‘Insatiable’ Renewed for Second Season at Netflix

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Congrats, “Insatiable” fans! Your new favorite show has been renewed for a second season at Netflix.

The Debby Ryan-led revenge comedy’s Season 2 will debut in 2019. Ryan announced the news herself in a video tweeted by the Netflix series’ official account Wednesday.

The show centers around Patty (Ryan), a high schooler who was overweight for years, which caused her to be bullied, ignored and underestimated by the people around her. But she gets thin (thanks to a punch to the face from a homeless man and an all-liquid diet) and then begins to seek revenge against those who ever made her feel bad about herself — and launch her pageant career with the help of coach/lawyer Bob Armstrong (Dallas Roberts).

Also Read: Debby Ryan Didn’t Want Her ‘Insatiable’ Fat Suit to Be ‘Done in Parody like in ‘Friends”

“Insatiable” Season 1 debuted in August, with Netflix dropping the trailer for the series the month before. The promo immediately received a lot of criticism on social media, with some users calling the show “toxic” for putting Ryan in a fat suit.

Change.org petition was even started before the series even debuted to try to get it canceled.

Both Ryan and co-star Alyssa Milano have defended the series, with Ryan saying creator Lauren Gussis didn’t want to use the fat suit if it tipped towards making fun and Milano noting, “we are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming.”

Also Read: Here’s Everything Coming and Going at Netflix in August

“There was a point where Lauren and I are like, If at any point this is funny, if at any point people laugh, we’re not doing it,” Ryan told Teen Vogue in August. “We’re not doing the show that we’re trying to do. We’re just trying to portray an origin story. We’re trying to showcase that.” She added that wearing the suit was an “eye-opening” experience.

grab your caboodle. season 2 is coming in 2019. pic.twitter.com/aTBHe3C4GG

— insatiable (@insatiable_) September 12, 2018

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Debby Ryan Didn’t Want Her ‘Insatiable’ Fat Suit to Be ‘Done in Parody like in ‘Friends”

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Debby Ryan wasn’t too crazy about wearing a fat suit in the new Netflix series “Insatiable,” afraid, like critics, that it would be done in a way that made fun of people whose bodies don’t fit the commercialized idea of beauty.

In a recent interview with Teen Vogue, Ryan said that she was afraid “it would almost be done in parody like in ‘Friends’” — referring to flashback scenes in the NBC sitcom that portray Monica (Courteney Cox) in a fat suit. The actress said that she and executive producer Lauren Gussis didn’t want to use the fat suit if it tipped towards making fun.

“There was a point where Lauren and I are like, If at any point this is funny, if at any point people laugh, we’re not doing it. We’re not doing the show that we’re trying to do. We’re just trying to portray an origin story. We’re trying to showcase that,” she said to Teen Vogue. She added that wearing the suit was an “eye-opening” experience.

Also Read: Alyssa Milano Combats ‘Fat Shaming’ Backlash Over ‘Insatiable’: ‘We Are Addressing the Damage’

“I was enraged and I learned what a slight percentage of Patty’s rage would feel like in that situation, to be like, ‘How dare you?’” Debby says. “To be able to experience that was super educational and really eye-opening,” she said.

After Netflix dropped the trailer for the comedy back in July, several viewers on Twitter were skeptical of the series, calling the show “toxic” for putting Ryan in a fat suit and inspiring a Change.org petition to cancel the series’ release.

Alyssa Milano, who also stars in the series, responded to critics on her own Twitter account.

Also Read: ‘Insatiable’ Trailer: Alyssa Milano Pops Up in Netflix’s Extra High School-Revenge Comedy (Video)

“We are not shaming Patty. We are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming. I hope that clears it up,” she said.

Ryan told the magazine that she understands the criticism of the show. “We knew that this conversation needed to be had. We knew that this societal brokenness needed to be addressed, but we didn’t know how badly it needed to be addressed,” she said.

“Insatiable” is now streaming on Netflix.

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Petition to Cancel ‘Insatiable’ Gains Steam: ‘This Series Will Cause Eating Disorders’

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A petition calling for Netflix to cancel its upcoming dark comedy series “Insatiable” has already gained 120,000 signatures, five days after Twitter commentators criticized the trailer for being “toxic” and promoting fat-shaming.

