Eurovision Song Contest Set For Tel Aviv in 2019

The Eurovision Song Contest is set to take place in Tel Aviv for the first time in 2019, it was announced Thursday. The 64th edition of the annual international song competition will be broadcast around the world from the Expo Tel Aviv International Co…

The Eurovision Song Contest is set to take place in Tel Aviv for the first time in 2019, it was announced Thursday. The 64th edition of the annual international song competition will be broadcast around the world from the Expo Tel Aviv International Convention Center in Israel with semi-final shows on May 14 and 16, […]

Will Ferrell To Star In Netflix Music Pic ‘Eurovision’ As Another A-List Comedy Star Tries A Streaming Vehicle

EXCLUSIVE: Netflix has set up another feature film anchored by an A-list comedy star. Netflix has set Will Ferrell to star in Eurovision, a comedy he will write with Andrew Steele. The premise revolves around the wildly popular and long running interna…

EXCLUSIVE: Netflix has set up another feature film anchored by an A-list comedy star. Netflix has set Will Ferrell to star in Eurovision, a comedy he will write with Andrew Steele. The premise revolves around the wildly popular and long running international TV music competition The Eurovision Song Contest. It is a contest that began in Switzerland in 1956, when seven West European nations participated. This year 43 countries competed for the prize, won in Lisbon by Netta…

What the World Needs Now Is a DJ Khaled-Netta Barzilai Collaboration

I’ve recently become infatuated with Netta Barzilai, the Israeli singer who won the Eurovision competition, held last week in Portugal, with her #Metoo inspired song “Toy.” It was the first time in 20 years that Israel had taken the t…

I’ve recently become infatuated with Netta Barzilai, the Israeli singer who won the Eurovision competition, held last week in Portugal, with her #Metoo inspired song “Toy.” It was the first time in 20 years that Israel had taken the top prize in the global contest, after dominating in the final years of the 1970s. Of […]

Israel Wins Eurovision Contest

Israel won the Eurovision contest on Saturday night (May 12) with the song “Toy” by Netta Barzilai. The annual competition was held in Lisbon, Portugal and featured 43 countries competing for the top prize. Eleni Foureira of Cyprus, an isla…

Israel won the Eurovision contest on Saturday night (May 12) with the song “Toy” by Netta Barzilai. The annual competition was held in Lisbon, Portugal and featured 43 countries competing for the top prize. Eleni Foureira of Cyprus, an island near Turkey, came in second place. Barzilai is a 25-year-old singer who won the TV […]

China Broadcast of Eurovision Contest Revoked After Anti-LGBT Censorship

The European Broadcasting Union has canceled the contract of China’s Mango TV to screen Saturday’s finale of the Eurovision Song Contest. Mango is one of China’s top TV operators and is part of the Hunan Television group that has multiple business rela…

The European Broadcasting Union has canceled the contract of China’s Mango TV to screen Saturday’s finale of the Eurovision Song Contest. Mango is one of China’s top TV operators and is part of the Hunan Television group that has multiple business relationships with Lionsgate. The decision was taken after Mango TV edited the Wednesday transmission […]

How Did the Chicken Cross the Euro Pop Charts? Starring in a #MeToo Music Anthem

Israeli singer Netta Barzilai gives a cluck about empowering women.

Barzilai is favored to win the Eurovision Song Contest, a massive phenomenon overseas, with a #MeToo anthem of sorts that incorporates chicken sounds.

“People are really connecting with the clucking,” Barzilai told TheWrap. “It’s uplifting.”

Hundreds of millions of viewers around the world follow the Eurovision contest. Barzilai qualified for it by winning “HaKokhav HaBa L’Eurovision” (The Next Star for Eurovision), an Israeli reality singing competition. When it came time to record her entry, “Toy,” Barzilai decided to wing it (sorry) with the chicken sounds.

Also Read: Charlie Rose Faces Backlash Over Proposed #MeToo Redemption Series: ‘My Feed Is Just Anger’

The song includes lyrics like: “I’m not your toy, you stupid boy,” and “Barbie got something to say.”

“We knew we were creating something special,” Barzilai said. “But we never thought it would be this crazy.”

“We’ve been getting fan mail from the U.S. and even Arab countries, places that have nothing to do with Europe,” the song’s co-writer, Doron Medalie, told TheWrap. “The Eurovision usually has the same cliche-ridden themes about peace and love. There aren’t a lot of songs using toys as metaphors for men.”

The winner of the Eurovision contest will be named May 12.

