‘Game of Thrones’ Actress Carice Van Houten to Star in ‘The Glass Room’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Carice Van Houten, who plays Lady Melisandre, the Red Priestess, in “Game of Thrones,” will star in “The Glass Room,” an adaptation of Simon Mawer’s novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize. The Dutch actress has also appeared in Paul Verhoeven’s “Black Book,” Bryan Singer’s “Valkyrie” opposite Tom Cruise, and Bill Condon’s “The Fifth […]

Carice Van Houten, who plays Lady Melisandre, the Red Priestess, in “Game of Thrones,” will star in “The Glass Room,” an adaptation of Simon Mawer’s novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize. The Dutch actress has also appeared in Paul Verhoeven’s “Black Book,” Bryan Singer’s “Valkyrie” opposite Tom Cruise, and Bill Condon’s “The Fifth […]

30 Best World War II Movies for Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (Photos)

Looking to look back on some history this Memorial Day? Critics and audiences alike didn’t think “Pearl Harbor” did WWII justice, but here are 29 other films that scored a 7/10 rating or higher on IMDB.

“Pearl Harbor” (2001).
The Michael Bay-directed film starred Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett and Kate Beckinsale and follows the story of two best friends as they go off to war.

“Saving Private Ryan” (1998).
Starring Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore and Edward Burns, the film follows a group of U.S. soldiers that go behind enemy lines to retrieve a paratrooper.

“The Thin Red Line” (1998).
Terrence Malick‘s adaptation of James Jones’ 1962 novel stars Jim Caviezel, Sean Penn and Nick Nolte, and focuses on the conflict at Guadalcanal.

“A Midnight Clear” (1992).
The film starring Peter Berg, Kevin Dillon and Arye Gross tells the story of the American intelligence unit which finds a German platoon wishing to surrender.

“The Big Red One” (1980).
Starring Lee Marvin, Mark Hamill and Robert Carradine, the film chronicles the story of a sergeant and his unit as they try to survive World War II.

“A Bridge Too Far” (1977).
Starring Sean Connery, Michael Caine and Laurence Olivier, “A Bridge Too Far” chronicles the events of Operation Market Garden in 1944.

“Valkyrie” (2008)
Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy and Carice van Houten star in the film that dramatizes the July 20 assassination plot against Adolf Hitler.

“Flags of Our Fathers” (2006)
Clint Eastwood directed this film also, starring Ryan Philippe, Barry Pepper and Joseph Cross. It follows the life stories of six men who raised the flat at the Battle of Iwo Jima.

“Das Boot” (1981).
Starring Jurgen Prochnow, Herbert Groenemeyer and Klaus Wennemann, the film chronicles the world of a WWII German U-boat.

“Downfall” (2004).
In the German biographical film, the final secretary of Adolf Hitler tells the story of the Fuehrer’s final days.

“Inglorious Basterds” (2009).
A group of Jewish U.S. soldiers plan to assassinate Nazi leaders in France. The Quentin Tarantino directed film stars Brad Pitt, Diane Kruger and Eli Roth.

“Dunkirk” (2017) 

Christopher Nolan recounts the heroic efforts to evacuate Allied forces surrounded by Nazis on the beaches of France at a critical moment in World War II.

Looking to look back on some history this Memorial Day? Critics and audiences alike didn’t think “Pearl Harbor” did WWII justice, but here are 29 other films that scored a 7/10 rating or higher on IMDB.

“Pearl Harbor” (2001).
The Michael Bay-directed film starred Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett and Kate Beckinsale and follows the story of two best friends as they go off to war.

“Saving Private Ryan” (1998).
Starring Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore and Edward Burns, the film follows a group of U.S. soldiers that go behind enemy lines to retrieve a paratrooper.

“The Thin Red Line” (1998).
Terrence Malick‘s adaptation of James Jones’ 1962 novel stars Jim Caviezel, Sean Penn and Nick Nolte, and focuses on the conflict at Guadalcanal.

