Oscars 2018: Our Predictions in All 24 Categories (Photos)

We know who’ll win the acting awards, but several other categories — notably including Best Picture — are completely up in the air as Oscar night approaches. Here are our best guesses (and for a more complete explanation, read my fuller analysis):

BEST PICTURE
Nominees:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

“The Shape of Water” has the most nominations, 13. It won the Producers Guild and Directors Guild awards. It’s a valentine to the art of cinema. And Guillermo del Toro is almost certainly going to win Best Director. “The Shape of Water” should be a clear front runner.

Predicted Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST DIRECTOR
Nominees:
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Phantom Thread”
Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird”
Christopher Nolan, “Dunkirk”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out”

If Best Picture is so split between “Shape of Water,” “Dunkirk,” “Lady Bird” and “Get Out,” shouldn’t this race be a nail-biter between del Toro, Nolan, Gerwig and Peele? Nope. Just as it has in every recent year, the heat has coalesced around a single director, in this case del Toro. This seems to be one of the nine categories that are pretty much a lock.

Predicted Winner: Guillermo del Toro

Also Read: ‘The Shape of Water’ Director Guillermo del Toro Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

 

BEST ACTOR
Nominees:
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

This is another of those locks. (In fact, all four acting categories are.) While Chalamet and Kaluuya are two of the year’s big discovery, this award was Oldman’s as soon as Focus began screening his all-but-unrecognizable performance as Winston Churchill. Throw in the fact that he’s a huge influence on a couple generations of actors and he was never even nominated for an Oscar until “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, and this is an Oscar standing ovation just waiting to happen.

Winner: Gary Oldman

BEST ACTRESS
Nominees:
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

It initially seemed to be one of the year’s most competitive categories, with McDormand, Ronan and Hawkins landing massive acclaim, Robbie sneaking into the field with a bold performance and Meryl being Meryl. But then McDormand, an absolute force of nature in “Three Billboards,” starting winning all the awards. And she’s not going to stop now.

Winner: Frances McDormand

Also Read: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Dominates BAFTA Awards (Complete List of Winners)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Nominees:
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

The two supporting categories followed a similar path. Initially, this one seemed to be a tight race between Willem Dafoe and Sam Rockwell, with Dafoe having a slight edge because he’s been on voters’ radar for longer and his character is more likable. And then Rockwell, playing a dimwitted and thuggish racist who is one of the only people in “Three Billboards” to slightly change, won SAG and the Golden Globes and the Critics’ Choice Award and BAFTA, which has made him a prohibitive favorite.

Winner: Sam Rockwell

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Nominees:
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

In this category, too, the softer (and more nuanced?) performance once seemed to have the upper hand, with Laurie Metcalf’s conflicted mom in “Lady Bird” offering more to like than Janney’s fearsome harridan in “I, Tonya.” But voters for all the precursor awards embraced the fun Janney had playing the monster, and Oscar voters seem all but certain to do the same. If there’s an upset in any of the acting categories, this is the likeliest category in which it could happen — but there’s not likely to be an upset.

Winner: Allison Janney

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Nominees:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“The Disaster Artist”
“Logan”
“Molly’s Game”
“Mudbound”

This is by far the easier of the two writing categories to predict, because the five nominees only include one Best Picture contender, “Call Me by Your Name.” While voters occasionally decide that the best screenplay is the one with the most words, which would be good news for Aaron Sorkin and “Molly’s Game,” nothing seems positioned to challenge James Ivory’s adaptation of the Andre Aciman novel. Plus, it would be the first Oscar for the acclaimed filmmaker who directed such classics as “A Room With a View” and “Howards End.”

Winner: “Call Me by Your Name”

Also Read: Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet Dance With Fans in Italy After Empty Screening

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Nominees:
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

This writing category, on the other hand, is fiercely competitive, with four Best Picture nominees going up against the extremely well-liked “The Big Sick.” And it’s a measure of just how competitive when you realize that the best-pic favorite, “The Shape of Water,” is probably only the fourth-likeliest winner, behind “Three Billboards,” “Get Out” and “Lady Bird.” This is likely a very close race between “Three Billboards” and “Get Out” — and while Jordan Peele wrote the year’s most zeitgeisty movie and could easily win, “Three Billboards” is a showier piece of writing.

Winner: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Nominees:
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Mudbound”
“The Shape of Water”

My thinking in this category might be colored by the idea of justice — because “Blade Runner” DP Roger Deakins, a pretty unanimous choice as the greatest living cinematographer, has been nominated 13 previous times but has never won, and his astounding work on the Denis Villeneuve epic ought to finally do the trick. But the cinematographers’ names aren’t on the ballot, just their films, and the competition is fearsome, particularly Hoyte van Hoytema’s dazzling large-format work in “Dunkirk” and Dan Laustsen’s fairy-tale world in “The Shape of Water.” Either of them could win — and even without names on the ballot, voters are probably well aware of (and possibly tempted by) the fact that “Mudbound” was shot by Rachel Morrison, the first female cinematography nominee in history.

But particularly after the American Society of Cinematographers and BAFTA did it, I have to think that Oscar voters will finally do right by Roger Deakins. I just have to.

Winner: “Blade Runner 2049”

BEST FILM EDITING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Dunkirk”
“I, Tonya”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

“Baby Driver” is such a virtuoso piece of fast-paced editing that it could well prove an exception to the usual rule that you need to be a Best Picture nominee to win in this category (as 13 of the last 15 winners have been). But the whole setup of “Dunkirk,” which simultaneously cuts between three different war stories taking place at different locations and different times, is an advertisement for its editing. The film may join “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Gravity,” “The Hurt Locker” and “The Bourne Identity” as a movie that sweeps film editing and both sound categories.

Winner: “Dunkirk”

Also Read: Top Film Editing Awards Go to ‘Dunkirk,’ ‘I, Tonya’

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Nominees:
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Darkest Hour”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Shape of Water”
“Victoria & Abdul”

It was a shock when the Costume Designers Guild gave its period-costumes award not to “Phantom Thread,” the movie about a clothes designer, but to “The Shape of Water,” most of whose characters sport lab coats or cleaning-lady smocks. But unless they think that the design of that movie’s aquatic creature qualifies as a costume, it’s unlikely that Oscar voters will go the same route. Instead, look for them to recognize the movie in which the man makes the clothes and the clothes make the man … and the women.

Winner: “Phantom Thread”

 

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Nominees:
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”

“Beauty and the Beast” is the kind of beautiful, wildly elaborate fantasy that often wins in this category, but it won’t help that a lot of the design is a variation on the design created by the Disney animators back in 1991. This should be a showdown between the amazing futurescapes of “Blade Runner” and the richly detailed environments of “The Shape of Water” — and the fact that voters like the latter movie better than the former one could tip the scales.

Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
Nominees:
“Darkest Hour”
“Victoria & Abdul”
“Wonder”

Here’s another lock, because only one of these films features makeup that is instrumental in an Oscar-winning performance. Before Gary Oldman could act like Winston Churchill, he had to look like Winston Churchill, and that was the considerable accomplishment of the “Darkest Hour” makeup team.

