‘SNL’ Finale: Tina Fey Takes Questions From Jerry Seinfeld, Benedict Cumberbatch, Donald Glover

Tina Fey hosted the May 19 season finale of “Saturday Night Live” and she brought with her some of her famous friends. For her opening monologue, the former “SNL” writer and actor said she was told she was allowed to do anything…

Tina Fey hosted the May 19 season finale of “Saturday Night Live” and she brought with her some of her famous friends. For her opening monologue, the former “SNL” writer and actor said she was told she was allowed to do anything because it was her birthday yesterday, and what she wanted to do was […]

Film Review: Adam Sandler in ‘The Week Of’

Adam Sandler and Chris Rock, together again? When it comes to combined star power, Netflix’s “The Week Of” can hardly compete with “The Avengers” (heck, it’s not even as glitzy as Sandler’s recent “Grown Ups” movies), and yet this latest re-teaming of …

Adam Sandler and Chris Rock, together again? When it comes to combined star power, Netflix’s “The Week Of” can hardly compete with “The Avengers” (heck, it’s not even as glitzy as Sandler’s recent “Grown Ups” movies), and yet this latest re-teaming of the two former “Saturday Night Live” comedians should earn its share of eyeballs […]

19 Netflix Stand-Up Comedy Specials of 2018 Ranked, From Ricky Gervais to Chris Rock (Photos)

Last year, Netflix went all in with stand-up comedy, managing to talk Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chappelle and Tracy Morgan into doing their first specials in years. This year, they’ve already done the same with Chris Rock, Ricky Gervais and coming soon, Ellen DeGeneres. But it’s still an incredible amount of comedy to wade through. We’re here to help, ranking each special from worst to best.

  1. Harith Iskander – “I Told You So”

Malaysian comic Harith Iskander endlessly pats himself on the back just for landing an international stand-up special. He asks, what am I going to wear on stage? How should I do my hair (he’s bald)? Should I call my special, “The Funniest Comedian in the World?” Check out my hot wife! Throw in some pointless crowd work and a hacky rimshot, and this is just painful.

  1. Fakkah Fuzz – “Almost Banned”

Another Malay comedian, Fakkah Fuzz’s standup is strictly limited to differences between Malaysians and people from Singapore, which would be even more reductive if international audiences had any idea what he was talking about.

  1. James Acaster – “Repertoire”

The pale, scruffy haired London comic James Acaster has not one, but four stand-up specials on Netflix. They’ve been framed as part of a comprehensive series, each color-coded and with a supposed theme. But after kneeling down for 15 minutes as a “loophole” to avoid actually starting the show, his childhood life story quickly unravels into goofy nonsense. He’s wacky, off-kilter and unusual, sure, but who has the time?

  1. Katt Williams – “Great America”

Is Katt Williams even telling jokes anymore or just pimpin’? His cranky exuberance feels awfully tired when aimed at Trump. He’s performing to a Jacksonville, Florida crowd (and he unwisely opens with material that only plays to that room) that likely is pretty split politically, and his bland observations barely cut left or right.

  1. Ricky Gervais – “Humanity”

Ricky Gervais’s special is called “Humanity,” but it’s all about him. Not ashamed of comparing himself to Jesus to start the show, Gervais spends the remainder of his time scoffing at his critics and explaining away already bad and tasteless jokes about Caitlyn Jenner he made at the Golden Globes years ago. “People get offended when they mistake the subject of the joke with the actual target,” he says, writing off any online backlash as just a misunderstanding. Inflating his ego is part of what you’re paying for with Gervais, but this is irritating even for him.

  1. Rachel Feinstein – “The Standups” Episode 4

Neurotic, overly personal, loud and far too familiar to be surprising, Rachel Feinstein’s routine falls into cliche awfully quick. Why so many accents? And wow, you have parents who are bad on Facebook too?

  1. Gad Elmaleh – “American Dream”

Gad Elmaleh’s material is inoffensive and pleasant, but rarely surprising. Some of his weaker gags can be boiled down to, “Americans tip like this, and French people tip like this.” He’s smart at deconstructing language. But what should’ve been fresh for Elmaleh, his first special entirely in English, results in some recycled gags about “em-PHA-sis” and French doors from his 2017 Netflix special.

