‘Coco’ Producer Darla K. Anderson Leaves Pixar After 25 Years

Darla K. Anderson, longtime producer at Pixar, will be leaving the animation studio after 25 years to pursue other creative projects.

“Darla has been a creative force in animation and a strong voice at Pixar for 25 years,” said Disney CEO Bob Iger in a statement on Thursday. “She’s made an indelible mark on the industry as an Oscar-winning producer and a relentless champion for stories that reflect the diversity of the global audience. She takes my best wishes with her as she sets a course for her next adventure”

Also Read: Bud Luckey, Pixar Animator Who Designed Woody in ‘Toy Story’ and Voiced Eeyore, Dies at 83

Anderson has been a part of Pixar since its earliest days, working on commercials for Coca-Cola and Listerine as part of the studio’s commercial division. She then made the jump to feature films, helping work on “Toy Story” and then getting her first feature producer role on “A Bug’s Life” in 1998. Darla, the braces-wearing girl who accidentally kills fish in “Finding Nemo,” was jokingly named after her.

This past Sunday, Anderson won her second Academy Award as producer of Pixar’s latest film “Coco,” which won in the Best Animated Feature category. She won her first for “Toy Story 3,” which also became one of only three animated films to be nominated for Best Picture. She also became the first animation producer to be named to the Producers Guild of America’s board of directors.

Also Read: ‘Coco’ Takes Annie Award for Best Animated Feature

“Darla is not only a storied producer, but one of the true pioneers in the creation of computer animated feature films. From A Bug’s Life to the sublime Coco, Darla has produced a remarkable body of movies that have not only raised the bar for animation, but for cinema as a whole,” Pixar chief Jim Morris said.

With Anderson’s departure, Pixar has now seen two members of its core creative team depart either temporarily or permanently. Founder John Lasseter, who is also Walt Disney Animation’s chief creative officer, announced a six-month leave of absence in November after admitting to “missteps” the same day that reports of sexual misconduct surfaced.

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Pixar Head John Lasseter Takes ‘Six-Month Sabbatical,’ Apologizes for ‘Missteps’

Pixar’s ‘Coco’ Becomes Mexico’s Highest Grossing Film Ever

Darla K. Anderson, longtime producer at Pixar, will be leaving the animation studio after 25 years to pursue other creative projects.

“Darla has been a creative force in animation and a strong voice at Pixar for 25 years,” said Disney CEO Bob Iger in a statement on Thursday. “She’s made an indelible mark on the industry as an Oscar-winning producer and a relentless champion for stories that reflect the diversity of the global audience. She takes my best wishes with her as she sets a course for her next adventure”

Anderson has been a part of Pixar since its earliest days, working on commercials for Coca-Cola and Listerine as part of the studio’s commercial division. She then made the jump to feature films, helping work on “Toy Story” and then getting her first feature producer role on “A Bug’s Life” in 1998. Darla, the braces-wearing girl who accidentally kills fish in “Finding Nemo,” was jokingly named after her.

This past Sunday, Anderson won her second Academy Award as producer of Pixar’s latest film “Coco,” which won in the Best Animated Feature category. She won her first for “Toy Story 3,” which also became one of only three animated films to be nominated for Best Picture. She also became the first animation producer to be named to the Producers Guild of America’s board of directors.

“Darla is not only a storied producer, but one of the true pioneers in the creation of computer animated feature films. From A Bug’s Life to the sublime Coco, Darla has produced a remarkable body of movies that have not only raised the bar for animation, but for cinema as a whole,” Pixar chief Jim Morris said.

With Anderson’s departure, Pixar has now seen two members of its core creative team depart either temporarily or permanently. Founder John Lasseter, who is also Walt Disney Animation’s chief creative officer, announced a six-month leave of absence in November after admitting to “missteps” the same day that reports of sexual misconduct surfaced.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Bud Luckey, Pixar Animator Who Designed Woody in 'Toy Story' and Voiced Eeyore, Dies at 83

Pixar Head John Lasseter Takes 'Six-Month Sabbatical,' Apologizes for 'Missteps'

Pixar's 'Coco' Becomes Mexico's Highest Grossing Film Ever

‘Coco’ Director: ‘Marginalized People Deserve to Feel Like They Belong’

While accepting the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, “Coco” director Lee Unkrich said he genuinely tried to change the world with his film.