“A Midnight Clear” (1992).
The film starring Peter Berg, Kevin Dillon and Arye Gross tells the story of the American intelligence unit which finds a German platoon wishing to surrender.

“The Big Red One” (1980).
Starring Lee Marvin, Mark Hamill and Robert Carradine, the film chronicles the story of a sergeant and his unit as they try to survive World War II.

“A Bridge Too Far” (1977).
Starring Sean Connery, Michael Caine and Laurence Olivier, “A Bridge Too Far” chronicles the events of Operation Market Garden in 1944.

“Valkyrie” (2008)
Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy and Carice van Houten star in the film that dramatizes the July 20 assassination plot against Adolf Hitler.

“Flags of Our Fathers” (2006)
Clint Eastwood directed this film also, starring Ryan Philippe, Barry Pepper and Joseph Cross. It follows the life stories of six men who raised the flat at the Battle of Iwo Jima.

“Das Boot” (1981).
Starring Jurgen Prochnow, Herbert Groenemeyer and Klaus Wennemann, the film chronicles the world of a WWII German U-boat.

“Downfall” (2004).
In the German biographical film, the final secretary of Adolf Hitler tells the story of the Fuehrer’s final days.

“Inglorious Basterds” (2009).
A group of Jewish U.S. soldiers plan to assassinate Nazi leaders in France. The Quentin Tarantino directed film stars Brad Pitt, Diane Kruger and Eli Roth.

“Dunkirk” (2017) 

Christopher Nolan recounts the heroic efforts to evacuate Allied forces surrounded by Nazis on the beaches of France at a critical moment in World War II.

Carice Van Houten Joins ‘I Am Not A Bird’; Mike Carlsen Boards ‘We Are Unsatisfied’; Danielle Burgess Cast In ‘Killer Kate!’

Game Of Throne actress Carice Van Houten has come aboard the indie thriller I Am Not A Bird, along with Andrew Rothney (The Huntsman: Winter’s War), Kate Easton (upcoming Ocean’s Eight ), Takehiro Hira and newcomer Elisabeth Larena. The bevy joins star Alexandra Daddario in the film, which has Swedish director William Olsson at the helm as production is underway in Tokyo, Japan. Based on the novel Lost Girls And Love Hotels by Catherine Hanrahan, who also adapted the…

Game Of Throne actress Carice Van Houten has come aboard the indie thriller I Am Not A Bird, along with Andrew Rothney (The Huntsman: Winter's War), Kate Easton (upcoming Ocean's Eight ), Takehiro Hira and newcomer Elisabeth Larena. The bevy joins star Alexandra Daddario in the film, which has Swedish director William Olsson at the helm as production is underway in Tokyo, Japan. Based on the novel Lost Girls And Love Hotels by Catherine Hanrahan, who also adapted the…

11 ‘Game of Thrones’ Actors Who Do More Than Just Act (Photos)

“Game of Thrones” is filled with well-known actors and has seen a ton of cameos from musicians throughout its run. But a few also have other jobs, and some are pretty well-known for their non-Westeros roles. Here are 10 “Game of Thrones” actors who aren’t just actors.

“Ser Ilyn Payne”: Wilko Johnson, guitarist
Ser Ilyn, the tongueless executioner known as the King’s Justice, was played by guitarist and songwriter Wilko Johnson. He’s best known for playing in punk band Dr Feelgood in the 1970s, and had a big influence on the punk movement and on music in general.

“Grey Worm”: Jacob Anderson, singer
When he’s not leading Daenerys’ army of Unsullied troops, Jacob Anderson is pursuing a music career as a singer and songwriter. He performs under the name Raleigh Ritchie, and his debut album, “You’re a Man Now, Boy,” was released in 2016. It got good reviews too.

Also Read: 21 Big ‘Game of Thrones’ Fan Theories for Season 7 and Beyond (Photos)

“The Mountain”: Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson, strongman
The third and current actor to play the Mountain That Rides, Gregor Clegane, is a real-life professional strongman from Iceland. He’s taken part in the World’s Strongest Man competition several times, most recently in 2016. He (just barely) came in second. Oh and before that, he was a professional basketball player in Iceland.