Since its March release, the tune has garnered 18 million views on YouTube and another 4.5 million on Facebook.

Betting sites have Barzilai as the odds-on favorite to win, with “Toy” taking up the No. 1 spot with bookmakers according to ESC Daily, a site dedicated to covering the Eurovision contest “as the Olympic Games of music.”

“She’s light years ahead of of anyone else,” said Gal Uchovsky, who served as a judge on the show “Kokhav Nolad(A Star Is Born) for five seasons. “It’s a great song and it’s very current.”

Also Read: Tony Robbins Dragged Over #MeToo Comments: ‘Biggest Pile of Dog S-‘ (Video)

Estonia’s “La Forza,” which bookies rank second-most likely to win the contest, has 2 million views. The Czech Republic’s entry, “Lie to Me,” another favorite to win, has 3.7 million YouTube views.

According to the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, it came in 17th on the list of the most listened-to songs on iTunes in Spain, 36th place in Poland, and 46th in the Netherlands.

Started in 1956, the Eurovision Song Contest is the longest-running international singing competition, with more than 200 million viewers, according to organizers. It’s largely considered the precursor for singing contests like “American Idol” and “The Voice.”

The event, held in Lisbon, Portugal, also airs in the U.S. For the third consecutive year, the show will be broadcast on Logo. The Viacom network will carry the live finale on May 12.

The internet has made Eurovision popular well outside Europe. Last month, a Ugandan dance group, Spoon Youth, choreographed dance to “Toy.” It has more than a quarter of a million views.

It also got a super-Jewish Yiddish spoof by a singer calling herself  “The Kosher Diva.”

The winning Eurovision country also gets to host the following year’s competition. The honor doesn’t come cheap — Ukraine forked over about $24 million for last year’s event, according to the Kyiv Post.

But hosting the live event can boost a county’s image and tourism. Stockholm, which hosted the Eurovision in 2016, saw a boom in international visitors and generated about $30.5 million in revenue, according to the city, which it said was the equivalent to 175 full-time jobs.

Israel has won three times —  in 1978, 1979 and 1998. But there are no guarantees the 2019 Eurovision contest will be held in Jerusalem. Last year, the Italian song was favored to win, but ended up sixth after the final tally came in.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Molly Ringwald Is Troubled by ‘Breakfast Club’ Crotch Scene in #MeToo Era

Broadway’s Revival Fever: Do Old Shows Still Play in #MeToo Era? (Guest Blog)

Terry Gilliam Blasts ‘Mob Rule’ of #MeToo Movement in Hollywood: ‘It Is a World of Victims’

Israeli singer Netta Barzilai gives a cluck about empowering women.

Barzilai is favored to win the Eurovision Song Contest, a massive phenomenon overseas, with a #MeToo anthem of sorts that incorporates chicken sounds.

“People are really connecting with the clucking,” Barzilai told TheWrap. “It’s uplifting.”

Hundreds of millions of viewers around the world follow the Eurovision contest. Barzilai qualified for it by winning “HaKokhav HaBa L’Eurovision” (The Next Star for Eurovision), an Israeli reality singing competition. When it came time to record her entry, “Toy,” Barzilai decided to wing it (sorry) with the chicken sounds.

The song includes lyrics like: “I’m not your toy, you stupid boy,” and “Barbie got something to say.”

“We knew we were creating something special,” Barzilai said. “But we never thought it would be this crazy.”

“We’ve been getting fan mail from the U.S. and even Arab countries, places that have nothing to do with Europe,” the song’s co-writer, Doron Medalie, told TheWrap. “The Eurovision usually has the same cliche-ridden themes about peace and love. There aren’t a lot of songs using toys as metaphors for men.”

The winner of the Eurovision contest will be named May 12.

Since its March release, the tune has garnered 18 million views on YouTube and another 4.5 million on Facebook.

Betting sites have Barzilai as the odds-on favorite to win, with “Toy” taking up the No. 1 spot with bookmakers according to ESC Daily, a site dedicated to covering the Eurovision contest “as the Olympic Games of music.”

“She’s light years ahead of of anyone else,” said Gal Uchovsky, who served as a judge on the show “Kokhav Nolad(A Star Is Born) for five seasons. “It’s a great song and it’s very current.”

Estonia’s “La Forza,” which bookies rank second-most likely to win the contest, has 2 million views. The Czech Republic’s entry, “Lie to Me,” another favorite to win, has 3.7 million YouTube views.

