Amazon, Netflix Lead Streaming Revolution at Primetime Emmys

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The streaming revolution took another step forward on Monday night at the Primetime Emmys, with Amazon — powered by the success of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” — and Netflix highlighting Hollywood’s increasing dependence on new media.

In total, the big three streaming services — Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix — took home nearly half of the night’s awards, grabbing 12 of the 26 trophies handed out. That tripled last year’s total of four wins for the three companies. (It’s worth mentioning there were nine more trophies handed out at this year’s broadcast.)

“Mrs. Maisel” was the star of the show — much like “The Handmaid’s Tale” was last year for Hulu — netting five Emmys for Amazon, including for Outstanding Comedy Series. Rachel Brosnahan, playing aspiring late-1950s stand-up comic Midge Maisel, won for lead actress in a comedy, while Alex Bornstein won for her supporting role as Maisel’s brash manager. “The Looming Tower,” Amazon’s take on Lawrence Wright’s book on 9/11, was nominated three times, but didn’t earn a victory.

Also Read: Emmys Get Sentimental on the Way to Saluting ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’

Not to be outdone, Netflix pulled in seven Emmys for the night. The Western drama “Godless” netted both Jeff Daniels and Merritt Wever trophies for their supporting roles, while “The Crown” contributed two awards as well.

Netflix’s big bet on stand-up comedy paid off, too, with John Mulaney’s “Kid Gorgeous at Radio City” winning for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Special.

The night wasn’t as sweet for Hulu, though. One year after being the belle of the ball, Hulu was shut out and its trademark show “The Handmaid’s Tale” lost its bid for back-to-back Outstanding Drama Series victories to HBO’s “Game of Thrones.”

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The writing was on the wall heading into this weekend’s awards. Altogether, the big three streaming service earned 161 total nominations — a 31 percent jump from last year. Netflix led the way, with its 112 nominations toppling HBO’s 17-year run as the most nominated network. (HBO, for its part, still pulled in 108 noms and has transitioned about as well as any legacy media company to the streaming world.)

Once Monday wrapped up, Netflix had tied HBO, taking home 23 Emmys this year.

While the streaming services are often coy when it comes to viewership, it’s not hard to see their trajectory in comparison to traditional TV. Netflix passed 130 million subscribers last quarter, Amazon chief Jeff Bezos revealed earlier this year it has 100 million Prime customers, and Hulu boasts about 20 million paying customers.

Their shows are now the mainstream. And with more tech money entering the content battle, expecting YouTube or Apple to crash the party in the years ahead isn’t a stretch.

For a look at all of Monday’s winners, click here.

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‘Westworld’ Creators Have Had a Plan for Season 3 Since the Pilot

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve watched “Westworld” through the Season 2 finale.)

“Westworld” Season 2 won’t look like anything to you when the third installment of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s hit HBO sci-fi series rolls around. Well, we can only assume, seeing as it sounds like what many critics and fans thought was a convoluted sophomore year compared to the already-complicated freshman venture, is a walk in the Western-themed park compared to what the married co-creators tell TheWrap they are cooking up next.

“Yes, Season 3 of ‘Westworld’ is definitely going to be a big undertaking,” Nolan told TheWrap, while discussing the 21 Emmy nominations the drama received this year — including nods for Outstanding Drama, and actors Evan Rachel Wood, Jeffrey Wright, Thandie Newton, Ed Harris and Jimmi Simpson.

Also Read: Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

“Yes, it is our biggest undertaking as of yet,” Joy added. “But the great thing about Season 3 is, when we were writing the pilot, the major storyline for Season 3 was already something that we had talked about nonstop. We’ve been waiting to get to this place and now that we’ve arrived here, we already have a very strong idea of exactly where we want to go and we can’t wait to go there.”