The petition, titled “Stop the Release of Netflix’s Body-Shaming Series ‘Insatiable,’” was created four days ago on Change.org.

Netflix dropped the trailer for “Insatiable” last Thursday. It showed Patty (Debby Ryan) as an overweight girl who loses weight after having her jaw wired shut and becomes the proverbial hot girl out for “revenge,” as she puts it. Alyssa Milano plays her mother on the series.

Representatives for Netflix, Ryan and Milano did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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The petition criticizes the series for “feeding into part of a much larger problem” surrounding eating disorders, diet culture, and the objectification of women’s bodies.

“For so long, the narrative has told women and young impressionable girls that in order to be popular, have friends, to be desirable for the male gaze, and to some extent be a worthy human … that we must be thin,” the petition reads. “This series will cause eating disorders, and perpetuate the further objectification of women’s bodies. The trailer has already triggered people with eating disorders. Let’s stop this, and protect further damage.”

The trailer became the subject of backlash soon after it was released, with Twitter users arguing that the plot promotes a “harmful” idea that fat women must become thin in order to be attractive and successful.

“So, anyone aware of Debby Ryan’s new movie coming to @Netflix?” wrote one detractor. “It’s called Insatiable, and I have a few problems with it, mainly that it’s essentially fat shaming people.”

So, anyone aware of Debby Ryan’s new movie coming to @Netflix? It’s called Insatiable, and I have a few problems with it, mainly that it’s essentially fat shaming people. Allow me to explain more.

— Kate Lopez (@TheMusician94) July 19, 2018

The show Insatiable on @netflix looks like a piece of utter trash. Don’t watch shows where people wear fat suits. Don’t watch shows where they try to turn fat phobia and hatred into a joke.

— Amanda Levitt (@FatBodyPolitics) July 19, 2018

Milano responded to the criticism with a tweet on Thursday afternoon, writing, “We are not shaming Patty. We are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming. I hope that clears it up.”

She was replying to a tweet from Twitter user @thecursedempath, who had criticized Milano after her initial tweet sharing the trailer, writing, “Really…..so she wasn’t able to take revenge until she was ‘conventionally attractive’? This is disgusting! You are the face of the Women’s Movement and THIS? Shame on you!”

We are not shaming Patty. We are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming. I hope that clears it up. Also, this article does a good job of explaining it more: https://t.co/WoR8R7TjqR #Insatiable https://t.co/GFkDdsn1uh

— Alyssa Milano (@Alyssa_Milano) July 19, 2018

Ryan also addressed the criticism in an Instagram post on Saturday. “We’re not in the business of fat shaming. We’re out to turn a sharp eye on broken, harmful systems that equate thinness with worth,” she wrote. “Twelve years into my own struggles with body image, struggles that took me in and out of terrible places I never want to go again, things I choose every day to leave behind, I was drawn to this show’s willingness to go to real places about how difficult and scary it can be to move through the world in a body, whether you’re being praised or criticized for its size, and what it feels like to pray to be ignored because it’s easier than being seen.”

@insatiable ????

A post shared by ???? (@debbyryan) on

Lauren Gussis, the show’s creator, responded to the backlash on Twitter, sharing that she was suicidal when she was 13 and later developed an eating disorder and “the kind of rage that makes you want to do dark things.” She added: “The show is a cautionary tale about how damaging it can be to believe the outsides are more important — to judge without going deeper. Please give the show a chance.”

This is my truth. @insatiable_ pic.twitter.com/xbs3YtueCQ

— Lauren Gussis (@GussisLauren) July 21, 2018

The petition was created by Florence Given, a body positivity activist and artist from London. “A lot of my curvier friends who have struggled their entire lives to accept their bodies were feeling incredibly hurt, and insulted by the premise of this series,” she told Refinery29. “Once I started the petition, thousands of girls were flooding my comments sections and my DM’s telling me that they were glad someone took a call to action, because it had triggered their eating disorder. If the show has the power to do this before it’s even been released, I can’t imagine the breeding ground this will become for eating disorders, and further insecurities.”

