‘Boundaries’ Trailer: Christopher Plummer Wants to Drive Cross-Country With His Family (And Also Sell a Lot of Weed)

In Shana Feste’s newest film, the Plummer and Vera Farmiga play an estranged — and mismatched — father and daughter, forced to reunite on a wacky road trip.

Talk about a road trip. “Country Strong” director Shana Feste is back on the big screen with a very funny, very personal slice of life that’s, well, literally sliced right from her own life.

In “Boundaries,” Vera Farmiga steps in as a Feste-surrogate (the film is loosely based on the filmmaker’s own family life and a trip she took with her dad back in the ’80s), who is forced to embark on a wacky road trip with her drug dealer dad Jack (Christopher Plummer). It already sounds ill-fated on paper — Jack has recently been kicked out of his nursing home for his bad behavior, and he’s hellbent on living it up while the family drives cross-country to deliver him to Farmiga’s sister, played by Kristen Schaal — but only gets more off-kilter as the wheels keep spinning.

The film also features “A Monster Calls” breakout Lewis MacDougall as Farmgia’s son, assuring the film can at least boast one of the best on-screen families the summer has to offer. (And that’s to say nothing of the rest of the supporting cast, including Peter Fonda and Bobby Cannavale.)

“We clicked right away; me with Plummer is like a dog left alone with his hamburger,” Farmiga told Entertainment Weekly of the actors’ dynamic. “The world just drops away, and I eat him up because he’s so delicious. Don’t let his prestige and his fancy-schmancy aura fool you. He’s a clown, he’s a jester, the sort of person you just laugh with most of the time. He’s the goddamn life of the party still at 88.”

The film debuted at SXSW, where our Eric Kohn wrote that “it’s rewarding enough to hang with these characters and roll with their mudslinging…its message of learning to love your relatives in spite of their flaws registering on a far simpler scale than the undercurrent of multi-generational resentment percolating throughout the story.” Check out the first trailer for “Boundaries,” thanks to EW, below.

“Boundaries” opens on June 22.

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Kevin Spacey Sexual Assault Case Under Review by LA District Attorney

The Los Angeles District Attorney’s office is reviewing a sexual assault case against Kevin Spacey sent by the County Sheriff’s Dept., according to multiple news outlets including CNN and NBC.

The case was presented on April 5 to the office’s special task force handling sexual assault in Hollywood. No further details have been included, according to the reports.

Spacey has not yet faced criminal charges for any of the accusations made against him, but damage to his career has been significant. He was removed from the hit show “House of Cards,” which earned him five Emmy nominations. Accusations against him also triggered reshoots for the Ridley Scott film “All The Money In The World,” which saw Spacey’s performance as oil tycoon J. Paul Getty replaced by Christopher Plummer — who earned an Academy Award nomination for the role.

Also Read: Kate Mara Says Kevin Spacey Sexual Misconduct Accusations Are ‘Very Shocking and Devastating’

The accusations against Spacey began in November when “Star Trek: Discovery” actor Anthony Rapp accused the former “House of Cards” star of sexually assaulting him when he was 14. Since then, Spacey’s charitable foundation has shut down operations, and London’s Old Vic Theatre, which Spacey served at as artistic director, opened a confidential hotline for anyone who says they were abused by Spacey to report their incidents.

In November, the Old Vic said that it had received more than 20 complaints of “inappropriate behavior” against Spacey, and advised 12 of the complainants to bring their accounts to the police. Some of the accusations against Spacey are also being investigated by Scotland Yard, though no formal charges have yet come from them.

Aside from Rapp’s accusation, Spacey has not responded to any of the accusations against him.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Kate Mara Says Kevin Spacey Sexual Misconduct Accusations Are ‘Very Shocking and Devastating’

Netflix Drops First Post-Kevin Spacey ‘House of Cards’ Trailer During the Oscars (Video)

Oscars: Ryan Seacrest Avoids Mentioning Kevin Spacey, #TIMESUP in Christopher Plummer Interview (Video)

The Los Angeles District Attorney’s office is reviewing a sexual assault case against Kevin Spacey sent by the County Sheriff’s Dept., according to multiple news outlets including CNN and NBC.