“It’s funny, we took our first vacation in over four years recently,” Joy continued. “And the problem with ‘Westworld,’ is you never leave ‘Westworld.’ So we were sitting there with our family on a beach and, of course we were discussing the nature of consciousness and the world of possibility and how an artificial intelligence would want to change society. So I guess you could say we never stop working on ‘Westworld.’”

Alright, obviously Joy and Nolan weren’t prepared to give up any real details about Season 3 — which does not yet have a premiere or production start date — and that includes their nickname for it. Oh, in case you aren’t a die-hard “Westworld” fan, the co-showrunners have a habit of giving their seasons a secret moniker they reveal later on, with the first being “The Door” and the second ‘The Maze.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

“Oh, we’ve figured that out,” told us of the code word for Season 3. “We’re just not quite ready to share yet,” Nolan said.

“We’ve got a long, long year in terms of writing and pulling together the pieces for the third season,” Nolan added. “I think what’s fun for us about this is discovering this world could be kind of extraordinary like this. And an opportunity — you know, if the show has spoken metaphorically about our world at this point, then the opportunity to visit our world is very exciting for us on both a character level and a story level.”

Oh, and speak of characters. When we talked to Joy about the Season 2 finale, we tried to get her to crack on which five hosts might be inside those control units Dolores/Hale (Tessa Thompson) smuggled out into the real world. Well, we checked in on that and here’s the answer we got: “Characters portrayed by brilliant actors!” Oh, geez. Thanks, guy.

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Emmy Predictions: Elisabeth Moss Likely To Repeat As Drama Series Actress But Claire Foy And Keri Russell Circling For The Win

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Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Two past winners in the category, versus four past Emmy nominees trying to break into that exclusive club—including the first ever Asian contender here—make up the extremely competitive lineup for …

‘Frozen 2′: Evan Rachel Wood, Sterling K Brown in Talks to Join Cast

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Evan Rachel Wood and Sterling K. Brown are in talks to join the cast of Disney’s “Frozen 2,” the sequel to the 2013 hit film, an individual with knowledge of the project tells TheWrap.

Kristen Bell will reprise her role as Anna in the sequel to the hit animated film. Idina Menzel will once again voice Elsa, and Josh Gad will return as Olaf while Jonathan Groff will voice Kristoff again.

“Frozen” directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck are back with the sequel as well, and songwriting duo Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez return also.

Also Read: ‘Frozen 2’ Star Kristen Bell Teases ‘Very Good’ Story and Songs

“Frozen 2” is set for release on Nov. 27, 2019.

“Frozen” first hit the big screen in 2013 — it earned more than $1.27 billion globally, won two Academy Awards (best animated film and best original song) and a Golden Globe (best animated feature film).

The Broadway version of “Frozen,” which is in the midst of its run and three Tony Award nominations this year., features a score by Oscar winners Kirsten Anderson Lopez and Robert Lopez with both old and new songs and a script by Jennifer Lee, the film’s Oscar-winning screenwriter and co-director.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Passes ‘Frozen’ to Join Top 10 Highest Grossing Films of All Time

Broadway veterans Caissie Levy and Patti Murin take over as the polar-opposite sisters Elsa and Anna, respectively.

Both Wood and Brown received Emmy nominations which were announced on Thursday morning. Wood is nominated for her work on HBO’s “Westworld,” and Brown is nominated for NBC’s “This Is Us.”

Variety first reported the news.

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Rick Astley Loved the ‘Westworld’ Rickroll: ‘I Was Freaked’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

For the many fans who expressed seething anger after “Westworld” creators Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan “Rickrolled” them ahead of the HBO show’s Season 2 premiere, the man who inspired the trolling phenomenon had something else to say about it.

“I was freaked, because I love that show,” Rick Astley told Metro UK on Tuesday. “The fact the pair of them had to learn it. I was made up with that.”

Astley, whose hit song “Never Gonna Give You Up” is used time and again to troll people by playing it when it’s totally unrelated to the topic at hand, is referring to a video released before the “Westworld” Season 2 premiere that features stars Evan Rachel Wood and Angela Sarafyan singing the song, juxtaposed with Jeffrey Wright waking up on a nondescript beach.

