‘Big Little Lies’ Star Kathryn Newton Nabs Lead in Netflix Survival Drama (Exclusive)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Kathryn Newton, star of HBO hit “Big Little Lies” and a slew of prestige films like “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and the upcoming Julia Roberts film “Ben is Back,” will soon star in a Netflix series billed as “Lord of the Flies” meets “Lost,” TheWrap has learned.

Newton will play the lead in a forthcoming Netflix original from Chris Keyser (“Tyrant,” “The Last Tycoon”), an individual close to the project told TheWrap. Netflix and reps for Newton had no immediate comment.

Keyser will writer and executive produce alongside “Amazing Spider-Man” producer Marc Webb. Production is slated for September on location in Massachusetts.

Also Read: ‘Big Little Lies’ Season 2: Everything We Know So Far

Titled “Hamelins” in its pilot order, the show follows a group of teens who arrive home after a field trip is cut short, only to find themselves trapped within the limits of a city with its entire population missing. Together, they must establish a hierarchy and a survival plan.

Newton is repped by Management 360, Innovative Artists, Hansen, Jacobson, Teller, Hoberman, Newman, Warren, Richman, Rush, Kaller & Gellman LLP.

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At the Oscars’ Governors Ball, Relief at a Break From All the Scandal

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The relief was palpable for a scandal-worn Hollywood at the Governors Ball on Sunday night —  at the familiarity of the Oscar ritual, at the results of the awards. Finally tradition was back and respected and for a minute no change was needed.

The industry needed a moment to catch its breath after the laserlike scrutiny of the media around #TimesUp, and from nonstop waves of business consolidation and cultural criticism. And, hey, it was nice to have a telecast with a minimum of catastrophic screw-ups.

There was lots of love in the room for Guillermo del Toro, winner for both Best Picture and Best Director. He said all the right words at the podium, and it’s undeniable that he has become a beloved figure across the industry through this awards season.

Also Read: Oscars 2018 After-Parties: Winners Frances McDormand, Jordan Peele and Kobe Bryant Celebrate (Photos)

“It’s justice,” said Alejandro Innaritu, who has himself twice won Best Director and Best Picture, for “The Revenant” and “Birdman,” and is one of Del Toro’s closest friends. He was beaming with pride, even though it wasn’t his win.

“The guy has been giving himself and his imagination and curiosity and his heart in every film,” he went on. “And after 25 years he’s recognized in this way — something came back.”

There were deep sighs of joy, and relief too, around the Fox Searchlight table. The arthouse studio released both “Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and had a well-deserved moment of triumph — playing to win at the Oscars without the resources of the bigger competitors (including parent company Fox).

Also Read: Oscars: 5 Things You Didn’t See on TV, From Kobe Bryant to Sam Rockwell’s Barney Fife Inspiration

The studio’s many wins on Oscar night might dissipate, at least a little, the nimbus of anxiety that hangs over its future as it heads toward a new owner in Disney. Nancy Utley, Steve Gilula and all their executives seemed practically bent over from joyful exhaling, and hovered like happy parents around their winners and nominees – including Richard Jenkins and Sam Rockwell. Even past Fox studio chief Jim Gianopulos (now running Paramount) couldn’t stay away.

We buttonholed Frances McDormand who responded with a sharp – “What are you looking for?” – before we could get out “Congratulations and what about this inclusion rider?”

She paused to explain: “It’s a contractual thing that’s been in place for a long time. I didn’t know about it and I’ve been in the business for 35 years. But anyone negotiating a contract – director, writer, actor – we can have an inclusion rider saying we ask for at least 50 percent diversity in the cast and the crew.”

Can that be achieved when so many movies don’t have an equal number of roles for men and women?

The balance can be spread, she explained.

“Just look a little bit closer, you’ll find not tokenism but you can find someone ready to step into that role who is diverse,” she said.

There’s a question of whether or not this is practical in the tough negotiating byways of the business — but “that’s the hope,” said her agent Brian Swardstrom, acknowledging that it probably can’t happen overnight.

Meanwhile, business rivalries were spread across the room, unspoken and present. Bob Iger and his team — who won Oscars for “Coco” and its song, and whose “Black Panther” rules at the box office — was on one side of the ballroom. Meanwhile, Comcast chief Brian Roberts stood with the Universal and Focus team on the other side. The two chieftains are effectively facing off over the European cable behemoth, Sky, which Comcast just swooped in to try and buy out from under Rupert Murdoch, who is in the middle of a deal to sell his movie and TV assets to Disney.

Meanwhile, grocery billionaire Ron Burkle — who supposedly bought The Weinstein Company last week with Maria Contreras-Sweet — didn’t want to talk. “I’m just here to have fun with my friends,” he said, begging off business chat.

Everyone seemed to have the same idea. Exhaustion from the business mano-a-mano and the do-not-call-him-by-his-Harvey-Weinstein name was like a spell spread all around the room.

For a an hour or two, it was like movie heaven.

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All 5 Best Actress Nominees Skip Ryan Seacrest on Oscar Carpet

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

All five women competing in this year’s Oscar race for Best Actress avoided what is typically the “must do” interview of the red carpet — a chat with Ryan Seacrest.

Amidst accusations of sexual misconduct against the busy E! News host — which he vehemently denies — his traffic at Hollywood’s Dolby Theater was noticeably lighter this year, especially when it came to stars nominated in key awards categories.

Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”), Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water”) and Meryl Streep (“The Post”) all skipped the E! spot on the Oscar carpet.

Also Read: Oscars: Adam Rippon’s Bondage Tux Has Social Media Swooning

Seacrest also declined to walk the red carpet before he began his hosting duties, breaking with his tradition of several years. He did land interviews with nominees like Mary J. Blige (“Mudbound”) and Richard Jenkins (“The Shape of Water”) as well as high-profile presenters and attendees like Tiffany Haddish.