The case was presented on April 5 to the office’s special task force handling sexual assault in Hollywood. No further details have been included, according to the reports.

Spacey has not yet faced criminal charges for any of the accusations made against him, but damage to his career has been significant. He was removed from the hit show “House of Cards,” which earned him five Emmy nominations. Accusations against him also triggered reshoots for the Ridley Scott film “All The Money In The World,” which saw Spacey’s performance as oil tycoon J. Paul Getty replaced by Christopher Plummer — who earned an Academy Award nomination for the role.

The accusations against Spacey began in November when “Star Trek: Discovery” actor Anthony Rapp accused the former “House of Cards” star of sexually assaulting him when he was 14. Since then, Spacey’s charitable foundation has shut down operations, and London’s Old Vic Theatre, which Spacey served at as artistic director, opened a confidential hotline for anyone who says they were abused by Spacey to report their incidents.

In November, the Old Vic said that it had received more than 20 complaints of “inappropriate behavior” against Spacey, and advised 12 of the complainants to bring their accounts to the police. Some of the accusations against Spacey are also being investigated by Scotland Yard, though no formal charges have yet come from them.

Aside from Rapp’s accusation, Spacey has not responded to any of the accusations against him.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Kate Mara Says Kevin Spacey Sexual Misconduct Accusations Are 'Very Shocking and Devastating'

Netflix Drops First Post-Kevin Spacey 'House of Cards' Trailer During the Oscars (Video)

Oscars: Ryan Seacrest Avoids Mentioning Kevin Spacey, #TIMESUP in Christopher Plummer Interview (Video)

‘All the Money in the World’: Christopher Plummer Didn’t Think He’d Be Able to Pull Off Replacement Role (Exclusive Video)

One of the biggest developments of the #MeToo movement late last year was the removal of Kevin Spacey from “All the Money in the World” just over a month before the film’s planned release after Spacey was accused of serious sexual misconduct, including attempted rape, by more than a dozen men.

Christopher Plummer ably took over the role in reshoots, and director Ridley Scott somehow managed to deliver the finished movie as planned in December.

“All the Money in the World” is now out on digital home video, with its DVD and blu-ray release coming on April 10, and those who purchase the movie will be treated to an extra feature titled “Recast, Reshot, Reclaimed” in which the cast and crew, including Scott, Plummer, producer Mark Huffam, and stars Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg discuss the trials involved in recasting such a major role at such a late stage.

Also Read: Getty Lawyer Accuses FX’s ‘Trust’ of ‘Cruel and Mean-Spirited’ Defamation

The Wrap has an exclusive look at that featurette, a one-minute clip which you can view at the top of this post.

In the clip, Plummer expresses his relief that the whole thing went off basically seamlessly. “I’m thrilled that I was able to do it. I didn’t think I was going to,” he said.

Also Read: Why Mark Wahlberg Got ‘All the Money in the World’ for Reshoots and Michelle Williams Didn’t

Williams, likewise, described what they were able to do in reshoots as “amazing.”

“I was proud to be with him here under these circumstances,” Williams says in the video. “This kind of amazing feat that we’re trying to pull off. But also to have the chance to work with him [Plummer].”

“All the Money in the World” tells the story of the kidnapping of the teenaged John Paul Getty and the battle between his mother (Williams) and billionaire grandfather, J. Paul Getty (Plummer), who refused to pay the ransom to get the kid back. The movie was written by David Scarpa as an adaptation of the book by John Pearson.

Also Read: ‘All the Money in the World’ Cast Discusses How Ridley Scott Pulled Off Reshoots With Christopher Plummer

The film is available for purchase now at digital retailers, and the physical release will follow on April 10 — at which point it will also become available for rent.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why Mark Wahlberg Got ‘All the Money in the World’ for Reshoots and Michelle Williams Didn’t

What Happened to John Paul Getty III After Kidnapping in ‘All the Money in the World’?

‘All the Money in the World’ Cast Discusses How Ridley Scott Pulled Off Reshoots With Christopher Plummer

Ridley Scott Didn’t Call Kevin Spacey When He Replaced Star in ‘All The Money in the World’

One of the biggest developments of the #MeToo movement late last year was the removal of Kevin Spacey from “All the Money in the World” just over a month before the film’s planned release after Spacey was accused of serious sexual misconduct, including attempted rape, by more than a dozen men.