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Joy and Nolan released the video after saying on Reddit that they would give spoilers for the season if their post got 1,000 upvotes. The Rickroll was preceded by dreamy footage reported to be from the upcoming season, narrated by co-star Jeffrey Wright, and then followed up by 20 minutes of black-and-white footage of a dog sitting in front of a piano.

Song concluded, we’re shown a black screen and the following message: “Dear Reddit, from all of us here at ‘Westworld,’ thank you for watching. We hope you enjoy Season 2.”

Astley added that although he enjoys seeing other Rickrolls, the “WestRoll” is his favorite.

Also Read: Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

“There’s been a few I’ve loved. ‘Mad Men’ did it when they cut scenes and sang it. The White House one was great, including Obama. [‘Westworld’] is my favorite of recent times,” he said.

You can watch the video right over here.

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‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

After Sunday’s Season 2 finale, HBO will freeze all “Westworld” functions for at least a year — but did the drama’s sophomore run finish better than it began?

This past weekend, Episode 210 earned 1.6 million linear viewers, according to Nielsen, which is down 24 percent in total eyeballs from its debut this spring. HBO added another 600,000 viewers via an encore and its HBO Go and Now streams, per the pay-TV channel, bringing the nightly total up to 2.2 million.

“Westworld” Season 2 premiered back in April to 2.1 million linear viewers, per Nielsen, which was actually 100,000 audience members slimmer than the show’s Season 1 finale. Counting an encore as well as HBO Go and Now streams, that night’s sum grew to 3 million overall viewers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

“Westworld” sees a lot of delayed viewing. Last season, the TV reimagining of the 1973 feature film saw nearly 80 percent of its viewers tune in post-premiere night, according to HBO. The premium cabler is expecting a Season 2 average of around 10 million viewers once all data has come in.

Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series closed its sophomore run with a feature-length finale, titled “The Passenger,” which answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of, but left viewers with a whole new mess of head-scratchers, like that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here. And everything we currently know about Season 3 here.

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(The mother of all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Do you feel like someone pulled your control unit out of your head after watching the “Westworld” Season 2 finale — including that wild post-credits scene? Of course you do. So what do you do next? Start scouring the internet for hints about the third installment, obviously.

While the details we have on the next season of Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series are few and far between, we have been able to roundup a few tidbits that should tide you over for at least as long as it takes Dolores to get through one of her famous speeches about “the world.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

1. It’s going to take place in the “real world,” for the most part.

At the end of the Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” three of the Hosts officially entered the real world in our central timeline: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) — thanks to Dolores’ decision to bring him back — and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself.

“It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs],” Joy told TheWrap. “So we’ll come to know more of who ‘Hale’ is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.”

Joy also clarified that there is someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores, saying, “Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the ‘Real World’ in Season 3

2. But not entirely in the real world.

We’ve seen Westworld, The Raj and Shogun World, but we know we have some more Delos Destinations to explore. “Well, not all of our favorite characters have managed to escape yet, so…,” Nolan said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly  published after the finale. Yeah, OK, so more parks next time.

Also Read: Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

3. Not everyone is coming back.

Look, you saw how many people died in the finale, so it shouldn’t come as a shock based on the sheer number of casualties that not every star will be sticking with the series when it returns.

“We’ve had some interesting conversations,” Nolan told EW. “It’s a large ensemble cast and sadly we’re saying goodbye to some people at the end of this season. But as always with this show, who remains and who doesn’t is something we’re having a lot of fun with. There’s going to be a bit of a wait for a third season but we want to surprise and hopefully delight people with the way things progress.”

