Peter Rabbit turns a classic character from children’s lit into an insufferable dick

It only takes a few minutes for Peter Rabbit to misunderstand its source material twice. This live action/animated hybrid opens on a group of birds singing a cutesy, vaguely preachy song, only to cut through the treacle with an elbow to the ribs in the form of a chase scene. Peter Rabbit, outlaw hero voiced by…

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It only takes a few minutes for Peter Rabbit to misunderstand its source material twice. This live action/animated hybrid opens on a group of birds singing a cutesy, vaguely preachy song, only to cut through the treacle with an elbow to the ribs in the form of a chase scene. Peter Rabbit, outlaw hero voiced by…

Read more...

9 Ways ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Could Fix ‘The Force Awakens’

(This may or may not contain spoilers for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” — this is a speculative post, so we don’t really know if anything contained within will happen, but it could happen. So if you’re the sort of person who is averse to spoilers, you should probably steer clear.

Look, OK, we understand that you’re probably a fan of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” You’re allowed to have your own taste in movies — what you like is what you like.

But for us, whenever we watch it again we can’t help but see more and more cracks. The thing is a great big mess that feels oddly patched together, giving off a vibe very similar to the one that we got from another recent movie: “Justice League.” Scenes don’t make sense next to each other, character development is basically nonexistent, and the whole thing just reeks of “what can we jam in here to remind viewers of ‘Star Wars’ movies that people already like?”

So it’s tough to watch, and we have watched this thing way too many times. But while we’ve long been tempted to adopt a nihilistic view of “The Force Awakens,” the possibility that “The Last Jedi” could somehow recontextualize it enough to make it watchable has always nagged at us in the back of our minds. So as we approach the moment of truth, we feel like it’s a great time to fully hash that out. Yes, it’s way too late for this to be considered an advice column since “The Last Jedi” has been in the can for a while now, but it’ll be nice to go ahead and have this out before we see the movie in a few days. There’s only so much it can do, of course — you can’t really retcon all the disjointing plotting and awkward edits that “The Force Awakens” sported.

Still, it’s worth a shot. So without further ado, here’s our list of items that, should they occur in “The Last Jedi,” would go a long way toward retroactively improving the fatally flawed “The Force Awakens.”

Also Read: ‘Rogue One’ Shows Disney Still Doesn’t Really Get ‘Star Wars’ (Commentary)

Explain what the deal is with Rey’s Force capabilities

When “The Force Awakens” was first released, it kicked off some arguments among audiences about Rey’s Force abilities. Many questioned how Rey (Daisy Ridley) could suddenly be great at the Force, as well as a physical kicker of butts, and others responded by seeing that as a sexist take. Luke (Mark Hamill), after all, was able to do quite a bit just by being Force-sensitive, without any training — like take down the entire Death Star.

On the other hand, Luke was already a good pilot before all that stuff happened, and he was using the Force in a very casual way, as a sort of intuition. Had Rey been put in a similar situation — say, having to face Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) in starfighter combat using the Force as a sort of subconscious intuition to bolster her abilities — that would have been one thing because, like Luke, being a pilot is Rey’s main thing. But using a lightsaber and the Force was not, since she’d never done either before.

So it’s not wrong to say that Rey jumped way up the learning curve by flexing serious Force muscles right out of the gate — given that she really had no point of reference for what the Force even was! — and “The Last Jedi” needs to spend some time showing us what’s up with her. She’s more powerful than Luke and more talented than Kylo Ren, it seems, so lets figure out why that is — and what her seemingly immense power means in the greater scheme of what the Force is.

Also Read: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Has a Chance to Succeed Where ‘Rogue One’ Failed (Commentary)

We see two ways that this can be handled — or they could even be combined into one.

The first would be to have a reveal that Rey was previously a student at Luke’s Jedi academy before it was destroyed by Kyle Ren and his followers. Rey could be the only surviving student who didn’t fall to the dark side, or she may even have turned alongside Ren and then been captured by Luke. In either situation, Luke wipes her memories and dumps her on Jakku, far away from Force teachings and the possibility of being a force for evil like Kylo Ren has become. This part bears some further discussion, so we have an entire other post talking about it at length that you can read here.

The other idea would have it demonstrate that in order to beat Kylo Ren, Rey drew on the power of the dark side of the Force. This would be in line with the philosophy of the original trilogy, in which the theme of the story is basically that power corrupts — and that without proper training and an understanding of how to wield his power, Luke ruan the risk of being overcome by it. Yoda’s concern was that Luke would give in to his anger and uses it, essentially, as a shortcut to the power he needs to save his friends. When his emotions control him and not the other way around, Luke is vulnerable to the same thinking as Vader — that the ends justify the means, and that cruelty is okay if you think you’re still trying to do good. So pivotal was the discussion of anger and hatred to “Star Wars” that it becomes the finale of “Return of the Jedi,” when Luke throws away his lightsaber and basically resolves to die, rather than kill Vader in anger.