During his segments on the broadcast, cohosted by Giuliana Rancic, Seacrest avoided any talk of the sweeping #MeToo and #TimesUp movements that have blanketed awards-season conversation since the Harvey Weinstein scandal erupted.

Hours before the carpet commenced, Deadline reported that Seacrest would be afforded a 30- second delay from the network in case he was rejected live by talent, or in the event that anyone confronted him about the accusation on the air. The network denied it, saying no such measures would be taken and the show would be “business as usual.”

Less than a week ago, Seacrest’s accuser, former stylist Suzie Hardy, came forward with the specifics of a harassment claim she raised with E! owner NBCUniversal last November — including accusations that Seacrest groped her genitals and pressed his erection against her.

A formal investigation from the network said Seacrest was innocent of any wrongdoing. His lawyer also said Hardy sought $15 million in exchange for her silence. Hardy hit back and said Seacrest was pushing a “false narrative.”

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Independent Spirit Awards: The Complete Winners List (Updating Live)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Get Out” emerged as the big winner of the 2018 Independent Spirit Awards, held Saturday on the beach in Santa Monica, Ca.

Jordan Peele’s racially charged thriller — which captivated the country and became an unlikely indie blockbuster — took Best Feature at the annual show put up by Film Independent. Peele also took Best Director.

Top acting prizes went to Frances McDormand for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and Timothee Chalamet for “Call Me by Your Name.” Best Supporting Male went to Sam Rockwell for “Three Billboards,” and Best Supporting Female went to Allison Janney of “I, Tonya.” That makes it a virtual clean sweep for the latter two actors on the eve of the Academy Awards.

Also Read: Kroll and Mulaney Roast Harvey Weinstein, Louis CK, Kevin Spacey in Spirit Awards Monologue

Greta Gerwig won Best Screenplay for her coming-of-age darling “Lady Bird,” while Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani took Best First Screenplay for their autobiographical comedy “The Big Sick.”

Notable below-the-line prizes went to Tatiana S. Riegel, who took Best Editing for
“I, Tonya.”  Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, director of photography on “Call Me by Your Name,” won Best Cinematography.

Comedians Nick Kroll and John Mulaney (“Big Mouth,” “Oh, Hello”) returned to host the ceremony, an annual splashy gathering of Hollywood stars and indie film luminaries willing to brave the natural lighting of  a rare daytime awards show.

Also Read: Independent Spirit Awards: In a Stormy Year, It’s Up to Jordan Peele to Keep the Streak Alive

The complete winners list:

BEST FEATURE
“Call Me by Your Name”
“The Florida Project”
“Get Out” *WINNER
“Lady Bird”
“The Rider”

BEST FIRST FEATURE
“Columbus”
“Ingrid Goes West,” Director Matt Spicer *WINNER 
“Menashe”
“Oh Lucy!”
“Patti Cake$”

JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD – Given to the best feature made for under $500,000. (Award given to the writer, director and producer. Executive Producers are not awarded.)
“Dayveon”
“A Ghost Story”
“Life and nothing more” *WINNER
“Most Beautiful Island”
“The Transfiguration”

BEST DIRECTOR
Sean Baker, “The Florida Project”
Jonas Carpignano, “A Ciambra”
Luca Guadagnino, “Call Me by Your Name”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out” *WINNER
Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie, “Good Time”
Chloé Zhao, “The Rider”

BEST SCREENPLAY
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird” *WINNER
Azazel Jacobs, “The Lovers”
Martin McDonagh, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out”
Mike White, “Beatriz at Dinner”

BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY
Kris Avedisian, Kyle Espeleta, Jesse Wakeman, “Donald Cried”
Emily V. Gordon, Kumail Nanjiani, “The Big Sick” *WINNER
Ingrid Jungermann, “Women Who Kill”
Kogonada, “Columbus”
David Branson Smith, Matt Spicer, “Ingrid Goes West”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Thimios Bakatakis, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”
Elisha Christian, “Columbus”
Hélène Louvart, “Beach Rats”
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, “Call Me by Your Name” *WINNER
Joshua James Richards, “The Rider”

BEST EDITING
Ronald Bronstein, Benny Safdie, “Good Time”
Walter Fasano, “Call Me by Your Name”
Alex O’Flinn, “The Rider”
Gregory Plotkin, “Get Out”
Tatiana S. Riegel, “I, Tonya” *WINNER

BEST FEMALE LEAD
Salma Hayek, “Beatriz at Dinner”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Shinobu Terajima, “Oh Lucy!”
Regina Williams, “Life and nothing more”

BEST MALE LEAD
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name” *WINNER
Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”
James Franco, “The Disaster Artist”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Robert Pattinson, “Good Time”

BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE
Holly Hunter, “The Big Sick”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya” *WINNER
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Lois Smith, “Marjorie Prime”
Taliah Lennice Webster, “Good Time”

BEST SUPPORTING MALE
Nnamdi Asomugha, “Crown Heights”
Armie Hammer, “Call Me by Your Name”
Barry Keoghan, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” *WINNER
Benny Safdie, “Good Time”

ROBERT ALTMAN AWARD – Given to one film’s director, casting director and ensemble cast

“Mudbound”
Director: Dee Rees
Casting Directors: Billy Hopkins, Ashley Ingram
Ensemble Cast: Jonathan Banks, Mary J. Blige, Jason Clarke, Garrett Hedlund, Jason Mitchell, Rob Morgan, Carey Mulligan

BEST DOCUMENTARY
“The Departure”
“Faces Places” *WINNER
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Motherland”
“Quest”

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM
“BPM (Beats Per Minute)”
“A Fantastic Woman” *WINNER
“I Am Not a Witch”
“Lady Macbeth”
“Loveless”

BONNIE AWARD
Chloé Zhao *WINNER

 

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Oscars: ‘The Shape of Water’ Swims Ahead With 13 Nominations

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The film academy’s best fit is “The Shape of Water.”