Winner: “Darkest Hour”

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Nominees:
“Dunkirk”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

John Williams is a giant who has been nominated an astonishing 51 times, but he hasn’t won in 34 years and it’s hard to imagine his eighth “Star Wars” score breaking the streak. (He only won for the first one, in 1977.) Carter Burwell’s “Three Billboards” score is subtle and understated, Hans Zimmer’s “Dunkirk” music bold and intricate, and Jonny Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” score alternately stately and challenging. They’re all terrific — but voters love a piece of music that instantly captures the mood of a film they admire, and Alexandre Desplat provides that in his music for “The Shape of Water.”

Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
Nominees:
“Mighty River” from “Mudbound”
“Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name”
“Remember Me” from “Coco”
“Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall”
“This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman”

Nine-time song nominee Diane Warren, who has never won, has been tireless in pushing her anthemic “Stand Up for Something,” and the song does seem to have some momentum. But it’ll be difficult to overcome the visibility of “Remember Me,” the centerpiece song from “Coco” and a new composition by the team that gave us “Let It Go”; and “This Is Me,” a highlight in the surprisingly successful musical “The Greatest Showman” and a song that is suddenly all over YouTube and has been featured in NBC’s coverage of the Olympics.

“Remember Me” is from a bigger movie but “This Is Me” is becoming a phenomenon at just the right time, which will probably give “City of Stars” writers Benj Pasek and Justin Paul their second consecutive song Oscar.

Winner: “This Is Me”

Also Read: Oscars: 18 Best Original Song Contenders Speak, From Nick Jonas to Questlove (Exclusive Photos)

BEST SOUND EDITING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

It might be hard for laymen to understand the difference between the two Oscar sound categories — but most voters understand that sound editing involves the creation of artificial sound effects, which means that this award typically goes to one of the biggest, loudest nominees. Two previous Christopher Nolan movies, “The Dark Knight” and “Inception,” have won in this category, and his “Dunkirk” should have the scale and drama to give him a third — unless voters want to reward the scrappy little “Baby Driver” or give a nod to “Blade Runner 2049,” whose director Denis Villeneuve was also responsible for last year’s winner, “Arrival.”

Winner: “Dunkirk”

BEST SOUND MIXING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Over the last 12 years, the same film has won in both Oscar sound categories eight times — so when in doubt, it’s best to predict a sound-category sweep. This year also lacks the kind of big musical nominee that often wins in the category, which will help “Dunkirk” in its quest to win another.

Winner: “Dunkirk”

 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Nominees:
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”
“Kong: Skull Island”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”

At the Oscar nominees luncheon, I listened as one of the other nominees told Joe Letteri, the 10-time Oscar nominee and four-time winner who’s up again for “War for the Planet of the Apes,” that there was no way he wouldn’t win another Oscar. And if other VFX whizzes were voting, that’s no doubt true, since the last three “Apes” movies have won the top prize from the Visual Effects Society. But they’ve never won the Oscar despite the remarkable work they’ve done in creating a world of completely believable apes, and “Apes” faces a formidable challenger this year in the futurescapes of “Blade Runner 2049.”

Still, unless the resistance to the “Apes” movies runs deep — which, for some inexplicable reason, it might — we’re guessing that voters will finally come to their senses and realize what an accomplishment the simian saga has been.

Winner: “War for the Planet of the Apes”

Also Read: Will ‘Planet of the Apes’ Finally Win a VFX Oscar? If Level of Difficulty Counted Most It Would (Video)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Nominees:
“The Boss Baby”
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco”
“Ferdinand”
“Loving Vincent”

Has “Coco” lost anything it’s been nominated for this year? If so, I wasn’t paying attention. Pixar is a juggernaut in this category, with 11 nominations and nine wins since the category began in 2001; the last one of their films that was nominated but didn’t win was “Cars” in 2006. Despite the technical accomplishment of “Loving Vincent” and the cross-cultural beauty of “The Breadwinner,” “Coco” really can’t lose.

Winner: “Coco”

 

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
Nominees:
“A Fantastic Woman,” Chile
“The Insult,” Lebanon
“Loveless,” Russia
“On Body and Soul,” Hungary
“The Square,” Sweden

Every year, we look at the field and say, “If the voters watch all the movies before they vote, the way they’re supposed to, Movie X will win.” And every year, that movie loses to something more timely (“The Salesman” over “A Man Called Ove” last year) or more significant (“Son of Saul” over “Mustang” the year before). This year, the “if voters watch everything” movie is probably Lebanon’s personal/political drama “The Insult.”

The Palme d’Or-winning “The Square” is bigger and more acclaimed, but it might well be too divisive and too much of a comedy to win. That leaves the touching “A Fantastic Woman” as the important movie (featuring transgender Oscar presenter Daniela Vega) that could win if voters want to send a message about inclusion and LGBT acceptance. In a very close race, we think the Euro-centric nature of the Academy’s international membership may give the slightest of edges to “The Insult.”

Winner: “The Insult”

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Nominees:
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail”
“Faces Places”
“Icarus”
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Strong Island”

“Last Men in Aleppo” might have gotten a boost from the publicity when its producer couldn’t get a visa to attend the Oscars — but a film about Syria’s White Helmets won the short-doc Oscar last year and voters might not want to honor another so soon after. “Icarus” could have gotten a bump by the Olympics, since its investigation into Russian sports doping helped get that country banned from the Pyeongchang games — except that every time we saw another athlete competing under the “Olympic Athlete from Russia” banner, it undercut the movie’s tagline as “the thriller that brought down an empire.”

With none of the four issue-oriented films really standing out, it’s quite possible that the serious vote will split four ways and allow the beloved French icon Agnès Varda to become the oldest Oscar winner ever for her and co-director JR’s wry and delightful travelogue “Faces Places.”

Winner: “Faces Places”

Also Read: ‘Faces Places’ Directors Agnès Varda and JR Look for Fun in a ‘Disgusting’ World

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Nominees:
“Edith+Eddie”
“Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405”
“Heroin(e)”
“Knife Skills”
“Traffic Stop”

In what is probably the Oscar category with the fewest voters, the two strongest contenders are “Heroin(e),” a wrenching but also inspiring look at the opioid crisis in West Virginia though the eyes of three women (a fire chief, a judge and a crusading volunteer) on the front lines, and “Edith+Eddie,” a character study of the country’s oldest biracial newlyweds that leaves viewers utterly infuriated at government indifference toward the elderly. (But don’t underestimate “Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” a character study of an L.A. artist that plays into voters’ affection for films about the arts.) Typically, the film that wins in this category is the film that leaves viewers with some hope, which could give “Heroin(e)” a tiny edge.

Winner: “Heroin(e)”

 

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Nominees:
“Dear Basketball”
“Garden Party”
“Lou”
“Negative Space”
“Revolting Rhymes”

At the Oscar nominees luncheon, there was no bigger star in the room than Kobe Bryant, and nobody who posed for more selfies. That kind of star power could well push “Dear Basketball” to victory — although it has also caused a quiet backlash among some Academy members who aren’t Kobe devotees and may balk at giving an award to a guy who once settled a rape accusation out of court. Perennial winner Pixar’s sweet “Lou” might be too much of a kids’ film to prevail, but the wry and touching family story “Negative Space” or the dark and amazingly photorealistic “Garden Party” could benefit if the backlash takes hold.