Also Read: ‘Star Wars: Battlefront II’ Gives Clues About How Luke Skywalker Got to That Planet He Was on in ‘The Force Awakens’

The big lightsaber fight in “The Force Awakens” sees Rey going up against Kylo Ren after only recently starting to become aware of her connection to the Force. She wins the battle after watching Ren nearly kill Finn and after watching him execute Han Solo. It’s fair to say that anger is fueling her in the fight. Losing yourself to anger was the entire threat to Luke in “The Empire Strikes Back,” but “The Force Awakens” basically forgets about that. So “The Last Jedi” could help explain Rey’s sudden power by bringing back this particular long-established idea about the Force.

Give Luke Skywalker a much better reason for disappearing

Probably the biggest issue with “The Force Awakens” is that, in trying to wipe the slate clean to introduce and pass the “Star Wars” torch to new characters, it does a rush job of pushing Luke and Han out of the way. When Ben Solo, also known as Kylo Ren, fell to the Dark Side while under Luke’s tutelage, he apparently bailed on everyone and went in search of the first Jedi temple — we say “apparently” because Han just offhandedly says he “thinks” that’s why Luke ran away and nobody else talks about that again. Shortly thereafter, Han took off on his wife, the Republic he’d helped found and the Resistance one assumes he would have helped lead, in order to go be a middling thief, smuggler and con artist.

Also Read: 79 ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ Characters Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

Neither of those events feels especially in character for Han or Luke, two heroic characters we saw grow and change over the course of three films. Han’s arc in the original trilogy turned him from the guy who only looks out for himself into a devoted friend, willing to die for his pals. Luke’s sense of duty and friendship was so strong, he basically marched into the Death Star II fully intending to distract the Emperor and Darth Vader long enough that his friends in the Rebel Alliance could blow the space station up — it was a suicide mission. It really doesn’t feel in keeping with Luke’s willingness to die to redeem his father or save his friends that he’d up and leave when things were at their darkest. “The Last Jedi” doesn’t just need to explain why Luke left with some Jedi mumbo-jumbo, it has to provide Luke a reason so compelling that it upends three movies of character development.

Let’s get some flashbacks of what Finn’s stormtrooper life was actually like

There’s two moments with Finn (John Boyega) in “The Force Awakens” that feel bizarrely out of context, and that’s the pair of moments in which members of the First Order call him a traitor like he’s supposed to feel guilty about it. Nevermind that the First Order is not given any sort of ideology, period, that might explain why anyone follows it to begin with — Finn’s story as we know it is that he was taken from his family as a baby and forced into service essentially as a slave soldier.

We don’t know if he had any friends, we don’t know what his feelings in general about the First Order were. His motivation for defecting, as presented in the film, was basically just that he wanted to save himself, rather than having any sort of “these guys are evil and need to be stopped” ideals. So we need to know more about Finn’s previous life, and provide any sort of reason why it would bother him when First Order people scream “Traitor!” at him.

Also Read: Biggest Failure of New ‘Star Wars’ Era Is Not Reuniting Leia, Luke and Han (Commentary)

Flesh out the First Order

Speaking of which — as it currently stands, the First Order is a less-interesting version of the original Galactic Empire. It’s true the original “Star Wars” trilogy didn’t do too terribly much to give the Empire a backstory — it was mostly just a fascist organization that wanted more and more power and control in the galaxy. But they were space fascists, at the very least, and George Lucas doubled back in the prequel trilogy to give a look at how they ended up that way: They embraced fascism as a response to a powerful, dangerous enemy and years of disastrous warfare. Once the Empire was in power, it was mostly concerned with staying in power, and that’s what the original trilogy ends up being about.

The First Order, on the other hand, isn’t even really in control of anything. It’s an evil military force running around killing people for no discernible reason that has yet been presented. It’s not fighting against an insurgent enemy, it’s fighting to gain something, apparently. To get people to follow you and to risk their lives, you need to have a pretty clear ideology for them to get behind. There’s a moment in “The Force Awakens” that almost hints at one, when General Hux (Domnhall Gleeson) gives a speech about the “lying” Republic, before wiping it out using the Starkiller Base. And Kylo Ren calls Rey’s Resistance buddies thieves and murderers. So there’s a hint that the First Order at least potentially believing not only that they’re the good guys, but that they are fighting something they perceive as “bad” in the galaxy. What is it? We have no idea — but if “The Last Jedi” were to tell us, it would go a long way to making the First Order seem like something other than just a bunch of generic bad guys.