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‘Insatiable’ Trailer: Alyssa Milano Pops Up in Netflix’s Extra High School-Revenge Comedy (Video)

Debby Ryan to Star in CW Pilot ‘Insatiable’

Alyssa Milano Combats ‘Fat Shaming’ Backlash Over ‘Insatiable’: ‘We Are Addressing the Damage’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

After Netflix released the trailer for its upcoming dark comedy series “Insatiable,” starring Alyssa Milano and Debby Ryan, Twitter commentators were quick to slam the movie for being “toxic” and promoting fat-shaming.

Milano has already addressed the criticism, tweeting that the film is intended to address “the damage that occurs from fat shaming.”

Netflix dropped the trailer on Thursday morning, showing Patty (Ryan) as an overweight girl who becomes thin after having her jaw wired shut and becomes the proverbial hot girl out for “revenge,” as she puts it. Milano plays her mother in the series.

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The trailer soon became the subject of backlash, with Twitter users arguing that the plot promotes a “harmful” idea that fat women must become thin in order to be attractive and successful.

“So, anyone aware of Debby Ryan’s new movie coming to @Netflix?” wrote one detractor. “It’s called Insatiable, and I have a few problems with it, mainly that it’s essentially fat shaming people.”

So, anyone aware of Debby Ryan’s new movie coming to @Netflix? It’s called Insatiable, and I have a few problems with it, mainly that it’s essentially fat shaming people. Allow me to explain more.

— Kate Lopez (@TheMusician94) July 19, 2018

The show Insatiable on @netflix looks like a piece of utter trash. Don’t watch shows where people wear fat suits. Don’t watch shows where they try to turn fat phobia and hatred into a joke.

— A.L. (@FatBodyPolitics) July 19, 2018

i love debby ryan so much but her new show “insatiable” is so toxic

— jenna 107 (@jennajozeph) July 19, 2018

Milano responded to the criticism with a tweet on Thursday afternoon, writing, ” We are not shaming Patty. We are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming. I hope that clears it up.”

She was replying to a tweet from Twitter user @thecursedempath, who had slammed Milano after her initial tweet sharing the trailer, writing, “Really…..so she wasn’t able to take revenge until she was ‘conventionally attractive’? This is disgusting! You are the face of the Women’s Movement and THIS? Shame on you!”

We are not shaming Patty. We are addressing (through comedy) the damage that occurs from fat shaming. I hope that clears it up. Also, this article does a good job of explaining it more: https://t.co/WoR8R7TjqR #Insatiable https://t.co/GFkDdsn1uh

— Alyssa Milano (@Alyssa_Milano) July 19, 2018

Along with Ryan and Milano, Dallas Roberts stars in the show from writer Lauren Gussis (“Dexter,” “Once Upon A Time”). “Insatiable” is produced by Ryan Seacrest Productions and Storied Media Group. The show will arrive on Netflix on August 10.

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‘Life of the Party’ Film Review: Melissa McCarthy Goes to College, But This Class Is Easily Dismissed

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Melissa McCarthy may be a crown jewel in today’s comedy realm, but she’s not doing her audacious shine any favors with “Life of the Party,” a slapdash back-to-college vehicle that leaves her formidable gifts floundering.

It’s become all too apparent that of the two directors who have worked with McCarthy the most since her “Bridesmaids” breakthrough — that film’s director, Paul Feig (“The Heat,” “Spy,” “Ghostbusters”) and McCarthy’s husband Ben Falcone (“Tammy,” “The Boss,” and now “Life of the Party”) — it’s Feig who recognizes her strengths, who understands how to let her elevate material and bounce off the people and situations around her. (That usually starts with a halfway decent script.) Falcone, on the other hand, clearly adores his wife, but thinks just turning on the camera is all his genius, wind-up spouse needs.

What that means for “Life of the Party” is, it doesn’t matter that the McCarthy at the beginning of the movie and the McCarthy at the end feel like two of at least seven different versions of housewife-turned-student Deanna Myles in this undercooked story. Whatever “Life of the Party” needs its star to be, it gives us — frumpy, hot, weird, normal, kind, mean, humiliated, heroic, limber, uncoordinated, sexy, unsexy — in the desperate hope that you’ll latch on to some nugget of McCarthy-patented brazenness and you’ll laugh, as if story and cohesion meant nothing.

Watch Video: Melissa McCarthy Heads Back to College in ‘Life of the Party’ Trailer

To reference a college staple, this is McCarthy as everything punch, and as deliriously on as she can be. But the lingering effect is, “What exactly was that?” And not in a good way.