But “Dear Basketball” is a very personal film in a category that often goes to the most personal nominee, and animator/director Glen Keane is a Disney vet almost as beloved in animation as Kobe is in basketball.

Winner: “Dear Basketball”

Also Read: Tribeca: Kobe Bryant on His New Career as Storyteller, Moviemaker

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
Nominees:
“DeKalb Elementary”
“The Eleven O’Clock”
“My Nephew Emmett”
“The Silent Child”
“Watu Wote/All of Us”

Three of the nominees — “DeKalb Elementary,” “My Nephew Emmett” and “Watu Wote” — are exceptional, fact-based student films that could not be timelier: “DeKalb” deals with a shooter at an elementary school, “Emmett” with a horrifying episode that helped trigger the civil rights movement, “Watu Wote” with Christian/Muslim tensions. Crucially, “DeKalb” and “Watu Wote” are works that showcase the best side of humanity and give hope that there can be a way out of impossibly dark situations — but if the serious vote splits between the four tough and sobering films, the sharp and very funny “The Eleven O’Clock” is positioned to sneak in and win in a very strong category and a very tight race.

Winner: “DeKalb Elementary”

We know who’ll win the acting awards, but several other categories — notably including Best Picture — are completely up in the air as Oscar night approaches. Here are our best guesses (and for a more complete explanation, read my fuller analysis):

BEST PICTURE
Nominees:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

“The Shape of Water” has the most nominations, 13. It won the Producers Guild and Directors Guild awards. It’s a valentine to the art of cinema. And Guillermo del Toro is almost certainly going to win Best Director. “The Shape of Water” should be a clear front runner.

Predicted Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST DIRECTOR
Nominees:
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Phantom Thread”
Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird”
Christopher Nolan, “Dunkirk”
Jordan Peele, “Get Out”

If Best Picture is so split between “Shape of Water,” “Dunkirk,” “Lady Bird” and “Get Out,” shouldn’t this race be a nail-biter between del Toro, Nolan, Gerwig and Peele? Nope. Just as it has in every recent year, the heat has coalesced around a single director, in this case del Toro. This seems to be one of the nine categories that are pretty much a lock.

Predicted Winner: Guillermo del Toro

 

BEST ACTOR
Nominees:
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

This is another of those locks. (In fact, all four acting categories are.) While Chalamet and Kaluuya are two of the year’s big discovery, this award was Oldman’s as soon as Focus began screening his all-but-unrecognizable performance as Winston Churchill. Throw in the fact that he’s a huge influence on a couple generations of actors and he was never even nominated for an Oscar until “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, and this is an Oscar standing ovation just waiting to happen.

Winner: Gary Oldman

BEST ACTRESS
Nominees:
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

It initially seemed to be one of the year’s most competitive categories, with McDormand, Ronan and Hawkins landing massive acclaim, Robbie sneaking into the field with a bold performance and Meryl being Meryl. But then McDormand, an absolute force of nature in “Three Billboards,” starting winning all the awards. And she’s not going to stop now.

Winner: Frances McDormand

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Nominees:
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

The two supporting categories followed a similar path. Initially, this one seemed to be a tight race between Willem Dafoe and Sam Rockwell, with Dafoe having a slight edge because he’s been on voters’ radar for longer and his character is more likable. And then Rockwell, playing a dimwitted and thuggish racist who is one of the only people in “Three Billboards” to slightly change, won SAG and the Golden Globes and the Critics’ Choice Award and BAFTA, which has made him a prohibitive favorite.

Winner: Sam Rockwell

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Nominees:
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

In this category, too, the softer (and more nuanced?) performance once seemed to have the upper hand, with Laurie Metcalf’s conflicted mom in “Lady Bird” offering more to like than Janney’s fearsome harridan in “I, Tonya.” But voters for all the precursor awards embraced the fun Janney had playing the monster, and Oscar voters seem all but certain to do the same. If there’s an upset in any of the acting categories, this is the likeliest category in which it could happen — but there’s not likely to be an upset.

Winner: Allison Janney

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Nominees:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“The Disaster Artist”
“Logan”
“Molly’s Game”
“Mudbound”

This is by far the easier of the two writing categories to predict, because the five nominees only include one Best Picture contender, “Call Me by Your Name.” While voters occasionally decide that the best screenplay is the one with the most words, which would be good news for Aaron Sorkin and “Molly’s Game,” nothing seems positioned to challenge James Ivory’s adaptation of the Andre Aciman novel. Plus, it would be the first Oscar for the acclaimed filmmaker who directed such classics as “A Room With a View” and “Howards End.”

Winner: “Call Me by Your Name”

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Nominees:
“The Big Sick”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

This writing category, on the other hand, is fiercely competitive, with four Best Picture nominees going up against the extremely well-liked “The Big Sick.” And it’s a measure of just how competitive when you realize that the best-pic favorite, “The Shape of Water,” is probably only the fourth-likeliest winner, behind “Three Billboards,” “Get Out” and “Lady Bird.” This is likely a very close race between “Three Billboards” and “Get Out” — and while Jordan Peele wrote the year’s most zeitgeisty movie and could easily win, “Three Billboards” is a showier piece of writing.

Winner: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Nominees:
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Mudbound”
“The Shape of Water”

My thinking in this category might be colored by the idea of justice — because “Blade Runner” DP Roger Deakins, a pretty unanimous choice as the greatest living cinematographer, has been nominated 13 previous times but has never won, and his astounding work on the Denis Villeneuve epic ought to finally do the trick. But the cinematographers’ names aren’t on the ballot, just their films, and the competition is fearsome, particularly Hoyte van Hoytema’s dazzling large-format work in “Dunkirk” and Dan Laustsen’s fairy-tale world in “The Shape of Water.” Either of them could win — and even without names on the ballot, voters are probably well aware of (and possibly tempted by) the fact that “Mudbound” was shot by Rachel Morrison, the first female cinematography nominee in history.

But particularly after the American Society of Cinematographers and BAFTA did it, I have to think that Oscar voters will finally do right by Roger Deakins. I just have to.

Winner: “Blade Runner 2049”

BEST FILM EDITING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Dunkirk”
“I, Tonya”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

“Baby Driver” is such a virtuoso piece of fast-paced editing that it could well prove an exception to the usual rule that you need to be a Best Picture nominee to win in this category (as 13 of the last 15 winners have been). But the whole setup of “Dunkirk,” which simultaneously cuts between three different war stories taking place at different locations and different times, is an advertisement for its editing. The film may join “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Gravity,” “The Hurt Locker” and “The Bourne Identity” as a movie that sweeps film editing and both sound categories.

Winner: “Dunkirk”

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Nominees:
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Darkest Hour”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Shape of Water”
“Victoria & Abdul”

It was a shock when the Costume Designers Guild gave its period-costumes award not to “Phantom Thread,” the movie about a clothes designer, but to “The Shape of Water,” most of whose characters sport lab coats or cleaning-lady smocks. But unless they think that the design of that movie’s aquatic creature qualifies as a costume, it’s unlikely that Oscar voters will go the same route. Instead, look for them to recognize the movie in which the man makes the clothes and the clothes make the man … and the women.