Dive deep into Kylo Ren’s psyche

Along the same lines as fleshing out the First Order, we could really stand to spend some time with Kylo Ren and figure out what he’s all about. “The Force Awakens” suggests he’s a Vader fanboy, taken with the Dark Side but struggling with the pull of the Light Side and, apparently, caring about his family. But we have no idea what his motivations are. He’s somewhat obsessive about finding Luke Skywalker but we don’t know why. We don’t know why Ren has thrown in with Supreme Leader Snoke, or believes in him so wholeheartedly. We don’t know what Ren wants to accomplish or why power is important to him.

Also Read: How the Character Chirrut in ‘Rogue One’ May Have a Direct Connection to ‘The Force Awakens’

Lucas created an entire prequel trilogy to explain the motivations of Darth Vader. He embraced fascism more or less in order to force peace on the galaxy. Vader saw the Dark Side and being evil as a means toward an ultimate good — protecting the galaxy and the people in it from themselves. It’s telling that Palpatine ultimately gets Vader to fall by offering him a means to save his loved ones from death. But so far, we have no idea what Kylo Ren actually wants. He’s just evil for the sake of evil right now, it seems, and that doesn’t make him particularly interesting.

Explain what happened to Poe Dameron after the crash on Jakku 

There’s a weird moment in one of the behind-the-scenes documentaries on the home video release of “The Force Awakens” in which the actor who plays Poe, Oscar Isaac, says that Poe was supposed to die when he and Finn crashed on Jakku. But then Isaac describes director JJ Abrams telling him excitedly during production that they’d found some way to adjust the story to keep him alive — but whatever they did wasn’t actually in the movie because Poe simply shows up later and provides no explanation. It’s just a weird inexplicable plot hole right now that bears some explanation.

Explain why Han and Leia named their kid after a guy Leia had never met and Han knew for maybe a day

Kylo Ren’s real name is Ben Solo, after the alias Obi-Wan used in hiding (“old Ben Kenobi”). Now, Ben would be a perfectly apt name for Luke’s kid, because Obi-Wan was probably the single most important person in Luke’s life from the moment he was born. Obi-Wan did, after all, live on Tatooine for decades to make sure Luke stayed safe, and then started him off on his hero’s journey and helped keep him on the path even after he died.

Also Read: All the ‘Star Wars’ Behind-the-Scenes Shakeups Since Disney Bought Lucasfilm (So Far)

Any attachment Han (Harrison Ford) and Leia (Carrie Fisher) might have for Obi-Wan is purely by proxy, though, and generally people don’t name their kids after people that the people they care about cared about but whom they themselve do not have any particular affection for. If I ever have kids I’m definitely not gonna name them after whatever mentor figures my sisters might have — I’d pick a name that has some meaning to me or the mother. There’s surely some kind of explanation to be had for this, even if there wasn’t one when the name was chosen.

Explain R2-D2’s a droid coma (and have it mean something)

My favorite moment in “The Force Awakens” (I’m using “favorite” sarcastically there) is when R2, who has apparently sat dormant in the Resistance base for years, randomly wakes up at the exact right moment to help find Luke. There’s any number of things we can infer about what happened there, but we shouldn’t have to make guesses. There needs to be some kind of substantial explanation for what happened there.

Make a joke about tentacle monsters but not actually have one

We’ve gotten two new movies in the Disney era of “Star Wars” and each one featured completely superfluous tentacle monsters that could have been cut without altering the overall plot much at all, if at all. So I need some kind of self-referential joke about this and a fourth wall-breaking joke about how they won’t do that anymore.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Star Wars: Battlefront II’ Gives Clues About How Luke Skywalker Got to That Planet He Was on in ‘The Force Awakens’

79 ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ Characters Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

All the ‘Star Wars’ Behind-the-Scenes Shakeups Since Disney Bought Lucasfilm (So Far)

(This may or may not contain spoilers for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” — this is a speculative post, so we don’t really know if anything contained within will happen, but it could happen. So if you’re the sort of person who is averse to spoilers, you should probably steer clear.

Look, OK, we understand that you’re probably a fan of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” You’re allowed to have your own taste in movies — what you like is what you like.

But for us, whenever we watch it again we can’t help but see more and more cracks. The thing is a great big mess that feels oddly patched together, giving off a vibe very similar to the one that we got from another recent movie: “Justice League.” Scenes don’t make sense next to each other, character development is basically nonexistent, and the whole thing just reeks of “what can we jam in here to remind viewers of ‘Star Wars’ movies that people already like?”

