Golden Globes: Marvel Scores First Best Picture Drama Nod for ‘Black Panther’

Marvel Studios has scored its first nomination in the Best Motion Picture – Drama category at the 2019 Golden Globes for “Black Panther,” which also marked the first time a superhero movie has been nominated in that category.

Fandango’s Managing Editor Erik Davis wrote on Twitter, “Congrats to @MarvelStudios for landing their first ever Best Picture nod at the today with . No superhero film in the history of the awards show has ever been nominated for Best Picture (Drama). This is the first.”

Congrats to @MarvelStudios for landing their first ever Best Picture nod at the #GoldenGlobes today with #BlackPanther. No superhero film in the history of the awards show has ever been nominated for Best Picture (Drama). This is the first. pic.twitter.com/MxGHrXlbCy

— Erik Davis (@ErikDavis) December 6, 2018

Indeed, Ryan Coogler’s superhero entry was nominated in the category, as well as in the categories Best Original Song and Best Original Score.

Also Read: ‘Vice,’ ‘Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Lead 2019 Golden Globes Nominations

The only other superhero film to break into the Globes Best Picture categories was 2016’s “Deadpool,” which received a nod in the category Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. The movie’s star, Ryan Reynolds, also received a Best Actor nomination that year.

Many Marvel fans shared their excitement on social media following the announcement.

me: the golden globes are a joke

black panther: gets nominated for a golden globe

me: i’d to thank the hollywood foreign pres

— angela (@captaindeadpooI) December 6, 2018

INTO THE SPIDERVERSE AND BLACK PANTHER GOT NOMINATED FOR GOLDEN GLOBES I pic.twitter.com/Yeo8iffKcX

— megan ???? (@spidervalkyrie) December 6, 2018

y’all say black panther is a “mediocre” movie but it was the first comic movie to be nominated for Best Picture are the Golden Globes so idgi

— BP AS IN BEST PICTURE (@wakandapwr) December 6, 2018

black panther getting nominated for best picture at the golden globes is SO huge wow…im over here cryin and shit

— kaiya (@fiImlesbian) December 6, 2018

“Black Panther” was directed by Ryan Coogler and starred Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Letitia Wright, Martin Freeman and Daniel Kaluuya. So far, it was won BET Awards, a Hollywood Film Award, MTV Movie Awards and Teen Choice Awards.

Also Read: Golden Globes Nominations by the Numbers

Apart from “Deadpool” and “Black Panther,” the only other two superhero movies to receive major recognition from the Academy or the Hollywood Foreign Press Association were “The Dark Knight,” for which Heath Ledger was nominated for his performance, and “Batman,” for which Jack Nicholson received a nod for his role. That of course does not count the various films that have been nominated in the sound or visual effects categories, or the animation category in which “The Incredibles” won in 2005 and “Big Hero 6” won in 2015.

The 2019 Golden Globes will take place on January 6. Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg will be hosting the 76th annual awards show.

A spokesperson for Marvel has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘First Man’ and ‘Black Panther’ Among 20 Films Advancing in Oscars VFX Race

Ryan Coogler to Write and Direct ‘Black Panther’ Sequel

‘Black Panther’ Becomes 3rd Film Ever to Hit $700 Million at Domestic Box Office

Marvel Studios has scored its first nomination in the Best Motion Picture – Drama category at the 2019 Golden Globes for “Black Panther,” which also marked the first time a superhero movie has been nominated in that category.

Fandango’s Managing Editor Erik Davis wrote on Twitter, “Congrats to @MarvelStudios for landing their first ever Best Picture nod at the today with . No superhero film in the history of the awards show has ever been nominated for Best Picture (Drama). This is the first.”

Indeed, Ryan Coogler’s superhero entry was nominated in the category, as well as in the categories Best Original Song and Best Original Score.

The only other superhero film to break into the Globes Best Picture categories was 2016’s “Deadpool,” which received a nod in the category Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. The movie’s star, Ryan Reynolds, also received a Best Actor nomination that year.

Many Marvel fans shared their excitement on social media following the announcement.

“Black Panther” was directed by Ryan Coogler and starred Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Letitia Wright, Martin Freeman and Daniel Kaluuya. So far, it was won BET Awards, a Hollywood Film Award, MTV Movie Awards and Teen Choice Awards.

Apart from “Deadpool” and “Black Panther,” the only other two superhero movies to receive major recognition from the Academy or the Hollywood Foreign Press Association were “The Dark Knight,” for which Heath Ledger was nominated for his performance, and “Batman,” for which Jack Nicholson received a nod for his role. That of course does not count the various films that have been nominated in the sound or visual effects categories, or the animation category in which “The Incredibles” won in 2005 and “Big Hero 6” won in 2015.

The 2019 Golden Globes will take place on January 6. Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg will be hosting the 76th annual awards show.

A spokesperson for Marvel has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'First Man' and 'Black Panther' Among 20 Films Advancing in Oscars VFX Race

Ryan Coogler to Write and Direct 'Black Panther' Sequel

'Black Panther' Becomes 3rd Film Ever to Hit $700 Million at Domestic Box Office

‘Black Mirror’ Creator on Casting Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright Before Stardom

The “Get Out” and “Black Panther” favorites got their start in beloved episodes of Charlie Brooker’s anthology series.

Daniel Kaluuya and Letitia Wright are rising stars in Hollywood following the critical and financial successes of “Get Out” and “Black Panther,” and the two actors have something in common in that they both attracted buzz early in their careers for appearing on “Black Mirror.” The science-fiction anthology series, created by Charlie Brooker, cast Kaluuya in the second episode of its first season, “15 Million Merits.” Brooker recently told Entertainment Weekly Kaluuya’s audition made it clear the show had to bring him on board.

“When it comes to Daniel, when we saw his audition it was a bit of a no-brainer,” Brooker said. “It’s a very tricky part because for the first 15-20 minutes he hardly says anything. He’s sort of depressed. When he comes to that big speech at the end where he has this huge explosion and rails against everything in that world, he was so incredible in that scene, such a towering performance, that I remember thinking, ‘As soon as anyone sees this, surely this guy will get snapped up by everyone.’”

Brooker said he was surprised Kaluuya’s career didn’t immediately skyrocket after the “Black Mirror” episode, which aired December 2011 on Channel 4. The actor landed a supporting role in Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario,” but Brooker knew Kaluuya was destined for leading roles after seeing his work in “15 Million Merits.”

“I thought he was a leading man,” Brooker said. “And then I remember seeing the trailer for ‘Get Out’ like, ‘Oh my God, it’s Daniel!’ I later discovered later that it was because Jordan Peele had seen him in ‘15 Million Merits’ that he was cast in ‘Get Out.’…Obviously he would have got there on his own because he’s such a talent, but it’s very gratifying that was literally the thing Jordan Peele saw that made him go, ‘Who is this guy?’ That’s brilliant, and it was borne out, because how fucking good was he in ‘Get Out’? He’s just an exceptional talent.”

Brooke revealed that years later Kaluuya played a role in Letitia Wright’s “Black Mirror” audition. Wright played the lead in “Black Museum,” the final episode of the show’s fourth season.

“She did an audition for us, and there was this voice reading lines off camera that she was responding to,” Brooker said. “It was an American accent, but Annabel and I were going, ‘We recognize that voice, where is that voice from?’ And it was Daniel Kaluuya! He was reading off-camera for her, and the character he was reading was American so he was doing his U.S. accent, and they were just doing it in her trailer for ‘Black Panther.’ We got her just in time, because now she’s much more in demand.”

Both Kaluuya and Wright’s careers have flourished in the years following their “Black Mirror” appearances. Both actors starred in “Black Panther,” while Wright reprised her Marvel role of Shuri in “Avengers: Infinity War.” Kaluuya is currently earning raves for his supporting turn in Steve McQueen’s “Widows,” now playing in theaters nationwide.

Ryan Coogler to Write and Direct ‘Black Panther’ Sequel

Ryan Coogler will officially write and direct the “Black Panther” sequel for Marvel, an individual with knowledge of the deal told TheWrap.

Of course, most everyone anticipated that Coogler would sign back on for the sequel, given the success of this past February’s mega-blockbuster that grossed $1.3 billion worldwide and has received critical acclaim. The film is even in consideration for a Best Picture nomination at the upcoming Academy Awards.

“Black Panther” was also written and directed by Coogler. Chadwick Boseman starred as the titular character, with Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya and Letitia Wright also having roles in the film.

Also Read: Marvel Focuses on a ‘Black Panther’ Best Picture Oscar Nod, Despite New Popular Film Category

The film holds a “fresh” score of 97 on Rotten Tomatoes.

Production on a sequel is set to start in either late 2019 or early 2020. Currently, Coogler is in development for the drama “Wrong Answer,” which also stars Michael B. Jordan.

He will also serve as an executive producer on the upcoming “Creed II” with Jordan, as well as on LeBron James’ “Space Jam” sequel.

Coogler is represented by WME.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Becomes 3rd Film Ever to Hit $700 Million at Domestic Box Office

Marvel had no comment. Representatives for Coogler and Disney have not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Filmmakers: ‘We Looked Pretty Smart’ Thanks to ‘Black Panther’ Success

Is ‘Black Panther’ the Year’s Only Real Oscar Best Picture Contender So Far?

Marvel Boss Kevin Feige on Ryan Coogler’s ‘Black Panther’: ‘Best Movie We’ve Ever Made’

Ryan Coogler will officially write and direct the “Black Panther” sequel for Marvel, an individual with knowledge of the deal told TheWrap.

Of course, most everyone anticipated that Coogler would sign back on for the sequel, given the success of this past February’s mega-blockbuster that grossed $1.3 billion worldwide and has received critical acclaim. The film is even in consideration for a Best Picture nomination at the upcoming Academy Awards.

“Black Panther” was also written and directed by Coogler. Chadwick Boseman starred as the titular character, with Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya and Letitia Wright also having roles in the film.

The film holds a “fresh” score of 97 on Rotten Tomatoes.

Production on a sequel is set to start in either late 2019 or early 2020. Currently, Coogler is in development for the drama “Wrong Answer,” which also stars Michael B. Jordan.

He will also serve as an executive producer on the upcoming “Creed II” with Jordan, as well as on LeBron James’ “Space Jam” sequel.

Coogler is represented by WME.

Marvel had no comment. Representatives for Coogler and Disney have not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Avengers: Infinity War' Filmmakers: 'We Looked Pretty Smart' Thanks to 'Black Panther' Success

Is 'Black Panther' the Year's Only Real Oscar Best Picture Contender So Far?

Marvel Boss Kevin Feige on Ryan Coogler's 'Black Panther': 'Best Movie We've Ever Made'

Dialect Coach Judges Movie Accents: Jennifer Lawrence Criticized in ‘Red Sparrow,’ Daniel Kaluuya Praised, and More

Dialect coach Erik Singer returns to put some recent movie accents to the ultimate test.

Dialect coach Erik Singer went viral in November 2016 after he joined Wired to judge memorable movie accents, including Brad Pitt in “Inglourious Basterds.” Two years later, Singer and Wired have reunited to put the likes of Jennifer Lawrence, Daniel Kaluuya, Sam Rockwell, and recent Emmy winner Matthew Rhys to the ultimate movie accent test.

Unfortunately for Lawrence in her Russian spy thriller “Red Sparrow,” Singer says there’s something that “doesn’t fully cohere” about her accent work. Singer claims “the logic of the Russian accent is missing,” noting the back of her tongue is loose and soft and the front of her tongue is bunched and doing most of the heavy lifting. The dialect coach claims Lawrence would’ve had a more organic accent had she switched her approach and been more loose up front.

As for Daniel Kaluuya’s American accent in “Get Out,” Singer has nothing but praise. “It’s so good, there’s nothing not to like about this accent,” the coach raves. Singer has similar praise for Margot Robbie in “I, Tonya,” Hong Chau in “Downsizing,” and Lucas HEdges in “Manchester by the Sea.”

Watch Wired and Singer’s latest movie accent breakdown in the video below.

53 Stunning Portraits From TheWrap’s Toronto Studio (Exclusive Photos)

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

Daniel Kaluuya and Lena Waithe Film ‘Queen & Slim’ Gets Release Date at Universal

Universal won a bidding war for a new project called “Queen & Slim” starring “Get Out” actor Daniel Kaluuya and penned by “Master of None” veteran Lena Waithe.
The film will explore America’s social and pol…

Universal won a bidding war for a new project called “Queen & Slim” starring “Get Out” actor Daniel Kaluuya and penned by “Master of None” veteran Lena Waithe.

The film will explore America’s social and political climate through the lens of a genre-defying love story.  When a black man and black woman on a first date are pulled over by a police officer at a traffic stop, their life goes awry.  Forced to kill him in self-defense, rather than turn themselves in, they must go on the run.

Universal plans to release the film Nov. 27, 2019

Waithe wrote the script based on an original idea and treatment by bestselling author James Frey (“A Million Little Pieces”).

“Queen & Slim” will be the feature-film directorial debut for Melina Matsoukas (“Insecure”). Kaluuya will star as Slim. Matsoukas and Waithe are still searching for a fresh face to play Queen.

Waithe is producing the film through her company, Hillman Grad Productions, along with Matsoukas via her production company, De La Rolucion Films.

Frey produces via his production company, 3BlackDot, alongside Andrew Coles and Michelle Knudsen.

“Queen & Slim” will be distributed by Universal Pictures worldwide, with eOne handling distribution in select territories including the U.K. and Canada.

The Academy Invites 928 New Members, from Daniel Kaluuya to Sufjan Stevens

The Academy dramatically increased the number of member invites for 2018.

In an astonishing move to swell the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences membership ranks, a record 928 artists and executives from 59 countries have been invited to join this year. The branches have increasingly actively sought eligible people to invite to join the Academy, but the Board of Governors makes the final call; this year, they did not invite Kobe Bryant to join although he won an Oscar for animated short “Dear Basketball.”

Clearly, people of color (38 percent) and women (49 percent) are among the many invites, as the Academy continues to address its long-term white-male dominance. As always, actors make up the largest branch of the Academy, but many new members also come from overseas.

In 2017, the Academy invited 744 new members.

Seventeen Oscar winners are among the new members and 92 Oscar nominees. Nine of the 17 branches invited more women than men. The percentage of women in the Academy has risen from 25 percent in 2015 to 31 percent in 2018. For people of color, the needle moved from 8 percent in 2015 to 16 percent. Not all invitees will accept. (Ryan Coogler, for example, declined.)

The full list follows.