Winner: “Phantom Thread”

 

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Nominees:
“Beauty and the Beast”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”

“Beauty and the Beast” is the kind of beautiful, wildly elaborate fantasy that often wins in this category, but it won’t help that a lot of the design is a variation on the design created by the Disney animators back in 1991. This should be a showdown between the amazing futurescapes of “Blade Runner” and the richly detailed environments of “The Shape of Water” — and the fact that voters like the latter movie better than the former one could tip the scales.

Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
Nominees:
“Darkest Hour”
“Victoria & Abdul”
“Wonder”

Here’s another lock, because only one of these films features makeup that is instrumental in an Oscar-winning performance. Before Gary Oldman could act like Winston Churchill, he had to look like Winston Churchill, and that was the considerable accomplishment of the “Darkest Hour” makeup team.

Winner: “Darkest Hour”

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Nominees:
“Dunkirk”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

John Williams is a giant who has been nominated an astonishing 51 times, but he hasn’t won in 34 years and it’s hard to imagine his eighth “Star Wars” score breaking the streak. (He only won for the first one, in 1977.) Carter Burwell’s “Three Billboards” score is subtle and understated, Hans Zimmer’s “Dunkirk” music bold and intricate, and Jonny Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” score alternately stately and challenging. They’re all terrific — but voters love a piece of music that instantly captures the mood of a film they admire, and Alexandre Desplat provides that in his music for “The Shape of Water.”

Winner: “The Shape of Water”

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
Nominees:
“Mighty River” from “Mudbound”
“Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name”
“Remember Me” from “Coco”
“Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall”
“This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman”

Nine-time song nominee Diane Warren, who has never won, has been tireless in pushing her anthemic “Stand Up for Something,” and the song does seem to have some momentum. But it’ll be difficult to overcome the visibility of “Remember Me,” the centerpiece song from “Coco” and a new composition by the team that gave us “Let It Go”; and “This Is Me,” a highlight in the surprisingly successful musical “The Greatest Showman” and a song that is suddenly all over YouTube and has been featured in NBC’s coverage of the Olympics.

“Remember Me” is from a bigger movie but “This Is Me” is becoming a phenomenon at just the right time, which will probably give “City of Stars” writers Benj Pasek and Justin Paul their second consecutive song Oscar.

Winner: “This Is Me”

BEST SOUND EDITING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

It might be hard for laymen to understand the difference between the two Oscar sound categories — but most voters understand that sound editing involves the creation of artificial sound effects, which means that this award typically goes to one of the biggest, loudest nominees. Two previous Christopher Nolan movies, “The Dark Knight” and “Inception,” have won in this category, and his “Dunkirk” should have the scale and drama to give him a third — unless voters want to reward the scrappy little “Baby Driver” or give a nod to “Blade Runner 2049,” whose director Denis Villeneuve was also responsible for last year’s winner, “Arrival.”

Winner: “Dunkirk”

BEST SOUND MIXING
Nominees:
“Baby Driver”
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Dunkirk”
“The Shape of Water”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”

Over the last 12 years, the same film has won in both Oscar sound categories eight times — so when in doubt, it’s best to predict a sound-category sweep. This year also lacks the kind of big musical nominee that often wins in the category, which will help “Dunkirk” in its quest to win another.

Winner: “Dunkirk”

 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Nominees:
“Blade Runner 2049”
“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”
“Kong: Skull Island”
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”
“War for the Planet of the Apes”

At the Oscar nominees luncheon, I listened as one of the other nominees told Joe Letteri, the 10-time Oscar nominee and four-time winner who’s up again for “War for the Planet of the Apes,” that there was no way he wouldn’t win another Oscar. And if other VFX whizzes were voting, that’s no doubt true, since the last three “Apes” movies have won the top prize from the Visual Effects Society. But they’ve never won the Oscar despite the remarkable work they’ve done in creating a world of completely believable apes, and “Apes” faces a formidable challenger this year in the futurescapes of “Blade Runner 2049.”

Still, unless the resistance to the “Apes” movies runs deep — which, for some inexplicable reason, it might — we’re guessing that voters will finally come to their senses and realize what an accomplishment the simian saga has been.

Winner: “War for the Planet of the Apes”

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Nominees:
“The Boss Baby”
“The Breadwinner”
“Coco”
“Ferdinand”
“Loving Vincent”

Has “Coco” lost anything it’s been nominated for this year? If so, I wasn’t paying attention. Pixar is a juggernaut in this category, with 11 nominations and nine wins since the category began in 2001; the last one of their films that was nominated but didn’t win was “Cars” in 2006. Despite the technical accomplishment of “Loving Vincent” and the cross-cultural beauty of “The Breadwinner,” “Coco” really can’t lose.

Winner: “Coco”

 

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
Nominees:
“A Fantastic Woman,” Chile
“The Insult,” Lebanon
“Loveless,” Russia
“On Body and Soul,” Hungary
“The Square,” Sweden

Every year, we look at the field and say, “If the voters watch all the movies before they vote, the way they’re supposed to, Movie X will win.” And every year, that movie loses to something more timely (“The Salesman” over “A Man Called Ove” last year) or more significant (“Son of Saul” over “Mustang” the year before). This year, the “if voters watch everything” movie is probably Lebanon’s personal/political drama “The Insult.”

The Palme d’Or-winning “The Square” is bigger and more acclaimed, but it might well be too divisive and too much of a comedy to win. That leaves the touching “A Fantastic Woman” as the important movie (featuring transgender Oscar presenter Daniela Vega) that could win if voters want to send a message about inclusion and LGBT acceptance. In a very close race, we think the Euro-centric nature of the Academy’s international membership may give the slightest of edges to “The Insult.”

Winner: “The Insult”

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Nominees:
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail”
“Faces Places”
“Icarus”
“Last Men in Aleppo”
“Strong Island”

“Last Men in Aleppo” might have gotten a boost from the publicity when its producer couldn’t get a visa to attend the Oscars — but a film about Syria’s White Helmets won the short-doc Oscar last year and voters might not want to honor another so soon after. “Icarus” could have gotten a bump by the Olympics, since its investigation into Russian sports doping helped get that country banned from the Pyeongchang games — except that every time we saw another athlete competing under the “Olympic Athlete from Russia” banner, it undercut the movie’s tagline as “the thriller that brought down an empire.”

With none of the four issue-oriented films really standing out, it’s quite possible that the serious vote will split four ways and allow the beloved French icon Agnès Varda to become the oldest Oscar winner ever for her and co-director JR’s wry and delightful travelogue “Faces Places.”

Winner: “Faces Places”

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Nominees:
“Edith+Eddie”
“Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405”
“Heroin(e)”
“Knife Skills”
“Traffic Stop”

In what is probably the Oscar category with the fewest voters, the two strongest contenders are “Heroin(e),” a wrenching but also inspiring look at the opioid crisis in West Virginia though the eyes of three women (a fire chief, a judge and a crusading volunteer) on the front lines, and “Edith+Eddie,” a character study of the country’s oldest biracial newlyweds that leaves viewers utterly infuriated at government indifference toward the elderly. (But don’t underestimate “Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” a character study of an L.A. artist that plays into voters’ affection for films about the arts.) Typically, the film that wins in this category is the film that leaves viewers with some hope, which could give “Heroin(e)” a tiny edge.