According to the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, it came in 17th on the list of the most listened-to songs on iTunes in Spain, 36th place in Poland, and 46th in the Netherlands.

Started in 1956, the Eurovision Song Contest is the longest-running international singing competition, with more than 200 million viewers, according to organizers. It’s largely considered the precursor for singing contests like “American Idol” and “The Voice.”

The event, held in Lisbon, Portugal, also airs in the U.S. For the third consecutive year, the show will be broadcast on Logo. The Viacom network will carry the live finale on May 12.

The internet has made Eurovision popular well outside Europe. Last month, a Ugandan dance group, Spoon Youth, choreographed dance to “Toy.” It has more than a quarter of a million views.

It also got a super-Jewish Yiddish spoof by a singer calling herself  “The Kosher Diva.”

The winning Eurovision country also gets to host the following year’s competition. The honor doesn’t come cheap — Ukraine forked over about $24 million for last year’s event, according to the Kyiv Post.

But hosting the live event can boost a county’s image and tourism. Stockholm, which hosted the Eurovision in 2016, saw a boom in international visitors and generated about $30.5 million in revenue, according to the city, which it said was the equivalent to 175 full-time jobs.

Israel has won three times —  in 1978, 1979 and 1998. But there are no guarantees the 2019 Eurovision contest will be held in Jerusalem. Last year, the Italian song was favored to win, but ended up sixth after the final tally came in.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Molly Ringwald Is Troubled by 'Breakfast Club' Crotch Scene in #MeToo Era

Broadway's Revival Fever: Do Old Shows Still Play in #MeToo Era? (Guest Blog)

Terry Gilliam Blasts 'Mob Rule' of #MeToo Movement in Hollywood: 'It Is a World of Victims'

Eurovision’s 9 Most Famous and Bizarre Moments, From ABBA to Russian Grandmas (Videos)

Eurovision’s most famous winner is undoubtedly ABBA, who managed to take their win in 1974 for “Waterloo,” and build it into international stardom. Another famous winner is Celine Dion, who rose to stardom through Eurovision before &#…

Eurovision’s most famous winner is undoubtedly ABBA, who managed to take their win in 1974 for “Waterloo,” and build it into international stardom. Another famous winner is Celine Dion, who rose to stardom through Eurovision before “My Heart Will Go On” ensured her everlasting fame.

Eurovision’s first big song came from Italian singer Domenico Modguno back in 1958. The song was called “Volare,” and though it didn’t win, it reached the top of the U.S. Billboard charts for five weeks and won two Grammys. David Bowie, Frank Sinatra, and Andrea Bocelli are among the singers who have put their own spin on the song.

In 2014, Eurovision made headlines again when LGBT star Conchita Wurst claimed victory for Austria. Conchita’s win was attacked by Russian conservatives as a sign that the European Union would lead to moral corruption in Russia, but that didn’t stop Conchita from becoming the biggest icon Eurovision had produced in centuries.

2012’s competition was won by the Swedish singer Loreen and her song “Euphoria.” The song received critical acclaim throughout the continent, topped the charts in 17 countries, and is regarded as one of the best songs ever performed on Eurovision.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

From time to time, the Nordic countries eschew europop and send in a heavy metal band to liven things up. For Finland, this tactic actually gave them their first win in 2006, thanks to the monster band Lordi and their song “Hard Rock Hallelujah”

Related stories from TheWrap:

What Is Eurovision 2017? A Guide for Confused Americans

Justin Timberlake Performs at Eurovison 2016, Ukraine Is Crowned the Winner (Video)

Spotify in Israel: Streaming Giant Finds Its Footing a Month After Launch

While international brands such as McDonald’s and Starbucks have struggled to penetrate the Israeli market, Spotify has expressed confidence in its recent entry. And after years of eager anticipation, Israelis are hoping the Swedish company gets it right. On the back of extensive market research, data analysis, partnerships with local music industry leaders, tastemakers, and […]

While international brands such as McDonald’s and Starbucks have struggled to penetrate the Israeli market, Spotify has expressed confidence in its recent entry. And after years of eager anticipation, Israelis are hoping the Swedish company gets it right. On the back of extensive market research, data analysis, partnerships with local music industry leaders, tastemakers, and […]

What Is Eurovision 2017? A Guide for Confused Americans

This weekend, a strange European phenomenon will arrive on American television for only the second time in its 61-year history.

Logo TV will be airing the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest, a cross between “The X Factor” and the Miss Universe pageant that offers Yanks a glimpse of what it’s like to be in a culture that doesn’t have jazz and blues as the foundation of its pop music.