Christopher Plummer ably took over the role in reshoots, and director Ridley Scott somehow managed to deliver the finished movie as planned in December.

“All the Money in the World” is now out on digital home video, with its DVD and blu-ray release coming on April 10, and those who purchase the movie will be treated to an extra feature titled “Recast, Reshot, Reclaimed” in which the cast and crew, including Scott, Plummer, producer Mark Huffam, and stars Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg discuss the trials involved in recasting such a major role at such a late stage.

The Wrap has an exclusive look at that featurette, a one-minute clip which you can view at the top of this post.

In the clip, Plummer expresses his relief that the whole thing went off basically seamlessly. “I’m thrilled that I was able to do it. I didn’t think I was going to,” he said.

Williams, likewise, described what they were able to do in reshoots as “amazing.”

“I was proud to be with him here under these circumstances,” Williams says in the video. “This kind of amazing feat that we’re trying to pull off. But also to have the chance to work with him [Plummer].”

“All the Money in the World” tells the story of the kidnapping of the teenaged John Paul Getty and the battle between his mother (Williams) and billionaire grandfather, J. Paul Getty (Plummer), who refused to pay the ransom to get the kid back. The movie was written by David Scarpa as an adaptation of the book by John Pearson.

The film is available for purchase now at digital retailers, and the physical release will follow on April 10 — at which point it will also become available for rent.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why Mark Wahlberg Got 'All the Money in the World' for Reshoots and Michelle Williams Didn't

What Happened to John Paul Getty III After Kidnapping in 'All the Money in the World'?

'All the Money in the World' Cast Discusses How Ridley Scott Pulled Off Reshoots With Christopher Plummer

Ridley Scott Didn't Call Kevin Spacey When He Replaced Star in 'All The Money in the World'

All 13 ‘Star Trek’ Movies Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

TheWrap critic Russ Fischer ranks “Star Trek Beyond” among all of the Enterprise crew’s big-screen adventures

Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
“Star Trek” borrowing from itself is fine (see a good use of ideas from “The Voyage Home” in “Beyond”), but the second J.J. Abrams film plunders “The Wrath of Khan” like Doctor Frankenstein’s assistant seeking raw monster material. The appropriation and reversal of the emotional crescendo of “Khan” lands with a thud, as does the illogical, witless script and its muddy 9/11 allegory.

Star Trek Nemesis (2002)
There are good elements in the final “Next Generation” outing: Tom Hardy‘s preening, arrogant interactions with Patrick Stewart; Ron Perlman‘s “Nosferatu”-inspired makeup, which looks like a Guillermo del Toro dream; one of Jerry Goldsmith’s final scores. But Stuart Baird’s atonal direction makes for a dull action slog stained with the psychic rape of Deanna Troi — a  scene which becomes merely setup for a battle maneuver. “Star Trek” was forced into a seven-year theatrical hiatus after this movie. Frankly, the break was needed.

Star Trek: The Final Frontier (1989)
William Shatner‘s directorial outing is all about Kirk as an ’80s action hero, but the film oddly undermines the captain as often as it beefs him up. That interesting tension is lost in a plot about Spock’s long-lost half brother, written as a forgettable combination of Jesus and Charlie Manson, seeking God at the far end of the universe. The goofball script, with ideas like Uhura distracting enemies by dancing atop a sand dune, goes full-on silly at the patchy, forgettable climax.

Star Trek Insurrection (1998)
“Insurrection” strives to be lighter than other Next Gen movies, with more jokes and a distracting love affair for Picard, but its “fountain of youth” plot leads to indignities such as Worf suffering a giant zit. A decent story kernel — the Federation is beginning to appear weak and out of date — hides within this film, but few scenes support or expand that idea. Instead, “Insurrection” works with a limited visual and story palette better suited for a TV episode.