Actors
Hiam Abbass – “Blade Runner 2049,” “The Visitor”
Damián Alcázar – “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian,” “El Crimen del Padre Amaro”
Naveen Andrews – “Mighty Joe Young,” “The English Patient”
Gemma Arterton – “Their Finest,” “Quantum of Solace”
Zawe Ashton – “Nocturnal Animals,” “Blitz”
Eileen Atkins – “Gosford Park,” “Cold Mountain”
Hank Azaria – “Anastasia,” “The Birdcage”
Doona Bae – “Cloud Atlas,” “The Host”
Christine Baranski – “Miss Sloane,” “Mamma Mia!”
Carlos Bardem – “Assassin’s Creed,” “Che”
Irene Bedard – “Smoke Signals,” “Pocahontas”
Bill Bellamy – “Any Given Sunday,” “love jones”
Haley Bennett – “Thank You for Your Service,” “The Girl on the Train”
Tammy Blanchard – “Into the Woods,” “Moneyball”
Sofia Boutella – “The Mummy,” “Atomic Blonde”
Diana Bracho – “A Ti Te Queria Encontrar,” “Y Tu Mamá También”
Alice Braga – “I Am Legend,” “City of God”
Andre Braugher – “Salt,” “Primal Fear”
Abigail Breslin – “August: Osage County,” “Little Miss Sunshine”
Alison Brie – “The Post,” “The Disaster Artist”
Joy Bryant – “Bobby,” “Get Rich or Die Tryin’”
Hannibal Buress – “Blockers,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming”
Vanessa Bell Calloway – “What’s Love Got to Do with It,” “Coming to America”
Javier Cámara – “Talk to Her,” “Sex and Lucia”
Jaime Camil – “Coco,” “Pulling Strings”
Tantoo Cardinal – “Wind River,” “Dances With Wolves”
Elpidia Carrillo – “Nine Lives,” “Predator”
Timothée Chalamet – “Call Me by Your Name,” “Lady Bird”
Sylvia Chang – “Love Education,” “20:30:40”
Dave Chappelle – “Chi-Raq,” “Robin Hood: Men in Tights”
Soumitra Chatterjee – “Bridge,” “Days and Nights in the Forest”
Hong Chau – “Downsizing,” “Inherent Vice”
Anna Chlumsky – “The End of the Tour,” “My Girl”
Emilia Clarke – “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” “Me before You”
Noel Clarke – “Brotherhood,” “Star Trek Into Darkness”
Aurore Clément – “A Bigger Splash,” “Paris, Texas”
Lily Collins – “Okja,” “Mirror Mirror”
Olivia Colman – “The Lobster,” “Tyrannosaur”
Ricardo Darín – “Wild Tales,” “The Secret in Their Eyes”
Elizabeth Debicki – “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” “The Great Gatsby”
Natalia De Molina – “Kiki, Love to Love,” “Food and Shelter”
Rossy De Palma – “Broken Embraces,” “Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown”
Eugenio Derbez – “Overboard,” “How to Be a Latin Lover”
Rosana DeSoto – “La Bamba,” “About Last Night…”
Zoey Deutch – “Before I Fall,” “Everybody Wants Some!!”
Melonie Diaz – “Fruitvale Station,” “Be Kind Rewind”
Kim Dickens – “Gone Girl,” “House of Sand and Fog”
Dale Dickey – “Hell or High Water,” “Winter’s Bone”
Taye Diggs – “Rent,” “Chicago”
Madhuri Dixit – “Bucket List,” “Devdas”
Ann Dowd – “Captain Fantastic,” “Compliance”
Verónica Echegui – “Let Yourself Go!,” “Katmandú, un Espejo en el Cielo”
Taron Egerton – “Eddie the Eagle,” “Kingsman: The Secret Service”
Aunjanue Ellis – “The Help,” “Ray”
Omar Epps – “Traffik,” “Love and Basketball”
Ato Essandoh – “Jason Bourne,” “Django Unchained”
Marta Etura – “The Impossible,” “Sleep Tight”
Ali Fazal – “Victoria & Abdul,” “Furious 7”
Isla Fisher – “Nocturnal Animals,” “Wedding Crashers”
Paulina García – “The Desert Bride,”Gloria”
Manuel Garcia-Rulfo – “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” “Murder on the Orient Express”
Daniel Giménez Cacho – “Zama,” “Blancanieves”
Ernesto Gómez Cruz – “El Crimen del Padre Amaro,” “El Imperio de la Fortuna”
Eva Green – “Casino Royale,” “Kingdom of Heaven”
Jennifer Grey – “Dirty Dancing,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”
Blanca Guerra – “Santa Sangre,” “El Imperio de la Fortuna”
Danai Gurira – “Black Panther,” “Mother of George”
Javier Gutiérrez – “Assassin’s Creed,” “Marshland”
Zaide Silvia Gutiérrez – “Bordertown,” “El Norte”
Ha Jung-woo – “The Handmaiden,” “The Yellow Sea”
Tiffany Haddish – “Girls Trip,” “Keanu”
Regina Hall – “Girls Trip,” “Scary Movie”
Chin Han – “Contagion,” “The Dark Knight”
Corey Hawkins – “BlacKkKlansman,” “Straight Outta Compton”
Lena Headey – “The Purge,” “300”
Shirley Henderson – “Meek’s Cutoff,” “Trainspotting”
André Holland – “Moonlight,” “Selma”
Celia Imrie – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Calendar Girls”
Omotola Jalade-Ekeinde – “Last Flight to Abuja,” “A Private Storm”
Lily James – “Darkest Hour,” “Cinderella”
Ken Jeong – “Crazy Rich Asians,” “The Hangover”
Jo Jin-woong – “The Handmaiden,” “Assassination”
Rashida Jones – “Celeste and Jesse Forever,” “The Social Network”
Toby Jones – “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy,” “Infamous”
Mindy Kaling – “Ocean’s 8,” “A Wrinkle in Time”
Daniel Kaluuya – “Black Panther,” “Get Out”
Takeshi Kaneshiro – “Red Cliff,” “House of Flying Daggers”
Anil Kapoor – “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Taal”
Julie Kavner – “The Simpsons Movie,” “Hannah and Her Sisters”
Zoe Kazan – “The Big Sick,” “Ruby Sparks”
Shah Rukh Khan – “Chennai Express,” “Devdas”
Q’orianka Kilcher – “Hostiles,” “The New World”
Kim Min-hee – “On the Beach at Night Alone,” “The Handmaiden”
Diane Kruger – “In the Fade,” “Inglourious Basterds”
Andy Lau – “House of Flying Daggers,” “Infernal Affairs”
Bárbara Lennie – “Magical Girl,” “The Skin I Live In”
Harry Lennix – “Ray,” “Titus”
Adrian Lester – “The Day after Tomorrow,” “Primary Colors”
Jenifer Lewis – “The Princess and the Frog,” “Corrina, Corrina”
Blake Lively – “The Age of Adaline,” “The Town”
George Lopez – “Rio,” “Real Women Have Curves”
Derek Luke – “Miracle at St. Anna,” “Antwone Fisher”
Melanie Lynskey – “The Informant!,” “Up in the Air”
Mía Maestro – “The Motorcycle Diaries,” “Frida”
Art Malik – “The Wolfman,” “True Lies”
Jena Malone – “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” “Into the Wild”
Sandy Martin – “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “Napoleon Dynamite”
Carmen Maura – “Volver,” “Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown”
Audra McDonald – “Beauty and the Beast,” “Ricki and the Flash”
Ángela Molina – “Broken Embraces,” “That Obscure Object of Desire”
Jordi Mollà – “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” “Blow”
Chloë Grace Moretz – “Hugo,” “Kick-Ass”
Wunmi Mosaku – “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”
Madhabi Mukherjee – “The Big City,” “Charulata”
Olivia Munn – “X-Men: Apocalypse,” “Magic Mike”
Kumail Nanjiani* – “The Big Sick,” “Hello, My Name Is Doris”
Julianne Nicholson – “I, Tonya,” “August: Osage County”
Eduardo Noriega – “Vantage Point,” “Open Your Eyes”
Rubén Ochandiano – “Biutiful,” “Broken Embraces”
Issei Ogata – “Silence,” “Yi Yi”
John Ortiz – “Kong: Skull Island,” “Silver Linings Playbook”
Randall Park – “Ant-Man and the Wasp,” “Snatched”
Pedro Pascal – “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” “The Adjustment Bureau”
Kal Penn – “The Namesake,” “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle”
Mekhi Phifer – “8 Mile,” “Soul Food”
Wendell Pierce – “Selma,” “Horrible Bosses”
Alison Pill – “Midnight in Paris,” “Milk”
Bel Powley – “Mary Shelley,” “The Diary of a Teenage Girl”
Tahar Rahim – “The Past,” “A Prophet”
Tony Revolori – “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Trevante Rhodes – “12 Strong,” “Moonlight”
Joely Richardson – “Red Sparrow,” “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”
Daisy Ridley – “Murder on the Orient Express,” “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”
Gina Rodriguez – “Annihilation,” “Deepwater Horizon”
Alba Rohrwacher – “The Wonders,” “I Am Love”
María Rojo – “Under the Same Moon,” “Esmeralda Comes by Night”
Amy Schumer – “I Feel Pretty,” “Trainwreck”
Kyra Sedgwick – “The Edge of Seventeen,” “The Woodsman”
Emmanuelle Seigner – “Venus in Fur,” “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”
Léa Seydoux – “Spectre,” “Blue Is the Warmest Color”
Naseeruddin Shah – “The League of Extraordinary Gentleman,” “Monsoon Wedding”
Harry Shearer – “A Mighty Wind,” “This Is Spinal Tap”
Sarah Silverman – “Battle of the Sexes,” “Wreck-It Ralph”
Jean Smart – “Garden State,” “Guinevere”
Jada Pinkett Smith – “Girls Trip,” “Set It Off”
Roger Guenveur Smith – “Dope,” “Do the Right Thing”
Yeardley Smith – “The Simpsons Movie,” “As Good as It Gets”
Amandla Stenberg – “Everything, Everything,” “The Hunger Games”
Mark Strong – “The Imitation Game,” “Zero Dark Thirty”
Emma Suárez – “Julieta,” “The Mosquito Net”
Tika Sumpter – “Southside with You,” “Get On Up”
Tabu – “Life of Pi,” “The Namesake”
Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa – “Kubo and the Two Strings,” “The Last Emperor”
Saïd Taghmaoui – “Wonder Woman,” “Three Kings”
Amber Tamblyn – “127 Hours,” “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants”
Larenz Tate – “Crash,” “Why Do Fools Fall in Love”
Miles Teller – “Thank You for Your Service,” “Whiplash”
Juno Temple – “Wonder Wheel,” “Atonement”
Liv Tyler – “The Incredible Hulk,” “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”
Blair Underwood – “Something New,” “Rules of Engagement”
Daniela Vega – “A Fantastic Woman,” “The Guest”
Quvenzhané Wallis – “Annie,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
Damon Wayans – “Bamboozled,” “Major Payne”
Ben Whishaw – “Bright Star,” “I’m Not There”
Michael K. Williams – “Inherent Vice,” “12 Years a Slave”
Penelope Wilton – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Match Point”
Benedict Wong – “Doctor Strange,” “The Martian”
Evan Rachel Wood – “The Wrestler,” “Thirteen”

Casting Directors
Tiffany Little Canfield – “Hotel Artemis,” “The Greatest Showman”
Kristy Carlson – “Wonder Woman,” “Happy Feet”
Kathleen Chopin – “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again,” “Florence Foster Jenkins”
Sheila Jaffe – “Ted,” “The Fighter”
Terri Taylor – “Get Out,” “Whiplash”

Cinematographers
Thimios Bakatakis – “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” “The Lobster”
Christophe Beaucarne – “Django,” “Mr. Nobody”
Giora Bejach – “Foxtrot,” “Lebanon”
Céline Bozon – “Félicité,” “Black Heaven”
Bobby Bukowski – “The Dinner,” “The Messenger”
Benjamín Echazarretta – “A Fantastic Woman,” “Gloria”
Bonnie Elliott – “Spear,” “Teenage Kicks”
Tommaso Fiorilli – “The Insult,” “Go Home”
Peter Flinckenberg – “Woodshock,” “Every Other Couple”
David Gallego – “Siete Cabezas (The Sacrifice),” “Embrace of the Serpent”
Dana Gonzales – “Shot Caller,” “Incarnate”
Máté Herbai – “On Body and Soul,” “Well”
Paula Huidobro – “Oh Lucy!,” “Permanent”
Hossein Jafarian – “Sara and Ayda,” “The Salesman”
Matthew Jensen – “Wonder Woman,” “Fantastic Four”
Rainer Klausmann – “In the Fade,” “Diana”
Mikhail Krichman – “Loveless,” “Leviathan”
Irina Lubtchansky – “Ismael’s Ghosts,” “My Golden Days”
Pedro Luque – “Desiree (Dermaphoria),” “Don’t Breathe”
Mihai Mălaimare – “November Criminals,” “A Walk among the Tombstones”
Claire Mathon – “A Violent Life,” “Staying Vertical”
Michael McDonough – “Leave No Trace,” “Winter’s Bone”
Anil Mehta – “Secret Superstar,” “Rockstar”
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom – “Call Me by Your Name,” “Antonia.”
Urszula Pontikos – “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” “Second Coming”
Jonathan Sela – “Atomic Blonde,” “Transformers: The Last Knight”
Warwick Thornton – “Sweet Country,” “Septembers of Shiraz”
Quyen Tran – “The Little Hours,” “The Automatic Hate”
Fredrik Wenzel – “The Square,” “Force Majeure”
Alexis Zabé – “The Florida Project,” “Post Tenebras Lux”

Costume Designers
Dolly Ahluwalia – “Haider,” “Vicky Donor”
Gabriele Binder – “In the Land of Blood and Honey,” “The Lives of Others”
Stephanie Collie – “Layer Cake,” “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels”
Gabriela Diaque – “Babel,” “Amores Perros”
Caroline Eselin – “Moonlight,” “The Paperboy”
Mariestela Fernández – “La Dictadura Perfecta (The Perfect Dictatorship),” “El Infierno (Hell)”
Mary Ellen Fields
Caroline Harris – “Legend,” “A Knight’s Tale”
Kate Hawley – “Crimson Peak,” “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
Lala Huete – “El Greco,” “Pan’s Labyrinth”
Monika Jacobs – “Lessons of a Dream,” “Run Lola Run”
Jo Sang-gyeong – “The Handmaiden,” “Oldboy”
Jennifer Johnson – “I, Tonya,” “20th Century Women”
Fabienne Katany – “Paris-Manhattan,” “French Twist”
Pierre-Jean Larroque – “Marguerite,” “Lautrec”
Lee Pik-kwan – “Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons,” “Infernal Affairs”
Manish Malhotra – “Om Shanti Om,” “Kai Ho Naa Ho”
Susan Matheson – “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues,” “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby”
Graciela Mazón – “The Flowers of War,” “Nacho Libre”
Virginie Montel – “Mesrine: Public Enemy #1,” “A Prophet”
April Napier – “Lady Bird,” “The Cell”
Isabelle Pannetier – “BPM (Beats Per Minute),” “Intouchables”
Beth Pasternak – “Ararat,” “The Sweet Hereafter”
Jane Petrie – “Moon,” “28 Weeks Later”
Gersha Phillips – “Miles Ahead,” “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones”
Anaïs Romand – “La Danseuse (The Dancer),” “Saint Laurent”
Carine Sarfati – “ The Connection,” “Monsieur N.”
Luis Sequeira – “The Shape of Water,” “Mama”
Laura Jean Shannon – “Scott Pilgrim vs the World,” “Iron Man”
Louise Stjernsward – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Made in Dagenham”
Malgosia Turzanska – “Hell or High Water,” “Maggie’s Plan”