For those who’ve never seen — or even heard of Eurovision — before, here’s a quick primer to get you caught up.

Also Read: Taylor Swift on ‘Taylor Swift Award’ Win: ‘I’m Really Super Relieved’ (Video)

What exactly is this contest?
Eurovision began as an idea back in the mid-1950s as a way for Europe to come together after World War II had ripped it apart. It was a pretty revolutionary effort for its time. Television was still the wild West of communications and the Olympics hadn’t yet become an international broadcasting event. Eurovision was one of the first major attempts to hold an event that people from a wide range of countries could watch. With that in mind, the organizers wanted each country to showcase a song that was indicative of their culture.

That sounds like a pretty noble goal
Yes … but it was also very out of touch with what was happening with music at the time. Rock ‘n’ roll was beginning to take root and The Beatles would take the world by storm just a few years after Eurovision’s inception. This meant that Eurovision’s lineup of ballads and cultural pieces quickly felt antiquated compared to the rock revolution that was going on in the charts. And that was six decades ago … the entries would only get weirder from there.

How weird?
For starters, there was once a rule implemented on and off over the years stating that participants could only enter songs that were in their country’s main language. When that rule was in effect, some countries found a loophole: make the lyrics complete gibberish. In 1968, a Spanish singer named Massiel won with a song that just consisted of her singing “La La La” over and over and over. Songs with titles like “Boom Boom” and “Diggi-loo Diggi-ley” poured out while the home-language rule was in effect.

Then there are the artists themselves. As Eurovision has evolved, more and more ridiculous acts have come out of the woodwork. Finnish monster-rock bands, Russian grandmas and Latvian pirates are among the acts that have performed for a TV audience of hundreds of millions in recent Eurovisions. And that Finnish monster rock band actually won.

Also Read: Celine Dion’s Brother Daniel Dies Just 2 Days After Her Husband

Jeez! So is this just some musical freak show?
Well … only partially. Let’s be fair, there’s always are some solid bits of Europop on hand every year to up the quality. Sweden won in 2012 with a really nice song called “Euphoria.” There’s also a small handful of top stars on the winners’ list you might recognize. ABBA used Eurovision as a launch pad to stardom in 1974 with their song “Waterloo,” and French-Canadian Celine Dion’s win in 1988 was her biggest claim to fame before “Titanic” came out. Quality — or at least creativity — does tend to win out at Eurovision.

OK, so how does this contest work?
First, all the countries have a national contest where they vote on which song will represent at Eurovision. The participants are divided up into two semifinals, with the 10 countries getting the most votes in each semifinal advancing to Saturday’s final. In the final, all 26 countries get three minutes to make a good impression, and then the whole continent votes “Idol”-style (not for their home country, of course), as do professional juries for each country.

Then the show transitions to a long procession of national “ambassadors” reading out who each country gave their votes to. The top 10 performers in each country’s vote get points, with 12 points going to the top vote-getter, followed by 10 and then eight down to one for the rest of the order. The same goes with the juries, but with 10 points going to the performer in first place.

And what does the performer with the most points win?
This trophy. Oh, and their country gets to host the competition next year.

What? No prize money? No contract? No vague promises of superstardom?
Nope. The winners do get their 15 minutes of fame, but beyond ABBA and Celine, Eurovision winners almost never make it big. Again, Eurovision long ago moved away from the sort of music that leaves a lasting cultural impact.

Even now, a good chunk of the acts are homogenous power ballads that can blur together when performed in succession. Still, even with the good musical acts few and far in between, Eurovision is worth watching just for the spectacle of it all. The Disneyland-esque sweetness of the proceedings is oddly charming, and the lack of stakes for the performers keeps it feeling light and fun rather than a battle for wealth, glory, and continental supremacy.

Also Read: ‘Can’t Stop the Feeling’: Justin Timberlake Drops Catchy New Single (Video)

It has also made headlines in recent years that have allowed it to take steps beyond the realm of annual oddities like the Running of the Bulls. The winner in 2014 was gay Austrian singer Thomas Neuwirth, who performed as drag queen superstar Conchita Wurst. The victory transformed Conchita into an LGBT icon in Europe, even as Russian conservatives raged in fury and used the singer as an example of why Russia shouldn’t be a part of the EU. For all of Eurovision’s platitudes about tolerance and peace, this was a moment where those ideals were actually acted upon, even if it meant breaking the general tone of inoffensiveness.

