portrait” is a frustrating contradiction. Like James Lord, we are invited into the world of a great artist, but once we get there we’re forced to wonder whether it was worth the trip. Lots of biopics reveal their subjects to be flawed, miserable, or even despicable human beings, but they don’t always reserve a healthy portion of judgment for the rest of us, who just wanted to know what it was like to hang out with them. It’s a clever subversion of the whole biopic genre; it just never really sells its point in an impactful way.

Stanley Tucci takes our collective urge to excuse bad behavior in the name of art, a topic we desperately need to consider right now, but he doesn’t really put it under a microscope to see why that happens or how that relationship works. His characters are subtle, but his tone is muddled, as though it would be rude to come out and damn any of them. Without a strong guiding hand we’re left with a finely acted, but only adequate biopic, which brushes against greatness and then paints over it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Armie Hammer's Wife Says an Impostor Used Her Name in Bid for Vanity Fair Oscars Party Invite

Armie Hammer Fires Back (Again) at Culture Writer: 'Your Glass Seems Chronically Half Empty'

TheWrap Screening Series 2017 Portraits, From Gary Oldman to Armie Hammer (Photos)

Armie Hammer to Make Broadway Debut in 'Straight White Men'

Geoffrey Rush’s Defamation Case Rules Out News Corp’s Truth Defense

The Australia federal court has struck out large parts of News Corp’s truth defense in Geoffrey Rush’s defamation case.
The news comes after the Oscar-winning actor filed defamation proceedings last year in Australia’s federal court, seeking damages from The Daily Telegraph which published allegations the actor behaved inappropriately towards a female cast member during a 2015 production of King Lear.
The federal court ruled in favor of Rush and ruled out New Corp’s truth…

The Australia federal court has struck out large parts of News Corp’s truth defense in Geoffrey Rush’s defamation case. The news comes after the Oscar-winning actor filed defamation proceedings last year in Australia's federal court, seeking damages from The Daily Telegraph which published allegations the actor behaved inappropriately towards a female cast member during a 2015 production of King Lear. The federal court ruled in favor of Rush and ruled out New Corp’s truth…

‘Final Portrait’ Trailer: Geoffrey Rush Paints Armie Hammer and Tests His Patience in Stanley Tucci’s Return to Directing — Watch

Oscar-nominated actor Stanley Tucci is back to writing and directing films after a decade-long absence.

Armie Hammer’s “Call Me by Your Name” follow-up is another Sony Pictures Classics period piece that casts him as an American on a European excursion.

In Paris-set “Final Portrait” — Stanley Tucci’s first film as a writer/director since 2007 (“Blind Date”) — Hammer plays James Lord, a writer who agrees to sit for a 1964 session with Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush). But hasty, distracted Giacometti demands weeks of Lord’s life, and 18 sessions altogether.

More than two decades later, Lord published a nearly 600-page biography of his late friend and patience-tester. Giacometti died in 1966 at age 64, shortly after traveling to New York for an exhibition of his sculptures, lithographs, and paintings at the Museum of Modern Art.

“Final Portrait” premiered at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival, where it earned a B+ from IndieWire. Co-starring three-time Emmy winner Tony Shalhoub, Clémence Poésy (the “Harry Potter” films), and Sylvie Testud (“La Vie en Rose”), the film was released across the pond in August.

Its American premiere will take place on March 9 at SXSW. Hammer is expected to attend, as he’ll be honored one night earlier alongside P.T. Anderson at the Texas Film Awards, presented by the Austin Film Society.

The same cannot be said for Rush: in December, he resigned as president of the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts, following a report that he engaged in “inappropriate behavior” while performing as King Lear in a Sydney Theatre Company production that ran from November 2015 to January 2016. Later that month, Rush filed a defamation lawsuit against the news organization that published the allegations — which he denies — Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.

“Final Portrait” will be released on March 23. Watch the trailer below.

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Geoffrey Rush Accused of ‘Inappropriate Touching,’ Court Documents Show

Australian actor Geoffrey Rush has been accused of “inappropriate touching” and entering the women’s bathroom during a Sydney Theater Company production of “King Lear” in 2015 and 2016, according to court documents released this week. Details of the sexual-misconduct allegations that have dogged Rush since November finally emerged as part of a defamation case brought […]

Australian actor Geoffrey Rush has been accused of “inappropriate touching” and entering the women’s bathroom during a Sydney Theater Company production of “King Lear” in 2015 and 2016, according to court documents released this week. Details of the sexual-misconduct allegations that have dogged Rush since November finally emerged as part of a defamation case brought […]