Guillermo del Toro’s whimsical period romance about a custodial worker and fish-man hybrid who fall in love stacked 13 Oscar nominations on Tuesday morning, more than any other film this year.

Those nods included Best Picture, Best Director for Del Toro, Best Actress for Sally Hawkins, and Best Supporting actor and actress for Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer, respectively. It also landed a healthy mix of below-the-line categories like Best Original Screenplay, Best Production Design and Sound Mixing.

Also Read: Oscars Nominate First Female Cinematographer: Rachel Morrison for ‘Mudbound’

Trailing behind was Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” with eight nominations in categories including Best Picture, Best Cinematography for Hoyte van Hoytema, Best Film Editing and Best Director.

Martin McDonagh’s controversial “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” rated seven nominations, including Best Actress for Frances McDormand and Best Supporting Actor for Sam Rockwell.

As predicted since its thunderous opening last February, Jordan Peele’s “Get Out’ shook the AMPAS establishment’s trees and here’s what fell out: Best Original Screenplay and Best Director for Peele, and a Best Actor nomination for his lead actor Daniel Kaluuya.

Greta Gerwig joins only four other women ever to be nominated for Best Director, for her drama “Lady Bird,” for which she also got a Best Original Screenplay nod. The film, produced by Scott Rudin, is also up for Best Picture.

Also Read: Jimmy Kimmel’s Oscars Writers Room Has More Men Than Women: ‘There Are Going to Be Some Surgeries’

“Phantom Thread,” a late-breaking player from Paul Thomas Anderson this awards season, earned an impressive six nominations, including a surprise Best Supporting Actress entry for Lesley Manville. The film’s star Daniel Day Lewis contends it his last film ever.

Some other exciting facts for the record books, from the academy:

Meryl Streep increases her lead as the most nominated performer with her 21st nomination.

At 88 years old, Christopher Plummer becomes the oldest acting nominee to date. He remains the oldest acting winner, having won for his supporting role in Beginners (2011) at the age of 82.

“The Shape of Water” is the tenth film in Oscar history to earn thirteen nominations. The current record of fourteen nominations is held by three films, “All About Eve” (1950), “Titanic” (1997) and “La La Land” (2016).

Rachel Morrison, nominated for “Mudbound,” is the first woman to receive a nomination for Cinematography.

More to come …

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Oscar Nominations 2018: The Complete List

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The nominations for the 2018 Oscars were announced on Tuesday morning by Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis.

“The Shape of Water,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “Dunkirk” and “Darkest Hour” led the nominations in the 24 categories. Greta Gerwig became the fifth woman ever nominated for Best Director for her film “Lady Bird.”

Best Picture nominees include “Call Me by Your Name,” “Darkest Hour,” “Dunkirk,” “Get Out,” “Lady Bird,” “Phantom Thread,” “The Post,” “The Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Also Read: James Franco Shut Out of Oscar Nominations After Sexual Misconduct Accusations

James Franco was shut out in the Best Actor category for his role in “The Disaster Artist” amid a swirl of sexual misconduct accusations. He won a Golden Globe award for his role as D-movie director Tommy Wiseau.

The 90th Academy Awards will take place on March 4, with Jimmy Kimmel set to host the annual awards show for the second consecutive year.

See the list of nominees below. 

Production Design

– “Beauty and the Beast”

– “Blade Runner 2049”

– “Darkest Hour”

– “Dunkirk”

– “The Shape of Water”

Cinematography

– “Blade Runner 2049”

– “Darkest Hour”

– “Mudbound”

– “Dunkirk”

– “The Shape of Water”

Costume Design

– “Beauty and the Beast”

– “Darkest Hour”

– “Phantom Thread”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Victoria and Abdul”

Sound Editing

– “Baby Driver”

– “Blade Runner 2049

– “Dunkirk”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Achievement in Sound Mixing

– “Baby Driver”

– “Blade Runner 2049”

– “Dunkirk”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Best Animated Short Film

– “Dear Basketball”

– “Garden Party”

– “Negative Space”

– “Lou”

– “Revolting Rhymes”

Best Live Action Short

– “The Eleven O’Clock”

– “My Nephew Emmett”

– “The Silent Child”

– “Watu Wote: All of Us”

– “Dekalb Elementary”

Original Score

– “Dunkirk”

– “Phantom Thread”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

– “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Achievement in Visual Effects

– “Blade Runner 2049”

– “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”

– “Kong: Skull Island”

– “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

–“War for the Planet of the Apes”

Film Editing

– “Baby Driver”

– “Dunkirk”

– “I, Tonya”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Makeup and Hairstyling

– “Darkest Hour”

– “Victoria and Abdul”

– “Wonder”

Supporting Actor

– Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”

– Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

– Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”

– Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”

– Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Supporting Actress

– Mary J Blige, “Mudbound”

– Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

– Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”

– Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”

– Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Original Screenplay

– “The Big Sick”

– “Get Out”

– “Lady Bird”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Adaptated Screenplay

– “Call Me by Your Name”

– “The Disaster Artist”

– “Logan”

– “Molly’s Game”

– “Mudbound”

Foreign Language

– “A Fantastic Woman,” Chile

– “The Insult,” Lebanon

– “Loveless,” Russia

– “On Body and Soul,” Hungary

– “The Square,” Sweden

Original Screenplay

– “The Big Sick”

– “Get Out”

– “Lady Bird”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best Documentary Short Subject

– “Edith + Eddie”

– “Heroin(e)”