Designers
Paul Denham Austerberry – “The Shape of Water,” “X-Men”
Deryck Blake – “Total Recall,” “A History of Violence”
Aline Bonetto – “A Very Long Engagement,” “Amélie”
Subrata Chakraborty – “24,” “Haider”
James Chinlund – “War for the Planet of the Apes,” “Requiem for a Dream”
Jimmy Chow – “Tron: Legacy,” “Snow Falling on Cedars”
Robin Citrin – “The Aviator,” “Rain Man”
William Cone – “Cars,” “Toy Story 2”
Mike Fantasia – “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” “Memoirs of a Geisha”
Ellen Freund – “Nocturnal Animals,” “A River Runs through It”
Collin Grant – “Furious 7,” “Underworld”
Karen Schulz Gropman – “Fences,” “August: Osage County”
Douglas Harlocker – “Blade Runner 2049,” “Independence Day”
Hwarng Wern Ying – “Silence,” “Three Times”
Deborah Jensen – “The Post,” “Inside Llewyn Davis”
Ilt Jones – “Black Panther,” “Kong: Skull Island”
Michele Laliberte – “The Smurfs 2,” “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”
Simone Leclerc – “Riddick,” “Immortals”
James R. Lin – “Captain America: Winter Soldier,” “Lady in the Water”
Rose Marie McSherry – “Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked,” “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse”
Véronique Melery – “Phantom Thread,” “Defiance”
Keiko Mitsumatsu – “Our Little Sister,” “Nobody Knows”
Cecilia Montiel – “From Dusk Till Dawn,” “Desperado”
Emma Pill – “Spectre,” “Mamma Mia!”
Alessandra Querzola – “Blade Runner 2049,” “Charlie Wilson’s War”
Sue Quinn – “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” “Edge of Tomorrow”
Amit Ray – “Rangoon,” “Haider”
Richard Roberts – “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Ryu Seong-hie – “The Handmaiden,” “The Front Line”
Oliver Scholl – “Suicide Squad,” “Edge of Tomorrow”
Wang Kuo – “The Great Wall,” “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop”
Gregory Weimerskirch – “Southpaw,” “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Directors
Sean Baker*– “The Florida Project,” “Tangerine”
Clio Barnard – “The Selfish Giant,” “The Arbor”
Laurent Cantet – “The Workshop,” “The Class”
Ziad Doueiri* – “The Insult,” “The Attack”
Craig Gillespie – “I, Tonya,” “Lars and the Real Girl”
Michel Gondry – “Microbe and Gasoline,” “The We and the I”
Luca Guadagnino – “ Call Me by Your Name,” “I Am Love”
Hong Sang-soo* – “The Day After,” “On the Beach at Night Alone”
Leon Ichaso – “Piñero,” “Bitter Sugar”
Annemarie Jacir – “Wajib,” “When I Saw You”
Jean-Pierre Jeunet – “A Very Long Engagement,” “Amélie”
Wanuri Kahiu – “Rafiki,” “From a Whisper”
Nadine Labaki – “Capernaum,” “Where Do We Go Now?”
Lee Chang-dong – “Poetry,” “Burning”
Lou Ye – “Blind Massage,” “Love and Bruises”
Lech Majewski – “Field of Dogs,” “Angelus”
Andy Muschietti – “It,” “Mama”
Ruben Östlund* – “The Square,” “Force Majeure”
Rachel Perkins – “Jasper Jones,” “Bran Nue Dae”
Angela Robinson – “Professor Marston and the Wonder Women,” “Herbie: Fully Loaded”
Alice Rohrwacher – “Happy as Lazzaro,” “The Wonders”
Justin Simien – “Dear White People”
Béla Tarr* – “The Turin Horse,” “The Man from London”
Aisling Walsh – “Maudie,” “The Daisy Chain”
Chloé Zhao* – “The Rider,” “Songs My Brother Taught Me”
Rebecca Zlotowski – “Planétarium,” “Grand Central”

Documentary
Evgeny Afineevsky – “Cries from Syria,” “Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom”
Claire Aguilar – “The Interrupters,” “Last Train Home”
Maite Alberdi – “Los Niños (The Grown-Ups),” “La Once (Tea Time)”
Greg Barker – “The Final Year,” “Sergio”
Francisco Bello – “The Reagan Show,” “Salim Baba”
Julie Parker Benello – “The Barber of Birmingham,” “Blue Vinyl”
Lillian Benson* – “Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise,” “Wounded Knee”
Mahen Bonetti
Dora Bouchoucha – “Ouled Ammar (A Doomed Generation),” “It Was Better Tomorrow”
Pietra Brettkelly – “Yellow Is Forbidden,” “A Flickering Truth”
Jenny Carchman – “Citizen Jane: Battle for the City,” “Koch”
Katy Chevigny – “E-Team,” “1971”
Petra Costa – “Olmo & the Seagull,” “Elena”
Natasha Dack-Ojumu – “The Lovers and the Despot,” “After the Apocalypse”
Paco de Onís – “500 Years,” “Granito: How to Nail a Dictator”
Tom Donahue – “Thank You for Your Service,” “Casting By”
Sara Dosa – “Audrie & Daisy,” “The Last Season”
Du Haibin – “A Young Patriot,” “1428”
Sigrid Dyekjaer – “Something Better to Come,” “The Monastery”
Don Edkins – “Mama Africa,” “Please Vote for Me”
Wendy Ettinger – “The War Room,” “Hotel Gramercy Park”
Fan Jian – “Still Tomorrow,” “Wu Tu, My Land”
Feras Fayyad – “Last Men in Aleppo,” “Untold Stories”
Greg Finton – “He Named Me Malala,” “It Might Get Loud”
Yance Ford – “Strong Island,” “The Ballad of Esequiel Hernández”
Tony Gerber – “Jane,” “Full Battle Rattle”
Sari Gilman – “Trapped,” “Kings Point”
Everardo González – “La Libertad del Diablo (Devil’s Freedom),” “Drought (Cuates de Australia)”
Barak Goodman – “Oklahoma City,” “Scottsboro: An American Tragedy”
Sabrina Schmidt Gordon – “Quest,” “BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez”
Catherine Gund – “Chavela,” “Born to Fly: Elizabeth Streb vs. Gravity”
Carla Gutierrez – “RBG,” “When Two Worlds Collide”
David Heilbroner – “Traffic Stop,” “Stonewall Uprising”
Lynn Hershman Leeson – “!Women Art Revolution,” “Strange Culture”
Tatiana Huezo – “Tempestad,” “The Tiniest Place”
Leslie Iwerks – “Citizen Hearst,” “Recycled Life”
Alexandra Johnes – “Holy Hell,” “Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God”
Gema Juarez Allen – “Ruben Blades Is Not My Name,” “Soldado”
Senain Kheshgi – “The Diplomat,” “Project Kashmir”
Simon Kilmurry – “If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front,” “My Perestroika”
Philippa Kowarsky – “Night Will Fall,” “The Gatekeepers”
Jennifer M. Kroot – “The Untold Tales of Armistead Maupin,” “To Be Takei”
David Lawson – “The Stuart Hall Project,” “The Nine Muses”
James LeBrecht – “The Force,” “Extremis”
Caroline Libresco – “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs,” “Sunset Story”
Daniel Lindsay – “LA 92,” “Undefeated”
Stephen Maing – “Crime + Punishment,” “High Tech, Low Life”
Steven Markovitz – “Beats of the Antonov,” “Behind the Rainbow”
TJ Martin – “LA 92,” “Undefeated”
Ivy Meeropol – “Indian Point,” “Heir to an Execution”
Robb Moss – “Secrecy,” “The Same River Twice”
Laura Nix – “ Inventing Tomorrow,” “The Yes Men Are Revolting”
Femi Odugbemi – “Literature, Language, and Literalism,” “Bariga Boy”
Jeff Orlowski – “Chasing Coral,” “Chasing Ice”
Nikki Parrott – “McCullin,” “Only When I Dance”
Cecilia A. Peck – “Brave Miss World,” “Shut Up & Sing”
Josh Penn – “Contemporary Color,” “The Last Season”
Pedro Pimenta – “A Ilha dos Espíritos (Island of Spirits),” “Memories of Dreams”
Martina Radwan – “The Final Year,” “Saving Face”
Maria Augusta Ramos – “Morro dos Prazeres (Hill of Pleasures),” “Justice (Justiça)”
Jenny Raskin – “Here Come the Videofreex,” “On Hostile Ground”
B. Ruby Rich
Caitrin Rogers – “The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble,” ”20 Feet from Stardom”
Jenna Rosher – “Janis: Little Girl Blue,” “Jesus Camp”
Bill Ross – “Western,” “Tchoupitoulas”
Turner Ross – “Western,” “Tchoupitoulas”
Andrew Rossi – “The First Monday in May,” “Ivory Tower”
Bernardo Ruiz – “Kingdom of Shadows,” “Reportero”
Juan Carlos Rulfo – “Those Who Remain,” “In the Pit”
Toby Shimin – “32 Pills: My Sister’s Suicide,” “Buck”
Mohamed Siam – “Amal,” “Whose Country?”
Marcia Smith – “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” “Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple”
Helena Solberg – “Palavra (En)cantada,” “Carmen Miranda: Bananas Is My Business”
Nicole Stott – “Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist,” “Keep Quiet”
Marty Syjuco – “Almost Sunrise,” “Give Up Tomorrow”
Orinne J.T. Takagi – “Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People,” “4 Little Girls”
Tan Pin Pin – “To Singapore, with Love,” “Singapore GaGa”
Clay Tweel – “Gleason,” “Finders Keepers”
Iikka Vehkalahti – “Machines,” “Tarinoiden Suomi (The Stories of Finland)”
Lois Vossen – “Tower,” “Newtown”
Nanfu Wang – “I Am Another You,” “Hooligan Sparrow”
Caroline Waterlow – “O.J.: Made in America,” “Cutie and the Boxer”
Marco Williams – “Two Towns of Jasper,” “In Search of Our Fathers”
Lana Wilson – “The Departure,” “After Tiller”
Chi-hui Yang

Executives
Lauren Abrahams
Chelsea Barnard
Daniel Berger
Kristin Burr
Daria Cercek
Samuel Dickerman
Shana Eddy-Grouf
Lizzie Francke
Rose Garnett
Walter Hamada
Sharon Harel-Cohen
Peter Kang
Caroline Kaplan
Andy Kim
Ann Le Cam
Kristin Lowe
Troy Andrew Lum
Alex Mahon
Joe Matukewicz
Mary T. McLaren
Charlotte Mickie
Greg Mooradian
Diane Nelson
Lisa Nishimura
Scott Parish
Palak Patel
Chris Petrikin
Claire Rudnick Polstein
Milan Popelka
Tessa Ross
Ron Sanders
Lisa Schwartz
Rachel Shane
Ray Strache
Karen Rupert Toliver*
Tony Vinciquerra
Michael Weber
Diana Williams
Wang Zhongjun
Wang Zhonglei
Yu Dong

Film Editors
Jonathan Amos – “Paddington 2,” “Baby Driver”
Laurence Bawedin – “8 Women,” “Under the Sand”
Lillian Benson* – “Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise,” “Fair Game?”
Ken Blackwell – “Ouija,” “The Expendables”
Valerio Bonelli – “Darkest Hour,” “The Martian”
Anita Brandt Burgoyne – “That’s What She Said,” “Legally Blonde”
Nicolas Chaudeurge – “Still Alice,” “Wuthering Heights”
Matt Chessé – “World War Z,” “Finding Neverland”
Cheung Ka-Fai – “Rise of the Legend,” “All’s Well, Ends Well”
Andrea Chignoli – “Princess,” “The Blind Christ”
Walter Fasano – “Call Me by Your Name,” “Bota”
Jon Gregory – “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “In Bruges”
Karen Harley – “Zama,” “Once upon a Time Veronica”
Lee Haxall – “Crazy, Stupid, Love.,” “Meet the Fockers”
Harry Hitner* – “Ferdinand,” “Rio”
Clare Knight – “Kung Fu Panda” series,” “Madagascar”
Steen Johannessen – “Last Men in Aleppo,” “Who We Were”
Felipe Lacerda – “Secrets of the Tribe,” “Garapa”
Anna Mass – “Loveless,” “Leviathan”
Joi McMillon – “Lemon,” “Moonlight”
Marion Monnier – “Personal Shopper,” “Eden”
Jane Moran – “Only the Dead See the End of War,” “Ramona and Beezus”
Nelly Quettier – “Tour de France,” “The Intruder”
Patricia Rommel – “First They Killed My Father,” “The Lives of Others”
Elísabet Ronaldsdóttir – “Deadpool 2,” “Atomic Blonde”
Elena Ruiz – “Eva,” “The Orphanage”
Soledad Salfate – “A Fantastic Woman,” “Gloria”
Ballu Saluja – “Dangal,” “Touring Talkies”
Jill Savitt – “Mortdecai,” “A Walk among the Tombstones”
Hervé Schneid – “A Very Long Engagement,” “Amélie”
Jacob Secher Schulsinger – “The Square,” “Force Majeure”
Cristiano Travaglioli – “Youth,” “The Great Beauty”
Plummy Tucker – “The Invitation,” “Jennifer’s Body”
Hansjörg Weissbrich – “The Divine Order,” “Colonia”
Sidney Wolinsky – “The Shape of Water,” “Not Fade Away”

Makeup Artists & Hairstylists
Chau Siu-Mui – “Curse of the Golden Flower,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”
Fionagh Cush – “Baby Driver,” “Get On Up”
Monica Huppert – “Star Trek Beyond,” “Deadpool”
Kwan Lee-Na – “House of Flying Daggers,” “Hero”
Ana Lozano – “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” “Volver”
David Malinowski – “Darkest Hour,” “Breathe”
Lori McCoy Bell – “American Hustle,” “Silver Linings Playbook”
Thomas Nellen – “True Grit,” “Seabiscuit”
Evelyne Noraz – “A Quiet Place,” “American Hustle”
Waldemar Pokromski – “The Baader Meinhof Complex,” “Schindler’s List”
Lou Sheppard – “Victoria & Abdul,” “Florence Foster Jenkins”
Arjen Tuiten – “Wonder,” “Maleficent”
Noriko Watanabe – “Silence,” “Memoirs of a Geisha”

Music
Jeff Beal – “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power,” “Blackfish”
Joe Bonn – “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “X-Men: Apocalypse”
Carlinhos Brown – “Rio,” “Capitães da Areia”
Joanna Bruzdowicz – “I Forgot to Tell You,” “The Gleaners and I”
Ted Caplan – “The Greatest Showman,” “The Maze Runner”
Benoît Charest – “Paul à Québec,” “The Triplets of Belleville”
Lisa Coleman – “Valentino’s Ghost,” “Dangerous Minds”
Ester Dean – “Ice Age Continental Drift,” “Rio”
Fil Eisler – “Newtown,” “How to Be Single”
Melissa Etheridge – “An Inconvenient Truth,” “Boys on the Side”
Sharon Farber – “The Dove Flyer,” “When Nietzsche Wept”
Osvaldo Golijov – “The Oath,” “The Man Who Cried”
Sofia Gubaidulina – “Mary Queen of Scots,” “Vertikal”
Hauschka – “Adrift,” “Lion”
Mandy Hoffman – “The Lovers,” “Terri”
Yoko Kanno – “Our Little Sister,” “Macross Plus”
Emilio Kauderer – “The Secret in Their Eyes,” “Metegol”
Usha Khanna – “Khandala House,” “Ali Baba and 40 Thieves”
Sneha Khanwalkar – “Detective Byomkesh Bakshy,” “Gangs of Wasseypur”
Joseph Koo – “A Better Tomorrow,” “Fists of Fury”
Kendrick Lamar – “Black Panther,” “Divergent”
Lee Byung-woo – “Mother,” “The Host”
Lim Giong – “The Assassin,” “Millennium Mambo”
Stephanie Lowry – “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” “Tropic Thunder”
Wendy Melvoin – “Just Wright,” “Soul Food”
Jen Monnar – “Paper Towns,” “(500) Days of Summer”
Jason Moran – “13th,” “Selma”
Trevor Morris – “Olympus Has Fallen,” “Bending the Rules”
Melissa Muik – “Wonder Woman,” “Madagascar”
Dustin O’Halloran – “Lion,” “Marie Antoinette”
Daniel Pemberton – “Molly’s Game,” “Steve Jobs”
Carlton Douglas “Chuck D” Ridenhour – “He Got Game,” “Do the Right Thing”
Jeff Rona – “Generation Iron,” “White Squall”
Steven A. Saltzman – “The Revenant,” “Bewitched”
Nitin Sawhney – “Breathe,” “The Namesake”
Ilona Sekacz – “Wondrous Oblivion,” “Solomon and Gaenor”
Eric Serra – “The Fifth Element,” “Goldeneye”
Gingger Shankar – “Brahmin Bulls,” “Home”
Carlo Siliotto – “The Punisher,” “Oltremare”
Rob Simonsen – “Love, Simon,” “Foxcatcher”
Sufjan Stevens – “Call Me by Your Name,” “Beyond This Place”
Jeanette Surga – “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “National Treasure”
Ahmir Khalib “Questlove” Thompson – “Detroit,” “The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975”
Nathan Wang – “No Man’s Land,” “Rumble in the Bronx”