  1. Gina Yashere – “The Standups” Episode 2

Gina Yashere observes that most people in Hollywood think black women look either like Halle Berry or Precious. Yashere is neither, a Nigerian woman from London, and she’s uniquely funny. But you wish her material would focus more on her own life rather than on clichéd, outdated observations of American culture. One joke stops just short of insights about why racism is far subtler in Britain and defaults to an easy swipe at the South. “I treated Alabama the way white people treat Africa the first time. Wow, they have cars and shoes and s—,” she says. And how many times does she have to sing the “Team America” theme song?

  1. Brent Morin – “The Standups” Episode 5

Brent Morin is that bro who dominates the conversation at a party rattling off a story you lost track of hours ago. He’s got great little callbacks and one-liners and a hilarious observation about how if you’re a white guy, how flattering it is to be complimented by a black or gay guy. But is he still doing that butler impression of his Uber driver? How did he start complaining about bread at Italian restaurants? What’s a “sunshine hand?”

  1. Marlon Wayans – “Woke-ish”

This is Marlon Wayans’s first ever stand-up special in a three decade career, and yet you know what you’re getting with him. It’s fun, raunchy and stupid, and it isn’t long before he crosses more than a few lines, thus his special’s title “Woke-ish.” Like Gervais, Wayans also has a tone deaf Caitlyn Jenner joke. “I ain’t seen a white chick that ugly since me and Shawn did the f—in’ movie!” But you might consider sticking around for his impression of Designer’s “Panda” or an amusing, if stereotypical, bit about white people going through customs to earn the privilege to say the N-word.

  1. Joe List – “The Standups” Episode 1

White guy insecurities, childhood name calling and nearly 10 minutes about being awkward at the gym are a dime a dozen, but Joe List does it justice with a deadpan delivery and relatable awkwardness. List’s best story is about how as a kid, a girl said his big forehead looked like a “fivehead.” Yeah, that’s a pretty good burn.

  1. Kavin Jay – “Everybody Calm Down”

The best of the three Malaysian comedians, Much of Kavin Jay’s charming material comes at the expense of his weight. But he acknowledges he’s not playing just to the room he’s in. “In Asia, parents use [my weight] to discipline children,” Jay says. “In America, I’m a medium.” At one point he even talks to some New Yorkers in the crowd. “I don’t know where that is. And now you know how that feels.”

  1. Greg Davies – “You Magnificent Beast”

“The more upset you are, the funnier I find it,” Greg Davies says to someone in his crowd. This Welsh comic takes glee out of telling charming stories about his parents and his childhood before turning them disgusting. He has one routine about getting a giant teddy bear as a kid. He named it BT, like the alien ET. Aww, how sweet. He makes us think that’s the end of the story before revealing that as a teenager, “I f—ed that bear.” He couldn’t go out with friends because he was “too busy knocking the back end out of it!”

  1. Fred Armisen – “Standup for Drummers”

Every word out of Fred Armisen’s mouth sounds like the start to some absurd, rejected “Portlandia” sketch, and I love it. Armisen is literally performing to a room full of people who know how to drum (Green Day’s Tre Cool pops up in the audience). Isn’t putting together a snare so annoying? I know! Sometimes his observations may genuinely be for an audience of one. But anyone will love his mini impressions of accents around the country and drumming impressions of Ringo Starr, Keith Moon, U2’s Larry Mullins Jr., Stewart Copeland and Meg White.

  1. Tom Segura – “Disgraceful”

Those who want a replacement for Louis C.K. in the schlubby, cynical and brutally honest middle-aged white guy department can look to Tom Segura. But Segura isn’t trying to challenge social norms in the way C.K. used to; he’d rather troll people in the parking lot or talk up how great it is to never have to leave the house. One of his best gags makes a smart comparison to show how future generations will never understand how hard it once was to buy weed. Pigeons used to deliver messages? Are you crazy?