Winner: “Heroin(e)”

 

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Nominees:
“Dear Basketball”
“Garden Party”
“Lou”
“Negative Space”
“Revolting Rhymes”

At the Oscar nominees luncheon, there was no bigger star in the room than Kobe Bryant, and nobody who posed for more selfies. That kind of star power could well push “Dear Basketball” to victory — although it has also caused a quiet backlash among some Academy members who aren’t Kobe devotees and may balk at giving an award to a guy who once settled a rape accusation out of court. Perennial winner Pixar’s sweet “Lou” might be too much of a kids’ film to prevail, but the wry and touching family story “Negative Space” or the dark and amazingly photorealistic “Garden Party” could benefit if the backlash takes hold.

But “Dear Basketball” is a very personal film in a category that often goes to the most personal nominee, and animator/director Glen Keane is a Disney vet almost as beloved in animation as Kobe is in basketball.

Winner: “Dear Basketball”

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
Nominees:
“DeKalb Elementary”
“The Eleven O’Clock”
“My Nephew Emmett”
“The Silent Child”
“Watu Wote/All of Us”

Three of the nominees — “DeKalb Elementary,” “My Nephew Emmett” and “Watu Wote” — are exceptional, fact-based student films that could not be timelier: “DeKalb” deals with a shooter at an elementary school, “Emmett” with a horrifying episode that helped trigger the civil rights movement, “Watu Wote” with Christian/Muslim tensions. Crucially, “DeKalb” and “Watu Wote” are works that showcase the best side of humanity and give hope that there can be a way out of impossibly dark situations — but if the serious vote splits between the four tough and sobering films, the sharp and very funny “The Eleven O’Clock” is positioned to sneak in and win in a very strong category and a very tight race.

Winner: “DeKalb Elementary”

Channel 4 Documentary Alleges Winston Churchill was Haunted by an Affair

A controversial British documentary will allege that Britain’s WWII leader Winston Churchill had an affair. The producers of one-off doc, “Churchill’s Secret Affair,” have unearthed a 1985 interview with Churchill’s private secretary, Jock Colville. They claim it reveals an affair with Doris Castlerosse, the great aunt of supermodel Cara Delevingne. “I don’t think that in […]

A controversial British documentary will allege that Britain’s WWII leader Winston Churchill had an affair. The producers of one-off doc, “Churchill’s Secret Affair,” have unearthed a 1985 interview with Churchill’s private secretary, Jock Colville. They claim it reveals an affair with Doris Castlerosse, the great aunt of supermodel Cara Delevingne. “I don’t think that in […]

Make-Up and Hair Stylists Guild Awards 2018: ‘Darkest Hour’ Scores Two Prizes

Oscar favorite “Darkest Hour” earned period and makeup special effects awards Saturday night.

Darkest Hour” continued its march toward Oscar gold for makeup and hairstyling, winning period and special makeup effects honors Saturday night at the MUAHS Awards at The Novo at L.A. Live. Oscar frontrunner Gary Oldman additionally earned the Distinguished Artisan Award for his remarkable portrayal of Winston Churchill.

Oldman lured Kazuhiro Tsuji out of retirement, and he responded with the greatest achievement of his career, sculpting from the inside out. The Japanese makeup artist would be the first Asian to win the Oscar in his category.

Kazuhiro Tsuji and Gary Oldman from “Darkest Hour”

Gisele Schmidt

Meanwhile, “Pitch Perfect 3” won the contemporary makeup award, “Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2” scored contemporary hairstyling, and “I, Tonya” grabbed period hairstyling. TV winners included “Game of Thrones” (period and special makeup effects), “The Crown” (period hairstyling). “Big Little Lies” (contemporary makeup and hairstyling), “Feud: Bette and Joan” (period makeup and hairstyling), and “American Horror Story: Cult” (special makeup effects).

In addition, Emmy-winning hair stylist Mary Guerrero (“Dancing with the Stars”) won the Lifetime Achievement Award, and Oscar-winning makeup artist Greg Cannom (“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” “Bram Stoker’s Dracula”) took home the Lifetime Achievement Award.

FEATURE LENGTH MOTION PICTURES

Best Contemporary Make-up
“Pitch Perfect 3”
Melanie Hughes-Weaver, Judy Yonemoto, Erica Kyker

Best Contemporary Hair Styling
“Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2”
Camille Friend, Louisa Anthony, Jules Holdren

Best Period and/or Character Make-up
“Darkest Hour”
Ivana Primorac, Flora Moody

Best Period and/or Character Hair Styling
“I, Tonya”
Adruitha Lee, Mary Everett

Best Special Make-up Effects
“Darkest Hour”
Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick

TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA SERIES

Best Contemporary Make-up
“Dancing with the Stars”
Zena Shteysel Green, Angela Moos, Sarah Woolf

Best Contemporary Hair Styling
“Dancing with the Stars”
Mary Guerrero, Kimi Messina, Gail Ryan

Best Period/Character Make-up
“Game of Thrones”
Jane Walker, Nicola Mathews

Best Period/Character Hair Styling
“The Crown”
Ivana Primorac

Best Special Make-up Effects
“Game of Thrones”
Barrie Gower, Sarah Gower

TELEVISION MINI SERIES / MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

Best Contemporary Make-up
“Big Little Lies”
Steve Artmont, Nicole Artmont

Best Contemporary Hair Styling
“Big Little Lies”
Michelle Ceglia, Frances Mathias, Lona Vigi

Best Period/Character Make-up
“Feud: Bette and Joan”
Eryn Krueger Mekash, Robin Beauchesne

Best Period/Character Hair Styling
“Feud: Bette and Joan”
Chris Clark, Ralph Abalos, Wendy Southard

Best Special Make-up Effects
“American Horror Story: Cult”
Eryn Krueger Mekash, Michael Mekash, David Anderson

COMMERCIALS AND MUSIC VIDEOS

Best Make-up
“American Horror Story: Cult” – Promotional Campaign
Kerry Herta, Jason Collins, Christina Waltz

Best Hair Styling
“American Horror Story: Cult” – Promotional Campaign
Nicki Alkire, Fernando Navarro, Stephanie Rives

THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS (LIVE STAGE)

Best Make-up
“Mamma Mia!”
Vanessa Dionne, Christina Tracey, Romaine Markus-Myers

Best Hair Styling
“Mamma Mia!”
Vanessa Dionne, Cassie Russek, Rheanne Garcia

CHILDREN AND TEEN PROGRAMMING

Best Make-up
“Henry Danger”
Michael Johnston, Patti Brand-Reese, Melanie Mills

Best Hair Styling
“Henry Danger”
Joe Matke, Roma Goddard, Dwayne Ross

DAYTIME TELEVISION

Best Make-up
“The Bold and the Beautiful”
Christine Lai Johnson, Chris Escobosa, Jennifer Wittman

Best Hair Styling
“The Bold and the Beautiful”
Lisa Long, Danielle Spencer, Danielle Dixon

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‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘American Horror Story’ Lead Make-up and Hair Stylists Guild Winners

“Darkest Hour” led the way with film winners at the 2018 Make-up and Hair Stylists Guild Awards with two prizes. “Pitch Perfect 3,” “Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2” and “I, Tonya” also received awards. For television, “American Horror Story: Cult” and promotional campaigns for the series combined for three wins, while “Big Little Lies,” […]

“Darkest Hour” led the way with film winners at the 2018 Make-up and Hair Stylists Guild Awards with two prizes. “Pitch Perfect 3,” “Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2” and “I, Tonya” also received awards. For television, “American Horror Story: Cult” and promotional campaigns for the series combined for three wins, while “Big Little Lies,” […]

‘Darkest Hour’ Wins Big at Makeup and Hairstyling Awards

The makeup artists who transformed Gary Oldman into Winston Churchill for “Darkest Hour” won the top honor from the Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild at Saturday night’s MUAHS Guild Awards.

Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick won in the Feature Length Motion Picture – Best Special Make Up Effects category, the MUAHS category that most closely corresponds to the Oscars Best Makeup and Hairstyling category.

(The Oscars call it “makeup and hairstyling,” while the guild adds a hyphen and another word by going for “make-up and hair styling.”)

Also Read: Gary Oldman, Joe Wright on ‘the Icon and the Myth’ of Winston Churchill (Video)

“Darkest Hour” also won in the period makeup category. In the other feature-film categories, the winners were “Pitch Perfect 3” (contemporary make-up), “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (contemporary hair), and “I, Tonya” (period and/or character hair).

“Dancing With the Stars” won the TV awards for contemporary make-up and hair, while “Game of Thrones” won for period/character makeup for for special makeup effects and “The Crown” won for period hair.

TV movie and miniseries awards were split between “Big Little Lies” in the contemporary categories and “Feud: Bette and Joan” in the period categories.

“American Horror Story: Cult” won three awards, one for special makeup effects and the others for its promotional campaign.

Also Read: Watch Bill Skarsgard Sans Pennywise Makeup in New Stephen King Series ‘Castle Rock’ Trailer (Video)

The MUAHS also gave awards for theatrical productions, children and teen programming and daytime television, and in each case the same production swept both hair and makeup categories: “Mamma Mia” for theatrical, “Henry Danger” for children’s and “The Bold and the Beautiful” for daytime.

In addition to his film winning two awards, “Darkest Hour” star Gary Oldman received the honorary Distinguished Artisan Award. Make-up artist Greg Cannom and hairstylist Mary Guerrero received MUAHS Lifetime Achievement Awards.

The ceremony took place at the Novo by Microsoft in downtown Los Angeles and was hosted by comic Loni Love.

The winners:

FEATURE LENGTH MOTION PICTURES
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Pitch Perfect 3,” Melanie Hughes-Weaver, Judy Yonemoto, Erica Kyker
Best Contemporary Hair: “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” Camille Friend, Louisa Anthony, Jules Holdren
Best Period and/or Character Make-Up: “Darkest Hour,” Ivana Primorac, Flora Moody
Best Period and/or Character Hair: “I, Tonya,” Adruitha Lee, Mary Everett
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick

TV AND NEW MEDIA SERIES
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Dancing With the Stars,” Zena Shteysel Green, Angela Moos, Sarah Woolf
Best Contemporary Hair Styling: “Dancing With the Stars,” Mary Guerrero, Kimi Messina, Gail Ryan
Best Period/Character Make-Up: “Game of Thrones,” Jane Walker, Nicola Matthews
Best Period/Character Hair Styling: “The Crown,” Ivana Primorac
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “Game of Thrones,” Barrie Gower, Sarah Gower

TV MINI SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION –
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Big Little Lies,” Steve Artmont, Nicole Artmont
Best Contemporary Hair: “Big Little Lies,” Michelle Ceglia, Nickole Jones, Jocelyn Carpenter
Best Period/Character Make-Up: “Feud: Bette and Joan,” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Robin Beauchesne
Best Period/Character Hair Styling: “Feud: Bette and Joan,” Chris Clark, Ralph Abalos, Wendy Southard
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “American Horror Story: Cult,” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Michael Mekash, David Anderson

COMMERCIALS & MUSIC VIDEOS
Best Make-Up: “American Horror Story: Cult” promotioinal campaign, Kerry Herta, Jason Collins, Christina Waltz
Best Hair Styling: “American Horror Story: Cult” promotional campaign, Nicki Alkire, Fernando Navarro, Stephanie Rives

THEATRICAL PRODUCTION
Best Make-Up: “Mamma Mia,” Vanessa Dionne, Christina Tracey, Romaine Markus Myers
Best Hair Styling: “Mamma Mia,” Vanessa Dionne, Cassie Russek, Rheanne Garcia

Also Read: ‘Mamma Mia’ Sequel Trailer Teases Key Character Death, Cher’s Grandmotherly Role (Video)

CHILDREN AND TEEN PROGRAMMING
Best Make-Up: “Henry Danger,” Michael Johnston, Patti Brand-Reese, Melanie Mills
Best Hair Styling: “Henry Danger,” Joe Matke, Roma Goddard, Dwayne Ross

DAYTIME TELEVISION
Best Make-Up: “The Bold and the Beautiful,” Christine Lai Johnson, Chris Escobosa, Jenna Wittman
Best Hair Styling: “The Bold and the Beautiful,” Lisa Long, Danielle Spencer, Danielle Dixon, Jenna Wittman

Distinguished Artisan Award: Gary Oldman
Lifetime Achievement Award: Greg Cannom
Lifetime Achievement Award: Mary Guerrero

Related stories from TheWrap:

Oscar Acting Races: Can Anyone Beat Gary Oldman, Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell or Allison Janney?

Will ‘Planet of the Apes’ Finally Win a VFX Oscar? If Level of Difficulty Counted Most It Would (Video)

The Last 15 Oscar Hosts Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

The makeup artists who transformed Gary Oldman into Winston Churchill for “Darkest Hour” won the top honor from the Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild at Saturday night’s MUAHS Guild Awards.

Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick won in the Feature Length Motion Picture – Best Special Make Up Effects category, the MUAHS category that most closely corresponds to the Oscars Best Makeup and Hairstyling category.

(The Oscars call it “makeup and hairstyling,” while the guild adds a hyphen and another word by going for “make-up and hair styling.”)

“Darkest Hour” also won in the period makeup category. In the other feature-film categories, the winners were “Pitch Perfect 3” (contemporary make-up), “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (contemporary hair), and “I, Tonya” (period and/or character hair).

“Dancing With the Stars” won the TV awards for contemporary make-up and hair, while “Game of Thrones” won for period/character makeup for for special makeup effects and “The Crown” won for period hair.

TV movie and miniseries awards were split between “Big Little Lies” in the contemporary categories and “Feud: Bette and Joan” in the period categories.

“American Horror Story: Cult” won three awards, one for special makeup effects and the others for its promotional campaign.

The MUAHS also gave awards for theatrical productions, children and teen programming and daytime television, and in each case the same production swept both hair and makeup categories: “Mamma Mia” for theatrical, “Henry Danger” for children’s and “The Bold and the Beautiful” for daytime.

In addition to his film winning two awards, “Darkest Hour” star Gary Oldman received the honorary Distinguished Artisan Award. Make-up artist Greg Cannom and hairstylist Mary Guerrero received MUAHS Lifetime Achievement Awards.

The ceremony took place at the Novo by Microsoft in downtown Los Angeles and was hosted by comic Loni Love.