Producers
Caroline Benjo – “Coco before Chanel,” “The Class”
Saïd Ben Saïd – “Elle,” “Aquarius”
Graham Broadbent – “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “In Bruges”
Lisa Bruce – “Darkest Hour,” “The Theory of Everything”
Andrea Calderwood – “Half of a Yellow Sun,” “The Last King of Scotland”
Vânia Catani – “Zama,” “Kill Me Please”
Hugues Charbonneau – “BPM (Beats Per Minute),” “Eastern Boys”
Aditya Chopra – “Sultan,” “Veer-Zaara”
Anne Clements – “Miles,” “Quinceañera”
Lisa Cortés – “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire,” “Shadowboxer”
Pete Czernin – “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”
J. Miles Dale – “The Shape of Water,” “Mama”
Jeremy Dawson – “Isle of Dogs,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Charles Gillibert – “Mustang,” “Clouds of Sils Maria”
Erik Hemmendorff – “The Square,” “Force Majeure”
Bridget Ikin – “Sherpa,” “An Angel at My Table”
Monica Levinson – “Captain Fantastic,” “Trumbo”
Mickey Liddell – “Jackie,” “The Grey”
Marie-Ange Luciani – “BPM (Beats Per Minute),” “Eastern Boys”
Tendeka Matatu – “Cold Harbour,” “Gangster’s Paradise: Jerusalema”
Sean McKittrick – “Get Out,” “Donnie Darko”
Gerhard Meixner – “Wadjda,” “Waltz with Bashir”
Guneet Monga – “The Lunchbox,” “Masaan”
Sara Murphy – “Gemini,” “Land Ho!”
Barbara Muschietti – “It,” “Mama”
Lisa Muskat – “Compliance,” “George Washington”
Rebecca O’Brien – “I, Daniel Blake,” “The Wind That Shakes the Barley”
Oh Jung-wan – “Woman on the Beach,” “A Tale of Two Sisters”
Simon Onwurah – “Wreckers,” “Welcome II the Terrordome”
Jacky Pang Yee Wah – “The Grandmaster,” “2046”
Nira Park – “Baby Driver,” “Shaun of the Dead”
Roman Paul – “Wadjda,” “Waltz with Bashir”
Sylvie Pialat – “Timbuktu,” “Stranger by the Lake”
Steven M. Rales – “Isle of Dogs,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Elsa Reyes – “Oso Polar (Polar Bear),” “Los Parecidos (The Similars)”
Nicole Rocklin – “Spotlight,” “The Perfect Guy”
Carole Scotta – “Coco before Chanel,” “The Class”
Antoun Sehnaoui – “The Ride,” “The Insult”
Derrick Tseng – “Joe,” “Life during Wartime”
Mark Vahradian – “Deepwater Horizon,” “Red”
Vibeke Windeløv – “Dancer in the Dark,” “Breaking the Waves”

Public Relations
Rachel Aberly
Nicolette Aizenberg
Christine Anderson
Heather Artis
Lawrence Atkinson
Megan Bendis
Natalie Bjelajac
Kristin Borella
Lauri Brown
Dora Candelaria
Fabian Castro
Emmy Chang
Peter Dangerfield
Robin Davids
Vicky Eguia
Scott Feinstein
Karen Fried
Anna Fuson
Kenny Gravillis
Gabriela Lee Gutentag
Aviz Hakhamanesh
Gloria Hann
Jan Kean
Alex Kostich
Michael Kupferberg
Karen Larsen
Rachael “Bebe” Lerner
Melissa Martinez
Cathy Nam
Warren Nung
Rachel Parness
Annalee Paulo Hensley
Michael Pavlic
Brian Pianko
Lina Plath
Steve Pollard
Dana Precious
Alicia Ramirez-Wyld
John Patrick Richards
Julie Rieger
Anna Roca
Janice Roland
Isabelle Sugimoto
Shannon Treusch
Michael Tritter
Annah Zafrani

Short Films and Feature Animation
Allison Abbate – “Frankenweenie,” “The Iron Giant”
Kim Adams – “Rain or Shine,” “Small Fry”
Ali Asgari – “Gaze,” “The Silence”
Katja Benrath – “Watu Wote/All of Us,” “Tilda”
Rose Bond – “Electroflux,” “Cerridwen’s Gift”
Jongnic Bontemps – “The Big Chop,” “There Are Ghosts”
Paul Briggs – “Big Hero 6,” “Frozen”
Nick Bruno – “The Peanuts Movie,” “Ice Age Continental Drift”
Spela Cadez – “Nighthawk,” “Boles”
Sofia Carrillo – “Cerulia,” “La Casa Triste (The Sad House)”
Scott Carroll – “Ferdinand,” “The Peanuts Movie”
Martine Chartrand – “MacPherson,” “Black Soul (Ame Noire)”
Bruno Chauffard – “Despicable Me 3,” “The Secret Life of Pets”
Yarrow Cheney – “The Secret Life of Pets,” “Despicable Me”
Teresa Cheng – “Shrek Forever After,” “Madagascar”
Pedro Collantes – “Serori,” “Eskiper”
Melanie Coombs – “Mary and Max,” “Harvie Krumpet”
Michèle Cournoyer – “Accordéon,” “The Hat”
Jill Culton – “Open Season,” “Monsters, Inc.”
Cassidy Curtis – “How to Train Your Dragon,” “Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa”
Jennifer Dahlman – “Coin Operated,” “Penguins of Madagascar”
Kevin Deters – “Olaf’s Frozen Adventure,” “The Ballad of Nessie”
Karen Disher – “Rio,” “Surviving Sid”
Ann Marie Fleming – “Window Horses (The Poetic Persian Epiphany of Rosie Ming),” “Blue Skies”
Nick Fletcher – “Trolls,” “Home”
Kirk Garfield – “Ferdinand,” “Rio 2”
Danis Goulet – “Barefoot,” “Wapawekka”
Carlos Grangel – “Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride,” “Shark Tale”
Hamish Grieve – “Captain Underpants The First Epic Movie,” “Rise of the Guardians”
Nicole Grindle – “Incredibles 2,” “Sanjay’s Super Team”
Yasser Hamed – “Moana,” “Big Hero 6”
Atsuko Hirayanagi – “Oh Lucy!,” “Mo Ikkai”
Harry Hitner* – “Ferdinand,” “Rio”
Brent Homman – “Olaf’s Frozen Adventure,” “Big Hero 6”
Mamoru Hosoda – “The Boy and the Beast,” “The Girl Who Leapt through Time”
Daisy Jacobs – “The Full Story,” “The Bigger Picture”
Jeong Dahee – “Man on the Chair,” “The Empty”
Yvette Kaplan – “Ice Age,” “Beavis and Butt-Head Do America”
Sunao Katabuchi – “In This Corner of the World,” “Mai Mai Miracle”
Dorota Kobiela – “Loving Vincent,” “Little Postman”
Ru Kuwahata – “Negative Space,” “Something Left, Something Taken”
Jan Lachauer – “Revolting Rhymes,” “Room on the Broom”
Josh Lawson – “The Eleven O’Clock,” “After the Credits”
Pierre Leduc – “Sing,” “Minions”
Lei Lei – “Hand-Colored No. 2,” “Recycled”
Anthony Leo – “The Breadwinner,” “Todd & the Book of Pure Evil: The End of the End”
Alexander Levenson – “Ferdinand,” “The Peanuts Movie”
Li Jie – “Coal Story,” “Three Pieces of Sincere Advice”
Liu Jian – “Have a Nice Day,” “Look at This Man”
Adolph Lusinsky – “Moana,” “Big Hero 6”
Maggie Malone – “Big Hero 6,” “The Princess and the Frog”
Joe Mancewicz – “Alvin and the Chipmunks,” “Happy Feet”
Pam Marsden Siragusa – “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs,” “Dinosaur”
Mauro Mueller – “A World for Raúl,” “Ge.hen’nah”
Vincent Di Nguyen – “The Peanuts Movie,” “Surviving Sid”
Fredrik Nilsson – “The Boss Baby,” “The Croods”
Kevin M. Ochs – “How to Train Your Dragon 2,” “Kung Fu Panda 2”
Ngozi Onwurah – “Hang Time,” “The Body Beautiful”
Mauricio Osaki – “My Father’s Truck,” “The Dust of Your Photos”
Chris Overton – “The Silent Child,” “Dalston Heath”
Sergio Pablos – “Rio,” “Despicable Me”
Nina Paley – “Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet,” “Sita Sings the Blues”
Michaela Pavlátová – “Tram,” “Reci, Reci, Reci… (Words, Words, Words)”
Ruben Perez – “The Boss Baby,” “Penguins of Madagascar”
Regina Pessoa – “Kali the Little Vampire,” “Tragic Story with Happy Ending”
Suzan Pitt – “Pinball,” “Visitation”
Bobby Podesta – “Cars 3,” “Toy Story 3”
Max Porter – “Negative Space,” “Something Left, Something Taken”
Carlos Fernandez Puertolas – “The Boss Baby,” “Home”
Joanna Quinn – “Dreams and Desires: Family Ties,” “Famous Fred”
Eric Ramsey – “Trolls,” “Turbo”
Vanitha Rangaraju – “The Boss Baby,” “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted”
Jeffrey R. Ranjo – “Frozen,” “Surf’s Up”
Timothy Reckart – “The Star,” “Head over Heels”
Tobias Rosen – “Watu Wote/All of Us,” “Feuerkind”
Farnoosh Samadi –“Gaze,” “The Silence”
Gini Cruz Santos – “Coco,” “The Good Dinosaur”
Jakob Schuh – “Revolting Rhymes,” “The Gruffalo”
Georges Schwizgebel – “Erlking,” “Romance”
Yuriko Senoo – “The Star,” “The Pirate Fairy”
Carla Shelley – “Early Man,” “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit”
Rachel Shenton – “The Silent Child,” “The Winter’s Club”
Makoto Shinkai – “Your Name,” “Children Who Chase Lost Voices”
Amy Lawson Smeed – “Moana,” “Tangled”
Tony Smeed – “Zootopia,” “Frozen”
Keith L. Smith – “Post Life,” “Island Song”
Patrick Smith – “Puppet,” “Handshake”
Josh Staub – “Inner Workings,” “Feast”
Stacey Steers – “Edge of Alchemy,” “Night Hunter”
Chris Stover – “Turbo,” “Foodfight”
Mark Swift – “Captain Underpants The First Epic Movie,” “Penguins of Madagascar”
Shannon Tindle – “Kubo and the Two Strings,” “Curious George”
Karen Rupert Toliver* – “Ferdinand,” “Rio”
Cilia Van Dijk – “The Last Words of Dutch Schultz,” “Anna & Bella”
Cesar Velazquez – “Zootopia,” “Wreck-It Ralph”
Dina Velikovskaya – “About a Mother,” “My Strange Grandfather”
John Walker – “Incredibles 2,” “The Incredibles”
Dick Walsh – “The Boss Baby,” “Shrek Forever After”
Dave Walvoord – “How to Train Your Dragon 2,” “Kung Fu Panda 2”
Hugh Welchman – “Loving Vincent,” “Peter & the Wolf”
Stevie Wermers-Skelton – “Olaf’s Frozen Adventure,” “The Ballad of Nessie”
Carey Williams – “Emergency,” “Cherry Waves”
Larry Y. Wu – “Moana,” “Big Hero 6”
Paul Young – “Song of the Sea,” “The Secret of Kells”
Jennifer Yu – “Moana,” “Wreck-It Ralph”
Kathy Zielinski – “The Road to El Dorado,” “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”

Sound
Dan Abrams – “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Captain America: Civil War”
David Acord – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Inherent Vice”
Vincent Arnardi – “Desierto,” “Amélie”
Michael Babcock – “Captain Underpants The First Epic Movie,” “The Dark Knight”
Daniela T. Bassani – “Like Crazy,” “Gomorrah”
David V. Butler – “Godzilla,” “Tangled”
John Casali – “Beauty and the Beast,” “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”
Tim Cavagin – “Baby Driver,” Amy”
Debajit Changmai – “Court,” “Bhaag Milkha Bhaag”
Bishwadeep Chatterjee – “Madras Café,” “3 Idiots”
Patrick Cyccone Jr. – “Geostorm,” “The Descendants”
Antonio Diego – “Duck Season,” “Amores Perros”
Nelson Ferreira – “The Shape of Water,” “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones”
Ruy Garcia – “Novitiate,” “Y Tu Mamá También”
Glen Gauthier – “The Shape of Water,” Pacific Rim”
Joan Giammarco – “La La Land,” “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol”
Shawn Holden – “Nightcrawler,” “Takers”
Joel Iwataki – “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”
Jason W. Jennings – “Trolls,” “Gangster Squad”
Kim Suk-won – “The Handmaiden,” “The Front Line”
Jason King – “Sicario,” “Letters from Iwo Jima”
Marissa Littlefield – “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “Gangs of New York”
Nico Louw – “Tomb Raider,” “Safe House”
Helen Luttrell – “Hidden Figures,” “Night at the Museum: Battle for the Smithsonian”
Mary Ellen Porto – “Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS,” “The Adjustment Bureau”
Jill Purdy – “Snow White and the Huntsman,” “Black Swan”
Christian Schaanning – “The King’s Choice,” “Penguins of Madagascar”
Julian Slater – “Baby Driver,” “Scott Pilgrim vs the World”
Unsun Song – “Dunkirk,” “The Great Wall”
John C. Stuver – “The Revenant,” “John Wick”
Tim Walston – “The Book of Life,” “Star Trek”
Yang Jiang – “Soul on a String,” “The Great Hypnotist”
Zhao Nan – “Battle of Memories,” “Mojin: The Last Legend”
Martyn Zub – “Atomic Blonde,” “Frozen”