When we meet Deanna, she’s a half-permed, half-blow-dried, bespectacled, appliqué-sweatered mom holding back tears at saying goodbye to her daughter Maddie (Molly Gordon, TNT’s “Animal Kingdom”) as she and impatient hubby Dan (Matt Walsh) drop their kid off at college. Deanna’s proud-ma vibe is quickly extinguished, however, by Dan’s asking for a divorce (he’s been having an affair) mere seconds after the car doors have closed.

After commiserating with her parents (Stephen Root and Jacki Weaver) and her best friend (Maya Rudolph), Deanna decides to finish what she cut short when she first got pregnant 18 years prior: getting her college degree at the same university where her daughter is now. Maddie is naturally sympathetic to her mom’s second-chance spirit, yet also mildly horrified, especially when, upon re-enrolling, Deanna gloms on to her sorority pals — a sweet oddball (Jessie Ennis, “Better Call Saul”), a shy beauty (Adria Arjona, “Emerald City”), and a twentysomething (Gillian Jacobs) returning to school after being in a coma for eight years — with well-intentioned, if awkwardly intrusive maternal zest.

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This would seem to be a suitably layered, conflict-ready dynamic for a mother and daughter, but it’s hardly explored as such, nor is any sense of what real college life is like; Deanna is presented as a responsible tornado of aw-shucks positivity instantly accepted by all the youngsters, save a pair of snarling mean girls (Debby Ryan, Yani Simone) whose status as foils for comeuppance is woefully transparent, and better suited to disposable high-school sitcoms than a movie supposedly about higher education.

The ins and outs of learning isn’t this movie’s focus, however: social flowering is, so we get the requisite makeover, the alcohol-fueled losing of inhibitions, the sorority initiation (McCarthy’s response to getting paddled is her funniest bit), and even a hook-up with a handsome frat boy (Luke Benward) that turns into a steady fling. The fast friendships and acceptance have the strange effect of neutering a late attempt to wring comedic tension out of Deanna’s ex quickly getting re-hitched to his snarling, well-heeled squeeze (Julie Bowen).

Also Read: Melissa McCarthy’s ‘The Happytime Murders’: Gritty, Gross, Hilarious First Look

Then again, much of “Life of the Party,” as cobbled-together by screenwriters Falcone and McCarthy, is a series of scenes intended to breed studio-comedy familiarity rather than honest character development: there’s the ’80s-themed dance party, the scarfed-down chocolate discovered (oops!) to contain marijuana, a classic McCarthy physical meltdown nervously delivering an oral midterm, and a money-raising final Greek blowout with a surprise-not-surprise appearance by a major recording star, message-y anthem at the ready.

Sure, comedy pros like Rudolph, Walsh, Bowen and Jacobs do their best to grab yuks in McCarthy’s towering shadow. But “Life of the Party,” and Falcone’s barely-there, beat-erratic direction, already makes it seem as if we’re in a greatest-hits stage of McCarthy’s career, when the reality is that a more comically nuanced, thoughtfully-structured, detail-rich movie about a middle-aged mom turning a gut-punch into a new lease on life could have been a killer showcase for McCarthy the soulfully hilarious actor.

Remember how she made every moment in “Bridesmaids” into a wild and richly dimensional portrait of proud outsider-dom? But also how she turned “Spy” into an unexpectedly shaded story of my-time-is-now, leading-lady heroism? McCarthy is the life of any party she stars in, but something’s wrong when she’s working overtime, with the seams showing, to hide how little else there is to enjoy.



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Zombie Musical ‘Anna and the Apocalypse’ Marks Orion Pictures’ First Acquisition Since Relaunch

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Orion Pictures has acquired the North American and Latin American rights to John McPhail’s zombie holiday musical “Anna and the Apocalypse,” the distribution company announced Tuesday.

Orion, recently relaunched by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) as a standalone theatrical marketing and distribution company, plans to release the film in the 2018 holiday season.

“Anna and the Apocalypse” stars Ella Hunt, Mark Benton and Paul Kaye, along with a group of new talent: Malcom Cumming, Ben Wiggins, Sarah Swire, Christopher Leveaux and Marli Su.