“Bronn”: Jerome Flynn, one half of pop group Robson & Jerome
Jerome Flynn has had a prolific acting career, but he also briefly burned up the UK charts in the 1990s and had three No. 1 hits as half of pop duo Robson & Jerome. Along with actor Robson Green, the pair performed the song “Unchained Melody” on their show “Soldier Soldier,” and parlayed the boost to stardom into two No. 1 studio albums.

“The Hound”: Rory McCann, carpenter
Actor Rory McCann is a versatile guy. Although prolific before his role as Sandor “The Hound” Clegane, he wasn’t quite a superstar before the show. So after shooting a Viking drama in Iceland, he found acting roles a bit sparse — and turned to carpentry while living in the country in the meantime. The Hound’s Season 6 turn helping build a sept wasn’t too big a stretch, as it happens.

Also Read: Every Important Dead ‘Game of Thrones’ Character You Forgot About (Photos)

“The Red Woman”: Carice van Houten, musician
Stannis Baratheon’s questionable counselor is an award-winning Dutch actress, but Carice van Houten also works as a singer. She provided vocals for four songs in the Dutch film “Black Book” in which she starred. (She won a Golden Calf Award for Best Actress from the Netherlands Film Festival for her role.) She also produced a couple of albums in the Netherlands as a singer and songwriter.

“Mag the Mighty”: Ian Whyte, basketball player
Part of being a 7-foot-1 actor means you always have a role on “Game of Thrones,” and Ian Whyte has played White Walkers, giants, and even The Mountain before Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson took over. Before he was an actor and stuntman taking all the tallest roles, Whyte was a pro basketball player for a British team, the Newcastle Eagles.

“Hodor”: Kristian Nairn, DJ
Although he’s well-known now as the stable boy at Winterfell and Bran Stark’s protector, “Game of Thrones” was actually Kristian Nairn’s first acting credit. His usual day job (or night job) is as a progressive house DJ, and he’s pretty prolific. With “Game of Thrones” fame at his back, he went on a tour in 2014 through the U.S. and Australia, titled, “Rave of Thrones.”

Also Read: All 49 ‘Game of Thrones’ Main Characters, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

“Daario Naharis”: Michiel Huisman, singer and guitarist
As Dutch actor Michiel Huisman’s acting career was getting going in the early 2000s, he was also part of the band Fontane, serving as singer and guitarist. The band had a few singles in its three or four years of existence, before it broke up and Huisman continued as a solo act through mid-2000s.

“Khal Drogo”: Jason Momoa, model
This one seems kind of obvious. Before he was Khal Drogo and on his way to becoming Aquaman, Jason Momoa was a model in his native Hawaii. In fact, he won Hawaii’s Model of the Year award in 1999.

“Hot Pie”: Ben Hawkey, actual baker
Arya Stark made a friend in her former King’s Landing bully, a kid everyone called Hot Pie, early in the show. Eventually, Hot Pie left Arya and pal Gendry when he landed a spot working in the kitchens at the Inn at the Crossroads, pursuing his real calling: baking. Hawkey’s doing the same thing in real life. He opened a bakery called “You Know Nothing, John Dough,” where he serves direwolf-shaped bread — just like in the show.

“Game of Thrones” is filled with well-known actors and has seen a ton of cameos from musicians throughout its run. But a few also have other jobs, and some are pretty well-known for their non-Westeros roles. Here are 10 “Game of Thrones” actors who aren’t just actors.

“Ser Ilyn Payne”: Wilko Johnson, guitarist
Ser Ilyn, the tongueless executioner known as the King’s Justice, was played by guitarist and songwriter Wilko Johnson. He’s best known for playing in punk band Dr Feelgood in the 1970s, and had a big influence on the punk movement and on music in general.

“Grey Worm”: Jacob Anderson, singer
When he’s not leading Daenerys’ army of Unsullied troops, Jacob Anderson is pursuing a music career as a singer and songwriter. He performs under the name Raleigh Ritchie, and his debut album, “You’re a Man Now, Boy,” was released in 2016. It got good reviews too.