– “Knife Skills”

– “Traffic Stop”

– “Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405”

Best Documentary Feature

– “Faces Places”

– “Icarus”

– “Last Men in Aleppo”

– “Abacus: Small enough to Jail”

– “Strong Island”

Original Song

– “Mighty River,” “Mudbound”

– “Mystery of Love,” “Call Me by Your Name”

– “Remember Me,” “Coco”

– “Stand Up for Something,” “Marshall”

– “This Is Me,” “The Greatest Showman”

Best Animated Feature Film

– “The Boss Baby”

– “The Breadwinner”

– “Coco”

– “Ferdinand”

– “Loving, Vincent”

Directing

– “Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan

– “Get Out,” Jordan peele

– “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig

– “Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson

– “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro

Best Actor

– Timothee Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”

– Daniel Day Lewis, “Phantom Thread”

– Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”

– Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

– Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Best Actress

– Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”

– Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

– Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”

– Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”

– Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Best Picture

– “Call Me by Your Name”

– “Darkest Hour”

– “Dunkirk”

– “Get Out”

– “Lady Bird”

– “Phantom Thread”

– “The Post”

– “The Shape of Water”

– “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

 

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Sundance: Will Fox Searchlight Still Be a Player in Shadow of Disney Acquisition?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

All eyes are on Fox Searchlight as the indie unit heads into its first Sundance Film Festival this week since Disney announced plans to acquire 20th Century Fox’s film and TV assets.

Many indie film buyers and sellers are openly questioning how aggressive unit chiefs Nancy Utley and Steve Gulila will be with a cloud hanging over their future — despite an established track record as producers and acquirers of Oscar-winning hits like “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Juno” and “Black Swan.”

“What we are told is that they are going to be a real buyer [but] the conversation they are having with Disney, their buying ability might be affected,” said one top sales agent, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Also Read: Golden Globes: Raising One Last Glass to 20th Century Fox as We Know It

Content makers, reps from talent agencies and producers have been assured that the full acquisition team from Fox Searchlight will be on the ground in Park City, as well as 20th Century Fox Film head Stacey Snider, multiple individuals who spoke with TheWrap said.

Fox Searchlight had no comment, but a studio insider told TheWrap that any shift in the unit’s direction under Disney would not take place until after the deal closes, fully 12 to 18 months from now. “Fox Searchlight has a business model that still has accountability in it,” the insider said, adding that it’s been more than a decade since Searchlight has left Sundance without buying a single film.

Still, those mouse ears is already casting a shadow. “I think they’re going to be cautious,” another senior deal maker with multiple titles in the market said. A third film rep wondered if sellers might be wary of selling to Searchlight with a Disney transition imminent.

Also Read: Fear, Anxiety Sink In at 20th Century Fox After Disney Takeover News

 

In analysis of the Disney deal, many industry experts said Searchlight was the most likely to emerge unscathed after the merger. In recent years, Walt Disney Pictures has never shown the prowess for prestige movies or the ability to capture awards attention the way Searchlight has — and it has also shied away from the more adult-oriented and R-rated fare that is a staple of the indie unit’s slate.

Searchlight’s most recent original productions — “The Shape of Water,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “Battle of the Sexes” this year — have been solid art-house performers at the box office. The first two are prominent players in this year’s awards race.

That’s an area that Disney has consistently de-emphasized since selling its Miramax unit in 2010 and giving up a multiyear distribution deal with DreamWorks.

Also Read: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Cancels Fantastic Fest Screening

Searchlight’s Sundance strategy might be further complicated by its recent track record with pricey acquisitions in Park city that have stumbled at the box office.

The company famously ponied up $17.5 million for Nate Parker’s 2016 historical drama “The Birth of a Nation,” which grossed only $15.8 million in the wake of resurfaced rape allegations against its star-director-cowriter (he was acquitted of the charges, which stemmed from his college days).

Last year’s rap drama “Patti Cake$,” bought by Searchlight for $9.5 million, earned just $800,000 domestically ($1.5 million worldwide), while the feel-good documentary “Step” has grossed $1.1 million after a $4 million purchase last January.

Searchlight’s biggest Sundance success story was 2006’s “Little Miss Sunshine,” which it picked up in Park City for $10.5 million and turned into a $60 million box office hit that earned two Oscars.

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Critics’ Choice Awards 2018: The Complete Winners List

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The critics have spoken, and so far they just want to “Get Out.”

Jordan Peele emerged a big early winner in the film category in the annual award show that honors both movies and television, voted on by critical bodies the Broadcast Film Critics Association and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association.

Peele took Best Adapted Screenplay for his racially charged horror thriller, as well as Best Sci-Fi / Horror Film.

Also Read: Will James Franco Accusations Hurt His Chances for Oscar, SAG and Spirit Awards?

James Franco, currently mired in sexual misconduct accusations from five women, won Best Actor in a Comedy for “The Disaster Artist.” He did not attend the ceremony, leading presenter Walton Goggins to accept on his behalf. Margot Robbie claimed the trophy in the comedy actress category for “I, Tonya.”