Also Read: MGM to Relaunch Orion Pictures, Sets February Release for Maria Bello’s ‘Every Day’

The zombie musical premiered at the Fantastic Fest earlier this year, where it was met with critical acclaim. It also screened at Sitges Film Festival, where it won the award for Best Midnight X-Treme Feature Length Film.

The film is based on the 2010 BAFTA-winning short film “Zombie Musical.” The short film was directed by McPhail, written by Alan McDonald and the late Ryan McHenry, and it was produced by Naysun Alae-Carew and Nicholas Crum of Blazing Griffin in associated with Tracy Jarvis of Parkhouse Pictures and Creative Scotland.

“The team at Orion can’t wait to work with Blazing Griffin in making ‘Anna and the Apocalypse’ a holiday spectacular for the ages,” said John Hegeman, President of Orion Pictures. “Nothing gets the blood flowing like a good holiday musical.”

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Producer Alae-Carew added: “The Orion logo was on the front of so many of our favorite films growing up.  It’s a real honor that ‘Anna and the Apocalypse’ will join the ranks of the films that inspired us. We are elated to have a partner in Orion that is as passionate about our film as we are.”

In the film, a zombie apocalypse threatens the sleepy town of Little Haven at Christmas, and Anna and her high school friends must fight, sing and slash their way to survival.

“Anna and the Apocalypse” marks Orion’s first acquisition since the announcement that it would return to wide release theatrical distribution last fall. Orion’s first release, the YA romance “Every Day,” will hit theaters Feb. 23 and stars Angourie Rice, Justice Smith, Maria Bello and Debby Ryan.

The deal was negotiated by Nate Bolotin of XYZ Films on behalf of the filmmakers. International territories are represented by James Norrie of AMP International.

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MGM is relaunching Orion Pictures as a new, standalone U.S. theatrical marketing and distribution company, MGM’s Chairman and CEO Gary Barber announced Wednesday.

Veteran entertainment executive John Hegeman will be appointed to the newly created role of President of Orion Pictures. He will report to Jonathan Glickman, MGM’s President of the Motion Picture Group, beginning next week.

The first film set to be released under the new standalone label will be Michael Sucsy’s YA romance “Every Day,” starring Angourie Rice, Maria Bello and Debby Ryan. The film will hit theaters on Feb. 2, 2018. “Every Day” is based on the best-selling novel of the same name and tells the story or a 16-year-old girl who falls in love with a spirit named A.

Also Read: James Gunn-Produced ‘Belko Experiment’ Acquired by Orion, BH Tilt

“Orion is one of MGM’s legacy brands that has released crowd-pleasing hits like ‘The Terminator,’ ‘Robocop,’ ‘Dirty Rotten Scoundrels’ and ‘Hoosiers,’ and such critically acclaimed films as ‘Silence of the Lambs’ and ‘Dances With Wolves,’” Barber said. “We couldn’t think of a better time to revitalize this nostalgic brand and return to U.S. theatrical distribution utilizing this label, with John leading the marketing and distribution efforts.”

“After working together, we saw first-hand John’s ingenuity in creating disruptive marketing campaigns with limited budgets. He is the ideal executive to lead Orion as he has proven that he can deftly craft strategies for releases, spanning all genres, to reach targeted audiences without the burden of high-cost traditional advertising,” added Glickman.

Also Read: MGM Q1 Revenue Dips Without ‘Spectre’ Tailwinds

Under the new Orion Pictures label, Hegeman will build out a theatrical distribution, marketing and digital team and will be responsible for the marketing and distribution of four to six modestly budgeted films a year.

Hegeman joins Orion from Blumhouse Productions’ BH Tilt, where he served as president of the division. There, he oversaw the successful wide release of James Gunn’s “The Belko Experiment” earlier this March.

He also spearheaded releases such as “The Green Inferno,” “The Darkness” and “Lowiders.” Prior to BH Tilt, he held various executive positions including Chief Marketing Officer for New Regency, and President of Worldwide Marketing for both Lionsgate and Artisan Entertainment.

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Alyssa Milano Cast In The CW Drama Pilot ‘Insatiable’

Read on: Deadline.