Visual Effects
Gregory Anderson – “The Wall,” “The Warrior’s Way”
Angela Barson – “Tulip Fever,” “Me before You”
Jay Barton – “The Fate of the Furious,” “Furious 7”
Geoffrey Baumann – “Black Panther,” “Doctor Strange”
Joel Behrens – “Ready Player One,” “Pixels”
Jean Bolte – “Thor: Ragnarok,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron”
Glenn Campbell – “Repentance,” “Walking with the Enemy”
Jeff Capogreco – “Kong: Skull Island,” “Transformers: The Last Knight”
Trent Claus – “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” “Doctor Strange”
Patrick Conran – “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Pacific Rim”
Jonathan Egstad – “The Boss Baby,” “Trolls”
Mark Elendt
Jonathan Fawkner – “Doctor Strange,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Audrey Ferrara – “Alien: Covenant,” “Passengers”
Lucinda Foy – “Ouija,” “Death Race”
Eric Frazier – “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” “Nocturnal Animals”
Florian Gellinger – “Black Panther,” “The Dark Tower”
Larry Gritz – “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” “The Emoji Movie”
Charlie Iturriaga – “Chappie,” “Gone Girl”
Paul Kavanagh – “Transformers: The Last Knight,” “Star Trek Into Darkness”
Michael Koperwas – “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Rango”
Gene Kozicki – “Big Miracle,” “Moneyball”
Paul Lambert – “Blade Runner 2049,” “The Huntsman: Winter’s War”
Kevin Martel – “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows”
Aaron McBride – “Kong: Skull Island,” “Marvel’s The Avengers”
Ken McGaugh – “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” “The BFG”
Scott Meadows – “Ready Player One,” “Black Panther”
Yvonne Muinde – “Rampage,” “Black Panther”
Mike Mulholland – “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron”
Gerd Nefzer – “Blade Runner 2049,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Erik Nordby – “Passengers,” “The Amazing Spider-Man 2”
Jessica Norman – “Wonder Woman,” “World War Z”
Kaori Ogino – “Kong: Skull Island,” “Jurassic World”
Russell T. Paul – “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”
Philip Peterson – “Mars Needs Moms,” “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”
Andrew Roberts – “Independence Day: Resurgence,” “Snow White and the Huntsman”
Rachel Rose – “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Noah”
Sue Rowe – “The Legend of Tarzan,” “Independence Day: Resurgence“
Daryl Sawchuk – “Black Panther,” “Doctor Strange”
Nelson Sepulveda – “Kong: Skull Island,” “Marvel’s The Avengers”
Thrain Shadbolt – “Rampage,” “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”
Matt Sloan – “Maze Runner: The Death Cure,” “X-Men: Apocalypse”
Greg Steele – “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Sandra Stewart – “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” “Journey 2: The Mysterious
Island”
Nigel Sumner – “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Pacific Rim”
Hanzhi Tang – “Thor: Ragnarok,” “Independence Day: Resurgence”
Corey Turner – “Monster Trucks,” “Transformers: Dark of the Moon”
Todd Vaziri – “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”
Chris Waegner – “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” “Suicide Squad”
Joel Whist – “War for the Planet of the Apes,” “The BFG”
Sheila Wickens – “On Chesil Beach,” “The Limehouse Golem”
Alison Wortman – “Dunkirk,” “Alice through the Looking Glass”

Writers
Roy Andersson – “A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence,” “You, the Living”
Robert L. Baird – “Ferdinand,” “Big Hero 6”
Sean Baker* – “The Florida Project,” “Tangerine”
Marco Bellocchio – “Sweet Dreams,” “Dormant Beauty”
Pablo Berger – “Abracadabra,” “Blancanieves”
Chris Bergoch – “The Florida Project,” “Tangerine”
Sabina Berman – “Gloria,” “Backyard”
Thomas Bidegain – “Racer and the Jailbird,” “Les Cowboys”
Roger Bohbot – “White as Snow,” “Lady Chatterley”
Bertrand Bonello – “Nocturama,” “Saint Laurent“
Emmanuel Bourdieu – “A Christmas Tale,” “Poison Friends”
Guillermo Calderón – “Neruda,” “The Club”
Robin Campillo – “BPM (Beats Per Minute),” “Eastern Boys”
Stephen Chbosky – “Wonder,” “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”
Joe Robert Cole – “Black Panther”
Laurie Collyer – “Sunlight Jr.,” “Sherrybaby”
Kelly Fremon Craig – “The Edge of Seventeen,” “Post Grad”
Arnaud Desplechin – “Ismael’s Ghosts,” “A Christmas Tale”
Anita Doron – “The Breadwinner,” “The Lesser Blessed”
Ziad Doueiri* – “The Insult,” “The Attack”
Laura Esquivel – “Like Water for Chocolate,” “Chido Guan, el Tacos de Oro”
Mateo Gil – “Realive,” “Open Your Eyes”
Emily V. Gordon – “The Big Sick”
Michael Green – “Logan,” “Blade Runner 2049”
Alain Guiraudie – “Staying Vertical,” “Stranger by the Lake”
Jason Hall – “Thank You for Your Service,” “American Sniper”
Hong Sang-soo* – “The Day After,” “On the Beach at Night Alone”
Jeong Seo-kyeong – “The Handmaiden,” “Thirst”
Guillaume Laurant – “The Scent of Mandarin,” “Amélie”
Rebecca Lenkiewicz – “Disobedience,” “Ida”
Guy Maddin – “The Forbidden Room,” “Keyhole“
Gonzalo Maza – “A Fantastic Woman,” “Gloria”
Anthony McCarten – “Darkest Hour,” “The Theory of Everything”
Michael McCullers – “The Boss Baby,” “Baby Mama”
Valérie Müller – “Polina,” “Le Monde de Fred”
Kumail Nanjiani* – “The Big Sick”
Oleg Negin – “Loveless,” “Leviathan”
Jonathan Nolan – “The Dark Knight,” “Memento“
Ruben Östlund* – “The Square,” “Force Majeure”
Park Hoon-jung – “The Tiger,” “New World”
Christian Petzold – “Phoenix,” “Jerichow”
Julie Peyr – “Ismael’s Ghosts,” “Four Lovers”
Gibrán Portela – “The Untamed,” “La Jaula de Oro”
Steven Rogers – “I, Tonya,” “Kate & Leopold”
Melissa Rosenberg – “Twilight” series, “Step Up”
J.K. Rowling – “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” “Harry Potter” creator
Alicia Scherson – “Family Life,” “Il Futuro”
Fernando E. Solanas – “A Journey to the Fumigated Towns,” “La Guerra del Fracking”
Sion Sono – “Tokyo Vampire Hotel,” “The Whispering Star”
Béla Tarr* – “The Turin Horse,” “The Man from London”
Vanessa Taylor – “The Shape of Water,” “Divergent”
Joëlle Touma – “The Insult,” “The Attack“
Joachim Trier – “Thelma,” “Louder than Bombs”
Pierre Uytterhoeven – “And Now My Love,” “A Man and a Woman”
Eskil Vogt – “Thelma,” “Louder than Bombs”
Wang Hui Ling – “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” “Fleeing by Night”
Virgil Williams – “Mudbound”
Yan Geling – “Youth,” “Coming Home”
Chloé Zhao* – “The Rider,” “Songs My Brother Taught Me”

Members-at-Large
Robert Alonzo
Wendy Armstrong
Jennifer Badger
Bill Baggelaar
Hanno Basse
Ali Bell
Jennifer Bell
Grace Blake
Linda Borgeson
Rosa Bosch
Mark Brown
Erika Wangberg Burton
Keith Campbell
Damon Caro
Jordi Casares
Jeffrey Chan
Andy Cheng
Jim Churchman
Carl Ciarfalio
David Cole
Maureen Crowe
Elizabeth Monk Daley
Nash Edgerton
Sheri Eisenberg
Nina Fallon
Christina Garberson
Dawn Gilliam
Allan Graf
Barbara Ford Grant
Mark Graziano
Mike Gunther
Barbara Harris
Kiri Hart
Warrington Hudlin
Richard Hull
Georgia Kacandes
Franz Kraus
Randy Lake
Jeff LaPlante
Julius LeFlore
David Leitch
Janet Lewin
Joe Lewis
Daniel Lupi
Johnny Martin
Claire McGrane
Jennifer Meislohn
Nate Moore
Stephen Nakamura
Guy Norris
Chris O’Hara
Maricel Pagulayan
Tom Peitzman
JJ Perry
James Plannette
Steven Andrew Pope
Sherri Potter
Keri Putnam
Mary Ramos
Helen Robin
Lisa Rodgers
Kevin Dennis Rosenberger
William Sargent
Kirsten Schaffer
Jessie Thiele Schroeder
Erin Scully
Michael Raye Smith
Ellen Somers
Sean Stratton
Tierre Turner
Stephen Ujlaki
Leon Vitali
Walter Volpatto
Jamie Voris
Fiona Walkinshaw
Owen Walstrom
Jeff Ward
Jeffrey Wike
Dwight Williams
David Womark

Associates
Matthew Dubin
Todd Feldman
Andrew Finkelstein
William Lazarus
Sandra Lucchesi
Ann Murtha
Theresa Peters
Steven Rabineau
Sylvie Rabineau
Brian Siberell

Academy Invites Record 928 New Members

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited a record number of new members, extending invites to 928 people. That Academy topped last year’s record of 774 new members. In an ongoing effort to diversify its ranks following uproar o…

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited a record number of new members, extending invites to 928 people. That Academy topped last year’s record of 774 new members. In an ongoing effort to diversify its ranks following uproar over the lack of African-American nominees over the last few years, which culminated in 2016’s […]

CAA Signs ‘Get Out’s Daniel Kaluuya

EXCLUSIVE: CAA has signed Daniel Kaluuya whose performance in Jordan Peele’s Get Out was one of the most talked about of the year. Get Out, which took the box office by storm when it came out in Feb. 2017, grossing a big $255M worldwide on a budg…

EXCLUSIVE: CAA has signed Daniel Kaluuya whose performance in Jordan Peele’s Get Out was one of the most talked about of the year. Get Out, which took the box office by storm when it came out in Feb. 2017, grossing a big $255M worldwide on a budget of only around $5M. The British actor was nominated for multiple awards for his role in the film, including the Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, SAG Award, and BAFTA Award for Best Actor. Kaluuya was also the recipient of…

Viola Davis Is Out for Blood in Explosive ‘Widows’ Trailer (Video)

Viola Davis plays the widow of a crime boss who is deep in debt to some very bad men in the explosive trailer for Steve McQueen’s new thriller “Widows.”

The film, which McQueen wrote with “Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn based on the novel by Lynda LaPlante, looks nothing like his Oscar-winning “12 Years a Slave” with its explosive action scenes.

Davis plays a woman in modern Chicago who joins forces with three other women whose husbands also died owing significant sums to criminal types: Elizabeth Debicki, Michelle Rodriguez and Cynthia Erivo.

Also Read: Lupita Nyong’o and Viola Davis’ African Power Epic ‘The Woman King’ Picked Up by TriStar

The quartet decides to take their fate into their own hands and conspire to forge a future on their own terms — donning masks, loading guns and generally behaving like guys typically do in crime thrillers.

“Widows” also stars Liam Neeson, Colin Farrell, Robert Duvall, Daniel Kaluuya, Lukas Haas and Brian Tyree Henry.

McQueen also produced along with Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Arnon Milchan.

Regency and 20th Century Fox will release the film in theaters November 16. Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Lupita Nyong’o and Viola Davis’ African Power Epic ‘The Woman King’ Picked Up by TriStar

Viola Davis to Star in Amazon Film ‘Troupe Zero’

Viola Davis to Hollywood: If I’m the ‘Black Meryl Streep,’ ‘Pay Me What I’m Worth’

Viola Davis plays the widow of a crime boss who is deep in debt to some very bad men in the explosive trailer for Steve McQueen’s new thriller “Widows.”

The film, which McQueen wrote with “Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn based on the novel by Lynda LaPlante, looks nothing like his Oscar-winning “12 Years a Slave” with its explosive action scenes.

Davis plays a woman in modern Chicago who joins forces with three other women whose husbands also died owing significant sums to criminal types: Elizabeth Debicki, Michelle Rodriguez and Cynthia Erivo.

The quartet decides to take their fate into their own hands and conspire to forge a future on their own terms — donning masks, loading guns and generally behaving like guys typically do in crime thrillers.

“Widows” also stars Liam Neeson, Colin Farrell, Robert Duvall, Daniel Kaluuya, Lukas Haas and Brian Tyree Henry.

McQueen also produced along with Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Arnon Milchan.

Regency and 20th Century Fox will release the film in theaters November 16. Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Lupita Nyong'o and Viola Davis' African Power Epic 'The Woman King' Picked Up by TriStar

Viola Davis to Star in Amazon Film 'Troupe Zero'

Viola Davis to Hollywood: If I'm the 'Black Meryl Streep,' 'Pay Me What I'm Worth'

‘Black Panther’ Editor Reveals Two ‘Painful’ Scenes Cut From Film

Even a juicy, global sensation like “Black Panther” had some fat to trim — not that anyone involved in the blockbuster was happy about leaving moments on the cutting room floor.

The film’s editor and frequent Ryan Coogler collaborator, Michael Shawver, spoke with ThewWrap about his latest gig, a cultural phenomenon that on Sunday crossed the billion-dollar mark at the worldwide box office.

“Hands down the most painful scene to cut was [one] with Danai Gurira and Daniel Kaluuya,” Shawver said of the actors, who play Wakanda’s armed forces General Okoye and tribe ambassador W’Kabi, respectively. They’re also onscreen lovers.

“Toward the end, after things go bad and Killmonger [Michael B. Jordan] is in control and all that, we’re talking about, what are they going to do? What is Wakanda going to become?” Shawver recalled.

Also Read: ‘SNL’: The ‘Black Panther’ Ancestral Plane Is Really Annoying for Sterling K Brown

“Those are two powerhouse actors and it was an incredible scene with so many layers to it — boyfriend and girlfriend, it was general and her advisor, all those things. That was painful,” he said.

In his role as editor, Shawver said his priority was to “have your finger on the pulse of what the audience is feeling. At that point in the movie, it’s about two thirds through, and that’s when most movies drag. Ours was taking a while to get to that point.”

The other cut scene was a grounding moment for Chadwick Boseman’s T’Challa and Forest Whitaker’s Zuri, the latter serving as an elder statesman for the fictional African country under the black panther’s rule.

“There’s a scene between Chadwick and Forest’s characters which sets up their relationship. It sort of lets you attach yourself to their father-son dynamic so that later on in the film … you really feel more,” he said.

Shawver confirmed that the scenes would be included on the forthcoming home entertainment release of “Black Panther,” available as DVD extras.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Leads ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ in All-Disney Box Office Face-Off

The editor and director met as film school students at the University of Southern California, where Shawver said he gravitated toward Coogler’s bold and personal filmmaking style. Shawver never imagined they would reach this level of success, he admitted.

“Ryan and I have been a team for five years, it’s honestly hard to wrap my head around it,” said Shawver, who said Coogler approached Marvel executives with the same determination and heart he had for their indie “Fruitvale Station.”

“It was a great excuse as an adult male to read as many comics as I could. I got a sense of it, Ryan brought me to Marvel and they asked me everything from ‘Will you be able to handle this?’ to, ‘What is your favorite Marvel movie?” Shawver said. “Ryan likes to be able to trust everybody he works with.”

In his job interview, Shawver told the executives his favorite Marvel film was “The Avengers.” We dare say he’s got a new favorite now.

Michael Shawver

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’: The ‘Black Panther’ Ancestral Plane Is Really Annoying for Sterling K Brown

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Disappoints as ‘Black Panther’ Pounces to 4th Straight Box Office Win

‘Black Panther’ Leads ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ in All-Disney Box Office Face-Off

Even a juicy, global sensation like “Black Panther” had some fat to trim — not that anyone involved in the blockbuster was happy about leaving moments on the cutting room floor.

The film’s editor and frequent Ryan Coogler collaborator, Michael Shawver, spoke with ThewWrap about his latest gig, a cultural phenomenon that on Sunday crossed the billion-dollar mark at the worldwide box office.

“Hands down the most painful scene to cut was [one] with Danai Gurira and Daniel Kaluuya,” Shawver said of the actors, who play Wakanda’s armed forces General Okoye and tribe ambassador W’Kabi, respectively. They’re also onscreen lovers.

“Toward the end, after things go bad and Killmonger [Michael B. Jordan] is in control and all that, we’re talking about, what are they going to do? What is Wakanda going to become?” Shawver recalled.