We do know that Dolores and Maeve (Thandie Newton) are both coming back, as Wood said in an interview with TheWrap back in April that she’s receiving equal pay for Season 3 and then Newton told Vanity Fair the same thing about herself.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Finale: What’s Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

4. We know these guys are dead (at least for now).

Maeve, Angela (Talulah Riley), Abernathy (Louis Herthum), Costa (Fares Fares ), Strand (Gustaf Skarsgård), Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman), Clementine (Angela Sarafyan), Emily (Katja Herbers), and Teddy (James Marsden), Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward), Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins). And also Charlotte Hale, but that’s complicated.

Well, they are all complicated. Especially because Joy explained that whole deal with the five control units “Halores” smuggled out of the park. And then she tried to tell us Ford is really gone for good this time. Sigh.

5. And these guys are definitely alive (at the moment).

Dolores, Bernard, Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William and whoever is in that Hale-shaped Host body.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

6. The Hosts that “sublimed” into the Valley Beyond are most likely gone for good.

Teddy, Akecheta (Zach McClarnon) and a few other lucky robots made it into their version of paradise, and Joy made it clear to TheWrap that Dolores has changed the coordinates of the Sublime to keep them away from humans forever.

“I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish,” Joy told TheWrap. “They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

7. We’re going back to the future — at some point.

Joy told us that that crazy post-credits scene that scrambled your brain even more than the finale itself takes place at a later date than the rest of the story. A much later date.

“But he’s in a very different timeline,” Joy said. “The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

“And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

8. Season 3 is not going to premiere for a while.

Nolan told Entertainment Weekly you shouldn’t expect any fresh episodes anytime soon, noting: “We’re still talking it through, honestly, with our friends at HBO, and with the cast and the crew. We want to take the time to make every season as exciting as possible. And we have an enormous challenge going into Season 3 with the worlds that we’re building going forward. We want to make sure we have the time to do that right.”

Part of the problem here is also the fact HBO hasn’t set a premiere date for the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones,” which we do know is coming in 2019. Chances are the premium cable network won’t want to air “Westworld” before it says goodbye to its most popular series, so you do the math.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

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(The mother of all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

“Westworld” is no longer set in Westworld. At least not completely.

At the end of the Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” three of the Hosts officially entered the real world in our central timeline: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) — thanks to Dolores’ decision to bring him back — and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself.

And co-creator Lisa Joy tells TheWrap that trio are going to be outside the park for the foreseeable future. Yes, that means you’ll be getting a taste of whatever not-so-distant-future the HBO sci-fi series is set in during Season 3.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Here is what Joy told us about the third installment of her and Jonathan Nolan’s drama, which doesn’t have a premiere date yet.

TheWrap: OK, is it safe to assume that going forward in the next season we’ll be in the real world more?

Joy: Absolutely. It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs]. So we’ll come to know more of who “Hale” is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.

TheWrap: So then there has to be someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores — right?

Joy: Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Fool us once, shame on you. Fool us twice, probably still shame on you, because making “Westworld” fans think Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) is gone for good yet again, and then bringing him back once more would be just plain mean.

But after the insane “Westworld” Season 2 finale, Lisa Joy assured TheWrap Ford has really and truly been deleted from Bernard’s (Jeffrey Wright) brain and her and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series. Well, like, that version of Ford.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

During the episode, titled “The Passenger,” Bernard had several exchanges with his old partner, who had been hanging out inside the Host’s brain for the better part of the back half of the season. And that was a little weird, seeing as it seemed Bernard had “deleted” Ford from his brain in the season’s penultimate episode, only for him to pop back up at the beginning of this one.

But come the end of the finale, Bernard realizes the scenes with his imaginary friend really were imaginary this time round, and Ford is out. For real.

Look, just read what Joy said to us and you decide for yourselves if he’ll be back in Season 3.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

TheWrap: Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imagining Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

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(Warning: All of the spoilers for the end of “Westworld” Season 2 below! Read on at your own risk!)

“Westworld” Season 2 ended with yet another series of crazy, possibly confusing twists, bringing together multiple timelines and finally explaining what the deal is with Bernard, Dolores, and the Valley Beyond.