  1. Aparna Nancherla – “The Standups” Episode 6

At first, Aparna Nancherla stands out as a socially awkward goofball, her cartoonish voice enhancing silly anxieties like what to say to a pilot upon leaving a plane. But she soon hauls out a PowerPoint presentation and brilliantly manages to translate Internet humor to the stage. Nancherla deconstructs emojis that look like a “multicultural boy band” or bullet points she grabbed from a Ted Talk random name generator, and she does it all in a deadpan weirdness that should make her a star.

  1. Todd Glass – “Act Happy”

Todd Glass has put together a truly strange and subversive hour of comedy. More performance art than strictly jokes, Glass has a big band playing only public domain songs to put a button on his ironically hacky gags. He’s playing to a tiny room of 75 people, but he’s giving rants and monologues that he presents as larger than life, even asking the sound guy to give some reverb on his voice. The band taunts his “bragging” and the audience seems to be in on the joke. He even twice busts out into “song,” singing a time-killing anthem that he wrote in case he didn’t have enough material. But I could watch him for hours.

  1. Chris Rock – “Tamborine”

For his first special in nearly a decade, “Tamborine,” Chris Rock immediately comes out swinging. His practical takes on the shootings of black kids, gun control and poverty are vintage Rock. But his material now reflects his middle age. You may disagree with some of his more Millennial-bashing takes, but he shows remarkable candor and great wisdom when he addresses his divorce and what it takes to keep a relationship going. The secret is to approach it like a tambourine player in a band. “You play that motherf— right!” Rock sure does.

  1. Kyle Kinane – “The Standups” Episode 3

Kyle Kinane may be from my hometown of Addison, Illinois, but that’s not the only reason I can relate. His material has been bleak in the past, but in this set he speaks to the moment with insightful material about why he’s still recycling in the face of an apocalypse, Kurt Cobain’s Christmas album and a theory that the Ku Klux Klan has a great chef (“same outfits, different hats”). His finest gag takes full advantage of the pulse of the country and even plays on knowing he was taping this in advance for Netflix: “What if by the time this airs, there’s no mass shooting,” he asks. “This is America.”

Last year, Netflix went all in with stand-up comedy, managing to talk Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chappelle and Tracy Morgan into doing their first specials in years. This year, they’ve already done the same with Chris Rock, Ricky Gervais and coming soon, Ellen DeGeneres. But it’s still an incredible amount of comedy to wade through. We’re here to help, ranking each special from worst to best.

  1. Harith Iskander – “I Told You So”

Malaysian comic Harith Iskander endlessly pats himself on the back just for landing an international stand-up special. He asks, what am I going to wear on stage? How should I do my hair (he’s bald)? Should I call my special, “The Funniest Comedian in the World?” Check out my hot wife! Throw in some pointless crowd work and a hacky rimshot, and this is just painful.

  1. Fakkah Fuzz – “Almost Banned”

Another Malay comedian, Fakkah Fuzz’s standup is strictly limited to differences between Malaysians and people from Singapore, which would be even more reductive if international audiences had any idea what he was talking about.

  1. James Acaster – “Repertoire”

The pale, scruffy haired London comic James Acaster has not one, but four stand-up specials on Netflix. They’ve been framed as part of a comprehensive series, each color-coded and with a supposed theme. But after kneeling down for 15 minutes as a “loophole” to avoid actually starting the show, his childhood life story quickly unravels into goofy nonsense. He’s wacky, off-kilter and unusual, sure, but who has the time?

  1. Katt Williams – “Great America”

Is Katt Williams even telling jokes anymore or just pimpin’? His cranky exuberance feels awfully tired when aimed at Trump. He’s performing to a Jacksonville, Florida crowd (and he unwisely opens with material that only plays to that room) that likely is pretty split politically, and his bland observations barely cut left or right.

  1. Ricky Gervais – “Humanity”

Ricky Gervais’s special is called “Humanity,” but it’s all about him. Not ashamed of comparing himself to Jesus to start the show, Gervais spends the remainder of his time scoffing at his critics and explaining away already bad and tasteless jokes about Caitlyn Jenner he made at the Golden Globes years ago. “People get offended when they mistake the subject of the joke with the actual target,” he says, writing off any online backlash as just a misunderstanding. Inflating his ego is part of what you’re paying for with Gervais, but this is irritating even for him.