If it’s supposed to be European, why is Australia a competitor?
It turns out that Eurovision has a major cult following in Australia, and they were invited to compete two years ago as a thanks for all the support down under. The expansion of the European Union means countries like Azerbaijan and Israel get to compete too.

So…if all these countries that aren’t strictly European are competing, and the show is airing on American TV , does this mean we may be seeing the USA compete in Eurovision soon?
Eh…don’t count on it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Taylor Swift Dances ‘Like No One’s Watching’ to The Darkness in New Apple Music Ad (Video)

Led Zeppelin Copyright Case Heats Up as Lawyers Clash Over Music Experts

Music Mogul Irving Azoff to YouTube: Stop Pretending You Love Musicians

Eurovision’s 9 Most Famous and Bizarre Moments, From ABBA to Russian Grandmas (Videos)

This weekend, a strange European phenomenon will arrive on American television for only the second time in its 61-year history.

Logo TV will be airing the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest, a cross between “The X Factor” and the Miss Universe pageant that offers Yanks a glimpse of what it’s like to be in a culture that doesn’t have jazz and blues as the foundation of its pop music.

For those who’ve never seen — or even heard of Eurovision — before, here’s a quick primer to get you caught up.

What exactly is this contest?
Eurovision began as an idea back in the mid-1950s as a way for Europe to come together after World War II had ripped it apart. It was a pretty revolutionary effort for its time. Television was still the wild West of communications and the Olympics hadn’t yet become an international broadcasting event. Eurovision was one of the first major attempts to hold an event that people from a wide range of countries could watch. With that in mind, the organizers wanted each country to showcase a song that was indicative of their culture.

That sounds like a pretty noble goal
Yes … but it was also very out of touch with what was happening with music at the time. Rock ‘n’ roll was beginning to take root and The Beatles would take the world by storm just a few years after Eurovision’s inception. This meant that Eurovision’s lineup of ballads and cultural pieces quickly felt antiquated compared to the rock revolution that was going on in the charts. And that was six decades ago … the entries would only get weirder from there.

How weird?
For starters, there was once a rule implemented on and off over the years stating that participants could only enter songs that were in their country’s main language. When that rule was in effect, some countries found a loophole: make the lyrics complete gibberish. In 1968, a Spanish singer named Massiel won with a song that just consisted of her singing “La La La” over and over and over. Songs with titles like “Boom Boom” and “Diggi-loo Diggi-ley” poured out while the home-language rule was in effect.

Then there are the artists themselves. As Eurovision has evolved, more and more ridiculous acts have come out of the woodwork. Finnish monster-rock bands, Russian grandmas and Latvian pirates are among the acts that have performed for a TV audience of hundreds of millions in recent Eurovisions. And that Finnish monster rock band actually won.

Jeez! So is this just some musical freak show?
Well … only partially. Let’s be fair, there’s always are some solid bits of Europop on hand every year to up the quality. Sweden won in 2012 with a really nice song called “Euphoria.” There’s also a small handful of top stars on the winners’ list you might recognize. ABBA used Eurovision as a launch pad to stardom in 1974 with their song “Waterloo,” and French-Canadian Celine Dion’s win in 1988 was her biggest claim to fame before “Titanic” came out. Quality — or at least creativity — does tend to win out at Eurovision.

OK, so how does this contest work?
First, all the countries have a national contest where they vote on which song will represent at Eurovision. The participants are divided up into two semifinals, with the 10 countries getting the most votes in each semifinal advancing to Saturday’s final. In the final, all 26 countries get three minutes to make a good impression, and then the whole continent votes “Idol”-style (not for their home country, of course), as do professional juries for each country.

Then the show transitions to a long procession of national “ambassadors” reading out who each country gave their votes to. The top 10 performers in each country’s vote get points, with 12 points going to the top vote-getter, followed by 10 and then eight down to one for the rest of the order. The same goes with the juries, but with 10 points going to the performer in first place.

And what does the performer with the most points win?
This trophy. Oh, and their country gets to host the competition next year.

What? No prize money? No contract? No vague promises of superstardom?
Nope. The winners do get their 15 minutes of fame, but beyond ABBA and Celine, Eurovision winners almost never make it big. Again, Eurovision long ago moved away from the sort of music that leaves a lasting cultural impact.

Even now, a good chunk of the acts are homogenous power ballads that can blur together when performed in succession. Still, even with the good musical acts few and far in between, Eurovision is worth watching just for the spectacle of it all. The Disneyland-esque sweetness of the proceedings is oddly charming, and the lack of stakes for the performers keeps it feeling light and fun rather than a battle for wealth, glory, and continental supremacy.