The winners:

FEATURE LENGTH MOTION PICTURES
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Pitch Perfect 3,” Melanie Hughes-Weaver, Judy Yonemoto, Erica Kyker
Best Contemporary Hair: “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” Camille Friend, Louisa Anthony, Jules Holdren
Best Period and/or Character Make-Up: “Darkest Hour,” Ivana Primorac, Flora Moody
Best Period and/or Character Hair: “I, Tonya,” Adruitha Lee, Mary Everett
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick

TV AND NEW MEDIA SERIES
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Dancing With the Stars,” Zena Shteysel Green, Angela Moos, Sarah Woolf
Best Contemporary Hair Styling: “Dancing With the Stars,” Mary Guerrero, Kimi Messina, Gail Ryan
Best Period/Character Make-Up: “Game of Thrones,” Jane Walker, Nicola Matthews
Best Period/Character Hair Styling: “The Crown,” Ivana Primorac
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “Game of Thrones,” Barrie Gower, Sarah Gower

TV MINI SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION -
Best Contemporary Make-Up: “Big Little Lies,” Steve Artmont, Nicole Artmont
Best Contemporary Hair: “Big Little Lies,” Michelle Ceglia, Nickole Jones, Jocelyn Carpenter
Best Period/Character Make-Up: “Feud: Bette and Joan,” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Robin Beauchesne
Best Period/Character Hair Styling: “Feud: Bette and Joan,” Chris Clark, Ralph Abalos, Wendy Southard
Best Special Make-Up Effects: “American Horror Story: Cult,” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Michael Mekash, David Anderson

COMMERCIALS & MUSIC VIDEOS
Best Make-Up: “American Horror Story: Cult” promotioinal campaign, Kerry Herta, Jason Collins, Christina Waltz
Best Hair Styling: “American Horror Story: Cult” promotional campaign, Nicki Alkire, Fernando Navarro, Stephanie Rives

THEATRICAL PRODUCTION
Best Make-Up: “Mamma Mia,” Vanessa Dionne, Christina Tracey, Romaine Markus Myers
Best Hair Styling: “Mamma Mia,” Vanessa Dionne, Cassie Russek, Rheanne Garcia

CHILDREN AND TEEN PROGRAMMING
Best Make-Up: “Henry Danger,” Michael Johnston, Patti Brand-Reese, Melanie Mills
Best Hair Styling: “Henry Danger,” Joe Matke, Roma Goddard, Dwayne Ross

DAYTIME TELEVISION
Best Make-Up: “The Bold and the Beautiful,” Christine Lai Johnson, Chris Escobosa, Jenna Wittman
Best Hair Styling: “The Bold and the Beautiful,” Lisa Long, Danielle Spencer, Danielle Dixon, Jenna Wittman

Distinguished Artisan Award: Gary Oldman
Lifetime Achievement Award: Greg Cannom
Lifetime Achievement Award: Mary Guerrero

Related stories from TheWrap:

Oscar Acting Races: Can Anyone Beat Gary Oldman, Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell or Allison Janney?

Will 'Planet of the Apes' Finally Win a VFX Oscar? If Level of Difficulty Counted Most It Would (Video)

The Last 15 Oscar Hosts Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

Oscar Acting Races: Can Anyone Beat Gary Oldman, Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell or Allison Janney?

Hey, Daniel Day-Lewis: It’s an honor just to be nominated. Remember that when you go to the Oscars on March 4.

You too, Meryl Streep. In fact, there are 16 estimable folks who are going to lose at the Oscars this year. We know it, you know it, everybody knows it. Even your agents and publicists know it, no matter what they’re telling you.

“Are we going to have any upsets at the Oscars this year?” moaned one voter to me this week — and the answer is that we will probably have a few, but almost definitely not among the acting awards, which are going to be won by Gary Oldman for “Darkest Hour,” Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and Allison Janney for “I, Tonya.”

Also Read: Oscars: Why 5 Films Still Have a Shot at Best Picture in the Craziest Race in Years

This is one of the most wide-open Best Picture races in Oscar history, but it might be the least suspenseful set of acting categories ever. That’s because for the first time, the same quartet of actors have won all four of the main precursor acting awards: the Screen Actors Guild Award, the Golden Globe, the Critics’ Choice Award and the British Academy Film Award (BAFTA).

We’ve had two years where three of the four categories had nominees come into the Oscars after a sweep of those awards — J.K. Simmons, Julianne Moore and Patricia Arquette in 2015; Forest Whitaker, Helen Mirren and Jennifer Hudson in 2007 — but never a year in which all four had shown up at the Oscars carrying brooms.

Which, if history is any guide, means we’ve never had a year with so little suspense in the Oscar acting categories.

Also Read: Oscar Contenders’ Final Pitch: ‘Get Out’ Isn’t Just a Horror Hit, ‘Lady Bird’ Plays TimesUp Card

Since the mid-1990s, when the SAG Awards and the Critics’ Choice Awards were launched, 28 actors have swept BAFTA, SAG, Globes and Critics’ Choice. (The latest were Viola Davis for “Fences” last year and Leonardo DiCaprio for “The Revenant” and Brie Larson for “Room” the year before.)

All but one of those 28 have gone on to win the Oscar. The exception: Russell Crowe, who swept the table in 2002 for “A Beautiful Mind” but then lost the Oscar to Denzel Washington in “Training Day.”

How could he have lost? Well, he’d won Best Actor the previous year for “Gladiator” — and even though the Academy knew he was better in “A Beautiful Mind,” he just wasn’t well-liked enough that they wanted to give him back-to-back Best Actor awards. (They reserve that for Tom Hanks and Spencer Tracy.)

And by the way, most Oscar watchers thought Crowe only won for “Gladiator” because the Academy felt it owed him for the previous year, when he’d lost for “The Insider,” in which he was also better than in “Gladiator.”

Also Read: ABC Boasts Fastest Oscars Ad-Sellout in Network History

There is no such labyrinthine reasoning going on this year with any of the rivals to Oldman, McDormand, Rockwell and Janney.

There’s no sentimental surge to give Daniel Day-Lewis a shiny parting gift for what he has said is his last performance. There’s no need to give Meryl Streep another statuette; after all, she’ll be back. And voters no doubt figure they’ll have lots more chances to recognize Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet, who are in their early 20s and show every sign of remaining great for a long time.

If there’s an underdog with any real chance of staging an upset, it might conceivably be Laurie Metcalf, whose mom in “Lady Bird” is domineering but significantly less despicable than Janney’s mom in “I, Tonya.” But that hasn’t hurt Janney or helped Metcalf yet, and it’s a little late to expect it to do so now.

So if you’re watching at home and wondering when to take a bathroom break or make a sandwich during this year’s Oscars, can we suggest something?

Stick around for Best Documentary Short and Best Sound Editing, and take your break during the acting categories.

Unless you want to see Meryl and Daniel and Saoirse and Timothée and the rest make those loser faces. They should be pretty good at them by now, because they’ve had a lot of practice.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Academy to Eliminate Paper Balloting at Next Year’s Oscars

‘Faces Places’ Director JR Explains Agnes Varda Cardboard Cutout at Oscars Luncheon (Video)

Oscars Box Office: Can Best Picture Contenders Turn Nominations Into Big Bucks?