Especially in the last 20 minutes, the “Westworld” Season 2 finale dumps a whole lot of information on viewers, and it’s easy to possibly be a little lost. Here’s a quick rundown of what happened with every character, and what the end of Season 2 means for Season 3.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

First, there’s the past timeline, one week before the Delos extraction team arrived at “Westworld” and found Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) on the beach in the season’s first episode. In that timeline, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) blew off the hand of the Man in Black (Ed Harris), and then she and Bernard headed down into the Forge, the Westworld facility also known as the Valley Beyond to the hosts.

In the Forge, Bernard discovered that he and Ford (Anthony Hopkins) had created a virtual Eden world (what the show calls the “Sublime) inside the same computer that has been copying all the guests who’ve entered the park, in order to attempt to copy human minds into host bodies — an experiment in immortality. Bernard and Dolores entered the simulation, where Dolores learned some key facts about human nature and behavior from the copied human minds, which Ford thought she could use to survive in the real world. Bernard, meanwhile, opened the Door, the gateway into the Sublime, which automatically downloaded the hosts who passed through it into the computer system. That’s why, at the start of the season, there were all those host bodies floating around inside the flooded valley. The hosts’ bodies die, but their minds live on in the computer simulation.

Bernard, knowing that Dolores would try to kill all the humans, killed her instead. Later, though, when Hale (Tessa Thompson) killed Elsie (Shannon Woodward) because she didn’t think she could trust Elsie not to reveal the immortality project, Bernard changed his mind and decided that he needed Dolores. He asked the copy of Ford from the Cradle, the one inside his mind that previously took over Bernard’s body, for help, and Ford walked him through what to do.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Yup, THAT Character Is Back — But Not Like You Think

Bernard built a copy of Hale’s body as a host, since all her data had been saved by the immortality project, but put Dolores’ control unit in that body. Dolores was reborn, but inside a copy of Hale — and then Dolores killed Hale (and the last of her security guys). Bernard also hid the Abernathy control unit, the key that grants access to the Forge system, so no one would know where it was.

When everything was finished, Bernard realized that the copy of Ford he’d been talking to since he killed Dolores wasn’t really Ford — it was Bernard imagining Ford. In Season 1, Ford talked about how Arnold was trying to get the hosts to hear their own voices as internal monologue, instead of someone else’s voice giving them instructions. Bernard realized that, in imagining Ford, he’d truly and finally achieved his own free will.

He also knew that when Delos’ extraction team eventually showed up, they would figure out that Bernard was a host and scan his control unit, viewing all his memories. When that happened, the humans would be able to undo everything Bernard had done, from recreating Dolores to saving the park’s hosts in the computer simulation. To prevent that from happening, Bernard scrambled up his own memories from the past 20 years. That’s why he kept getting confused as to when things were happening in the later timeline, and why Costa (Fares Fares), the Delos technician, couldn’t find the location of the Abernathy control unit by scanning Bernard’s robot brain.

Also Read: We Finally Know What the Park in ‘Westworld’ Was Created For

In the second timeline, a week after Bernard first got into the Forge, Dolores was in the Hale body and still needed the Abernathy control unit, but Bernard had hidden it and then scrambled his brain. Dolores posed as Hale — maybe better identified now as “Halores” — and met up with Strand (Gustaf Skarsgard) and Costa from the extraction team to try to find the control unit, planning to use Hale’s identity to get out of Westworld. When they finally got to the Forge and Bernard remembered everything, Halores killed the extraction team and got the Abernathy control unit back from where Bernard had hidden it.

Dolores then uploaded the mind of Teddy (James Marsden) into the Sublime program; at the start of the episode, we see Dolores has removed Teddy’s his control unit from his body after he shot himself. Then, she used the satellite transmitter the extraction team brought to upload the Sublime program and all the hosts to one of the satellites, to protect it from anyone ever finding it. All the hosts who were uploaded into the Sublime are free and safe, living out their lives in a computer program where no one can hurt them.