“The Mountain”: Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson, strongman
The third and current actor to play the Mountain That Rides, Gregor Clegane, is a real-life professional strongman from Iceland. He’s taken part in the World’s Strongest Man competition several times, most recently in 2016. He (just barely) came in second. Oh and before that, he was a professional basketball player in Iceland.

“Bronn”: Jerome Flynn, one half of pop group Robson & Jerome
Jerome Flynn has had a prolific acting career, but he also briefly burned up the UK charts in the 1990s and had three No. 1 hits as half of pop duo Robson & Jerome. Along with actor Robson Green, the pair performed the song “Unchained Melody” on their show “Soldier Soldier,” and parlayed the boost to stardom into two No. 1 studio albums.

“The Hound”: Rory McCann, carpenter
Actor Rory McCann is a versatile guy. Although prolific before his role as Sandor “The Hound” Clegane, he wasn’t quite a superstar before the show. So after shooting a Viking drama in Iceland, he found acting roles a bit sparse — and turned to carpentry while living in the country in the meantime. The Hound’s Season 6 turn helping build a sept wasn’t too big a stretch, as it happens.

“The Red Woman”: Carice van Houten, musician
Stannis Baratheon’s questionable counselor is an award-winning Dutch actress, but Carice van Houten also works as a singer. She provided vocals for four songs in the Dutch film “Black Book” in which she starred. (She won a Golden Calf Award for Best Actress from the Netherlands Film Festival for her role.) She also produced a couple of albums in the Netherlands as a singer and songwriter.

“Mag the Mighty”: Ian Whyte, basketball player
Part of being a 7-foot-1 actor means you always have a role on “Game of Thrones,” and Ian Whyte has played White Walkers, giants, and even The Mountain before Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson took over. Before he was an actor and stuntman taking all the tallest roles, Whyte was a pro basketball player for a British team, the Newcastle Eagles.

“Hodor”: Kristian Nairn, DJ
Although he’s well-known now as the stable boy at Winterfell and Bran Stark’s protector, “Game of Thrones” was actually Kristian Nairn’s first acting credit. His usual day job (or night job) is as a progressive house DJ, and he’s pretty prolific. With “Game of Thrones” fame at his back, he went on a tour in 2014 through the U.S. and Australia, titled, “Rave of Thrones.”

“Daario Naharis”: Michiel Huisman, singer and guitarist
As Dutch actor Michiel Huisman’s acting career was getting going in the early 2000s, he was also part of the band Fontane, serving as singer and guitarist. The band had a few singles in its three or four years of existence, before it broke up and Huisman continued as a solo act through mid-2000s.

“Khal Drogo”: Jason Momoa, model
This one seems kind of obvious. Before he was Khal Drogo and on his way to becoming Aquaman, Jason Momoa was a model in his native Hawaii. In fact, he won Hawaii’s Model of the Year award in 1999.

“Hot Pie”: Ben Hawkey, actual baker
Arya Stark made a friend in her former King’s Landing bully, a kid everyone called Hot Pie, early in the show. Eventually, Hot Pie left Arya and pal Gendry when he landed a spot working in the kitchens at the Inn at the Crossroads, pursuing his real calling: baking. Hawkey’s doing the same thing in real life. He opened a bakery called “You Know Nothing, John Dough,” where he serves direwolf-shaped bread — just like in the show.

‘Game of Thrones’ Star Carice van Houten: Melisandre Wants to ‘Witness’ Jon Snow’s Meeting With Daenerys

The actress also spoke with IndieWire about faith in prophecies and a possible reunion with Arya.

Six weeks after giving birth to her first child, actress Carice van Houten was in Spain, playing Melisandre, speaking High Valyrian and trying to convince the Mother of Dragons to make a key ally.

“It’s funny because I just had a baby six weeks before, so it was a really weird transition,” van Houten said in an interview with IndieWire. “To come from that little bubble, my little baby bubble, into this ‘Game of Thrones’ world and the first time to work again — [Melisandre had] gone through so much development in one season, it almost feels like I’m a different character. I can play her differently now a little bit.”