Best Acting Ensemble went to the gang from “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

More to come. See the Critics’ Choice Awards winners, updating live:

FILM CATEGORIES

BEST PICTURE
“The Big Sick”
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“The Florida Project”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

BEST ACTOR
Timothée Chalamet – “Call Me by Your Name”
*WINNER James Franco – “The Disaster Artist”
Jake Gyllenhaal – “Stronger”
Tom Hanks – “The Post”
Daniel Kaluuya – “Get Out”
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Phantom Thread”
Gary Oldman – “Darkest Hour”

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain – “Molly’s Game”
Sally Hawkins – “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
*WINNER Margot Robbie – “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan – “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep – “The Post”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Willem Dafoe – “The Florida Project”
Armie Hammer – “Call Me By Your Name”
Richard Jenkins – “The Shape of Water”
Sam Rockwell – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Patrick Stewart – “Logan”
Michael Stuhlbarg – “Call Me by Your Name”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mary J. Blige – “Mudbound”
Hong Chau – “Downsizing”
Tiffany Haddish – “Girls Trip”
Holly Hunter – “The Big Sick”
Allison Janney – “I, Tonya”
Laurie Metcalf – “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer – “The Shape of Water”

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Mckenna Grace – “Gifted”
Dafne Keen – “Logan”
*WINNER: Brooklynn Prince – “The Florida Project”
Millicent Simmonds – “Wonderstruck”
Jacob Tremblay – “Wonder”

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
“Dunkirk”
“Lady Bird”
“Mudbound”
“The Post”
*WINNER “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

BEST DIRECTOR
Guillermo del Toro – “The Shape of Water”
Greta Gerwig – “Lady Bird”
Martin McDonagh – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Christopher Nolan – “Dunkirk”
Luca Guadagnino – “Call Me By Your Name”
Jordan Peele – “Get Out”
Steven Spielberg – “The Post”

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor – “The Shape of Water”
Greta Gerwig – “Lady Bird”
Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani – “The Big Sick”
Liz Hannah and Josh Singer – “The Post”
Martin McDonagh – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
*WINNER: Jordan Peele – “Get Out”

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
*WINNER: James Ivory – “Call Me by Your Name”
Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber – “The Disaster Artist”
Virgil Williams and Dee Rees – “Mudbound”
Aaron Sorkin – “Molly’s Game”
Jack Thorne, Steve Conrad, Stephen Chbosky – “Wonder”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Roger Deakins – “Blade Runner 2049”
Hoyte van Hoytema – “Dunkirk”
Dan Laustsen – “The Shape of Water”
Rachel Morrison – “Mudbound”
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom – “Call Me By Your Name”

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Paul Denham Austerberry, Shane Vieau, Jeff Melvin – “The Shape of Water”
Jim Clay, Rebecca Alleway – “Murder on the Orient Express”
Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis – “Dunkirk”
Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola – “Blade Runner 2049”
Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer – “Beauty and the Beast”
Mark Tildesley, Véronique Melery – “Phantom Thread”

BEST EDITING
Michael Kahn, Sarah Broshar – “The Post”
Paul Machliss, Jonathan Amos – “Baby Driver”
Lee Smith – “Dunkirk”
Joe Walker – “Blade Runner 2049”
Sidney Wolinsky – “The Shape of Water”

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Renée April – “Blade Runner 2049”
Mark Bridges – “Phantom Thread”
Jacqueline Durran – “Beauty and the Beast”
Lindy Hemming – “Wonder Woman”
Luis Sequeira – “The Shape of Water”

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Darkest Hour”
“I, Tonya”
“The Shape of Water”
“Wonder”

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”
“Thor: Ragnarok”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”
“Wonder Woman”

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco”
“Despicable Me 3”
“The LEGO Batman Movie”
“Loving Vincent”

BEST ACTION MOVIE
“Baby Driver”
“Logan”
“Thor: Ragnarok”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”
“Wonder Woman”

BEST COMEDY
*WINNER “The Big Sick”
“The Disaster Artist”
“Girls Trip”
“I, Tonya”
“Lady Bird”

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY
Steve Carell – “Battle of the Sexes”
*WINNER James Franco – “The Disaster Artist”
Chris Hemsworth – “Thor: Ragnarok”
Kumail Nanjiani – “The Big Sick”
Adam Sandler – “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)”

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY
Tiffany Haddish – “Girls Trip”
Zoe Kazan – “The Big Sick”
Margot Robbie – “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan – “Lady Bird”
Emma Stone – “Battle of the Sexes”

BEST SCI-FI OR HORROR MOVIE
“Blade Runner 2049”
*WINNER “Get Out”
“It”
“The Shape of Water”

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“BPM (Beats Per Minute)”
“A Fantastic Woman”
“First They Killed My Father”
*WINNER “In the Fade”
“The Square”
“Thelma”

BEST SONG
“Evermore” – “Beauty and the Beast”
“Mystery of Love” – “Call Me By Your Name”
*WINNER “Remember Me” – “Coco”
“Stand Up for Something” – “Marshall”
“This Is Me” – “The Greatest Showman”

BEST SCORE
Alexandre Desplat – “The Shape of Water”
Jonny Greenwood – “Phantom Thread”
Dario Marianelli – “Darkest Hour”
Benjamin Wallfisch and Hans Zimmer – “Blade Runner 2049”
John Williams – “The Post”
Hans Zimmer – “Dunkirk”

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

BEST DRAMA SERIES
“American Gods” (Starz)
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“Game of Thrones” (HBO)
“Game of Thrones” (Hulu)
“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
“This Is Us” (NBC)
*WINNER “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
*WINNER Sterling K. Brown – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Paul Giamatti – “Billions” (Showtime)
Freddie Highmore – “Bates Motel” (A&E)
Ian McShane – “American Gods” (Starz)
Bob Odenkirk – “Better Call Saul” (AMC)
Liev Schreiber – “Ray Donovan” (Showtime)

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
Caitriona Balfe – “Outlander” (Starz)
Christine Baranski – “The Good Fight” (CBS All Access)
Claire Foy – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Tatiana Maslany – “Orphan Black” (BBC America)
*WINNER Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Robin Wright – “House of Cards” (Netflix)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
Bobby Cannavale – “Mr. Robot” (USA)
Asia Kate Dillon – “Billions” (Showtime)
Peter Dinklage – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
 *WINNER David Harbour – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Delroy Lindo – “The Good Fight” (CBS All Access)
Michael McKean – “Better Call Saul” (AMC)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
Gillian Anderson – “American Gods” (Starz)
Emilia Clarke – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
*WINNER: Ann Dowd – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Cush Jumbo – “The Good Fight” (CBS All Access)
Margo Martindale – “Sneaky Pete” (Amazon)
Chrissy Metz – “This Is Us” (NBC)