Star Trek Generations (1994)
Cinematographer John A. Alonzo (“Chinatown”) ensures this first “Next Generation” movie often looks tremendous, and the opening featuring Kirk, Scotty and Chekov is a pleasant original crew callback. Yet the script’s big-screen ambitions are squandered on a mediocre Enterprise-breaking setpiece. The film’s sagging midsection shows how poorly theatrical films explored Data’s yearning for humanity as a replacement for Spock grappling with the meeting of Vulcan and human instincts. Some good interaction between Kirk and Picard notwithstanding, their meeting is saved for the last reels, and Kirk’s final send-off is so lame that casual viewers probably won’t even remember his fate.

Star Trek First Contact (1996)
The best of the Next Gen movies fuses Borg invasion and time travel plots, throwing the Enterprise-E into Earth’s past on the trail of the cybernetic collective as it attempts to prevent humanity’s first contact with Vulcans, thereby destroying the Federation at its root. “First Contact” has more action than most Picard stories, but it’s still padded with a lot of corridor-crawling filler. For all their visual menace, the Borg aren’t particularly frightening, and even with Alige Krige in the role, the Borg Queen never gels as a villain. Points go to Alfre Woodard, however, for dressing down Picard.

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)
After the grandeur of “The Wrath of Khan,” director Leonard Nimoy‘s first Trek feature feels cheap, even though it is the first “Star Trek” film to destroy the Enterprise. The Genesis planet created in “Wrath of Khan” is a great setting, but “The Search for Spock” is saddled with stilted staging and mediocre villains driving the plot. This chapter succeeds by bringing Spock back to life in a way that prevents a simple reunion with his former crew members, but it serves best as a bridge between the second and fourth film.

Star Trek Beyond (2016)
The streamlined, effective third outing for the reboot crew is free of baggage — no need to justify its own existence or kooky fan-service tricks. Having firmly defined their roles, the cast has room to play and riff off one another, aided by a script that traps the crew, broken into pairs, on an alien planet. As Kirk says early on, things feel a bit episodic, but that’s “Trek,” and in this case the vibe of “Beyond” is calibrated to evoke the spirit of the Original Series. That task is accomplished well, and while the villain, played by Idris Elba, first seems growlingly rote, he grows into a respectable counter-balance for Kirk.

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)
The series’ first film is slow even by 1979 standards, though a 2001 director’s cut has better pacing and character work. Even with the glacial movement, the crawl through V’Ger’s environment and loving pans across the Enterprise — a gift to fans who waited a decade for new live-action adventures — are glorious. The story offers a welcome window on the running of the Enterprise and develops the sort of hardcore sci-fi story even “Star Trek” doesn’t often get to do.

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)
Gene Roddenberry often pushed his series to explore stories as allegory for modern life and politics; here “Trek” becomes  a Cold War story in which the Federation and a nearly bankrupt Klingon Empire are dropped into the context of a political thriller. Christopher Plummer adds weight as a key villain in a dark and heavy story that folds in murder mystery elements. It’s not always successful, especially when it comes to obscuring the mystery culprit, but this is a look at the Federation unlike anything else in the “Star Trek” film series.

Star Trek (2009)
The script for J.J. Abrams‘ franchise reboot takes big swings and doesn’t always connect, especially in the villain department. Yet the cast is so well-chosen, with chemistry and charisma to spare, that the new ensemble explores the dynamics of Roddenberry’s old crew with apparent ease. Rather than replicating the interaction between Shatner and Nimoy, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto find their own rhythm and quickly make a case for their versions of the well-known character pair. Sure, the the lighting and camerawork can be distractingly overbearing, but in all other respects the new “Trek” is a warp-speed success.

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)
Aided by an expanded budget and directorial freedom after “The Search for Spock,” director Leonard Nimoy ditched weapons and villains to shoot on location in San Francisco. In what seems like a contradiction for the series, “The Voyage Home” explores the characters in a new light by pitching the crew back in time to rescue two humpback whales in an effort to save Federation-era Earth. The script can veer into the didactic and the sun-slingshot time-travel device is kooky as hell. Even so, this sequel is a wonderfully entertaining high-water mark for the series with some of the best character beats for every crew member.