So it’s tough to watch, and we have watched this thing way too many times. But while we’ve long been tempted to adopt a nihilistic view of “The Force Awakens,” the possibility that “The Last Jedi” could somehow recontextualize it enough to make it watchable has always nagged at us in the back of our minds. So as we approach the moment of truth, we feel like it’s a great time to fully hash that out. Yes, it’s way too late for this to be considered an advice column since “The Last Jedi” has been in the can for a while now, but it’ll be nice to go ahead and have this out before we see the movie in a few days. There’s only so much it can do, of course — you can’t really retcon all the disjointing plotting and awkward edits that “The Force Awakens” sported.

Still, it’s worth a shot. So without further ado, here’s our list of items that, should they occur in “The Last Jedi,” would go a long way toward retroactively improving the fatally flawed “The Force Awakens.”

Explain what the deal is with Rey’s Force capabilities

When “The Force Awakens” was first released, it kicked off some arguments among audiences about Rey’s Force abilities. Many questioned how Rey (Daisy Ridley) could suddenly be great at the Force, as well as a physical kicker of butts, and others responded by seeing that as a sexist take. Luke (Mark Hamill), after all, was able to do quite a bit just by being Force-sensitive, without any training — like take down the entire Death Star.

On the other hand, Luke was already a good pilot before all that stuff happened, and he was using the Force in a very casual way, as a sort of intuition. Had Rey been put in a similar situation — say, having to face Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) in starfighter combat using the Force as a sort of subconscious intuition to bolster her abilities — that would have been one thing because, like Luke, being a pilot is Rey’s main thing. But using a lightsaber and the Force was not, since she’d never done either before.

So it’s not wrong to say that Rey jumped way up the learning curve by flexing serious Force muscles right out of the gate — given that she really had no point of reference for what the Force even was! — and “The Last Jedi” needs to spend some time showing us what’s up with her. She’s more powerful than Luke and more talented than Kylo Ren, it seems, so lets figure out why that is — and what her seemingly immense power means in the greater scheme of what the Force is.

We see two ways that this can be handled — or they could even be combined into one.

The first would be to have a reveal that Rey was previously a student at Luke’s Jedi academy before it was destroyed by Kyle Ren and his followers. Rey could be the only surviving student who didn’t fall to the dark side, or she may even have turned alongside Ren and then been captured by Luke. In either situation, Luke wipes her memories and dumps her on Jakku, far away from Force teachings and the possibility of being a force for evil like Kylo Ren has become. This part bears some further discussion, so we have an entire other post talking about it at length that you can read here.

The other idea would have it demonstrate that in order to beat Kylo Ren, Rey drew on the power of the dark side of the Force. This would be in line with the philosophy of the original trilogy, in which the theme of the story is basically that power corrupts — and that without proper training and an understanding of how to wield his power, Luke ruan the risk of being overcome by it. Yoda’s concern was that Luke would give in to his anger and uses it, essentially, as a shortcut to the power he needs to save his friends. When his emotions control him and not the other way around, Luke is vulnerable to the same thinking as Vader — that the ends justify the means, and that cruelty is okay if you think you’re still trying to do good. So pivotal was the discussion of anger and hatred to “Star Wars” that it becomes the finale of “Return of the Jedi,” when Luke throws away his lightsaber and basically resolves to die, rather than kill Vader in anger.

The big lightsaber fight in “The Force Awakens” sees Rey going up against Kylo Ren after only recently starting to become aware of her connection to the Force. She wins the battle after watching Ren nearly kill Finn and after watching him execute Han Solo. It’s fair to say that anger is fueling her in the fight. Losing yourself to anger was the entire threat to Luke in “The Empire Strikes Back,” but “The Force Awakens” basically forgets about that. So “The Last Jedi” could help explain Rey’s sudden power by bringing back this particular long-established idea about the Force.

Give Luke Skywalker a much better reason for disappearing

Probably the biggest issue with “The Force Awakens” is that, in trying to wipe the slate clean to introduce and pass the “Star Wars” torch to new characters, it does a rush job of pushing Luke and Han out of the way. When Ben Solo, also known as Kylo Ren, fell to the Dark Side while under Luke’s tutelage, he apparently bailed on everyone and went in search of the first Jedi temple — we say “apparently” because Han just offhandedly says he “thinks” that’s why Luke ran away and nobody else talks about that again. Shortly thereafter, Han took off on his wife, the Republic he’d helped found and the Resistance one assumes he would have helped lead, in order to go be a middling thief, smuggler and con artist.

Neither of those events feels especially in character for Han or Luke, two heroic characters we saw grow and change over the course of three films. Han’s arc in the original trilogy turned him from the guy who only looks out for himself into a devoted friend, willing to die for his pals. Luke’s sense of duty and friendship was so strong, he basically marched into the Death Star II fully intending to distract the Emperor and Darth Vader long enough that his friends in the Rebel Alliance could blow the space station up — it was a suicide mission. It really doesn’t feel in keeping with Luke’s willingness to die to redeem his father or save his friends that he’d up and leave when things were at their darkest. “The Last Jedi” doesn’t just need to explain why Luke left with some Jedi mumbo-jumbo, it has to provide Luke a reason so compelling that it upends three movies of character development.