BEST COMEDY SERIES
“The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)
“Black-ish” (ABC)
“GLOW” (Netflix)
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)
“Modern Family” (ABC)
“Patriot” (Amazon)

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
Anthony Anderson – “Black-ish” (ABC)
Aziz Ansari – “Master of None” (Netflix)
Hank Azaria – “Brockmire” (IFC)
*WINNER Ted Danson – “The Good Place” (NBC)
Thomas Middleditch – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Randall Park – “Fresh Off the Boat” (ABC)

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
Kristen Bell – “The Good Place” (NBC)
Alison Brie – “GLOW” (Netflix)
*WINNER Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)
Sutton Foster – “Younger” (TV Land)
Ellie Kemper – “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
Constance Wu – “Fresh Off the Boat” (ABC)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
Tituss Burgess – “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
*WINNER Walton Goggins – “Vice Principals” (HBO)
Sean Hayes – “Will & Grace” (NBC)
Marc Maron – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Kumail Nanjiani – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Ed O’Neill – “Modern Family” (ABC)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
*WINNER Mayim Bialik – “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)
Alex Borstein – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)
Betty Gilpin – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Jenifer Lewis – “Black-ish” (ABC)
Alessandra Mastronardi – “Master of None” (Netflix)
Rita Moreno – “One Day at a Time” (Netflix)

BEST LIMITED SERIES
“American Vandal” (Netflix)
“Big Little Lies” (HBO)
“Fargo” (FX)
“Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
“Godless” (Netflix)
“The Long Road Home” (National Geographic)

BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TV
“Flint” (Lifetime)
“I Am Elizabeth Smart” (Lifetime)
“The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” (HBO)
“Sherlock: The Lying Detective” (PBS)
*WINNER “The Wizard of Lies” (HBO)

BEST ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
Jeff Daniels – “Godless” (Netflix)
Robert De Niro – “The Wizard of Lies” (HBO)
Ewan McGregor – “Fargo” (FX)
Jack O’Connell – “Godless” (Netflix)
Evan Peters – “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX)
Bill Pullman – “The Sinner” (USA)
Jimmy Tatro – “American Vandal” (Netflix)

BEST ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
Jessica Biel – “The Sinner” (USA)
Alana Boden – “I Am Elizabeth Smart” (Lifetime)
Carrie Coon – “Fargo” (FX)
Nicole Kidman – “Big Little Lies” (HBO)
Jessica Lange – “Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
Reese Witherspoon – “Big Little Lies” (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
Johnny Flynn – “Genius” (National Geographic)
Benito Martinez – “American Crime” (ABC)
Alfred Molina – “Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
*WINNER Alexander Skarsgård – “Big Little Lies” (HBO)
David Thewlis – “Fargo” (FX)
Stanley Tucci – “Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
Judy Davis – “Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
*WINNER Laura Dern – “Big Little Lies” (HBO)
Jackie Hoffman – “Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
Regina King – “American Crime” (ABC)
Michelle Pfeiffer – “The Wizard of Lies” (HBO)
Mary Elizabeth Winstead – “Fargo” (FX)

BEST TALK SHOW
“Ellen” (NBC)
“Harry” (Syndicated)
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!” (ABC)
“The Late Late Show with James Corden” (CBS)
“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” (NBC)
“Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen” (BRAVO)

BEST ANIMATED SERIES
“Archer” (FX)
“Bob’s Burgers” (FOX)
“BoJack Horseman” (Netflix)
“Danger & Eggs” (Amazon)
“Rick and Morty” (Adult Swim)
“The Simpsons” (FOX)

BEST UNSTRUCTURED REALITY SERIES
“Born This Way” (A&E)
“Ice Road Truckers” (History)
“Intervention” (A&E)
“Live PD” (A&E)
“Ride with Norman Reedus” (AMC)
“Teen Mom” (MTV)

BEST STRUCTURED REALITY SERIES
“The Carbonaro Effect” (truTV)
“Fixer Upper” (HGTV)
“The Profit” (CNBC)
“Shark Tank” (ABC)
“Undercover Boss” (CBS)
“Who Do You Think You Are?” (TLC)

BEST REALITY COMPETITION SERIES
“America’s Got Talent” (NBC)
“Chopped” (Food Network)
“Dancing with the Stars” (ABC)
“Project Runway” (Lifetime)
“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)
“The Voice” (NBC)

BEST REALITY SHOW HOST
Ted Allen – “Chopped” (Food Network)
Tyra Banks – “America’s Got Talent” (NBC)
Tom Bergeron – “Dancing with the Stars” (ABC)
Cat Deeley – “So You Think You Can Dance” (FOX)
Joanna and Chip Gaines – “Fixer Upper” (HGTV)
RuPaul – “RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)

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Steven Spielberg on Natalie Portman’s Best Director Quip at Golden Globes: ‘Watershed for Women’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

At Sunday’s Golden Globes, Natalie Portman called out the lack of female director nominees this year. Now male nominee Steven Spielberg has weighed in on the issue.

“There’s also a watershed happening right now, slowly, maybe not fast enough, for women directors,” Spielberg told Entertainment Tonight. “I mean you have Patty Jenkins. We have some amazing women that have come forward, you know ‘Mudbound’ and ‘Lady Bird.’ This is a pretty incredible year, and I think you’ll be seeing some nominations. I’m predicting at the Oscars this year for a woman director, if not several.”