When we first met the red priestess, she was so devoted to R’llhor, aka the Lord of Light, that she didn’t have time to suffer fools who wrung their hands over sacrificing loved ones in the name of her god. So strong was her belief that Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) would be the future king of Westeros and the prophesied warrior Azor Ahai that she gave birth to his assassinating shadow baby and then later burned his only daughter Shireen (Kerry Ingram) alive in sacrifice. But Stannis was killed, never having won the kingdom and never becoming the “prince who was promised.”

Melisandre’s confidence was shaken to say the least, and even when she was called upon to resurrect Jon Snow (Kit Harington) using her powers, she didn’t expect it to work. Even after succeeding, Melisandre wasn’t as full of fire and fervor as she once was.

“I think she didn’t expect to bring Jon Snow back, so that definitely has brought some of her faith back in the Lord of Light,” said van Houten. “But I guess she’s also aware of how she can be wrong. So I don’t think she’s gonna ever come back like she was in Season 2.”

In fact, Melisandre seemed subdued when meeting with Daenerys. “It’s more self-awareness, it’s more humbleness, there’s more doubt. There’s more human kind of feelings in general,” van Houten said. “She’s more transparent I guess, the way she speaks about the fact that prophecies are dangerous. She would never have said that before. She just feels wiser and more broken as well.”

One of the dangers of prophecies of course is that the clues can be misconstrued, especially when it comes to translations. As court interpreter Missandei (Nathalie Emmanuel) pointed out in Sunday’s episode, the High Valyrian word for “prince” is not gender-specific, and therefore the one who was promised could be female. This is one reason why Melisandre met with Daenerys, believing she might be the warrior reborn.

“I think she wants to believe [the prophecy] still and still takes her strength from that, but is aware how fragile that is,” said van Houten. “How she’s not been right and how she not always has read the Lord of Light’s signs in the right way I guess.”

"Game of Thrones"

“Game of Thrones”

HBO

Part of the prophecy is that this savior will wake dragons from stone, which could be interpreted as Daenerys hatching dragons from old eggs that were long thought to have been petrified. The fact that Dany has also displayed a leader’s sensibilities by freeing the slaves in Meereen also went a long way in convincing Melisandre, who was once sold into slavery herself long ago.

“At this point, Melisandre is on a mission and really determined to put the right people together in order to save us from a terrible thing,” said van Houten. “I think she respects Daenerys and she knows that she has a role to play.”

Looking ahead, Melisandre isn’t necessarily going to abandon Dragonstone quite yet. “She did what she had to do and she wants to make sure that’s actually going to happen,” van Houten said. “She wants to be there, to see that it’s actually going to happen, to witness it from a distance literally.”

Jon Snow and Daenerys’ meeting would be the fulfillment of fans’ wishes since the show began — actually, since the book series began over 20 years ago. Now that the TV series has surpassed the events of the books that have been released, the show can explore far more territory.

In fact, there’s another meeting that “Game of Thrones” could make happen before the event occurs in the books. In Season 4, when Melisandre buys off the bastard Gentry (Joe Demise) from the Brotherhood Without Banners, she sees Arya Stark (Maisie Williams). While looking into the girl’s eyes, she predicted that Arya would kill many people and that they would meet again someday.

“I’d love to do something else with Maisie,” said van Houten. “I think that the writers didn’t write that for nothing. I’m pretty sure that they will meet again.”

“Game of Thrones” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. ET on HBO.

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‘Game of Thrones’: Why ‘The Prince That Was Promised’ Prophecy Mistranslation is a Big Deal

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the July 23 episode of “Game of Thrones”, “Stormborn.”)

For season after season of “Game of Thrones,” several people in Westeros have been worried about a certain prophecy about the Prince That Was Promised, the mythical figure who will lead the world in the fight to defeat the White Walkers.

Melisandre (Carice van Houten), the Red Woman, spent most of “Game of Thrones” telling Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) he was the Prince That Was Promised. Obviously, that wasn’t true, since Stannis died. After that Melisandre thought it might be Jon Snow (Kit Harrington), since she managed to bring him back from the dead.