Let’s get some flashbacks of what Finn’s stormtrooper life was actually like

There’s two moments with Finn (John Boyega) in “The Force Awakens” that feel bizarrely out of context, and that’s the pair of moments in which members of the First Order call him a traitor like he’s supposed to feel guilty about it. Nevermind that the First Order is not given any sort of ideology, period, that might explain why anyone follows it to begin with — Finn’s story as we know it is that he was taken from his family as a baby and forced into service essentially as a slave soldier.

We don’t know if he had any friends, we don’t know what his feelings in general about the First Order were. His motivation for defecting, as presented in the film, was basically just that he wanted to save himself, rather than having any sort of “these guys are evil and need to be stopped” ideals. So we need to know more about Finn’s previous life, and provide any sort of reason why it would bother him when First Order people scream “Traitor!” at him.

Flesh out the First Order

Speaking of which — as it currently stands, the First Order is a less-interesting version of the original Galactic Empire. It’s true the original “Star Wars” trilogy didn’t do too terribly much to give the Empire a backstory — it was mostly just a fascist organization that wanted more and more power and control in the galaxy. But they were space fascists, at the very least, and George Lucas doubled back in the prequel trilogy to give a look at how they ended up that way: They embraced fascism as a response to a powerful, dangerous enemy and years of disastrous warfare. Once the Empire was in power, it was mostly concerned with staying in power, and that’s what the original trilogy ends up being about.

The First Order, on the other hand, isn’t even really in control of anything. It’s an evil military force running around killing people for no discernible reason that has yet been presented. It’s not fighting against an insurgent enemy, it’s fighting to gain something, apparently. To get people to follow you and to risk their lives, you need to have a pretty clear ideology for them to get behind. There’s a moment in “The Force Awakens” that almost hints at one, when General Hux (Domnhall Gleeson) gives a speech about the “lying” Republic, before wiping it out using the Starkiller Base. And Kylo Ren calls Rey’s Resistance buddies thieves and murderers. So there’s a hint that the First Order at least potentially believing not only that they’re the good guys, but that they are fighting something they perceive as “bad” in the galaxy. What is it? We have no idea — but if “The Last Jedi” were to tell us, it would go a long way to making the First Order seem like something other than just a bunch of generic bad guys.

Dive deep into Kylo Ren’s psyche

Along the same lines as fleshing out the First Order, we could really stand to spend some time with Kylo Ren and figure out what he’s all about. “The Force Awakens” suggests he’s a Vader fanboy, taken with the Dark Side but struggling with the pull of the Light Side and, apparently, caring about his family. But we have no idea what his motivations are. He’s somewhat obsessive about finding Luke Skywalker but we don’t know why. We don’t know why Ren has thrown in with Supreme Leader Snoke, or believes in him so wholeheartedly. We don’t know what Ren wants to accomplish or why power is important to him.

Lucas created an entire prequel trilogy to explain the motivations of Darth Vader. He embraced fascism more or less in order to force peace on the galaxy. Vader saw the Dark Side and being evil as a means toward an ultimate good — protecting the galaxy and the people in it from themselves. It’s telling that Palpatine ultimately gets Vader to fall by offering him a means to save his loved ones from death. But so far, we have no idea what Kylo Ren actually wants. He’s just evil for the sake of evil right now, it seems, and that doesn’t make him particularly interesting.

Explain what happened to Poe Dameron after the crash on Jakku 

There’s a weird moment in one of the behind-the-scenes documentaries on the home video release of “The Force Awakens” in which the actor who plays Poe, Oscar Isaac, says that Poe was supposed to die when he and Finn crashed on Jakku. But then Isaac describes director JJ Abrams telling him excitedly during production that they’d found some way to adjust the story to keep him alive — but whatever they did wasn’t actually in the movie because Poe simply shows up later and provides no explanation. It’s just a weird inexplicable plot hole right now that bears some explanation.

Explain why Han and Leia named their kid after a guy Leia had never met and Han knew for maybe a day

Kylo Ren’s real name is Ben Solo, after the alias Obi-Wan used in hiding (“old Ben Kenobi”). Now, Ben would be a perfectly apt name for Luke’s kid, because Obi-Wan was probably the single most important person in Luke’s life from the moment he was born. Obi-Wan did, after all, live on Tatooine for decades to make sure Luke stayed safe, and then started him off on his hero’s journey and helped keep him on the path even after he died.