Hey, Daniel Day-Lewis: It’s an honor just to be nominated. Remember that when you go to the Oscars on March 4.

You too, Meryl Streep. In fact, there are 16 estimable folks who are going to lose at the Oscars this year. We know it, you know it, everybody knows it. Even your agents and publicists know it, no matter what they’re telling you.

“Are we going to have any upsets at the Oscars this year?” moaned one voter to me this week — and the answer is that we will probably have a few, but almost definitely not among the acting awards, which are going to be won by Gary Oldman for “Darkest Hour,” Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and Allison Janney for “I, Tonya.”

This is one of the most wide-open Best Picture races in Oscar history, but it might be the least suspenseful set of acting categories ever. That’s because for the first time, the same quartet of actors have won all four of the main precursor acting awards: the Screen Actors Guild Award, the Golden Globe, the Critics’ Choice Award and the British Academy Film Award (BAFTA).

We’ve had two years where three of the four categories had nominees come into the Oscars after a sweep of those awards — J.K. Simmons, Julianne Moore and Patricia Arquette in 2015; Forest Whitaker, Helen Mirren and Jennifer Hudson in 2007 — but never a year in which all four had shown up at the Oscars carrying brooms.

Which, if history is any guide, means we’ve never had a year with so little suspense in the Oscar acting categories.

Since the mid-1990s, when the SAG Awards and the Critics’ Choice Awards were launched, 28 actors have swept BAFTA, SAG, Globes and Critics’ Choice. (The latest were Viola Davis for “Fences” last year and Leonardo DiCaprio for “The Revenant” and Brie Larson for “Room” the year before.)

All but one of those 28 have gone on to win the Oscar. The exception: Russell Crowe, who swept the table in 2002 for “A Beautiful Mind” but then lost the Oscar to Denzel Washington in “Training Day.”

How could he have lost? Well, he’d won Best Actor the previous year for “Gladiator” — and even though the Academy knew he was better in “A Beautiful Mind,” he just wasn’t well-liked enough that they wanted to give him back-to-back Best Actor awards. (They reserve that for Tom Hanks and Spencer Tracy.)

And by the way, most Oscar watchers thought Crowe only won for “Gladiator” because the Academy felt it owed him for the previous year, when he’d lost for “The Insider,” in which he was also better than in “Gladiator.”

There is no such labyrinthine reasoning going on this year with any of the rivals to Oldman, McDormand, Rockwell and Janney.

There’s no sentimental surge to give Daniel Day-Lewis a shiny parting gift for what he has said is his last performance. There’s no need to give Meryl Streep another statuette; after all, she’ll be back. And voters no doubt figure they’ll have lots more chances to recognize Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet, who are in their early 20s and show every sign of remaining great for a long time.

If there’s an underdog with any real chance of staging an upset, it might conceivably be Laurie Metcalf, whose mom in “Lady Bird” is domineering but significantly less despicable than Janney’s mom in “I, Tonya.” But that hasn’t hurt Janney or helped Metcalf yet, and it’s a little late to expect it to do so now.

So if you’re watching at home and wondering when to take a bathroom break or make a sandwich during this year’s Oscars, can we suggest something?

Stick around for Best Documentary Short and Best Sound Editing, and take your break during the acting categories.

Unless you want to see Meryl and Daniel and Saoirse and Timothée and the rest make those loser faces. They should be pretty good at them by now, because they’ve had a lot of practice.

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Oscar Makeup and Hair Nominees, Ranked: ‘Darkest Hour’ v. ‘Wonder’ v. ‘Victoria & Abdul’

The work that created Gary Oldman’s Winston Churchill, Judi Dench’s Queen Victoria, and Jacob Tremblay’s Auggie are testaments to the power of the human face.

The Oscar 2018 trio of makeup and hair nominees are marked by memorable and effective transformations: Best Actor favorite Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour,” nine-year-old Auggie (Jacob Tremblay) suffering from a rare facial deformity in “Wonder,” and Judi Dench as withering Queen Victoria restored to joyful grace in “Victoria & Abdul.”

In all three instances, the sculpting and applications provided believable looks that never detracted from superb performances. Oldman and Dench don’t resemble Churchill and Victoria, yet their appearances captured the essence of these historical figures. And while Auggie’s Treacher Collins syndrome appeared less severe than in the best-selling novel by R.J. Palacio, the effects of the deformity were very realistic.

“Wonder”

“Darkest Hour” remains the heavy favorite, of course, but “Wonder” (released this month on Blu-ray/DVD from Lionsgate) and “Victoria & Abdul” are worthy competitors, and all three are testaments to the power of the human face.

Read more about these nominees, ranked in order of their likelihood to win:

“Darkest Hour” (Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, and Lucy Sibbick)

Oldman lured Tsuji (Oscar-nominated for “Norbit” and “Click”) out of retirement for “Darkest Hour,” and the makeup master responded with the greatest achievement of his career. The reason he became a makeup artist in the first place was his admiration for how legendary Dick Smith turned Hal Holbrook into Lincoln. He applied the same philosophy to Churchill, fusing the two faces by working from the inside out, which he learned from fine-art sculpting.

“Darkest Hour”

Since their faces were very different, Tsuji had to find a balance. “I tried to put the essence of Churchill in a sculpture, and apply that on Gary without hiding him too much,” he said. “But he was amazing and his acting disappeared inside Churchill. I never experienced that before.” The key to the prosthetics, though, was pushing the likeness of Churchill’s cheeks and the use of European baby hair to get the right texture.

“Wonder” (Arjen Tuiten)

Dutch-born special-effects makeup designer Tuiten found himself in unfamiliar territory after standout creature work on “Pan’s Labyrinth,” “Alice in Wonderland,” and “Maleficent.” But director Stephen Chbosky wouldn’t make “Wonder” without him: He had faith that Tuiten could pull off the realism of Treacher Collins syndrome.  Yet it was the first time that a child in full prosthetics had a lead role, and Tremblay had to carry the movie with less prep and shooting time because he was a minor.

Wonder Jacob Tremblay

“Wonder”

“From his shoulders up, everything was covered and we had to design it in a way that came together rapidly and comfortably,” said Tuiten. Tremblay had prosthetics on the chin and nose, along with fake eyebrows and teeth. But the key were tiny eye bags connected to a wire mechanism to avoid a droopy look in concert with contact lenses that enlarged the irises. After being mentored by Rick Baker, Tuiten learned to trust the inner whisper of how to get the work done.

“Victoria & Abdul” (Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard)

Phillips and Sheppard went lo-tech with no prosthetics on Dench in Stephen Fears’ biopic about Queen Victoria’s friendship with Muslim clerk Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal). Through a gradual change in monochromatic makeup and wigs, they literally restored the color back in her life. “At the beginning of the film, she had to look completely bored and worn down by the weight of the world,” said Phillips. “We had to show that in her face, and then she had to blossom through the story.”

“Victoria & Abdul”

First, they removed Dench’s makeup and eyebrows, and aged the skin. Then they repainted shadows and lines, emphasizing facial creases and eye folds, making her look old and pale. They added a steel-gray wig to increase the severity. As she grows fonder of Abdul, they applied a softer tone with warmer colors and a lighter wig. “It was great to convey the pain in her life and then the joy,” Phillips said.

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