“Those are two powerhouse actors and it was an incredible scene with so many layers to it — boyfriend and girlfriend, it was general and her advisor, all those things. That was painful,” he said.

In his role as editor, Shawver said his priority was to “have your finger on the pulse of what the audience is feeling. At that point in the movie, it’s about two thirds through, and that’s when most movies drag. Ours was taking a while to get to that point.”

The other cut scene was a grounding moment for Chadwick Boseman’s T’Challa and Forest Whitaker’s Zuri, the latter serving as an elder statesman for the fictional African country under the black panther’s rule.

“There’s a scene between Chadwick and Forest’s characters which sets up their relationship. It sort of lets you attach yourself to their father-son dynamic so that later on in the film … you really feel more,” he said.

Shawver confirmed that the scenes would be included on the forthcoming home entertainment release of “Black Panther,” available as DVD extras.

The editor and director met as film school students at the University of Southern California, where Shawver said he gravitated toward Coogler’s bold and personal filmmaking style. Shawver never imagined they would reach this level of success, he admitted.

“Ryan and I have been a team for five years, it’s honestly hard to wrap my head around it,” said Shawver, who said Coogler approached Marvel executives with the same determination and heart he had for their indie “Fruitvale Station.”

“It was a great excuse as an adult male to read as many comics as I could. I got a sense of it, Ryan brought me to Marvel and they asked me everything from ‘Will you be able to handle this?’ to, ‘What is your favorite Marvel movie?” Shawver said. “Ryan likes to be able to trust everybody he works with.”

In his job interview, Shawver told the executives his favorite Marvel film was “The Avengers.” We dare say he’s got a new favorite now.

Michael Shawver

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL': The 'Black Panther' Ancestral Plane Is Really Annoying for Sterling K Brown

'A Wrinkle in Time' Disappoints as 'Black Panther' Pounces to 4th Straight Box Office Win

'Black Panther' Leads 'A Wrinkle in Time' in All-Disney Box Office Face-Off

Will ‘Black Panther’ Finally Open Hollywood’s Floodgates for More Diverse Studio Movies?

“Black Panther” has become a Hollywood hit on a level that few other films have ever achieved: It is now only the fifth film ever to post an opening weekend of over $200 million and is guaranteed to hit $1 billion worldwide within the next month.

Given its African American director, Ryan Coogler, and 10 leading black stars, “Black Panther” has especially been embraced by the African American community, who see the movie’s success has a potential bellwether for Hollywood to embrace more films by and featuring people of color.

The Marvel film’s success comes three years after the #OscarsSoWhite controversy raged — and follows the critical and commercial success of films like “Straight Outta Compton,” “Wonder Woman,” “Coco,” “Get Out,” and last year’s Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight.” Time and time again, moviegoers have made the message clear: Diversity isn’t just culturally important…it’s profitable too.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Director Ryan Coogler Thanks Fans in Emotional Letter, Says He’s Moved ‘to Tears’

“It’s clear that representation matters, and moviegoers have responded every time we’ve answered that demand,” said Dave Hollis, Disney’s President of Theatrical Distribution. “We are trying to make movies that resonate with a global audience, and that means making movies that allow people to see themselves represented on screen.”

Audiences are certainly responding with overwhelming enthusiasm, transforming this film’s release into a major cultural moment. Analytics group Shareablee notes that there was three times more Twitter traffic for “Black Panther” than for “Wonder Woman” and nine times more on Instagram.

Celebrities like Octavia Spencer and Snoop Dogg are organizing field trips for underprivileged schoolchildren to go see the film. And directors like Barry Jenkins and Ava DuVernay — as well as former First Lady Michelle Obama — are praising “Black Panther” as a game changer.

BLACK PANTHER is PEAK double consciousness. It’s a Marvel movie, sure. And a blockbuster, absolutely, covers those bases and covers them well. But a film that features that vegetarian bit? Or Kilmonger’s last line? Ryan’s made two movies at once. And he crushed them both ????????

– Barry Jenkins (@BarryJenkins) February 18, 2018

I’ve loved the Black Panther reaction videos, read the reviews/think pieces, swooned over folks lining theaters, tried to teach myself Panther flash mob dance moves, admired all the African threads. But this. This broke me. Our babies. Our young ones. Imagine the seeds planted… pic.twitter.com/rEbsjm5gld

– Ava DuVernay (@ava) February 19, 2018

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Will Hit $1 Billion at the Box Office – The Only Question Is When

It wouldn’t be the first time a major blockbuster prompted studios to rethink strategy. The runaway success of Jennifer Lawrence’s “The Hunger Games” in 2012 is often credited with playing a major hand in unleashing a slew of female-fronted blockbusters on the marketplace.

In the years since Katniss Everdeen took on the Capitol on the big screen, actresses like Charlize Theron in “Mad Max: Fury Road,” Daisy Ridley in the new “Star Wars” trilogy, and Gal Gadot in “Wonder Woman.” Meanwhile, Universal found success with female-fronted comedies like “Girls Trip” and the “Pitch Perfect” trilogy, and later this year audiences will get to see “Ocean’s 8,” an all-female revamp of “Ocean’s Eleven.”

But Darnell Hunt, dean of social sciences at UCLA, cautioned that the recent success of films like “Black Panther” and “Get Out” is no guarantee of long-term changes. He pointed to the success of “12 Years a Slave” four years ago, which instead of triggering more stories of the African American experience led to an all-white Oscar nominee list the following year triggered the #OscarsSoWhite movement.

“We see all these big movies come out every year, but when we do our annual diversity study at UCLA, the numbers for women and [people of color] in front and behind the camera haven’t changed,” Hunt said. “Every year we see a series of exceptional films like ‘Moonlight’ that tells a different story and features women or POC, but they have always prove to be exceptions to the rule. We see a bump here and there, but nothing that points to a sustained trend.”

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ to Top ‘Justice League’ Total U.S. Box Office in Just 4 Days

Hunt also said that there’s been proof that diverse films can sell long for a long time, pointing to Universal’s “Fast & Furious” franchise, eight films that featured actors of different ethnicities such as Ludacris, Dwayne Johnson,and Sung Kang, as well as directors like Justin Lin and F. Gary Gray. (Last year, Gray became the first black director to make a $1 billion hit with “The Fate of the Furious.”)

“There’s been data that has gone back for years proving that movies made by and starring minorities can make money, yet our study hasn’t found any noticeable change,” he said.

Todd Boyd, professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, pointed to the explosion of blaxploitation films in the 1970 which were cheap to produce and financial hit. “These films played a big part in helping some studios stay afloat during some very difficult economic times,” Boyd said. “Then ‘Jaws’ and ‘Star Wars’ came out and the industry forgot about those movies and moved on.”

Also Read: No, ‘Black Panther’ Was Not Named After the Black Panther Party

Too often, mainstream Hollywood forgets about underserved audiences — even when it’s in their financial interest to appeal to a diverse pool of moviegoers.

“Hollywood is cyclical,” Boyd said. “We’ve seen all these films do very well, but we could have this conversation again two years from now and be back to the situation we were in two years ago […] While everyone else is getting caught up [with ‘Black Panther’], what I see Hollywood doing what it does best, and that is capitalizing on a market that it had not previously pursued.”

At the very least, the success of blockbusters like “Black Panther” can help elevate those involved and build interest for futre projects. Daniel Kaluuya, hot off his Oscar-nominated performance in “Get Out,” has earned even more praise for his performance as W’Kabi, the head of Wakanda’s security. Danai Gurira, already known for “The Walking Dead,” has become an overnight icon for black women as the fierce Dora Milaje leader Okoye. And Letitia Wright, arguably this film’s biggest breakout star, will continue to have a presence in cinemas this spring with roles in “Ready Player One” and “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Crosses $201 Million, 5th Film to Earn $200 Million-Plus in 3 Days

Then there’s director Ryan Coogler, who was already a critical darling with his indie debut film “Fruitvale Station” and his “Rocky” spinoff “Creed,” but now has his blockbuster calling card as the director of one of the biggest hits Hollywood has ever seen.

His next project, “Wrong Answer,” will see him return to his roots with a retelling of the 2009 Atlanta public school scandal. But with a blockbuster under his belt, he now joins a short list of go-to directors on studio call sheets.

For the success being seen now with “Black Panther” to translate into widespread industry change, Boyd believes it’s going to take more than just diverse blockbusters that make money hand over vibranium-clawed fist. It’s also going to take more films like “Moonlight” and “Mudbound” getting greenlit by studios, and more than that, it’s going to take a change at the highest levels of Hollywood.

“It needs to be across the board. Every aspect needs to change because, let’s be honest, Hollywood has never been diverse. And until that happens, we can return to the points where there was nothing to really talk about. It’s important that there are people in positions of power throughout the industry who reflect diversity — in executive suites, in agencies — and when you see that, I think we can talk about long-lasting change.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Black Panther’ Will Hit $1 Billion at the Box Office – The Only Question Is When

Find Out Why ‘Black Panther’s’ Michael B. Jordan Has to Do Push Ups for Co-Star Lupita Nyong’o

Michelle Obama ‘Loved’ Marvel’s ‘Black Panther’: ‘It Will Inspire People of All Backgrounds’

“Black Panther” has become a Hollywood hit on a level that few other films have ever achieved: It is now only the fifth film ever to post an opening weekend of over $200 million and is guaranteed to hit $1 billion worldwide within the next month.

Given its African American director, Ryan Coogler, and 10 leading black stars, “Black Panther” has especially been embraced by the African American community, who see the movie’s success has a potential bellwether for Hollywood to embrace more films by and featuring people of color.

The Marvel film’s success comes three years after the #OscarsSoWhite controversy raged — and follows the critical and commercial success of films like “Straight Outta Compton,” “Wonder Woman,” “Coco,” “Get Out,” and last year’s Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight.” Time and time again, moviegoers have made the message clear: Diversity isn’t just culturally important…it’s profitable too.

“It’s clear that representation matters, and moviegoers have responded every time we’ve answered that demand,” said Dave Hollis, Disney’s President of Theatrical Distribution. “We are trying to make movies that resonate with a global audience, and that means making movies that allow people to see themselves represented on screen.”

Audiences are certainly responding with overwhelming enthusiasm, transforming this film’s release into a major cultural moment. Analytics group Shareablee notes that there was three times more Twitter traffic for “Black Panther” than for “Wonder Woman” and nine times more on Instagram.

Celebrities like Octavia Spencer and Snoop Dogg are organizing field trips for underprivileged schoolchildren to go see the film. And directors like Barry Jenkins and Ava DuVernay — as well as former First Lady Michelle Obama — are praising “Black Panther” as a game changer.

It wouldn’t be the first time a major blockbuster prompted studios to rethink strategy. The runaway success of Jennifer Lawrence’s “The Hunger Games” in 2012 is often credited with playing a major hand in unleashing a slew of female-fronted blockbusters on the marketplace.

In the years since Katniss Everdeen took on the Capitol on the big screen, actresses like Charlize Theron in “Mad Max: Fury Road,” Daisy Ridley in the new “Star Wars” trilogy, and Gal Gadot in “Wonder Woman.” Meanwhile, Universal found success with female-fronted comedies like “Girls Trip” and the “Pitch Perfect” trilogy, and later this year audiences will get to see “Ocean’s 8,” an all-female revamp of “Ocean’s Eleven.”

But Darnell Hunt, dean of social sciences at UCLA, cautioned that the recent success of films like “Black Panther” and “Get Out” is no guarantee of long-term changes. He pointed to the success of “12 Years a Slave” four years ago, which instead of triggering more stories of the African American experience led to an all-white Oscar nominee list the following year triggered the #OscarsSoWhite movement.

“We see all these big movies come out every year, but when we do our annual diversity study at UCLA, the numbers for women and [people of color] in front and behind the camera haven’t changed,” Hunt said. “Every year we see a series of exceptional films like ‘Moonlight’ that tells a different story and features women or POC, but they have always prove to be exceptions to the rule. We see a bump here and there, but nothing that points to a sustained trend.”

Hunt also said that there’s been proof that diverse films can sell long for a long time, pointing to Universal’s “Fast & Furious” franchise, eight films that featured actors of different ethnicities such as Ludacris, Dwayne Johnson,and Sung Kang, as well as directors like Justin Lin and F. Gary Gray. (Last year, Gray became the first black director to make a $1 billion hit with “The Fate of the Furious.”)

“There’s been data that has gone back for years proving that movies made by and starring minorities can make money, yet our study hasn’t found any noticeable change,” he said.

Todd Boyd, professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, pointed to the explosion of blaxploitation films in the 1970 which were cheap to produce and financial hit. “These films played a big part in helping some studios stay afloat during some very difficult economic times,” Boyd said. “Then ‘Jaws’ and ‘Star Wars’ came out and the industry forgot about those movies and moved on.”

Too often, mainstream Hollywood forgets about underserved audiences — even when it’s in their financial interest to appeal to a diverse pool of moviegoers.

“Hollywood is cyclical,” Boyd said. “We’ve seen all these films do very well, but we could have this conversation again two years from now and be back to the situation we were in two years ago […] While everyone else is getting caught up [with ‘Black Panther’], what I see Hollywood doing what it does best, and that is capitalizing on a market that it had not previously pursued.”

At the very least, the success of blockbusters like “Black Panther” can help elevate those involved and build interest for futre projects. Daniel Kaluuya, hot off his Oscar-nominated performance in “Get Out,” has earned even more praise for his performance as W’Kabi, the head of Wakanda’s security. Danai Gurira, already known for “The Walking Dead,” has become an overnight icon for black women as the fierce Dora Milaje leader Okoye. And Letitia Wright, arguably this film’s biggest breakout star, will continue to have a presence in cinemas this spring with roles in “Ready Player One” and “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Then there’s director Ryan Coogler, who was already a critical darling with his indie debut film “Fruitvale Station” and his “Rocky” spinoff “Creed,” but now has his blockbuster calling card as the director of one of the biggest hits Hollywood has ever seen.

His next project, “Wrong Answer,” will see him return to his roots with a retelling of the 2009 Atlanta public school scandal. But with a blockbuster under his belt, he now joins a short list of go-to directors on studio call sheets.

For the success being seen now with “Black Panther” to translate into widespread industry change, Boyd believes it’s going to take more than just diverse blockbusters that make money hand over vibranium-clawed fist. It’s also going to take more films like “Moonlight” and “Mudbound” getting greenlit by studios, and more than that, it’s going to take a change at the highest levels of Hollywood.

“It needs to be across the board. Every aspect needs to change because, let’s be honest, Hollywood has never been diverse. And until that happens, we can return to the points where there was nothing to really talk about. It’s important that there are people in positions of power throughout the industry who reflect diversity — in executive suites, in agencies — and when you see that, I think we can talk about long-lasting change.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Panther' Will Hit $1 Billion at the Box Office – The Only Question Is When

Find Out Why 'Black Panther's' Michael B. Jordan Has to Do Push Ups for Co-Star Lupita Nyong'o

Michelle Obama 'Loved' Marvel's 'Black Panther': 'It Will Inspire People of All Backgrounds'

‘Black Panther’ Director Ryan Coogler Thanks Fans in Emotional Letter, Says He’s Moved ‘to Tears’

“Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler penned an emotional letter thanking fans for coming out to watch and support the new Marvel movie, which has shattered multiple box office records.

“Deep down we all hoped that people would come to see a film about a fictional country on the continent of Africa, made up of a cast of people of African descent,” the director wrote. “Never in a million years did we imagine that you all would come out this strong.”