Any attachment Han (Harrison Ford) and Leia (Carrie Fisher) might have for Obi-Wan is purely by proxy, though, and generally people don’t name their kids after people that the people they care about cared about but whom they themselve do not have any particular affection for. If I ever have kids I’m definitely not gonna name them after whatever mentor figures my sisters might have — I’d pick a name that has some meaning to me or the mother. There’s surely some kind of explanation to be had for this, even if there wasn’t one when the name was chosen.

Explain R2-D2’s a droid coma (and have it mean something)

My favorite moment in “The Force Awakens” (I’m using “favorite” sarcastically there) is when R2, who has apparently sat dormant in the Resistance base for years, randomly wakes up at the exact right moment to help find Luke. There’s any number of things we can infer about what happened there, but we shouldn’t have to make guesses. There needs to be some kind of substantial explanation for what happened there.

Make a joke about tentacle monsters but not actually have one

We’ve gotten two new movies in the Disney era of “Star Wars” and each one featured completely superfluous tentacle monsters that could have been cut without altering the overall plot much at all, if at all. So I need some kind of self-referential joke about this and a fourth wall-breaking joke about how they won’t do that anymore.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Star Wars: Battlefront II' Gives Clues About How Luke Skywalker Got to That Planet He Was on in 'The Force Awakens'

79 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' Characters Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

All the 'Star Wars' Behind-the-Scenes Shakeups Since Disney Bought Lucasfilm (So Far)

Watch Jennifer Lawrence in First Hair-Raising ‘Mother!’ Teaser: ‘You’re Insane… Murderer!’ (Video)

Fasten your seat belts. Darren Aronofsky’s “Mother!” is going to be intense, judging from the first teaser for his upcoming psychological thriller starring Jennifer Lawrence.

The first peek at the film has Lawrence walking calming through a house as sound bites from climactic parts of movie play over the otherwise peaceful scene. At one point we hear the words “You’re insane” and “Murderer!” belted out.

Lawrence and Javier Bardem lead a cast, which also includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Domnhall Gleeson, Ed Harris and Kristen Wiig.

Also Read: Jennifer Lawrence Tears Out Her Own, Bloody Heart in ‘Mother!’ Poster

The film revolves around a couple, whose relationship gets tested when disruptive, uninvited guests arrive at their home. And, clearly, the new teaser suggests things get deadly.

During this year’s Cinemacon convention, Paramount Domestic Distribution chief Kyle Davies let the cat out of the bag over what’s been a somewhat secretive project, promising “thrills and chills” from Aronofsky and company upon the film’s Halloween-season release.

This is the first collaboration for real-life couple Aronofsky and Lawrence.

The film enters theaters Sept. 15.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Lawrence Refuses to Be Shamed for Wild Night Out at Strip Club

Marvel Editor Cyber-Bullied After Selfie Posted With Friends Drinking Milkshakes

‘Game of Thrones’: Here’s the Real Reason the Lannisters Attacked Highgarden

‘Game of Thrones’ Fan Favorite Gets the Last Word and Fans Are in Love

Fasten your seat belts. Darren Aronofsky’s “Mother!” is going to be intense, judging from the first teaser for his upcoming psychological thriller starring Jennifer Lawrence.

The first peek at the film has Lawrence walking calming through a house as sound bites from climactic parts of movie play over the otherwise peaceful scene. At one point we hear the words “You’re insane” and “Murderer!” belted out.

Lawrence and Javier Bardem lead a cast, which also includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Domnhall Gleeson, Ed Harris and Kristen Wiig.

The film revolves around a couple, whose relationship gets tested when disruptive, uninvited guests arrive at their home. And, clearly, the new teaser suggests things get deadly.

During this year’s Cinemacon convention, Paramount Domestic Distribution chief Kyle Davies let the cat out of the bag over what’s been a somewhat secretive project, promising “thrills and chills” from Aronofsky and company upon the film’s Halloween-season release.

This is the first collaboration for real-life couple Aronofsky and Lawrence.

The film enters theaters Sept. 15.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Lawrence Refuses to Be Shamed for Wild Night Out at Strip Club

Marvel Editor Cyber-Bullied After Selfie Posted With Friends Drinking Milkshakes

'Game of Thrones': Here's the Real Reason the Lannisters Attacked Highgarden

'Game of Thrones' Fan Favorite Gets the Last Word and Fans Are in Love

James Franco’s ‘The Disaster Artist’ Gets Awards-Season Release From A24

Decorated indie distributor A24 has acquired domestic distribution rights to James Franco’s “The Disaster Artist,” which saw Franco labelled an early Best Actor contender upon its SXSW premiere in March.