  1. Rachel Feinstein – “The Standups” Episode 4

Neurotic, overly personal, loud and far too familiar to be surprising, Rachel Feinstein’s routine falls into cliche awfully quick. Why so many accents? And wow, you have parents who are bad on Facebook too?

  1. Gad Elmaleh – “American Dream”

Gad Elmaleh’s material is inoffensive and pleasant, but rarely surprising. Some of his weaker gags can be boiled down to, “Americans tip like this, and French people tip like this.” He’s smart at deconstructing language. But what should’ve been fresh for Elmaleh, his first special entirely in English, results in some recycled gags about “em-PHA-sis” and French doors from his 2017 Netflix special.

  1. Gina Yashere – “The Standups” Episode 2

Gina Yashere observes that most people in Hollywood think black women look either like Halle Berry or Precious. Yashere is neither, a Nigerian woman from London, and she’s uniquely funny. But you wish her material would focus more on her own life rather than on clichéd, outdated observations of American culture. One joke stops just short of insights about why racism is far subtler in Britain and defaults to an easy swipe at the South. “I treated Alabama the way white people treat Africa the first time. Wow, they have cars and shoes and s—,” she says. And how many times does she have to sing the “Team America” theme song?

  1. Brent Morin – “The Standups” Episode 5

Brent Morin is that bro who dominates the conversation at a party rattling off a story you lost track of hours ago. He’s got great little callbacks and one-liners and a hilarious observation about how if you’re a white guy, how flattering it is to be complimented by a black or gay guy. But is he still doing that butler impression of his Uber driver? How did he start complaining about bread at Italian restaurants? What’s a “sunshine hand?”

  1. Marlon Wayans – “Woke-ish”

This is Marlon Wayans’s first ever stand-up special in a three decade career, and yet you know what you’re getting with him. It’s fun, raunchy and stupid, and it isn’t long before he crosses more than a few lines, thus his special’s title “Woke-ish.” Like Gervais, Wayans also has a tone deaf Caitlyn Jenner joke. “I ain’t seen a white chick that ugly since me and Shawn did the f—in’ movie!” But you might consider sticking around for his impression of Designer’s “Panda” or an amusing, if stereotypical, bit about white people going through customs to earn the privilege to say the N-word.

  1. Joe List – “The Standups” Episode 1

White guy insecurities, childhood name calling and nearly 10 minutes about being awkward at the gym are a dime a dozen, but Joe List does it justice with a deadpan delivery and relatable awkwardness. List’s best story is about how as a kid, a girl said his big forehead looked like a “fivehead.” Yeah, that’s a pretty good burn.

  1. Kavin Jay – “Everybody Calm Down”

The best of the three Malaysian comedians, Much of Kavin Jay’s charming material comes at the expense of his weight. But he acknowledges he’s not playing just to the room he’s in. “In Asia, parents use [my weight] to discipline children,” Jay says. “In America, I’m a medium.” At one point he even talks to some New Yorkers in the crowd. “I don’t know where that is. And now you know how that feels.”

  1. Greg Davies – “You Magnificent Beast”

“The more upset you are, the funnier I find it,” Greg Davies says to someone in his crowd. This Welsh comic takes glee out of telling charming stories about his parents and his childhood before turning them disgusting. He has one routine about getting a giant teddy bear as a kid. He named it BT, like the alien ET. Aww, how sweet. He makes us think that’s the end of the story before revealing that as a teenager, “I f—ed that bear.” He couldn’t go out with friends because he was “too busy knocking the back end out of it!”

  1. Fred Armisen – “Standup for Drummers”

Every word out of Fred Armisen’s mouth sounds like the start to some absurd, rejected “Portlandia” sketch, and I love it. Armisen is literally performing to a room full of people who know how to drum (Green Day’s Tre Cool pops up in the audience). Isn’t putting together a snare so annoying? I know! Sometimes his observations may genuinely be for an audience of one. But anyone will love his mini impressions of accents around the country and drumming impressions of Ringo Starr, Keith Moon, U2’s Larry Mullins Jr., Stewart Copeland and Meg White.