It has also made headlines in recent years that have allowed it to take steps beyond the realm of annual oddities like the Running of the Bulls. The winner in 2014 was gay Austrian singer Thomas Neuwirth, who performed as drag queen superstar Conchita Wurst. The victory transformed Conchita into an LGBT icon in Europe, even as Russian conservatives raged in fury and used the singer as an example of why Russia shouldn’t be a part of the EU. For all of Eurovision’s platitudes about tolerance and peace, this was a moment where those ideals were actually acted upon, even if it meant breaking the general tone of inoffensiveness.

If it’s supposed to be European, why is Australia a competitor?
It turns out that Eurovision has a major cult following in Australia, and they were invited to compete two years ago as a thanks for all the support down under. The expansion of the European Union means countries like Azerbaijan and Israel get to compete too.

So…if all these countries that aren’t strictly European are competing, and the show is airing on American TV , does this mean we may be seeing the USA compete in Eurovision soon?
Eh…don’t count on it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Taylor Swift Dances 'Like No One's Watching' to The Darkness in New Apple Music Ad (Video)

Led Zeppelin Copyright Case Heats Up as Lawyers Clash Over Music Experts

Music Mogul Irving Azoff to YouTube: Stop Pretending You Love Musicians

Eurovision's 9 Most Famous and Bizarre Moments, From ABBA to Russian Grandmas (Videos)

Eurovision’s 9 Most Famous and Bizarre Moments, From ABBA to Russian Grandmas (Videos)

Eurovision’s most famous winner is undoubtedly ABBA, who managed to take their win in 1974 for “Waterloo,” and build it into international stardom. Another famous winner is Celine Dion, who rose to stardom through Eurovision before “My Heart Will Go On” ensured her everlasting fame.

Eurovision’s first big song came from Italian singer Domenico Modguno back in 1958. The song was called “Volare,” and though it didn’t win, it reached the top of the U.S. Billboard charts for five weeks and won two Grammys. David Bowie, Frank Sinatra, and Andrea Bocelli are among the singers who have put their own spin on the song.

In 2014, Eurovision made headlines again when LGBT star Conchita Wurst claimed victory for Austria. Conchita’s win was attacked by Russian conservatives as a sign that the European Union would lead to moral corruption in Russia, but that didn’t stop Conchita from becoming the biggest icon Eurovision had produced in centuries.

2012’s competition was won by the Swedish singer Loreen and her song “Euphoria.” The song received critical acclaim throughout the continent, topped the charts in 17 countries, and is regarded as one of the best songs ever performed on Eurovision.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

From time to time, the Nordic countries eschew europop and send in a heavy metal band to liven things up. For Finland, this tactic actually gave them their first win in 2006, thanks to the monster band Lordi and their song “Hard Rock Hallelujah”

Eurovision’s most famous winner is undoubtedly ABBA, who managed to take their win in 1974 for “Waterloo,” and build it into international stardom. Another famous winner is Celine Dion, who rose to stardom through Eurovision before “My Heart Will Go On” ensured her everlasting fame.

Eurovision’s first big song came from Italian singer Domenico Modguno back in 1958. The song was called “Volare,” and though it didn’t win, it reached the top of the U.S. Billboard charts for five weeks and won two Grammys. David Bowie, Frank Sinatra, and Andrea Bocelli are among the singers who have put their own spin on the song.

In 2014, Eurovision made headlines again when LGBT star Conchita Wurst claimed victory for Austria. Conchita’s win was attacked by Russian conservatives as a sign that the European Union would lead to moral corruption in Russia, but that didn’t stop Conchita from becoming the biggest icon Eurovision had produced in centuries.

2012’s competition was won by the Swedish singer Loreen and her song “Euphoria.” The song received critical acclaim throughout the continent, topped the charts in 17 countries, and is regarded as one of the best songs ever performed on Eurovision.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

Not all of them are masterpieces, though. A Latvian group called Pirates of the Sea made a song called “Wolves of the Sea” that may go down as the cheesiest pirate song ever made. Surprisingly, it became a smash hit in South Africa, where it has become an anthem for their national rugby team.

From time to time, the Nordic countries eschew europop and send in a heavy metal band to liven things up. For Finland, this tactic actually gave them their first win in 2006, thanks to the monster band Lordi and their song “Hard Rock Hallelujah”