“Disaster Artist” centers on the making of “The Room” — largely considered the worst modern movie ever made, by enigmatic director and star Tommy Wiseau. The film, released independently in 2003, has gained a considerable cult following in the subsequent years.

The move mirrors a successful previous deal made by A24 when they acquired “Ex Machina” from Universal in 2014. That was a flagship title that over-performed commercially and got raves for director Alex Garland and stars Oscar Isaac, Alicia Vikander and Domnhall Gleeson.

Also Read: ‘The Disaster Artist’ Review: James Franco Celebrates Bad Movies in a Good One

New Line will handle international territories on the project. Franco stars and directs from a script by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, based on the book by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell.

Dave Franco and Seth Rogen round an ensemble that also includes Alison Brie, Zac Efron, Josh Hutcherson, Jacki Weaver, Ari Graynor and Jason Mantzoukas.

Good Universe and RatPac-Dune, a Point Grey production in association with Ramona Films.

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Decorated indie distributor A24 has acquired domestic distribution rights to James Franco’s “The Disaster Artist,” which saw Franco labelled an early Best Actor contender upon its SXSW premiere in March.

“Disaster Artist” centers on the making of “The Room” — largely considered the worst modern movie ever made, by enigmatic director and star Tommy Wiseau. The film, released independently in 2003, has gained a considerable cult following in the subsequent years.

The move mirrors a successful previous deal made by A24 when they acquired “Ex Machina” from Universal in 2014. That was a flagship title that over-performed commercially and got raves for director Alex Garland and stars Oscar Isaac, Alicia Vikander and Domnhall Gleeson.

New Line will handle international territories on the project. Franco stars and directs from a script by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, based on the book by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell.

Dave Franco and Seth Rogen round an ensemble that also includes Alison Brie, Zac Efron, Josh Hutcherson, Jacki Weaver, Ari Graynor and Jason Mantzoukas.

Good Universe and RatPac-Dune, a Point Grey production in association with Ramona Films.

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Winnie the Pooh Movie ‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’ Set for Awards Season

Fox Searchlight has set its family drama “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” starring Domnhall Gleeson and Margot Robbie, for an awards-season release date of November 10. Gleeson portrays British author A.A. Milne, who f0und the inspiration for his two Winnie the Pooh books — “Winnie the Pooh” in 1926 and “The House at Pooh Corner” in 1928… Read more »

Fox Searchlight has set its family drama “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” starring Domnhall Gleeson and Margot Robbie, for an awards-season release date of November 10. Gleeson portrays British author A.A. Milne, who f0und the inspiration for his two Winnie the Pooh books — “Winnie the Pooh” in 1926 and “The House at Pooh Corner” in 1928... Read more »

That Mysterious Jennifer Lawrence-Darren Aronofsky Movie is a Horror-Thriller, You Guys

The plot of Darren Aronofsky’s next film has largely been under wraps since it was announced — but this week’s CinemaCon convention, and an individual close to project that spoke to TheWrap, revealed the director is going back to “Black Swan” territory with his latest.

Aronofsky’s “mother!” will be a horror-thriller, and a star-studded one at that. Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem lead a cast that includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Domnhall Gleeson, Ed Harris and Kristen Wiig.

At this week’s annual convention of movie exhibitors, Paramount Domestic Distribution chief Kyle Davies let the cat out of the bag, promising “thrills and chills” from Aronofsky and company upon the film’s Halloween-season release.

Also Read: Jim Gianopulos Is Finalizing Deal to Run Paramount Pictures

A second individual with close knowledge of the project confirmed Davies’ description is accurate —  Aronofsky is flirting with the same psycho-horror that won Natalie Portman an Oscar for the unraveling ballerina she played in “Black Swan.”

“mother!” did have a vague synopsis floating around, described as: “A couple’s relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence.”

Expect things to be much darker than some unexpected visitors (though we pray this film crosses over into one of our favorite movie genres, Dinner Parties From Hell).

This is the first collaboration for real-life couple Aronofsky and Lawrence. Paramount will open the film wide on Oct. 13.

The filmmaker also wrote the script, and produces through his Protozoa Pictures. “Arrival” composer Jóhann Jóhannsson is on board for original score. Scott Franklin and Ari Handel are producers with Jeff G. Waxman on board as executive producer.

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The plot of Darren Aronofsky’s next film has largely been under wraps since it was announced — but this week’s CinemaCon convention, and an individual close to project that spoke to TheWrap, revealed the director is going back to “Black Swan” territory with his latest.

Aronofsky’s “mother!” will be a horror-thriller, and a star-studded one at that. Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem lead a cast that includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Domnhall Gleeson, Ed Harris and Kristen Wiig.