  1. Tom Segura – “Disgraceful”

Those who want a replacement for Louis C.K. in the schlubby, cynical and brutally honest middle-aged white guy department can look to Tom Segura. But Segura isn’t trying to challenge social norms in the way C.K. used to; he’d rather troll people in the parking lot or talk up how great it is to never have to leave the house. One of his best gags makes a smart comparison to show how future generations will never understand how hard it once was to buy weed. Pigeons used to deliver messages? Are you crazy?

  1. Aparna Nancherla – “The Standups” Episode 6

At first, Aparna Nancherla stands out as a socially awkward goofball, her cartoonish voice enhancing silly anxieties like what to say to a pilot upon leaving a plane. But she soon hauls out a PowerPoint presentation and brilliantly manages to translate Internet humor to the stage. Nancherla deconstructs emojis that look like a “multicultural boy band” or bullet points she grabbed from a Ted Talk random name generator, and she does it all in a deadpan weirdness that should make her a star.

  1. Todd Glass – “Act Happy”

Todd Glass has put together a truly strange and subversive hour of comedy. More performance art than strictly jokes, Glass has a big band playing only public domain songs to put a button on his ironically hacky gags. He’s playing to a tiny room of 75 people, but he’s giving rants and monologues that he presents as larger than life, even asking the sound guy to give some reverb on his voice. The band taunts his “bragging” and the audience seems to be in on the joke. He even twice busts out into “song,” singing a time-killing anthem that he wrote in case he didn’t have enough material. But I could watch him for hours.

  1. Chris Rock – “Tamborine”

For his first special in nearly a decade, “Tamborine,” Chris Rock immediately comes out swinging. His practical takes on the shootings of black kids, gun control and poverty are vintage Rock. But his material now reflects his middle age. You may disagree with some of his more Millennial-bashing takes, but he shows remarkable candor and great wisdom when he addresses his divorce and what it takes to keep a relationship going. The secret is to approach it like a tambourine player in a band. “You play that motherf— right!” Rock sure does.

  1. Kyle Kinane – “The Standups” Episode 3

Kyle Kinane may be from my hometown of Addison, Illinois, but that’s not the only reason I can relate. His material has been bleak in the past, but in this set he speaks to the moment with insightful material about why he’s still recycling in the face of an apocalypse, Kurt Cobain’s Christmas album and a theory that the Ku Klux Klan has a great chef (“same outfits, different hats”). His finest gag takes full advantage of the pulse of the country and even plays on knowing he was taping this in advance for Netflix: “What if by the time this airs, there’s no mass shooting,” he asks. “This is America.”

Every 2018 Netflix Stand-Up Special, Ranked

An updated look at this year’s best on-stage comedy that’s available to stream right now.

One day the algorithm will swallow us whole. Until then, while we’re still able to keep our heads above the sea of content flooding the Netflix servers, there’s one constant anchor in the storm: Every week, Netflix adds a new standup special.

Some of them take on different shapes in front of different audiences. The return of the Netflix half-hour collection “The Standups” gives a more condensed alternative to some of its larger, longer counterparts. Giant names in the business have taken something close to a blank check approach to make something that doesn’t look, sound, or feel like the other titles next to it on the home menu.

That said, time is precious. Even the biggest comedy fans probably can’t keep up with every weekly addition. (Now that some comedians are dropping multiple specials simultaneously, they’ve become small seasons of television all their own.) To help, we’ve ranked every new 2018 standup special that has come to the service over this calendar year. Comedy is subjective, but this is one way of helping make sure your comedy time is well-spent.

As the year goes on, we’ll keep this updated with all the newest adds to the Netflix comedy lineup. In the meantime, if you’re looking for something to keep you busy for the next hour, here’s our ranked list of all that Netflix comedy has to offer in 2018.

[Note: Netflix has a collection of standup in a variety of languages, but for the sake of keeping this a judge of material from the performer and not just a translator’s subtitles, we kept this list to primarily English-language specials.]