Also Read: ‘Game of Thrones’: Why Arya Told Nymeria ‘That’s Not You’

But Missandei (Nathalie Emmanuel) added another wrinkle into the prophecy mix. In Episode 2, “Stormborn,” of Season 7, Melisandre made her way to Dragonstone to meet up with Daenerys (Emilia Clarke), telling the queen about the prophecy. As she explained it in High Valyrian, however, translator extraordinaire Missandei noticed an error: The word for “prince” in Valyrian is actually gender-neutral, meaning the prophecy could be the Prince That Was Promised — or the Princess That Was Promised.

Misunderstanding the prophecy has already cost some people quite a bit (including Stannis — his head, in fact), and the fact that it’s vague means there’s no person in Westeros who it clearly refers to.

Fans have been doing their own translating of the prophecy, in fact, and that’s led to some additional theories about who’s really the Prince That Was Promised. As Reddit user byrd82 pointed out, several words in the prophecy could have been mistranslated, including the key terms “lord” and “light.” In Valyrian, those words are extremely close to the words for “hand” and “gold.”

Also Read: All 49 ‘Game of Thrones’ Main Characters, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

Who’s the hero with the golden hand? That’s right, it’s Jaime Lannister (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau). (In fact, there are a bunch of fan theories about who the Prince That Was Promised actually is, from Tyrion Lannister to Davos Seaworth.)

Though this is the first time the possibility of the prophecy being mistranslated has popped up on the show, the “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels on which the show is based have delved into that territory long ago. The most pointed example would be in “A Feast for Crows” when Sam Tarly talks to Maester Aemon about the rumors of Daenerys and her dragons in Essos. Aemon believed based on that info that Daenerys fits the prophecy, and that it had been mistranslated as “prince.” Aemon tied the error not to the Valyrian word being non-gendered as Missandei says on the show, but rather that it should have said “princess” instead of “prince.”

There’s also the thought that the prophecy isn’t referring to a single person at all, an idea that is drawn from Dany’s adventure in the House of the Undying in Qarth. The “A Clash of Kings” version of that event is a bit different from what we saw in season 2 of “Game of Thrones,” they relevant difference here being a vision she saw of her dead brother Rhaegar in the book but not on the show.

Also Read: ‘Game of Thrones’: Theon Made the Right Call (Commentary)

In the vision Rhaegar is with his wife, Elia Martell, and their baby son Aegon. Rhaegar says to Elia about their son: “He is the prince that was promised, and his is the song of ice and fire.” Then, noticing Dany standing there, Rhaegar adds that “there must be one more” and also “the dragon has three heads.” Some have taken that last bit to mean that the prince that was promised, also known as the reincarnation of the legendary hero Azor Ahai, is actually three separate people fighting for a single cause, possibly all Targaryens.

We know Danenerys is a Targaryen, and that Jon Snow’s real father was Rhaegar, making him fit that bill as well. Another big fan theory supposes that Tyrion is the third, via complicated theory that states that the Mad King is secretly his father (thus also being the real reason why Tywin hated him so much).

Even if those theories aren’t on-point, it’s clear from “Stormborn” that interpreting the prophecy is more art than science, and there are a lot of easy ways to screw it up. Maybe Melisandre should run the whole thing by Missandei just to be sure.

Related stories from TheWrap:

First Big Holy S— Moment of ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 7 Has Fans Freaking Out

‘Game of Thrones’: Why Arya Told Nymeria ‘That’s Not You’

‘Game of Thrones’ 101: Arya Stark’s Biggest Moments (Photos)

‘Game of Thrones’: Who Is the Man Stuck in That Oldtown Cell?

‘Game of Thrones’: What You Need to Know About Dragonstone, Daenerys’ New Castle

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the July 23 episode of “Game of Thrones”, “Stormborn.”)

For season after season of “Game of Thrones,” several people in Westeros have been worried about a certain prophecy about the Prince That Was Promised, the mythical figure who will lead the world in the fight to defeat the White Walkers.