While presenting the award for Best Director with Ron Howard on Sunday, Portman said, “Here are all the male nominees” before listing of the men in the category.

Also Read: ‘Here Are the All-Male Nominees:’ Natalie Portman Calls Out Snub of Female Directors

The category notably left out Greta Gerwig for directing “Lady Bird,” which won for Best Movie – Musical or Comedy. Gerwig recently won Best Director from the National Society of Film Critics.

Speilberg added to ET that the current climate for women directors is “powerful, a watershed for women, a watershed for men, who will learn to listen or those who have been listening.”

Only one woman has ever won the Best Director award in the Golden Globes’ 75-year history — Barbra Streisand for her 1984 film “Yentl,” which also won Best Picture that year.

Also Read: Weinstein Accusers Say They Weren’t Invited to Golden Globes, Call Out ‘Hollywood Fakery’

The all-male nominees for the Best Director category included winner Guillermo del Toro for “The Shape of Water,” Martin McDonagh for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Christopher Nolan for “Dunkirk,” Ridley Scott for “All The Money in the World” and Spielberg for “The Post.”

Portman wore black in solidarity with the Time’s Up initiative, which has raised millions to go towards legal fees for survivors of sexual harassment and assault.

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Golden Globes: ‘Get Out’ Biggest Snub, James Franco’s Win Greatest Surprise, Says Fandango Survey (Exclusive)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Get Out” going home with no awards at the 2018 Golden Globes was the biggest snub of the night, while James Franco’s win for “The Disaster Artist” was its greatest surprise, according to a new Fandango survey.

Fandango surveyed more than 1,000 film fans who watched the award show on Jan. 7.

Following the “Get Out” shutout, the biggest omissions for fans were Christopher Nolan (26 percent), Meryl Streep (13 percent) and “The Shape of Water” (10 percent) not winning for Best Director, Best Actress and Best Picture, respectively.

“Call Me by Your Name” was another snub in all categories, and fans also cited Willem Dafoe (“The Florida Project”) as a shutout.

Also Read: Golden Globes: 5 Things You Didn’t See On TV

Pleasant surprises for fans included “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” winning Best Picture, Drama, “Lady Bird” winning Best Picture, Comedy, and Allison Janney, Sam Rockwell and Frances McDormand each winning awards for their roles.

“For many moviegoers, it’s a happy surprise to see Globe Best Picture Awards go to ‘Three Billboards’ and ‘Lady Bird,’ two films centered on strong female protagonists,” Fandango Managing Editor Erik Davis told TheWrap. “The big wins should help give these two small films needed momentum as we head towards the Oscars on March 4.  At the same time, the top snubs include virtual shutouts for films like ‘Get Out,’ ‘Dunkirk,’ ‘Call Me By Your Name’ and ‘The Post.’

Also Read: Golden Globes Rise 1 Percent in Early TV Ratings

Davis added, “I think the biggest shocker was Willem Dafoe getting passed over for his authentic and heartfelt performance in ‘The Florida Project,’ but it’s clear that Sam Rockwell’s win was part of the general adoration for ‘Three Billboards,’ which also took home wins for Best Actress and Best Screenplay. Overall, it was great to see so many talented, deserving artists take home awards for the first time in their careers.”

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9 Golden Globes Snubs and Surprises, From Sam Rockwell to Tommy Wiseau (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Here’s who the HFPA embraced — and dissed — during the 75th Golden Globes on Jan. 7.

Surprise: Sam Rockwell, Best Supporting Actor for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Rockwell winning for his role in Martin McDonagh’s drama is a clear upset over other nominees, Christopher Plummer, Armie Hammer and Willem Dafoe

Snub: Willem Dafoe, Best Best Supporting Actor for “The Florida Project.”

Dafoe was a clear frontrunner for his role in “The Florida Project,” and Armie Hammer and Christopher Plummer were favorites too, but Sam Rockwell managed to upset them.

Surprise: Rachel Brosnahan, Best Actress in a TV Series Musical or Comedy for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.”

Pamela Adlon and Issa Rae were snubbed in this category due to Brosnahan’s win for a relatively new show.

Snub: Tommy Wiseau not being allowed to speak on stage

James Franco called Tommy Wiseau on stage while accepting his award for Best Actor Musical or Comedy, and when Wiseau gunned for the mic, Franco pushed him away. The crowd anxiously waited for Wiseau to speak, but he never did.

Surprise: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” wins Best Screenply

Sure, the race was tight between Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” and McDonagh’s “Three Billboards” — but many thought the award would go to Gerwig due to the fact that it’s more heartfelt and that the movie has become the best reviewed film in Rotten Tomatoes history.

Snub: Robert de Niro, Best Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made For Television for “The Wizard of Lies.”

Many predicted De Niro to win in this category, or Kyle MacLachlan for “Twin Peaks.” But instead, Ewan McGregor won the award for “Fargo.”

Surprise: Aziz Ansari, Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy for “Master of None.”

Anthony Anderson for “black-ish” is always a strong contender, and voters apparently really liked the revived “Will and Grace,” so Eric McCormack was a frontrunner. TheWrap’s Steve Pond predicted Kevin Bacon would win for “I Love Dick,” but in the end, Ansari took home the prize.

Surprise: “Lady Bird” wins Best Motion Picture — Musical or Comedy.

“Lady Bird,” “The Disaster Artist” and “Get Out” were sure frontrunners, but many had thought “Get Out” would win due to its social criticism (although the HFPA received criticism for accepting it as a comedy). “Lady Bird” is also a surprising win given that director Greta Gerwig wasn’t even nominated in the Best Director category.

‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Lady Bird’ Top Australian Academy Award Nominees

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Call Me By Your Name,” “Lady Bird” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” all emerged as the top nominated films from the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts.