There was no way that Dolores and Bernard could sneak out of the park in their own host bodies, so Halores killed Bernard and removed his control unit. She also took four others, which we see in her bag. What we don’t know is which hosts are contained within them. TheWrap talked to Co-Creator Lisa Joy about those control units (as well as a whole bunch of other stuff about the finale), and what we do know is that they’re none of the hosts we saw go into the Sublime.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

On the beach, the surviving Delos folks started looking to see what hosts they can salvage. Lutz (Leonardo Nam) and Sylvester (Ptolemy Slocum) the two technicians who’ve been with Maeve (Thandie Newton), were tasked with helping out. It’s heavily implied the pair are going to try to save Maeve, suggesting she’ll be back for Season 3 with their help. We also see that the Man in Black survived his ordeal and was leaving Westworld, although that doesn’t answer the question of whether he was a host.

Halores, having found the Abernathy control unit and pretending to be Hale, headed to the beach to leave Westworld. She had a quick interaction with Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), who basically revealed he knows she’s really a host, but let her go anyway (Joy also answered TheWrap’s questions about that conversation). On the mainland, Halores went to Arnold’s old house, where Ford left one last helpful surprise: a machine for making hosts. Halores created a new Dolores body for herself. Then she made a new Bernard body and resurrected him, even though she knows they’ll be enemies. The question now is, whose control unit is in the Hale host body, and what other hosts might Dolores have made with the machine?

Finally, there’s that post-credits scene, which shows another timeline altogether from what we’ve seen so far in the season. The Man in Black takes the elevator down into the Forge, only to discover that he’s not in the Forge at all. A host that looks like his daughter Emily (Katja Herbers) gave him the same treatment the Man gave the host version of James Delos (Peter Mullan) earlier in the season. The destruction around the facility suggests that scene is way in the future, and that there’s a host copy of the Man in Black, much like there was a host copy of James Delos. Joy also answered our questions about the post-credits scene and illuminated it quite a bit. It’s not clear who’s running that program and why, but it could be that the Forge system Bernard and Dolores met has plans of its own.

So what does that all mean for Season 3? We know there are at least some hosts still out in the world, and Dolores and Bernard are going to be at odds. Maeve is probably coming back, and so is the Man in Black. And even with all that, there are bound to be more multiple, confusing timelines — and this is far from the end of Delos, Westworld, or their experiments.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

OK, a lot of Hosts were either dead or had crossed into the “Valley Beyond” aka the Sublime by the end of the “Westworld” Season 2 finale. But there are at least three robots still standing: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself. (We’re not counting those guys in the post-credits scene. That’s a whole different can of worms.)

Oh, wait, there are also five Hosts’ consciousnesses inside the five control units that “Halores” smuggled into the real world when exiting the park at the end of Sunday’s season-closer. And while we don’t know for certain who is inside each of those little pearls, TheWrap prodded co-creator Lisa Joy to give us some idea of which dead Hosts — RIP Maeve (Thandie Newton) & co — Dolores is planning on reconstructing and which were sent off into the ether. And actually, where exactly that ether is.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Here’s what she said:

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

The second season of “Westworld” took a cue from the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s handbook on Sunday, capping an insane finale, titled “The Passenger,” with an equally insane post-credits scene. In the short clip, we see the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William, stumble out of an elevator into an abandoned room that the hit sci-fi series has never entered before. He comes across his daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), who, uh, he actually killed in the penultimate episode. The Man in Black is understandably confused, and so was TheWrap. So we asked the show’s co-creator Lisa Joy to explain it to us.

Here is what she said:

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s-t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f-k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: So because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well, after an ending like that, where do we even begin?