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
To counter the heady and slow-moving debut film, director and co-writer Nicholas Meyer fashioned a high-spirited naval adventure with Ricardo Montalban delivering an all-time melodramatic villain performance and battle scenes energized by James Horner’s ringing score. The movie can turn on a dime, from the opening thrills of the Kobayashi Maru test to the alien weirdness of brain parasites. Spock’s final scenes etch the Kirk/Spock relationship in stone and set the standard for character relationships in genre film as a whole, to say nothing of future “Star Trek” sequels.

TheWrap critic Russ Fischer ranks “Star Trek Beyond” among all of the Enterprise crew’s big-screen adventures

Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
“Star Trek” borrowing from itself is fine (see a good use of ideas from “The Voyage Home” in “Beyond”), but the second J.J. Abrams film plunders “The Wrath of Khan” like Doctor Frankenstein’s assistant seeking raw monster material. The appropriation and reversal of the emotional crescendo of “Khan” lands with a thud, as does the illogical, witless script and its muddy 9/11 allegory.

Star Trek Nemesis (2002)
There are good elements in the final “Next Generation” outing: Tom Hardy‘s preening, arrogant interactions with Patrick Stewart; Ron Perlman‘s “Nosferatu”-inspired makeup, which looks like a Guillermo del Toro dream; one of Jerry Goldsmith’s final scores. But Stuart Baird’s atonal direction makes for a dull action slog stained with the psychic rape of Deanna Troi — a  scene which becomes merely setup for a battle maneuver. “Star Trek” was forced into a seven-year theatrical hiatus after this movie. Frankly, the break was needed.

Star Trek: The Final Frontier (1989)
William Shatner‘s directorial outing is all about Kirk as an ’80s action hero, but the film oddly undermines the captain as often as it beefs him up. That interesting tension is lost in a plot about Spock’s long-lost half brother, written as a forgettable combination of Jesus and Charlie Manson, seeking God at the far end of the universe. The goofball script, with ideas like Uhura distracting enemies by dancing atop a sand dune, goes full-on silly at the patchy, forgettable climax.

Star Trek Insurrection (1998)
“Insurrection” strives to be lighter than other Next Gen movies, with more jokes and a distracting love affair for Picard, but its “fountain of youth” plot leads to indignities such as Worf suffering a giant zit. A decent story kernel — the Federation is beginning to appear weak and out of date — hides within this film, but few scenes support or expand that idea. Instead, “Insurrection” works with a limited visual and story palette better suited for a TV episode.

Star Trek Generations (1994)
Cinematographer John A. Alonzo (“Chinatown”) ensures this first “Next Generation” movie often looks tremendous, and the opening featuring Kirk, Scotty and Chekov is a pleasant original crew callback. Yet the script’s big-screen ambitions are squandered on a mediocre Enterprise-breaking setpiece. The film’s sagging midsection shows how poorly theatrical films explored Data’s yearning for humanity as a replacement for Spock grappling with the meeting of Vulcan and human instincts. Some good interaction between Kirk and Picard notwithstanding, their meeting is saved for the last reels, and Kirk’s final send-off is so lame that casual viewers probably won’t even remember his fate.

Star Trek First Contact (1996)
The best of the Next Gen movies fuses Borg invasion and time travel plots, throwing the Enterprise-E into Earth’s past on the trail of the cybernetic collective as it attempts to prevent humanity’s first contact with Vulcans, thereby destroying the Federation at its root. “First Contact” has more action than most Picard stories, but it’s still padded with a lot of corridor-crawling filler. For all their visual menace, the Borg aren’t particularly frightening, and even with Alige Krige in the role, the Borg Queen never gels as a villain. Points go to Alfre Woodard, however, for dressing down Picard.

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)
After the grandeur of “The Wrath of Khan,” director Leonard Nimoy‘s first Trek feature feels cheap, even though it is the first “Star Trek” film to destroy the Enterprise. The Genesis planet created in “Wrath of Khan” is a great setting, but “The Search for Spock” is saddled with stilted staging and mediocre villains driving the plot. This chapter succeeds by bringing Spock back to life in a way that prevents a simple reunion with his former crew members, but it serves best as a bridge between the second and fourth film.