He continued, “It still humbles me to think that people care enough to spend their money and time watching our film. But to see people of all backgrounds wearing clothing that celebrates their heritage, taking pictures next to our posters with their friends and family, and sometimes dancing in the lobbies of theaters — often moved me and my wife to tears.”

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Will Hit $1 Billion at the Box Office – The Only Question Is When

With its record-obliterating $242 million President’s Day opening weekend and $426 million global launch, “Black Panther” is all but guaranteed to surpass $1 billion at the worldwide box office.

Down the road, “Black Panther” could soon leave several major releases in the dust. A $100 million second weekend is a possible feat for this film, as this weekend’s releases, “Game Night” and “Annihilation,” aren’t expected to open to more than $25 million. At that pace, “Black Panther” could pass the domestic run for “Thor: Ragnarok” as early as this coming Sunday and pass the domestic run for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” the week after.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Tops ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ With $242 Million 4-Day Opening

Additionally, “Black Panther” is all people have been talking about for weeks. The film holds a score of 96 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes and has since received an A+ CinemaScore.

“Black Panther” stars Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Andy Serkis, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Martin Freeman and Daniel Kaluuya.

“Thank you for giving our team of filmmakers the greatest gift,” he concluded. “The opportunity to share this film, that we poured our hearts and soul into, with you.”

Read Coogler’s emotional letter below.

#WakandaForever #BlackPanther pic.twitter.com/DKOG3AESUn

— Marvel Entertainment (@Marvel) February 21, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Black Panther’ Mid-Credits Scene Was Hit Film’s Original Ending, Director Says

Find Out Why ‘Black Panther’s’ Michael B. Jordan Has to Do Push Ups for Co-Star Lupita Nyong’o

‘Black Panther’: All the Box Office Records It Has Broken So Far (Photos)

“Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler penned an emotional letter thanking fans for coming out to watch and support the new Marvel movie, which has shattered multiple box office records.

“Deep down we all hoped that people would come to see a film about a fictional country on the continent of Africa, made up of a cast of people of African descent,” the director wrote. “Never in a million years did we imagine that you all would come out this strong.”

He continued, “It still humbles me to think that people care enough to spend their money and time watching our film. But to see people of all backgrounds wearing clothing that celebrates their heritage, taking pictures next to our posters with their friends and family, and sometimes dancing in the lobbies of theaters — often moved me and my wife to tears.”

With its record-obliterating $242 million President’s Day opening weekend and $426 million global launch, “Black Panther” is all but guaranteed to surpass $1 billion at the worldwide box office.

Down the road, “Black Panther” could soon leave several major releases in the dust. A $100 million second weekend is a possible feat for this film, as this weekend’s releases, “Game Night” and “Annihilation,” aren’t expected to open to more than $25 million. At that pace, “Black Panther” could pass the domestic run for “Thor: Ragnarok” as early as this coming Sunday and pass the domestic run for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” the week after.

Additionally, “Black Panther” is all people have been talking about for weeks. The film holds a score of 96 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes and has since received an A+ CinemaScore.

“Black Panther” stars Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Andy Serkis, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Martin Freeman and Daniel Kaluuya.

“Thank you for giving our team of filmmakers the greatest gift,” he concluded. “The opportunity to share this film, that we poured our hearts and soul into, with you.”

Read Coogler’s emotional letter below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Panther' Mid-Credits Scene Was Hit Film's Original Ending, Director Says

Find Out Why 'Black Panther's' Michael B. Jordan Has to Do Push Ups for Co-Star Lupita Nyong'o

'Black Panther': All the Box Office Records It Has Broken So Far (Photos)

What’s Next for the Cast of ‘Black Panther’ (Photos)

“Black Panther” is a watershed moment for both Hollywood and the stellar cast. Here are their next projects.

1. T’Challa/Black Panther
Chadwick Boseman will reprise the role of “Black Panther” in Marvel Studios upcoming “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Untitled Avengers Part 4.”

2. Erik Kilmonger
Michael B. Jordan, who brought gravitas to the role of villain Kilmonger, will reprise the role of Adonis Johnson in “Creed 2.”

3.W’Kabi
Daniel Kaluuya who is a Best Actor Oscar nominee for his breakout role in “Get Out” will next be seen in Steve McQueen’s “Widows.”

4. Nakia
Lupita Nyong’o will next be seen opposite Josh Gad in Zombie Horror Comedy “Little Monsters” and is attached to star in “Charlie’s Angels.”

5. Okoye
Danai Gurira, who practically steals the film as the head of the Dora Milaje will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and currently can be seen in “The Walking Dead” as Michonne.

6. Shuri
Letitia Wright will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and can also be seen in Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player One.”

7. Zuri
The prolific Forest Whitaker has a busy slate and will next be seen in “How It Ends,” and “LAbyrinth” about the the murders of Tupac Shakur and Notorious BIG.

8. Ramonda
Angela Bassett has two other tentpoles in 2018 as she will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and has “Mission: Impossible – Fallout” opposite Tom Cruise and Henrey Cavill.

9. M’Baku
Winston Duke, who play one of the leaders of the five tribes of Wakanda will reprise his role in “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Through 91 days in theaters, the DC team-up film “Justice League” made $228 million domestically, a total that would be good for many other films but was below the $412.5 million made by “Wonder Woman” and below what was expected for a movie that aimed to be DC’s answer to the “Avengers.” “Black Panther” has already more than doubled the three-day opening made by “JL,” with a $201.7 million start compared to $95 million made by “JL” back in November.

“Black Panther” is a watershed moment for both Hollywood and the stellar cast. Here are their next projects.

1. T’Challa/Black Panther
Chadwick Boseman will reprise the role of “Black Panther” in Marvel Studios upcoming “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Untitled Avengers Part 4.”

2. Erik Kilmonger
Michael B. Jordan, who brought gravitas to the role of villain Kilmonger, will reprise the role of Adonis Johnson in “Creed 2.”

3.W’Kabi
Daniel Kaluuya who is a Best Actor Oscar nominee for his breakout role in “Get Out” will next be seen in Steve McQueen’s “Widows.”

4. Nakia
Lupita Nyong’o will next be seen opposite Josh Gad in Zombie Horror Comedy “Little Monsters” and is attached to star in “Charlie’s Angels.”

5. Okoye
Danai Gurira, who practically steals the film as the head of the Dora Milaje will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and currently can be seen in “The Walking Dead” as Michonne.

6. Shuri
Letitia Wright will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and can also be seen in Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player One.”

7. Zuri
The prolific Forest Whitaker has a busy slate and will next be seen in “How It Ends,” and “LAbyrinth” about the the murders of Tupac Shakur and Notorious BIG.

8. Ramonda
Angela Bassett has two other tentpoles in 2018 as she will reprise her role in “Avengers: Infinity War” and has “Mission: Impossible – Fallout” opposite Tom Cruise and Henrey Cavill.

9. M’Baku
Winston Duke, who play one of the leaders of the five tribes of Wakanda will reprise his role in “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Through 91 days in theaters, the DC team-up film “Justice League” made $228 million domestically, a total that would be good for many other films but was below the $412.5 million made by “Wonder Woman” and below what was expected for a movie that aimed to be DC’s answer to the “Avengers.” “Black Panther” has already more than doubled the three-day opening made by “JL,” with a $201.7 million start compared to $95 million made by “JL” back in November.

BAFTA Awards: Allison Janney Wins Supporting Actress; Sam Rockwell Takes Supporting Actor

The 71st British Academy Film Awards are underway in London. The ceremony, which is being held at the Royal Albert Hall for the second consecutive year, is hosted for the first time by Joanna Lumley, best known for her role as Patsy in the “Absolutely Fabulous” TV show and movie. Lumley took over as host from […]

The 71st British Academy Film Awards are underway in London. The ceremony, which is being held at the Royal Albert Hall for the second consecutive year, is hosted for the first time by Joanna Lumley, best known for her role as Patsy in the “Absolutely Fabulous” TV show and movie. Lumley took over as host from […]

How to Watch the 2018 BAFTA Awards and Red Carpet

Some of award season’s top honors are about to be handed out across the pond. The British Academy Film Awards are taking place on Sunday, and movie fanatics can tune into the red carpet digitally. The pre-show for the BAFTAs will be live-streamed on its Facebook and Twitter accounts. The stream will also be available to […]

Some of award season’s top honors are about to be handed out across the pond. The British Academy Film Awards are taking place on Sunday, and movie fanatics can tune into the red carpet digitally. The pre-show for the BAFTAs will be live-streamed on its Facebook and Twitter accounts. The stream will also be available to […]

‘Get Out’s Jordan Peele & Daniel Kaluuya Reveal The Careful Chemistry Behind Most Combustible Best Picture Nominee

With the final voting about to begin for the Best Picture Oscar, Deadline looks at the challenges and the hard road for each of the nine finalists. First up is our AwardsLine cover story film, Get Out.
What led Get Out toward becoming the rare genre film that, on a $4.5 million budget, grossed over $255 million globally and drew the most Oscar nominations of any horror film since The Sixth Sense and The Silence of the Lambs? Jordan Peele‘s hit scored four nominations, for…

With the final voting about to begin for the Best Picture Oscar, Deadline looks at the challenges and the hard road for each of the nine finalists. First up is our AwardsLine cover story film, Get Out. What led Get Out toward becoming the rare genre film that, on a $4.5 million budget, grossed over $255 million globally and drew the most Oscar nominations of any horror film since The Sixth Sense and The Silence of the Lambs? Jordan Peele's hit scored four nominations, for…

‘Black Panther’ Now Ranks Among Fandango’s Top 5 Biggest Pre-Sellers of All Time

“Black Panther” is now among Fandango’s top 5 ticket pre-sellers of all time, the mobile ticketing company said on Thursday.

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Rogue One” top the list, with “Black Panther” coming in fourth place. Jennifer Lawrence’s “The Hunger Games” rounds out the list.

#BlackPanther keeps climbing the charts. pic.twitter.com/794SSfXkkc

— Fandango (@Fandango) February 15, 2018

“Black Panther” opens in previews on Thursday night and is projected to open to at least $150 million in its four-day holiday opening weekend. However, “Black Panther” is expected to post an opening that would rank in the top 10 for superhero films, and the question arises whether it will beat the February box office record held by “Deadpool” two years ago when it opened to $152 million.

Also Read: Does ‘Black Panther’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Right now, “Black Panther” is also the top-rated superhero film of all time, at 98 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, DC or Marvel.

“Black Panther” follows T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) who, after the death of his father in “Captain America: Civil War,” returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to take the throne as its new king. But when vicious arms dealer Ulysees Klaue (Andy Serkis) returns to threaten the kingdom, T’Challa’s mettle as king — and Black Panther — is tested when he is drawn into a formidable conflict against enemies both inside and outside his kingdom, including the mutinous Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan).

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Film Review: Supporting Players Steal Show in Marvel’s Excellent African Adventure

Lupita Nyong’o, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, and Winston Duke star with Angela Bassett and Forest Whitaker. Ryan Coogler directed from a script he co-wrote with Joe Robert Cole.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Black Panther’: 5 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Marvel’s Latest Big-Screen Hero (Video)

‘Black Panther’ Slays at Korean Box Office, Signs Point to Olympics Boost

Here Are Some Key MCU Developments to Remember Before Seeing ‘Black Panther’

“Black Panther” is now among Fandango’s top 5 ticket pre-sellers of all time, the mobile ticketing company said on Thursday.

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Rogue One” top the list, with “Black Panther” coming in fourth place. Jennifer Lawrence’s “The Hunger Games” rounds out the list.

“Black Panther” opens in previews on Thursday night and is projected to open to at least $150 million in its four-day holiday opening weekend. However, “Black Panther” is expected to post an opening that would rank in the top 10 for superhero films, and the question arises whether it will beat the February box office record held by “Deadpool” two years ago when it opened to $152 million.

Right now, “Black Panther” is also the top-rated superhero film of all time, at 98 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, DC or Marvel.

“Black Panther” follows T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) who, after the death of his father in “Captain America: Civil War,” returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to take the throne as its new king. But when vicious arms dealer Ulysees Klaue (Andy Serkis) returns to threaten the kingdom, T’Challa’s mettle as king — and Black Panther — is tested when he is drawn into a formidable conflict against enemies both inside and outside his kingdom, including the mutinous Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan).

Lupita Nyong’o, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, and Winston Duke star with Angela Bassett and Forest Whitaker. Ryan Coogler directed from a script he co-wrote with Joe Robert Cole.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Panther': 5 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Marvel's Latest Big-Screen Hero (Video)

'Black Panther' Slays at Korean Box Office, Signs Point to Olympics Boost

Here Are Some Key MCU Developments to Remember Before Seeing 'Black Panther'

Does ‘Black Panther’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

It may only be February, but it’s already time for the first of three Marvel Cinematic Universe movies in 2018. “Black Panther” is the last Marvel movie before this summer’s teamup to end all teamups, “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Of course, it’s important for far more than just that reason — “Black Panther” is the first mega-budget blockbuster ever to feature a cast made up almost entirely of black actors. Chadwick Boseman headlines as the titular hero, and the supporting cast is spectacular, with Michael B. Jordan as the villainous Eric Killmonger alongside Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Sterling K. Brown, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Daniel Kaluuya and many others.

Clocking in at a robust 140 minutes, “Black Panther” is a movie that will test the limits of your bladder if you grabbed a large beverage at the theater. And so once the credits roll you may feel a strong urge to head to the bathroom and want to know if you’re going to miss anything by doing so. And so here’s the skinny.

Also Read: All 49 Marvel Movies Ranked, Including ‘Black Panther’

“Black Panther” contains two extra scenes after the credits start to roll. The first comes early in the credits, about a minute or so in. And the second comes at the very end of the credits. There’s about a five minute gap in between the two, so you probably will have time to run out and come back if there’s not like a long long at the bathroom.

Thus concludes the spoiler-free portion of this post. If you don’t want to know any of the details of the post-credits scenes in “Black Panther,” now’s the time to bow out.

Here’s a cool shot from the movie to act as a buffer.

Okay, it’s spoiler time.

The first of the two scenes is sort of a bonus ending of the movie. T’Challa is addressing the United Nations, declaring Wakanda’s intent to, for the first time, work with other countries in order to make the world a better place, following up on the outreach center he’s planning to set up in Oakland. At the end of T’Challa’s address, some smarmy white guy pompously asks how a nation of farmers is going to be able to contribute anything meaningful. At which point all the Wakandans in the room smile wryly.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Grabs Best Rotten Tomatoes Score of Any DC or Marvel Movie

The scene at the end of the credits gives us an update on the status of one Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan), who at the end of “Captain America: Civil War” was seen being put into what appeared to be cryogenic stasis in Wakanda. But now he’s out and awake, still in Wakanda, meditating in a hut on the plains. T’Challa’s sister Shuri (Letitia Wright) pays him a visit, and calls him by a new title: White Wolf. It’s a significant thing — White Wolf is a Marvel character, but not one associated with Bucky.

In the comics, White Wolf is a white man named Hunter whose family died in a plane crash in Wakanda when he was a boy. White Wolf was the head of Wakanda’s secret police, the Hatut Zeraze, under T’Chaka. T’Challa abolished the organization when he took the throne, which led to an estrangement between him and the White Wolf, who then became a mercenary.