17. “Harith Iskander: I Told You So”

A surprising portion of the early part of “I Told You So” is Iskander marveling at his ability to have a standup special. Rather than plunge right into his set, there’s a lot of buildup around the fact that he even gets to do this. Overall, it’s a harmless hour that feels more designed for the people in the room when it was recorded than the people who are watching it however many months later. Iskander gets a lot of goodwill from being a likable guy, but that doesn’t necessarily translate to much substantial comedy. Most of “I Told You So” is made up of the story of him as a teenager flying overseas to visit his girlfriend — on its own, it’s a charming enough monologue that’s more interesting than funny. Still, there is something valuable in a moment of forgiveness near the special’s end.

Joke Worth Watching For: The personal stories are the most compelling, but Iskander’s impression of a bag waiting to be picked up at Kuala Lumpur International Airport is the show’s biggest laugh. (Airport material plays in any country.)

16. “Marlon Wayans: Woke-ish”

Marlon Wayans Woke-Ish Netflix

“Marlon Wayans: Woke-ish”

Cara Howe

Wayans took three decades into his career to release his first standup special and it shows. Not because “Woke-ish” contains a nonstop stream of carefully crafted material honed over decades (it doesn’t), but because it feels mostly like a collection of stray observations and film script B-sides. The best parts of “Woke-ish” are when Wayans taps into things that feel his own, particularly his physical comedy stuff. But when he takes a broader view of the world, it’s delivered with the same spirit of reactive toothlessness that guided two different “A Haunted House” movies. Any half-hearted attempts at sincerity or introspection immediately get undercut by a cheap gag. Wayans has to go big to please a giant MGM crowd, and in the process he loses a lot of what would make this a distinctive debut worth waiting for.

One Joke Worth Watching For: Again, not so much a joke as it is repeating something that happened to someone else, but his recreation of the Wendy Williams fainting GIF is a crowd-pleaser for a reason.

15. “Katt Williams: Great America”

Katt Williams Great America

“Katt Williams: Great America”

The best parts of “Great America” are when Katt Williams plays to his Jacksonville, Fla., crowd. The jokes and references meant mostly for the people in the room somehow work even better because of how well you can tell he’s tapping into what’s getting a big response. But as soon as Williams loses that specificity, that charm devolves into tired Trump jokes and recycled observations about relationships that are whispers of some of Williams’ more magnetic stuff from specials past. If the photos of him hanging on the wall on either side of a fake Oval Office are any indication, most of this is designed to bring back memories of sharper things he’s done elsewhere.

Joke Worth Watching For: Williams covers plenty of ground in a short timeframe, so blink and you’ll miss some of the better stuff here. Some strong candidates? Unveiling the Jacksonville Jaguars new uniforms and trying to figure out what mesothelioma is.

14. “Fakkah Fuzz: Almost Banned”

Fakkah Fuzz Netflix

“Fakkah Fuzz: Almost Banned”

Netflix

Building an entire set around a “some people are like this, and other people are like that” group of premises is a tricky proposition. Fuzz makes the most of relaying his experiences as a Malay man in Singapore, turning it around on some of the different groups that make up his audience. Most of it is limited to some surface-level comparisons, but Fuzz also gets the chance to point out how many people (not just Americans) can be condescending when they come across a culture they think they understand but they don’t.

Joke Worth Watching For: There’s a great payoff to Fuzz’s story about reconnecting with someone from his past via Instagram DMs.

13. “Ricky Gervais: Humanity”

Ricky Gervais Humanity Netflix

“Ricky Gervais: Humanity”

Ray Burmiston

Even when a few genuine spontaneous smiles sneak through, “Humanity” has the air of something Gervais feels obliged to do, either to feed some nonexistent need to bolster his cred as Bad Boy of Comedy or as a self-appointed crusader for insufferable people everywhere. A large portion of the special is an exercise in bad faith, especially when his coda tries to have it both ways by insisting he has permission to joke about his adopted targets. Getting there is a parade of recycled Twitter material and insistent jokes about how there is no God. (Have you heard he’s an atheist? Surprisingly, it’s never come up before.) Those parts are all the more frustrating, because when you strip those away, there’s a chunk of “Humanity” that feels fine-tuned. Some selective carving leaves a few slivers of bits that let Gervais poke fun at his own assholery. But whenever it seems like he’s finally figured out a way to peel back the top layer of faux outrage and get at what’s wrong with a “we’re just too PC these days” premise, he turns his focus to people who he thinks have unfairly maligned him. He’s slavishly committed to exposing people who trolls see as trolls, which occasionally does work to his benefit, but that doesn’t leave much room for honesty.