At this week’s annual convention of movie exhibitors, Paramount Domestic Distribution chief Kyle Davies let the cat out of the bag, promising “thrills and chills” from Aronofsky and company upon the film’s Halloween-season release.

A second individual with close knowledge of the project confirmed Davies’ description is accurate —  Aronofsky is flirting with the same psycho-horror that won Natalie Portman an Oscar for the unraveling ballerina she played in “Black Swan.”

“mother!” did have a vague synopsis floating around, described as: “A couple’s relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence.”

Expect things to be much darker than some unexpected visitors (though we pray this film crosses over into one of our favorite movie genres, Dinner Parties From Hell).

This is the first collaboration for real-life couple Aronofsky and Lawrence. Paramount will open the film wide on Oct. 13.

The filmmaker also wrote the script, and produces through his Protozoa Pictures. “Arrival” composer Jóhann Jóhannsson is on board for original score. Scott Franklin and Ari Handel are producers with Jeff G. Waxman on board as executive producer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Lawrence Goes Killer Ballerina in 'Red Sparrow' Footage

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Jennifer Lawrence Ripped for Criticizing Trump Travel Ban

Paramount Pulls Brad Pitt’s ‘World War Z 2,’ ‘Friday the 13th’ Reboot From Schedule

Paramount Pictures has pulled two high profile projects from its release schedule, while dating the anticipated collaboration between Jennifer Lawrence and Darren Aronofsky.

Brad Pitt’s zombie sequel “World War Z 2” is now undated, formerly pegged for June 9, 2017. A younger reboot of the “Friday The 13th” franchise is now undated, previously scheduled for Oct. 13, 2017.

“mother!” — which pairs “Passengers” star Lawrence and “Black Swan” director Aronofsky — will now open on the Oct. 13th date that was held for the horror reboot. The relationship drama also stars Michelle Pfeiffer, Javier Bardem, Domnhall Gleeson and Ed Harris.

Also Read: Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt Documentary in the Works From Ian Halperin

In January 2016, “World War Z 2” lost director Juan Antonio Bayona, who was said to be held up finishing post-production on “A Monster Calls.”

The search has been on for a replacement ever since, with Pitt himself imploring some of Hollywood’s biggest directors to step in and help the franchise, numerous individuals have told TheWrap throughout the process.

The first “World War Z” movie also had its share of behind-the-scenes strife, as script doctors Damon Lindelof and Drew Goddard boarded the project late in the game to fix its third act. The film went on to gross nearly $540 million worldwide, opening the door for a sequel.

Also Read: Paramount Hires Stephen Plum as Senior Business Affairs Exec

As for “Friday the 13th,” initial news about the project angled for a younger take on undead serial killer Jason Voorhees. No casting emerged, and in August a lawsuit hit from the writer of the 1980 classic. It’s unclear how that litigation might have affected Paramount’s development on the project.

It’s not all uncertainty from the studio: It’s safe to say that “mother!” finds itself slotted for awards season thanks to its mid-October rollout.

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Paramount Pictures has pulled two high profile projects from its release schedule, while dating the anticipated collaboration between Jennifer Lawrence and Darren Aronofsky.

Brad Pitt’s zombie sequel “World War Z 2” is now undated, formerly pegged for June 9, 2017. A younger reboot of the “Friday The 13th” franchise is now undated, previously scheduled for Oct. 13, 2017.

“mother!” — which pairs “Passengers” star Lawrence and “Black Swan” director Aronofsky — will now open on the Oct. 13th date that was held for the horror reboot. The relationship drama also stars Michelle Pfeiffer, Javier Bardem, Domnhall Gleeson and Ed Harris.

In January 2016, “World War Z 2” lost director Juan Antonio Bayona, who was said to be held up finishing post-production on “A Monster Calls.”

The search has been on for a replacement ever since, with Pitt himself imploring some of Hollywood’s biggest directors to step in and help the franchise, numerous individuals have told TheWrap throughout the process.

The first “World War Z” movie also had its share of behind-the-scenes strife, as script doctors Damon Lindelof and Drew Goddard boarded the project late in the game to fix its third act. The film went on to gross nearly $540 million worldwide, opening the door for a sequel.

As for “Friday the 13th,” initial news about the project angled for a younger take on undead serial killer Jason Voorhees. No casting emerged, and in August a lawsuit hit from the writer of the 1980 classic. It’s unclear how that litigation might have affected Paramount’s development on the project.

It’s not all uncertainty from the studio: It’s safe to say that “mother!” finds itself slotted for awards season thanks to its mid-October rollout.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Johnny Knoxville and Paramount Get Started On 'Jackass'-Style Comedy, 'Action Park'

Paramount Hires Stephen Plum as Senior Business Affairs Exec

Oscar Nominations by the Numbers: Lionsgate, Paramount Dominate the Field