Melisandre (Carice van Houten), the Red Woman, spent most of “Game of Thrones” telling Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) he was the Prince That Was Promised. Obviously, that wasn’t true, since Stannis died. After that Melisandre thought it might be Jon Snow (Kit Harrington), since she managed to bring him back from the dead.

Also Read: ‘Game of Thrones': Why Arya Told Nymeria ‘That’s Not You’

But Missandei (Nathalie Emmanuel) added another wrinkle into the prophecy mix. In Episode 2, “Stormborn,” of Season 7, Melisandre made her way to Dragonstone to meet up with Daenerys (Emilia Clarke), telling the queen about the prophecy. As she explained it in High Valyrian, however, translator extraordinaire Missandei noticed an error: The word for “prince” in Valyrian is actually gender-neutral, meaning the prophecy could be the Prince That Was Promised — or the Princess That Was Promised.

Misunderstanding the prophecy has already cost some people quite a bit (including Stannis — his head, in fact), and the fact that it’s vague means there’s no person in Westeros who it clearly refers to.

Fans have been doing their own translating of the prophecy, in fact, and that’s led to some additional theories about who’s really the Prince That Was Promised. As Reddit user byrd82 pointed out, several words in the prophecy could have been mistranslated, including the key terms “lord” and “light.” In Valyrian, those words are extremely close to the words for “hand” and “gold.”

Also Read: All 49 ‘Game of Thrones’ Main Characters, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

Who’s the hero with the golden hand? That’s right, it’s Jaime Lannister (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau). (In fact, there are a bunch of fan theories about who the Prince That Was Promised actually is, from Tyrion Lannister to Davos Seaworth.)

Though this is the first time the possibility of the prophecy being mistranslated has popped up on the show, the “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels on which the show is based have delved into that territory long ago. The most pointed example would be in “A Feast for Crows” when Sam Tarly talks to Maester Aemon about the rumors of Daenerys and her dragons in Essos. Aemon believed based on that info that Daenerys fits the prophecy, and that it had been mistranslated as “prince.” Aemon tied the error not to the Valyrian word being non-gendered as Missandei says on the show, but rather that it should have said “princess” instead of “prince.”

There’s also the thought that the prophecy isn’t referring to a single person at all, an idea that is drawn from Dany’s adventure in the House of the Undying in Qarth. The “A Clash of Kings” version of that event is a bit different from what we saw in season 2 of “Game of Thrones,” they relevant difference here being a vision she saw of her dead brother Rhaegar in the book but not on the show.

Also Read: ‘Game of Thrones': Theon Made the Right Call (Commentary)

In the vision Rhaegar is with his wife, Elia Martell, and their baby son Aegon. Rhaegar says to Elia about their son: “He is the prince that was promised, and his is the song of ice and fire.” Then, noticing Dany standing there, Rhaegar adds that “there must be one more” and also “the dragon has three heads.” Some have taken that last bit to mean that the prince that was promised, also known as the reincarnation of the legendary hero Azor Ahai, is actually three separate people fighting for a single cause, possibly all Targaryens.

We know Danenerys is a Targaryen, and that Jon Snow’s real father was Rhaegar, making him fit that bill as well. Another big fan theory supposes that Tyrion is the third, via complicated theory that states that the Mad King is secretly his father (thus also being the real reason why Tywin hated him so much).

Even if those theories aren’t on-point, it’s clear from “Stormborn” that interpreting the prophecy is more art than science, and there are a lot of easy ways to screw it up. Maybe Melisandre should run the whole thing by Missandei just to be sure.

Related stories from TheWrap:

First Big Holy S— Moment of 'Game of Thrones' Season 7 Has Fans Freaking Out

'Game of Thrones': Why Arya Told Nymeria 'That's Not You'

'Game of Thrones' 101: Arya Stark's Biggest Moments (Photos)

'Game of Thrones': Who Is the Man Stuck in That Oldtown Cell?

'Game of Thrones': What You Need to Know About Dragonstone, Daenerys' New Castle