“With ‘Coco,’ we tried to take a step forward toward a world where all children can grow up seeing characters in movies that look and talk and live like they do” Unkrich said. “Marginalized people deserve to feel like they belong. Representation matters.”

Producer Darla K. Anderson echoed his sentiments. “‘Coco’ is proof that art can change and connect the world,” she said, “and this can only be done when we have a place for everyone and anyone who feels like an ‘other’ to be heard.”

Also Read: ‘Coco’ Takes Annie Award for Best Animated Feature

The film follows a 12-year-old Mexican boy named Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez), who yearns to follow in the footsteps of the legendary musician Ernesto De La Cruz (Benjamin Bratt) despite the protests of his grandmother (Renee Victor), who bans music in the family. During Dia De Muertos, Miguel sneaks into the church where Ernesto’s guitar is located and is transported to the Land of the Dead, where he meets his ancestors and a trickster named Hector Rivera (Gael Garcia Bernal). As he tries to find a way back to the land of the living, he uncovers why his family is forbidden to play music.

Co-Director Adrian Molina, who was not eligible to be named as part of the winning team because the Academy rules allow only one director and one producer to be named, said, “Love and thanks to my family, my Latino community, to my husband Ryan. Each for expanding my sense of what it means to be proud of who you are and where you’re from. We hope the same thing for everyone who connected with this film.”

Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”) and Adrian Molina directed the film from a script written by Molina and Matthew Aldritch.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Coco’ Producer Ducks Question About John Lasseter

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‘Coco’ Stays No. 1 While ‘Disaster Artist’ Performs Well at Quiet Box Office

While accepting the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, “Coco” director Lee Unkrich said he genuinely tried to change the world with his film.

“With ‘Coco,’ we tried to take a step forward toward a world where all children can grow up seeing characters in movies that look and talk and live like they do” Unkrich said. “Marginalized people deserve to feel like they belong. Representation matters.”

Producer Darla K. Anderson echoed his sentiments. “‘Coco’ is proof that art can change and connect the world,” she said, “and this can only be done when we have a place for everyone and anyone who feels like an ‘other’ to be heard.”

The film follows a 12-year-old Mexican boy named Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez), who yearns to follow in the footsteps of the legendary musician Ernesto De La Cruz (Benjamin Bratt) despite the protests of his grandmother (Renee Victor), who bans music in the family. During Dia De Muertos, Miguel sneaks into the church where Ernesto’s guitar is located and is transported to the Land of the Dead, where he meets his ancestors and a trickster named Hector Rivera (Gael Garcia Bernal). As he tries to find a way back to the land of the living, he uncovers why his family is forbidden to play music.

Co-Director Adrian Molina, who was not eligible to be named as part of the winning team because the Academy rules allow only one director and one producer to be named, said, “Love and thanks to my family, my Latino community, to my husband Ryan. Each for expanding my sense of what it means to be proud of who you are and where you’re from. We hope the same thing for everyone who connected with this film.”

Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”) and Adrian Molina directed the film from a script written by Molina and Matthew Aldritch.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Coco' Producer Ducks Question About John Lasseter

Surprise: Mexico-Based 'Coco' Is More Popular in China Than the U.S.

'Coco' Stays No. 1 While 'Disaster Artist' Performs Well at Quiet Box Office

‘Coco’ Filmmakers Respond To “Missteps” At Pixar: “Focus On Solidarity”

Pixar’s colorful homage to Dia de los Muertos Coco took the Golden Globe for Best Animated Feature, but when co-directors Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina and producer Darla K. Anderson came backstage to celebrate, they were faced with the question of how they were dealing with the cloud of harassment hovering over Pixar.
Specific names may have not been directly mentioned, but this was most likely referring to Pixar co-founder John Lasseter and his leave of absence that was…

Pixar’s colorful homage to Dia de los Muertos Coco took the Golden Globe for Best Animated Feature, but when co-directors Lee Unkrich & Adrian Molina and producer Darla K. Anderson came backstage to celebrate, they were faced with the question of how they were dealing with the cloud of harassment hovering over Pixar. Specific names may have not been directly mentioned, but this was most likely referring to Pixar co-founder John Lasseter and his leave of absence that was…