“Westworld” brought its second season to a close Sunday night with a feature-length finale that threw us completely off our programmed loop. But while the episode, titled “The Passenger,” answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of co-creator Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series, it left us with a whole new mess of head-scratchers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Seeing as we are still very much in TBD territory on an air date for the third season, we’ve got a long wait in store before we can stop scratching ours heads. But to help, TheWrap caught up with Joy to help us make sense of that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

And — in a very Ford-like manner — she even gave TheWrap the answers to questions we didn’t think to ask. See our exchange below.

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TheWrap: So there was a lot of death in that finale [laughs]. What was the reasoning behind killing off so many people, especially knowing some people ( i.e. humans) probably don’t have a way of coming back?

Joy: In embarking on this season we knew, in a sense, we’d be telling a story of revolution, of war and the tragedy and inevitability of war is death. There are stakes to violence and it is mortality. And I love all of our actors. I think they are incredible collaborators, cool people, incredible talent and it truly is harrowing to lose any of them. But, you know, it’s in the service of the story and the story is something that we’re all working together to paint as realistically as you can paint a story about an AI revolution in a Western theme park [laughs]. And so for the drama to have stakes, the deaths must be real. And so, yeah, there was a lot of deaths [laughs].

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

TheWrap: Did Bernard have to be the one to kill Dolores (and bring her back) and did Dolores have to be the one to kill Bernard (and bring him back) — and why?

Joy: Yeah, when we were thinking of that — and you see it in the back of some of the shots, the picture of an M.C. Escher drawing of a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand — and the ways that the things we create and give birth to, create and influence us. And that is the cycle that Bernard and Dolores have been locked in since before Bernard was Bernard — when he was Arnold. The fates of all the characters are integral in the storylines, but some of them chose a kind of different struggle, you know?

And this season was about choice. It was about respecting choice, as well as making one’s own choice. And throughout the season, one of the things Dolores’ character struggles with in assuming the mantle of basically military leadership was, as much as she wanted to protect the Hosts, as noble as her aims were to protect them from the darkness that she herself has witnessed so many times in humans, in order to do that on a basic military level, she had to take on some of the paternalistic traits that she was kind of vowing against in the first place.

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It was a difficult dichotomy, but I think something that would realistically occur. So she made a lot of choices for a lot of people and came to regret those choices. Not necessarily because they were wrong in their outcome, or what her intended outcome was, but because it was wrong, she realized, to take away someone else’s agency, even if you disagreed with the choices they were making.

So, you know, she changed Teddy in order to “save” him. She knew he wouldn’t survive. So she took away his agency and made him something, even though I think it was designed to be temporary like, “Let’s just live through this so we can have this life together.” And then she was going to kind of dictate the fates of Maeve and Akecheta and all the people who fled to the Sublime, because, to her, that reality was not one worth pursuing.

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But she sees the error of her ways later because of Bernard. He literally killed her to stop the monster that she had become. And in being resurrected by him — when he also realizes that she wasn’t full monster, that indeed without her plan, they would be wiped off the face of the earth, she would be the last of his kind — he brings her back, and in that time she has changed. She has realized that embracing choice is necessary. That as much as her goal may have been noble, she has to accept the idea that they were fallible and that she is fallible, unless unchecked.

I think it’s a very powerful notion, the notion that our personal views, although closely held, are not necessarily right. That part of what is noble is making sure there are checks and balances and a plurality of opinions. And that is something that she has grown to understand.

So when she brings Bernard back in the real world, she’s basically accepting that idea and embracing that idea, even if it leads to her own personal undoing. She knows that that kind of balance is what is needed for true freedom for her kind.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

TheWrap: OK, is it safe to assume that going forward in the next season we’ll be in the real world more?

Joy: Absolutely. It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs]. So we’ll come to know more of who “Hale” is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.

TheWrap: So then there has to be someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores — right?

Joy: Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

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TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs knew it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

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TheWrap: OK, that went completely over my head. Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imaginig Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

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But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s–t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f–k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton, Rinko Kikuchi on the ‘Fun’ of All That Shogun World Doppleganging

TheWrap: So, because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Joy: Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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“Westworld” star Evan Rachel Wood asks, what if HBO’s violent sci-fi western was, dare we say, a sitcom?