Mistresses alumna Alyssa Milano is set for a key role opposite Dallas Roberts and Debby Ryan in the CW drama pilot Insatiable, from former Dexter co-executive producer Lauren Gussis, Ryan Seacrest Productions, Storied Media Group and CBS TV Studios.
Written/executive produced by Gussis and directed by Andrew Fleming, Insatiable was inspired by real-life Southern lawyer and top beauty pageant coach Bill Alverson. It focuses on Bob (Dallas), a disgraced, dissatisfied civil…

TV News Roundup: ‘Sons of Anarchy’ Spinoff ‘Mayans MC’ Casts JD Pardo in Lead Role

Read on: Variety.

In today’s TV News Roundup, “Sons of Anarchy” spinoff “Mayans MC” casts its lead, former Disney Channel star Debby Ryan lands a role in a CW pilot, Netflix releases the premiere date for part two of “The Get Down,” and more…  CASTING The “Sons of Anarchy” spinoff and FX show “Mayans MC” has cast JD Pardo… Read more »

Debby Ryan to Star in CW Pilot ‘Insatiable’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Debby Ryan has been tapped as the female lead in The CW’s dramedy pilot “Insatiable.”

“Insatiable” follows a disgraced, dissatisfied civil lawyer-turned-beauty pageant coach who takes on a vengeful, bullied teenager (Ryan) as his client, with no idea what he’s about to unleash upon the world.

“Dexter” co-executive producer Lauren Gussis writes and executive produces, with Ryan Seacrest and Nina Wass acting as EPs through Ryan Seacrest Productions, along with Todd Hoffman and Dennis Kim through Storied Media Group.

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“Insatiable” is one of six pilots The CW is considering for its upcoming 2017-18 season. Lucy Hale-led “Life Sentence,” a reboot of “Dynasty,” sci-fi drama “Searchers” from “The 100” creator Jason Rothenberg and Greg Berlanti, DC comic book adaptation “Black Lightning” and military drama “Valor” round out the list.

Ryan is best known for her title role on Disney Channel’s “Jessie.” She also recently recurred on NBC’s “The Mysteries of Laura.”

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Disney Star Debby Ryan Assures Fans She’s Still Alive: I’m Not Debbie Reynolds

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Debbie Reynolds died on Wednesday at the age of 84, but many thought Disney Channel star Debby Ryan had passed away instead.

So many, in fact, that the 23-year-old star of “Jessie” had to take to social media to reassure her fans that she is alive and well — and shouldn’t be confused with the star of classic Hollywood movies like “Singin’ in the Rain” and mother of “Star Wars” icon Carrie Fisher.

“No… guys, that’s very thoughtful but it’s Reynolds. Debbie Reynolds…” Ryan tweeted early Thursday morning.

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No… guys, that’s very thoughtful but it’s Reynolds.
Debbie Reynolds…

— debbyryan (@DebbyRyan) December 29, 2016

Many fans were shocked that there had been any confusion: “I honestly don’t know how how anyone could. The age difference, the resume, THE SPELLING,” read one tweet.

“Oh my… please tell me no one got confused…” tweeted another.

But sometimes there’s no stopping internet fans from sowing misinformation online.

“Omg I can’t believe that 2016 took away Debby Ryan too. Rip girl, I will always be Jessie’s #1 fan,” tweeted one user along with a picture of Ryan’s show, “Jessie.”

Also Read: Debbie Reynolds Dies One Day After Daughter Carrie Fisher

Omg I can’t believe that 2016 took away Debby Ryan too. Rip girl, I will always be Jessie’s #1 fan. ???????? pic.twitter.com/WJnhYz9KTI

— shania (@sj_peralta) December 29, 2016

RIP Debby Ryan… queen of Disney Channel

— michael better (@mrmeeseeksboy) December 29, 2016

Debby Ryan is dead guys ???????????????? #RIP

— daniel (@Kimsbeyotch) December 29, 2016

rip debby ryan

— m u f ✵ r o (@mufxro) December 29, 2016

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On Wednesday, Reynolds died at the age of 84, one day after the death of her daughter.

“She’s with Carrie,” Reynolds’ son Todd Fisher said in a statement, referring to his sister, who died Tuesday morning.

The Oscar-nominated actress was hospitalized after reportedly suffering a possible stroke on Wednesday. She was rushed to a hospital at around 1 p.m. PT.

Reynolds’ daughter, the beloved actress best known for playing Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” franchise, died on Tuesday after suffering a severe heart attack while returning to Los Angeles on a United Airlines flight from London last week.
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