Joke Worth Watching For: The story of a relative going bald but continuing to wear a toupee is an ideal example of what Gervais can do with a great story — when he’s not sidetracked by outsized pettiness.

‘The Week Of’ Trailer: Netflix Unveils Extended Look At Adam Sandler & Chris Rock Starrer

We got a first a look at The Week Of in a teaser released earlier this month, and now Netflix has unveiled the full trailer for the comedy starring Adam Sandler and Chris Rock.
In a re-teaming of the two Saturday Night Live alums, The Week Of tells the story of a devoted, middle class father (Sandler) determined to pay for his daughter’s wedding despite the prodding of the wealthier father of the groom (Rock). A series of calamities forces the dads (and their families) to…

We got a first a look at The Week Of in a teaser released earlier this month, and now Netflix has unveiled the full trailer for the comedy starring Adam Sandler and Chris Rock. In a re-teaming of the two Saturday Night Live alums, The Week Of tells the story of a devoted, middle class father (Sandler) determined to pay for his daughter’s wedding despite the prodding of the wealthier father of the groom (Rock). A series of calamities forces the dads (and their families) to…

The Last 15 Oscar Hosts Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

1. Steve Martin (2001, 2003)
He’s smart, classy and relaxed, an effortless performer with a sharp wit who knows how to hit the right tone, even when he hosted a show that began a few days after the Iraq war began. Plus the crew all say he’s the most low-maintenance host imaginable.

2. Hugh Jackman (2009)
When it seemed as if the standup-comic-as-Oscar-host tradition was becoming awfully tired, producers Bill Condon and Lawrence Mark brought in a singing, dancing, charismatic movie star to show what a new kind of host could do. Since then, no other star has come close to doing what Jackman did, maybe because none could.

10. David Letterman (1995)
You have to feel bad for Letterman, who followed his idol Johnny Carson onto the Oscar stage but didn’t adapt to the job the way Carson had. Some of his stuff was actually pretty funny, but his Oscarized version of the “Late Show” was a bad fit, and you could tell that he knew it.

5. Jimmy Kimmel (2017, 2018) Before his first Oscars hosting gig was overshadowed by that envelope fiasco, Kimmel was smart and entertaining enough that we forgave him for a few too many Matt Damon jokes. Hosting this year will be a trying task, but his heart should make him the right man for the job (though you could argue that maybe they should have hired a woman).

1. Steve Martin (2001, 2003)
He’s smart, classy and relaxed, an effortless performer with a sharp wit who knows how to hit the right tone, even when he hosted a show that began a few days after the Iraq war began. Plus the crew all say he’s the most low-maintenance host imaginable.

2. Hugh Jackman (2009)
When it seemed as if the standup-comic-as-Oscar-host tradition was becoming awfully tired, producers Bill Condon and Lawrence Mark brought in a singing, dancing, charismatic movie star to show what a new kind of host could do. Since then, no other star has come close to doing what Jackman did, maybe because none could.

10. David Letterman (1995)
You have to feel bad for Letterman, who followed his idol Johnny Carson onto the Oscar stage but didn’t adapt to the job the way Carson had. Some of his stuff was actually pretty funny, but his Oscarized version of the “Late Show” was a bad fit, and you could tell that he knew it.

5. Jimmy Kimmel (2017, 2018) Before his first Oscars hosting gig was overshadowed by that envelope fiasco, Kimmel was smart and entertaining enough that we forgave him for a few too many Matt Damon jokes. Hosting this year will be a trying task, but his heart should make him the right man for the job (though you could argue that maybe they should have hired a woman).

Chris Rock, Mickey Rourke Toast Hollywood Eatery Mr. Chow’s 50th Birthday (Photos)

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