It’s unlikely that Bucky’s arc from here will follow that of the comic book White Wolf in any meaningful way, the title instead carrying a symbolic parallel — that of a favored adopted son of Wakanda. Since, according to the trailer for “Avengers: Infinity War,” we’ll next see Bucky defending Wakanda from the forces of Thanos, that thought follows.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Black Panther’ Grabs Best Rotten Tomatoes Score of Any DC or Marvel Movie

All 49 Marvel Movies Ranked, Including ‘Black Panther’

‘Black Panther’ Review Roundup: Marvel Fans ‘Won’t Want Experience to End’

It may only be February, but it’s already time for the first of three Marvel Cinematic Universe movies in 2018. “Black Panther” is the last Marvel movie before this summer’s teamup to end all teamups, “Avengers: Infinity War.”

Of course, it’s important for far more than just that reason — “Black Panther” is the first mega-budget blockbuster ever to feature a cast made up almost entirely of black actors. Chadwick Boseman headlines as the titular hero, and the supporting cast is spectacular, with Michael B. Jordan as the villainous Eric Killmonger alongside Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Sterling K. Brown, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Letitia Wright, Daniel Kaluuya and many others.

Clocking in at a robust 140 minutes, “Black Panther” is a movie that will test the limits of your bladder if you grabbed a large beverage at the theater. And so once the credits roll you may feel a strong urge to head to the bathroom and want to know if you’re going to miss anything by doing so. And so here’s the skinny.

“Black Panther” contains two extra scenes after the credits start to roll. The first comes early in the credits, about a minute or so in. And the second comes at the very end of the credits. There’s about a five minute gap in between the two, so you probably will have time to run out and come back if there’s not like a long long at the bathroom.

Thus concludes the spoiler-free portion of this post. If you don’t want to know any of the details of the post-credits scenes in “Black Panther,” now’s the time to bow out.

Here’s a cool shot from the movie to act as a buffer.

Okay, it’s spoiler time.

The first of the two scenes is sort of a bonus ending of the movie. T’Challa is addressing the United Nations, declaring Wakanda’s intent to, for the first time, work with other countries in order to make the world a better place, following up on the outreach center he’s planning to set up in Oakland. At the end of T’Challa’s address, some smarmy white guy pompously asks how a nation of farmers is going to be able to contribute anything meaningful. At which point all the Wakandans in the room smile wryly.

The scene at the end of the credits gives us an update on the status of one Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan), who at the end of “Captain America: Civil War” was seen being put into what appeared to be cryogenic stasis in Wakanda. But now he’s out and awake, still in Wakanda, meditating in a hut on the plains. T’Challa’s sister Shuri (Letitia Wright) pays him a visit, and calls him by a new title: White Wolf. It’s a significant thing — White Wolf is a Marvel character, but not one associated with Bucky.

In the comics, White Wolf is a white man named Hunter whose family died in a plane crash in Wakanda when he was a boy. White Wolf was the head of Wakanda’s secret police, the Hatut Zeraze, under T’Chaka. T’Challa abolished the organization when he took the throne, which led to an estrangement between him and the White Wolf, who then became a mercenary.

It’s unlikely that Bucky’s arc from here will follow that of the comic book White Wolf in any meaningful way, the title instead carrying a symbolic parallel — that of a favored adopted son of Wakanda. Since, according to the trailer for “Avengers: Infinity War,” we’ll next see Bucky defending Wakanda from the forces of Thanos, that thought follows.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Black Panther' Grabs Best Rotten Tomatoes Score of Any DC or Marvel Movie

All 49 Marvel Movies Ranked, Including 'Black Panther'

'Black Panther' Review Roundup: Marvel Fans 'Won't Want Experience to End'

‘Black Panther’ Cast, Oscar Nominees Share the Influential Black Films That Inspired Them (Watch)

In honor of Black History month, Variety asked actors, directors and composers of Hollywood what seminal black films inspired them as artists. “Black Panther” star Lupita Nyong’o chose Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg’s  “The Color Purple.” “It was one of the first films I watched where a woman had my complexion and my hair texture,” says […]

In honor of Black History month, Variety asked actors, directors and composers of Hollywood what seminal black films inspired them as artists. “Black Panther” star Lupita Nyong’o chose Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg’s  “The Color Purple.” “It was one of the first films I watched where a woman had my complexion and my hair texture,” says […]

‘Black Panther’ Film Review: Supporting Players Steal Show in Marvel’s Excellent African Adventure

It used to be that once characters became established stars in the world of comics, publishers would create anthology titles like “Superman Family” or “Archie’s Gals and Pals,” thus allowing readers to get not only new stories about the title character but also ancillary tales about, say, Lois Lane or Principal Weatherbee. I bring this up because “Black Panther” does such a great job introducing the fascinating supporting characters in his orbit that it can barely find time to dig into its purported protagonist.

Black Panther (played by Chadwick Boseman) was introduced to the Marvel Cinematic Universe in a fairly brief appearance in “Captain America: Civil War,” in which his father, King T’Chaka of the African nation of Wakanda, was assassinated. This mostly rousing solo adventure, directed by Ryan Coogler (who co-wrote with Joe Robert Cole, “American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson”), surrounds our hero with such a terrific cadre of gals and pals — and sidelines him for a chunk of the third act — that he almost gets shoved to the background.

As the film opens, Boseman’s Prince T’Challa is returning to Wakanda, where he will succeed his father both on the throne and as the possessor of the powers of the Black Panther. (This is one of the few superheroes who is also a head of state.) What makes “Black Panther” unusual is that there are no personal hurdles our hero has to overcome; he’s ready, willing and able to inherit both titles, with no need to overcome hubris or fear or arrogance. Thankfully, we’re spared yet another Joseph Campbell-style reluctant hero’s journey.

Watch Video: New Marvel ‘Black Panther’ Trailer Warns ‘War Is Coming’

What does stand in T’Challa’s way are the harsh realities of politics and statesmanship, as he learns a dark secret from his father’s past that casts a pall over a land that is a paradise on Earth. Wakanda, you see, was built on the site where a meteorite made of pure vibranium (the metal from which Captain America’s shield was forged) crashed. It’s made the Wakandans technologically advanced, but they’ve kept their wealth and wizardry a secret from the world.

One of the most dramatic — and relevant — storylines the film explores is whether or not advanced societies owe it to the global community to share their discoveries rather than keep their bounty to themselves. (Or as one character asks, putting none too fine a point on it, do we build bridges or erect barriers?)

T’Challa’s ex-girlfriend Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o), a spy we first see liberating captured women and child soldiers, thinks it’s the duty of Wakanda to use its resources to help those less fortunate. And when a villainous black-ops assassin with the catchy nickname Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) shows up, he also wants Wakanda to share its wealth — by putting its high-tech weapons in the hands of black revolutionaries the world over.

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Director on Anti-Disney Sabotage Plan: I Welcome Fans ‘Regardless of… Political Views’

Coogler (who previously directed Jordan in “Creed” and “Fruitvale Station”) plunges us into the wonders of Wakanda, and in doing so, gives us three women in T’Challa’s orbit who steal his onscreen thunder: besides Nakia, there’s Okoye (Danai Gurira, “The Walking Dead”), the intensely dedicated (and drily funny) warrior general, as well as the new king’s younger sister Shuri (Letitia Wright, “The Commuter”), a tech genius who serves as this movie’s Tony Stark.

Or, if you prefer, Q: “Black Panther” features at least one sequence that out-007s the recent James Bond movies. Shuri outfits T’Challa with some new gizmos just in time for him, Nakia and Okoye to travel to a casino in Busan, South Korea, where they get into a brawl with arms dealer Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis) before a breathtaking car chase ensues. (Among that sequence’s thrilling aspects is Black Panther riding on top of a driverless sports car that Shuri is handling via remote control from her lab in Wakanda.)

Also Read: Octavia Spencer to Offer Free ‘Black Panther’ Movie Screenings to ‘Underserved’ Mississippi Kids

It’s these thrilling moments that make the film’s occasional pacing lapses forgivable; not to give away too much of the plot, but the story is structured in a way that several key moments are repeated or revisited from another angle. (There’s a lot of rule-of-threes in the storytelling here.)

But when “Black Panther” works, it’s thrillingly alive, whether it’s the dazzling colors of the vivid costumes by Ruth E. Carter (“Selma”) — in Wakanda, the Basotho blankets emit force-fields — or the eclectic and vibrant music choices; the score by Ludwig Göransson (“Get Out”) vacillates smoothly between European strings and African percussion and woodwinds, while the songs put Kendrick Lamar and The Weeknd side by side with South African performers like Babes Wodumo and Sjava.

One reason the charismatic Boseman doesn’t register as much as his counterparts might be his mask. We don’t get to see his face during fights the way we do Nyong’o’s or Gurira’s. (In some of the film’s less successful VFX moments, it’s obvious that the fighting figure of Black Panther is pure cartoon.) But who can complain when the film offers up Jordan’s Killmonger, one of the MCU’s most fascinating villains to date, as part of a powerful ensemble that includes Angela Bassett, Daniel Kaluuya, Winston Duke and Sterling K. Brown?

Also Read: ‘Black Panther’ Tops All Superhero Movies in Advance Ticket Sales on Fandango

“Black Panther” boasts a lot of black talent on both sides of the camera, which is unusual enough for a big studio movie, but this is also one of the most Africa-centric films Hollywood has ever produced. Outside of “Queen of Katwe” — would that a tenth of the “Black Panther” audience had bought a ticket for that lovely film two years ago — or “Sense 8,” American viewers don’t get much of a look at one of the planet’s most gorgeous and populous continents, so it’s exciting to see the wildly popular Marvel movies take us there.

Like many of the best of the MCU movies, “Black Panther” doesn’t waste time laying out a lot of groundwork for films to come (still, stay for those closing credits) and it doesn’t assume that you’ve seen and memorized the previous 17 movies (still, if you have, you’ll pick up on a thing or two that others might miss). It’s already been announced that Black Panther will fight alongside the Avengers in the upcoming “Infinity War,” but here’s hoping he brings as much of his entourage with him as possible.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Facebook Boots Anti-‘Black Panther’ Group for Violating Community Standards

‘Black Panther’ Whips Up A-List Fans Like Ava DuVernay, John Boyega: ‘This Movie Means History’

‘Black Panther’ Ready to Charge Into Theaters With $100 Million-Plus Debut

Kendrick Lamar to Produce ‘Black Panther: The Album’ (Video)

It used to be that once characters became established stars in the world of comics, publishers would create anthology titles like “Superman Family” or “Archie’s Gals and Pals,” thus allowing readers to get not only new stories about the title character but also ancillary tales about, say, Lois Lane or Principal Weatherbee. I bring this up because “Black Panther” does such a great job introducing the fascinating supporting characters in his orbit that it can barely find time to dig into its purported protagonist.

Black Panther (played by Chadwick Boseman) was introduced to the Marvel Cinematic Universe in a fairly brief appearance in “Captain America: Civil War,” in which his father, King T’Chaka of the African nation of Wakanda, was assassinated. This mostly rousing solo adventure, directed by Ryan Coogler (who co-wrote with Joe Robert Cole, “American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson”), surrounds our hero with such a terrific cadre of gals and pals — and sidelines him for a chunk of the third act — that he almost gets shoved to the background.

As the film opens, Boseman’s Prince T’Challa is returning to Wakanda, where he will succeed his father both on the throne and as the possessor of the powers of the Black Panther. (This is one of the few superheroes who is also a head of state.) What makes “Black Panther” unusual is that there are no personal hurdles our hero has to overcome; he’s ready, willing and able to inherit both titles, with no need to overcome hubris or fear or arrogance. Thankfully, we’re spared yet another Joseph Campbell-style reluctant hero’s journey.

What does stand in T’Challa’s way are the harsh realities of politics and statesmanship, as he learns a dark secret from his father’s past that casts a pall over a land that is a paradise on Earth. Wakanda, you see, was built on the site where a meteorite made of pure vibranium (the metal from which Captain America’s shield was forged) crashed. It’s made the Wakandans technologically advanced, but they’ve kept their wealth and wizardry a secret from the world.

One of the most dramatic — and relevant — storylines the film explores is whether or not advanced societies owe it to the global community to share their discoveries rather than keep their bounty to themselves. (Or as one character asks, putting none too fine a point on it, do we build bridges or erect barriers?)

T’Challa’s ex-girlfriend Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o), a spy we first see liberating captured women and child soldiers, thinks it’s the duty of Wakanda to use its resources to help those less fortunate. And when a villainous black-ops assassin with the catchy nickname Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) shows up, he also wants Wakanda to share its wealth — by putting its high-tech weapons in the hands of black revolutionaries the world over.

Coogler (who previously directed Jordan in “Creed” and “Fruitvale Station”) plunges us into the wonders of Wakanda, and in doing so, gives us three women in T’Challa’s orbit who steal his onscreen thunder: besides Nakia, there’s Okoye (Danai Gurira, “The Walking Dead”), the intensely dedicated (and drily funny) warrior general, as well as the new king’s younger sister Shuri (Letitia Wright, “The Commuter”), a tech genius who serves as this movie’s Tony Stark.

Or, if you prefer, Q: “Black Panther” features at least one sequence that out-007s the recent James Bond movies. Shuri outfits T’Challa with some new gizmos just in time for him, Nakia and Okoye to travel to a casino in Busan, South Korea, where they get into a brawl with arms dealer Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis) before a breathtaking car chase ensues. (Among that sequence’s thrilling aspects is Black Panther riding on top of a driverless sports car that Shuri is handling via remote control from her lab in Wakanda.)

It’s these thrilling moments that make the film’s occasional pacing lapses forgivable; not to give away too much of the plot, but the story is structured in a way that several key moments are repeated or revisited from another angle. (There’s a lot of rule-of-threes in the storytelling here.)

But when “Black Panther” works, it’s thrillingly alive, whether it’s the dazzling colors of the vivid costumes by Ruth E. Carter (“Selma”) — in Wakanda, the Basotho blankets emit force-fields — or the eclectic and vibrant music choices; the score by Ludwig Göransson (“Get Out”) vacillates smoothly between European strings and African percussion and woodwinds, while the songs put Kendrick Lamar and The Weeknd side by side with South African performers like Babes Wodumo and Sjava.

One reason the charismatic Boseman doesn’t register as much as his counterparts might be his mask. We don’t get to see his face during fights the way we do Nyong’o’s or Gurira’s. (In some of the film’s less successful VFX moments, it’s obvious that the fighting figure of Black Panther is pure cartoon.) But who can complain when the film offers up Jordan’s Killmonger, one of the MCU’s most fascinating villains to date, as part of a powerful ensemble that includes Angela Bassett, Daniel Kaluuya, Winston Duke and Sterling K. Brown?

“Black Panther” boasts a lot of black talent on both sides of the camera, which is unusual enough for a big studio movie, but this is also one of the most Africa-centric films Hollywood has ever produced. Outside of “Queen of Katwe” — would that a tenth of the “Black Panther” audience had bought a ticket for that lovely film two years ago — or “Sense 8,” American viewers don’t get much of a look at one of the planet’s most gorgeous and populous continents, so it’s exciting to see the wildly popular Marvel movies take us there.

Like many of the best of the MCU movies, “Black Panther” doesn’t waste time laying out a lot of groundwork for films to come (still, stay for those closing credits) and it doesn’t assume that you’ve seen and memorized the previous 17 movies (still, if you have, you’ll pick up on a thing or two that others might miss). It’s already been announced that Black Panther will fight alongside the Avengers in the upcoming “Infinity War,” but here’s hoping he brings as much of his entourage with him as possible.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Facebook Boots Anti-'Black Panther' Group for Violating Community Standards

'Black Panther' Whips Up A-List Fans Like Ava DuVernay, John Boyega: 'This Movie Means History'

'Black Panther' Ready to Charge Into Theaters With $100 Million-Plus Debut

Kendrick Lamar to Produce 'Black Panther: The Album' (Video)