Star Trek Beyond (2016)
The streamlined, effective third outing for the reboot crew is free of baggage — no need to justify its own existence or kooky fan-service tricks. Having firmly defined their roles, the cast has room to play and riff off one another, aided by a script that traps the crew, broken into pairs, on an alien planet. As Kirk says early on, things feel a bit episodic, but that’s “Trek,” and in this case the vibe of “Beyond” is calibrated to evoke the spirit of the Original Series. That task is accomplished well, and while the villain, played by Idris Elba, first seems growlingly rote, he grows into a respectable counter-balance for Kirk.

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)
The series’ first film is slow even by 1979 standards, though a 2001 director’s cut has better pacing and character work. Even with the glacial movement, the crawl through V’Ger’s environment and loving pans across the Enterprise — a gift to fans who waited a decade for new live-action adventures — are glorious. The story offers a welcome window on the running of the Enterprise and develops the sort of hardcore sci-fi story even “Star Trek” doesn’t often get to do.

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)
Gene Roddenberry often pushed his series to explore stories as allegory for modern life and politics; here “Trek” becomes  a Cold War story in which the Federation and a nearly bankrupt Klingon Empire are dropped into the context of a political thriller. Christopher Plummer adds weight as a key villain in a dark and heavy story that folds in murder mystery elements. It’s not always successful, especially when it comes to obscuring the mystery culprit, but this is a look at the Federation unlike anything else in the “Star Trek” film series.

Star Trek (2009)
The script for J.J. Abrams‘ franchise reboot takes big swings and doesn’t always connect, especially in the villain department. Yet the cast is so well-chosen, with chemistry and charisma to spare, that the new ensemble explores the dynamics of Roddenberry’s old crew with apparent ease. Rather than replicating the interaction between Shatner and Nimoy, Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto find their own rhythm and quickly make a case for their versions of the well-known character pair. Sure, the the lighting and camerawork can be distractingly overbearing, but in all other respects the new “Trek” is a warp-speed success.

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)
Aided by an expanded budget and directorial freedom after “The Search for Spock,” director Leonard Nimoy ditched weapons and villains to shoot on location in San Francisco. In what seems like a contradiction for the series, “The Voyage Home” explores the characters in a new light by pitching the crew back in time to rescue two humpback whales in an effort to save Federation-era Earth. The script can veer into the didactic and the sun-slingshot time-travel device is kooky as hell. Even so, this sequel is a wonderfully entertaining high-water mark for the series with some of the best character beats for every crew member.

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
To counter the heady and slow-moving debut film, director and co-writer Nicholas Meyer fashioned a high-spirited naval adventure with Ricardo Montalban delivering an all-time melodramatic villain performance and battle scenes energized by James Horner’s ringing score. The movie can turn on a dime, from the opening thrills of the Kobayashi Maru test to the alien weirdness of brain parasites. Spock’s final scenes etch the Kirk/Spock relationship in stone and set the standard for character relationships in genre film as a whole, to say nothing of future “Star Trek” sequels.

‘Boundaries’ Review: Christopher Plummer Is a Weed Dealer and Vera Farmiga’s Dad in Endearing Road Trip Comedy — SXSW 2018

Yes, it’s another family road trip comedy, but at least this one has some bite.

Road trip movies are among the oldest indie film clichés in the book, and often one of the lamest, especially when they involve estranged relatives healing their differences. To the credit of “Boundaries,” Shana Feste’s comedy about single mom Laura (Vera Farming) hauling her pot-dealing dad Jack (Christopher Plummer) across California, these familiar beats have a ring of maturity that elevates the stale material. While it never quite shakes the deja vu, a set of sharp performances and insightful character details elevate the material above low expectations.

As “Boundaries” begin, Laura’s problems have nothing to do with her deadbeat dad. Her cramped Seattle home is overrun with abandoned animals she can’t stop taking in, nabbing every stray that falls into her sight (in the first scene, she sneaks a kitten into her bag before visiting her therapist). Her teen son Henry (Lewis MacDougall, in a smarmy shift from his “A Monster Calls” performance) struggles from bullying at a local high school, and while her mom wants to send him to a private art school instead, she lacks the funds.