The Luca Guadagnino, Greta Gerwig and Martin McDonagh films each received five nominations in top categories, with plenty of love shown to Australian stars Nicole Kidman and Margot Robbie.

“Dunkirk” and “The Shape of Water” join the aforementioned three in the Best Picture race. Guadagnino and Gerwig rated in the Best Director category, while McDonagh was shut out in favor of “I, Tonya” helmer Craig Gillespie, Christopher Nolan of “Dunkirk” and Jordan Peele for “Get Out.”

Also Read: ‘I, Tonya’: Margot Robbie Dazzles as ‘White Trash’ Olympian But Allison Janney Takes the Gold

The Best Actress race consists of Judi Dench for the Focus Features release “Victoria & Abdul,” Sally Hawkins of “The Shape of Water,” “Billboards” lead Frances McDormand, Robbie for “I, Tonya” and Saoirse Ronan of “Lady Bird.”

“Now in our seventh year, we are delighted to continue celebrating international excellence within the film industry, honoring the world’s best performers, practitioners and productions,” said the academy’s CEO Damian Trewhella.

Read the full list of nominees:

AACTA International Award for Best Film
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Dunkirk”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”

AACTA International Award for Best Direction
“Call Me by Your Name” – Luca Guadagnino
“Dunkirk” – Christopher Nolan
“I, Tonya”  – Craig Gillespie
“Lady Bird”  – Greta Gerwig
“The Shape of Water”  – Guillermo del Toro

AACTA International Award for Best Screenplay
“Call Me by Your Name” – James Ivory
“Dunkirk” – Christopher Nolan
“Get Out”- Jordan Peele
“Lady Bird” – Greta Gerwig
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”- Martin McDonagh

AACTA International Award for Best Lead Actress
Judi Dench – “Victoria & Abdul” 
Sally Hawkins – “The Shape of Water” 
Frances McDormand -“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Margot Robbie – “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan – “Lady Bird” 

AACTA International Award for Best Lead Actor
Timothée Chalamet – “Call Me by Your Name” 
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Phantom Thread” 
Hugh Jackman – “Logan”
Daniel Kaluuya – “Get Out” 
Gary Oldman – “Darkest Hour” 

AACTA International Award for Best Supporting Actress
Mary J. Blige – “Mudbound” 
Abbie Cornish – “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Allison Janney – “I, Tonya” 
Nicole Kidman – “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” 
Laurie Metcalf – “Lady Bird” 

AACTA International Award for Best Supporting Actor
Willem Dafoe – THE FLORIDA PROJECT
Armie Hammer – CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
Tom Hardy – DUNKIRK
Ben Mendelsohn – DARKEST HOUR
Sam Rockwell – THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

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‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘The Crown,’ ‘Stranger Things’ Among AFI’s Best Film and TV of 2017

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The American Film Institute has issued its annual list of top movies and TV shows for 2017, where presumptive Oscar contenders reigned and one superhero lassoed a big surprise.

“Wonder Woman” was one of their ten best of the year, selected annually by the prestigious group. It joins buzzy award titles “The Post,” “The Shape of Water,” “Call Me By Your Name,” “Dunkirk” and “The Florida Project.”

The film list was rounded out by Jordan Peele’s horror smash “Get Out,” Greta Gerwig’s historically well-reviewed “Lady Bird,” Michael Showalter’s “The Big Sick” and Martin McDonagh’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Also Read: The Golden Globes Without Harvey Weinstein: How Big a Change Is in Store?

On the TV side, HBO’s Emmy magnet “Big Little Lies” made the cut, as did Issa Rae’s “Insecure” and the juggernaut “Game of Thrones.” Netflix was represented in the form of Claire Foy’s “The Crown,” Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang’s “Master of None” and the second season of the Duffer Brothers’ “Stranger Things.”

NBC’s “This Is Us” was an obvious choice, but the peacock network earned their own surprise with Mike Schur’s “The Good Place.”

FX’s “Feud: Bette and Joan” and Hulu’s Best Drama Series Emmy winner “The Handmaid’s Tale” rounded out the TV list.

Also Read: New York Film Critics 2017 Winners: ‘Lady Bird’ Named Best Picture

“At a time when the world seems defined by division, storytellers bring us together as one,” said Bob Gazzale, AFI President and CEO.

Gazzale said the group was “honored to celebrate this community of artists who challenge and inspire us, entertain and enlighten us — ultimately reminding us of our common heartbeat.”

AFI also awarded a special prize to the PBS series “The Vietnam War.” The group will honor all the winners on Jan. 5 at a private luncheon in Los Angeles. Carmaker Audi presents its eponymous Fellowship for Women to a female director at the annual event — which will cover the recipients’ tuition to the AFI Conservatory.

Read the complete list:

AFI MOVIES OF THE YEAR

THE BIG SICK
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
DUNKIRK
THE FLORIDA PROJECT
GET OUT
LADY BIRD
THE POST
THE SHAPE OF WATER
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
WONDER WOMAN

AFI TV PROGRAMS OF THE YEAR

BIG LITTLE LIES
THE CROWN
FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
GAME OF THRONES
THE GOOD PLACE
THE HANDMAID’S TALE
INSECURE
MASTER OF NONE
STRANGER THINGS 2
THIS IS US

AFI SPECIAL AWARD

THE VIETNAM WAR

Marking the 18th chapter in the American Film Institute’s ongoing almanac of the moving image, the 2017 entries join a notable pantheon of previous AFI honorees — works of significance that contribute to the rich cultural legacy and define the state of the art form. View the complete almanac here.

AFI AWARDS selections are made through a jury process where AFI Trustees, scholars, artists and critics determine the year’s most outstanding achievements and provide contextual rationales for each selection.

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