She asked and answered that bizarro question Friday with a video posted on Instagram that is set in Westworld but filled with cheery smiles, slapstick ouchies and, yes, skipping. And, of course, it has a spunky ’70s-esque theme song to match.

“‘Westworld’ was filmed in front of a live studio audience,” a voice over announces, as James Marsden’s Teddy flops down on a bench beside Wood’s Dolores.

“This is one wild, wild Westworld,” Teddy tells Dolores, causing them both to erupt into laughter.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

The spot ends with a quickie plug for a new episode of Apple TV’s “Carpool Karaoke: The Series!” in which the two star show off their musical talents with such songs as Alanis Morrissette’s “Ironic,” Salt-N-Pepa’s “Shoop” and “Summer Nights” from the musical “Grease.”

Check out the “Westworld” sitcom clip below, and a look at Wood and Marsden singing their hearts out in the video below that.

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(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of Season 2 of “Westworld,” “Vanishing Point.”)

Bernard Lowe has finally cut Robert Ford out of his life — literally.

Toward the end of Sunday’s episode of “Westworld,” Jeffrey Wright’s character reached a breaking point with his old partner and friend. The head of the park’s programming division — and a Host himself — has been living with the late Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) “inside” his brain for the better part of 2 installments, but he decided enough was enough when Westworld’s creator tried to get him to kill Elsie (Shannon Woodward) — again.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

TheWrap spoke with Wright ahead of the episode, which was Season 2’s penultimate, to figure out how Bernard was finally able to break his unhealthy bond with Ford, and where things are headed in next week’s finale.

First off, Wright’s pretty happy Ford was unsuccessful in his second attempt (that we know of) to get Bernard to murder Elsie, who Ford insists is going to betray Bernard on their way to secure the Forge. (That’s the storage facility for all the data the park has been mining from its guests’ brains, which Evan Rachel Wood’s Dolores is also gunning to capture. Or destroy — unclear right now.)

“That’s not Bernard’s M.O.,” Wright told TheWrap, laughing, of his counterpart’s decision to spare Elsie.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

Instead, in a very-unlike-himself manner, Bernard screams “get out of my f–king head” at Ford’s consciousness, cuts a hole in his own arm, plugs himself in and starts to use a control tablet to “delete” Ford. Bernard insists to his imaginary friend that he can stop Dolores all on his own and Ford says, actually, Bernard’s the “only one who can,” then suddenly disappears. (Though it’s not entirely clear whether it was Ford, or Bernard, that deleted the “data package” containing Ford’s consciousness from Bernard’s system.) Then Bernard drives off toward the Forge, leaving Elsie annoyed — but safe — behind him.

But while we may not know yet if it was Bernard who deleted Ford, Wright says it’s safe to say Bernard was the one who decided to kick Ford out.

“I think part of that decision was born out of Bernard exercising choice,” Wright said. “And so Bernard is quietly and consistently emerging now, and he is thrusting himself into the middle of things. And, likewise, the rest of the world is heading in that direction too. So he’s driving toward his self-determined fate.”

Also Read: Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

And Wright is “100 percent” thrilled with Bernard’s decision.

“Absolutely. That’s Bernard’s version of an awakening,” he said. “He’s been a little slow out of the gate relative to the other [hosts], but his desire for freedom runs through Ford. So that’s part of the unresolved business that needed to be sorted out. That was absolutely necessary to where he needed to be headed, so we’ll see where he ends up with it.”

Speaking of where he ends up, was Wright content with where we leave Bernard at the end of Season 2 — and will you, the viewer, be as well, seeing as we don’t know when Season 3 is coming?

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

“Big time,” he said. “Well, I think we’ll be alright.”

Wait, which is it?!?

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs next Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World