Enter Jack, who has been kicked out of his nursing home across the state for his drug-dealing antics and begs Laura to get him out of there. It’s instantly clear that Plummer’s foul-mouthed troublemaker will provide the movie with its key to elevating the basic formula. “You geriatric sons of bitches,” he growls at the nursing home’s board with a half-smirk, and he’s just getting started.

Jack makes a deal: Help him leave the nursing home and he’ll give her the money to pay for Henry’s education. Once they arrive, however, the situation grows more complicated. He wants to drive, he says, because he’s dying; privately to Henry, however, he says it’s because he needs to transport loads of marijuana in the trunk. So begins the trio’s journey, which finds them dropping in on Laura’s crude ex-husband (a slimy Bobby Canavale), one of Jack’s aging hippie friends (Christopher Lloyd, eyes-bulging alongside a maniacal grin), and another more refined pal who’s basically just an excuse to give Peter Fonda a fun cameo.

As the family careens through California to drop Jack with Laura’s sister (Kristen Schaal, goofy and hilarious as usual), Jack veers from self-serving jerk who could care less about his family to show some modicum of empathy, but only once the situation veers out of control.

There are no big twists in “Boundaries,” and the small ones that do arrive late in the game could have been predicted by most savvy viewers from the first act. But the “Little Miss Sunshine” clichés have been supplanted by a welcome dose of snark thanks to Plummer, who couldn’t be in more different territory from his “All the Money in the World” turn, and Feste’s screenplay. While J. Paul Getty rejected his family for selfish reasons and preferred to brood on his own, Jack thrives on making them uncomfortable. To Henry, he asserts, “Even pedophiles steer clear of your bad vibes.”

Henry himself is an innocent observer in the uneasy dynamic between Jack and his daughter, played by Farmiga with a jittery angst that provides a great reminder that she’s one of the most engaging American actresses working today. Laura’s frantic expression of frustrations become the movie’s core engine, and as she grows increasingly exasperated, her animal fixation goes from neurotic impulse to logical coping mechanism. Plus, all the dogs are adorable.

Needless to say, “Boundaries” breaks no fresh ground and sags into conventional story beats on autopilot, but it’s rewarding enough to hang with these characters and roll with their mudslinging. Eventually, the trip grows tiresome, its message of learning to love your relatives in spite of their flaws registering on a far simpler scale than the undercurrent of multi-generational resentment percolating throughout the story. Feste can’t help but give up and resort to a basic happy ending, and while it works well enough on its own terms, it’s also the sort of thing that Jack would probably turn off after five minutes.

Grade: B

“Boundaries” premiered at the 2018 SXSW Film Festival. Sony Pictures Classics will release it later this year.

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SXSW Film Review: ‘Boundaries’

We’ve seen him dozens of times before, saying any damn thing that comes into his head (because living on the planet for 70 or 80 years has given him the right to do so). He’s on his own incorrigible wavelength, dropping putdowns as fresh as his body is old, spicing every cranky comment with a perfectly […]

We’ve seen him dozens of times before, saying any damn thing that comes into his head (because living on the planet for 70 or 80 years has given him the right to do so). He’s on his own incorrigible wavelength, dropping putdowns as fresh as his body is old, spicing every cranky comment with a perfectly […]

Jimmy Kimmel Tackles Donald Trump, Mike Pence, Acceptance Speech Excess In Oscar Opening Monologue

UPDATED with video: Jimmy Kimmel cautiously tip-toed through the year’s political minefield at the top of tonight’s Academy Awards, skewering President Donald Trump, Veep Mike Pence, and Fox News Channel, while giving the industry only the most gentle of roastings.
Two Trump jokes sprinkled in the opening included one about tweeting from his toilet, and another about Trump; having declared Get Out to be “¾ of a good movie” – because, of course, evil white people die in…

UPDATED with video: Jimmy Kimmel cautiously tip-toed through the year’s political minefield at the top of tonight's Academy Awards, skewering President Donald Trump, Veep Mike Pence, and Fox News Channel, while giving the industry only the most gentle of roastings. Two Trump jokes sprinkled in the opening included one about tweeting from his toilet, and another about Trump; having declared Get Out to be "¾ of a good movie" – because, of course, evil white people die in…